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...E poi non rimase nessuno

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Otto persone completamente estranee l'una all'altra vengono invitate in una maestosa villa su un'isola deserta. Per motivi diversi, sono tutti stati invitati da un vecchio e misterioso amico desideroso di incontrarili nuovamente dopo tanti anni. Ad attenderli, però, trovano solo i due domestici, il signore e la signora Rogers. Superato un primo imbarazzo iniziale, i dieci Otto persone completamente estranee l'una all'altra vengono invitate in una maestosa villa su un'isola deserta. Per motivi diversi, sono tutti stati invitati da un vecchio e misterioso amico desideroso di incontrarili nuovamente dopo tanti anni. Ad attenderli, però, trovano solo i due domestici, il signore e la signora Rogers. Superato un primo imbarazzo iniziale, i dieci personaggi iniziano a interagire tra loro, fino al fatidico momento in cui, durante la cena, una voce registrata da un grammofono svela le loro identità e li accusa di vari crimini da loro commessi senza essere stati puniti. Pubblicato per la prima volta in Italia nel 1946 con il titolo ... e poi non rimase nessuno, il romanzo considerato il capolavoro di Agatha Christie venne ristampato come Dieci piccoli indiani solo nel 1977. Il titolo originale, Ten Little Niggers, fu al centro di un'accesa polemica per il tono "dispregiativo" assunto dal termine nigger e fu quindi modificato in Ten Little Indians.


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Otto persone completamente estranee l'una all'altra vengono invitate in una maestosa villa su un'isola deserta. Per motivi diversi, sono tutti stati invitati da un vecchio e misterioso amico desideroso di incontrarili nuovamente dopo tanti anni. Ad attenderli, però, trovano solo i due domestici, il signore e la signora Rogers. Superato un primo imbarazzo iniziale, i dieci Otto persone completamente estranee l'una all'altra vengono invitate in una maestosa villa su un'isola deserta. Per motivi diversi, sono tutti stati invitati da un vecchio e misterioso amico desideroso di incontrarili nuovamente dopo tanti anni. Ad attenderli, però, trovano solo i due domestici, il signore e la signora Rogers. Superato un primo imbarazzo iniziale, i dieci personaggi iniziano a interagire tra loro, fino al fatidico momento in cui, durante la cena, una voce registrata da un grammofono svela le loro identità e li accusa di vari crimini da loro commessi senza essere stati puniti. Pubblicato per la prima volta in Italia nel 1946 con il titolo ... e poi non rimase nessuno, il romanzo considerato il capolavoro di Agatha Christie venne ristampato come Dieci piccoli indiani solo nel 1977. Il titolo originale, Ten Little Niggers, fu al centro di un'accesa polemica per il tono "dispregiativo" assunto dal termine nigger e fu quindi modificato in Ten Little Indians.

30 review for ...E poi non rimase nessuno

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chaima ✨ شيماء

    There is scarcely any comfort to be found in this book, only an ancient, arcane horror. The story is a vast underwater cavern, where nothing flows and nothing ebbs and all is as dark and still as the grave. Even my most harrowing nightmares would have never conjured such a soul-fearing tale. And Then There Were None was uncomfortable as it lodged itself in the darkest corner of my mind. The questions it asks and the implications it conceals are still twining up my legs like a barbed vine. I liked th There is scarcely any comfort to be found in this book, only an ancient, arcane horror. The story is a vast underwater cavern, where nothing flows and nothing ebbs and all is as dark and still as the grave. Even my most harrowing nightmares would have never conjured such a soul-fearing tale. And Then There Were None was uncomfortable as it lodged itself in the darkest corner of my mind. The questions it asks and the implications it conceals are still twining up my legs like a barbed vine. I liked this book—but it honestly isn’t an experience I’m keen on revisiting. So, what’s this book about? In And Then There Were None’s nightmarish tableau, ten people are summoned as house guests to a remote island by a Mr and Mrs U.N. Owen. The guests assembled trade stiff dialogue over dinner and cocktails while musing about the celebrity of the island and puzzling about their hosts’ tardiness. The whimsy of the moment, however, ebbs away when a disembodied message blaring from a gramophone tallies, in vivid and mordant detail, their unpunished crimes. The house occupants’ astonishment quickly turns to horror—their faces wheeling from the shallows to the depths of terror when shortly after, they all embark on the ghastly business of being murdered, one by one per the instructions of a horrid nursery rhyme. Memories of their misdeeds, which used to be a distant and blurry thing, suddenly come into a sharp, lurid focus. Death runs rampant with his bloody scythe on Soldier Island. Each creak and groan is a hunter stalking them, each flutter of wind its breath, close against their necks. This is their sentence coming to retrieve them. “Be sure thy sin will find thee out.” Agatha Christie, an extraordinarily good writer, digs with bright, horrible relish into an exhilarating, unsettling and ingeniously constructed story that relentlessly yanks the brain as it pitilessly disorients the heart. She plays the reader with the delicacy and finesse of an expert angler, and doesn’t allow you a moment to dig in your heels and stop where you were, just for a while, just long enough to get a better idea of what’s ahead. The experience of reading this book is akin to walking through a nightmare; I could not orient myself, did not know north from south. My heart was a fistful of thunder, my mind a whirl pool of possibilities—each more terrible than the last. The not knowing was like a splinter in my mind. And as I was tracing the implications of every new revelation, my small, sickly faith was eroding. And Then There Were None is not a light read—it is, in fact, unrelentingly harrowing. The hermetic, creepy atmosphere of Soldier Island makes a thriving black petri dish of foreboding and distortion. And as each of the characters' haunting pasts come to light and as their secrets swell to bursting, the book becomes more and more page-turning. But what appears to be a thriller is something far more perilous. Christie imbues the story with a well-observed psychological depth that holds its own fascination. The surface, of course, is arresting, but the harder you think the further you go, and it keeps on getting more productive. The mind is an imperfect engine that does what it will with the information it receives. But what happens when fear, true fear, takes hold of it and scours out all else? When it becomes fractured and wild, crowded with the images of your most torturous evils? What happens when your flimsy attempts at exonerating yourself and asserting some kind of spurious decency no longer stand up under the glaring attacks of guilt? Each of the ten guests is a mirror, from which there’s no escape, reflecting their monstrosity back at each other. And this book is, in many senses, an invitation to take a long, hard look at one’s own self in the mirror. It is also a forensic examination of remorse—the kind that is sharp enough to slice a man off his shadows. The truth of it eventually draws blood, and when it does, it isn’t a clean cut. The truth of it hurts jagged. “Crime is terribly revealing. Try and vary your methods as you will, your tastes, your habits, your attitude of mind, and your soul is revealed by your actions.” This is, furthermore, a portrait of a psychopath whose beguiling trappings conceal a being watchful, capricious, and heartless. They are the author of this horrendous drama—a madman of the most blatant kind who suffers an unconquerable confederation of self-righteousness and depravity. But what is most frightening is not the depth of their evil, but how cold it runs. Are humans really capable of being this infatuated with the blood and groaning of the theatrics of murder? None of these characters are, of course, the kind of people you want to roll the red carpet for, but does anyone really deserve this? The questions this book asks are grim and land too hard to catch but it doesn't make this book’s dizzying journey less than worthwhile. If there's a flaw running through And Then There Were None, it's that Christie maintains a respectful distance from her characters, and at times, that distance runs toward dryness. I think a bit more poison in the pen would have helped in drawing out the characters, some of whom don’t entirely step into the page before, y'know, they start dropping like flies. Overall, however, And Then There Were None is a highly readable murder mystery and a provocative, pitch-black psychological thriller that will be hard to forget! BLOG | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM | TUMBLR

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kinga

    Before I begin I would like to apologise for my use of the N word in this review. It is necessary, I promise. This book was originally published in UK under a charming title of "Ten Little Niggers". When it came to the US version in the 40's someone decided that 'Ten Little Niggers' is not the most marketable title for a book so they changed it to 'Ten Little Indians' (as it was still ok to call Native Americans Indians then). Only years after someone decided that neither 'Niggers', nor 'Indians' is a fortunate choice Before I begin I would like to apologise for my use of the N word in this review. It is necessary, I promise. This book was originally published in UK under a charming title of "Ten Little Niggers". When it came to the US version in the 40's someone decided that 'Ten Little Niggers' is not the most marketable title for a book so they changed it to 'Ten Little Indians' (as it was still ok to call Native Americans Indians then). Only years after someone decided that neither 'Niggers', nor 'Indians' is a fortunate choice of words for the title so it was changed to 'And Then There Were None' - the last line of the nursery rhyme which in this new version was called 'Ten Boy Soldiers'. This is the version that I read and I must say I am glad. I think I would be rather uncomfortable reading something called 'The Little Niggers', which takes place on 'Nigger Island' (how did Christie want to pull this off? 'Nigger Island' off the Devon coast? Really? How?). The premise, I am sure you know, is this: ten people end up cut off from the world on a tiny island. One of them is a murderer and people keep dying as in the nursery rhyme. Every person on the island has a secret and is guilty of a murder. It's the kind of murder where law is helpless. Nothing can be proven. This is why they found themselves on that island, at the mercy of a prototype 'Jigsaw' madman who decided justice must be done. The premise requires the structure of the novel to be very organised and clean cut. I felt that it was only right for me to approach the reading of it in an equally disciplined way. I took five sheets of papers and divide each in half, thus ending up with ten cards, one for each character. And I continued to dilligently fill them out with all the details I learnt about the characters until about halfway through the book when I became too engrossed, frightened and nervous. I already had an inkling as to who the murderer was and was petrified I would be murdered in my sleep as well. The situation was very serious and I had to invite all my teddy bears back to my bed, so they could protect me. I grew to like two of the characters - the sentiment, I think, I shared with Christie as she liked them so, she killed them last. This was my second Christie, and the first proper one. The first one I read was a bit of a mishap spy novel, so Christie's brilliance wasn't as apparent as it was in 'And Then There Were None'. UPDATE: Now that I've read a couple more Christie's books I realise that random casual racism and antisemitism was very much her trademark. It's almost amazing she could sneak racism into books that have no black characters at all. Really off-putting and uncomfortable. 4.5 stars PS> Thanks to karen I have just found this page - betterbooktitles And here is their take on Ms Christie:

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nataliya

    This lovely mystery book is first and foremost about the administration of the long-overdue justice, right? At least that's what the mastermind behind it all believes. But the question is - who has the right to decide what justice is? And who is to decide what punishment serves the crime? And is perceived justice at all costs the ultimate goal, or is it the frequently pointless work of a maniac? As a matter of fact, what is justice after all? This lovely mystery book is first and foremost about the administration of the long-overdue justice, right? At least that's what the mastermind behind it all believes. But the question is - who has the right to decide what justice is? And who is to decide what punishment serves the crime? And is perceived justice at all costs the ultimate goal, or is it the frequently pointless work of a maniac? As a matter of fact, what is justice after all? I think the story of this book (the one that may win the contest for the most offensive original title, after all) is familiar to most readers. It is a lovely and fascinating idea. Ten people are lured onto a remote island under false pretenses just to realize that they are all about to be punished by death for the 'crimes' that they have committed in the past and have gotten away with. Killed in a manner predicted by a silly yet ominous children's poem with the conclusion of "... and then there were none". What's more, they come to realize that the mastermind - or maniac? - has to be among them. And the (very polite, in the traditional British way) game of survival begins, complete with all the necessary societal rituals¹ and classism² that are not disposed of even under the threat of imminent demise. ¹The politeness and overt show of respect to one another even in the face of imminent murder by someone in their midst - because, of course, you would not want to offend anyone. Continuing to socialize and take meals together. Insisting on chivalry when a woman could be the murderer just as well as a man ((view spoiler)[this viewing of women as shrinking violets was what cost Philip Lombard his life in the end! (hide spoiler)] ) - these are just some of the examples. ² Just think of everyone expecting the impeccable service by the butler even though HIS WIFE JUST DIED! Everyone deciding to stick together and be careful - but never including the servants in it. The belief by some that people of 'proper class' would be incapable of murder ((view spoiler)[Doctor Amstrong becomes a victim of just this reasoning (hide spoiler)] ). The list can go on and on. And all of these assumptions prove to be wrong. And as, despite the precautions, the number of people trapped on the island continues to decline, the uneasy tension sets in, and the impeccable facades begin to crack. "The oth­ers went up­stairs, a slow unwilling pro­ces­sion. If this had been an old house, with creak­ing wood, and dark shad­ows, and heav­ily pan­elled walls, there might have been an eerie feel­ing. But this house was the essence of moder­ni­ty. There were no dark corners - ​no possi­ble slid­ing pan­els - it was flood­ed with elec­tric light - everything was new and bright and shining. There was nothing hid­den in this house, noth­ing con­cealed. It had no at­mo­sphere about it. Some­how, that was the most fright­en­ing thing of all. They ex­changed good-​nights on the up­per land­ing. Each of them went in­to his or her own room, and each of them automatical­ly, al­most with­out con­scious thought, locked the door." The story is captivating and very smart, and the ending had me baffled for a bit the first time I read it. It has a neat resolution despite an obvious plot hole (view spoiler)[ - Wargrave's brains will be all over the bed on which he was NOT supposed to have died! (hide spoiler)] . It's an enjoyable read to say the least. But what made me unsettled both of the times I read it was the nagging question of justice, as I mentioned above. Yes, on one hand, it's almost poetic justice to punish the criminals who thought they got away with it. On the other hand, is eye-for-an-eye the best way to get even? And who's to judge, anyway? Who is either conceited enough or deranged enough to assume that he has the right and the moral authority to determine guilt and the extent of punishment just like that? Don't get me wrong - the people accused on the island are undeniably guilty (even though it's not necessarily murder as we think of for some of them - Vera Claythorne is really guilty of neglect, albeit with a desire to kill, and Emily Brent is pretty much guilty of being a judgmental über-righteous heartless prude). But the degree of their guilt varies quite significantly in my perception, and it does not always coincide with what their 'unknown' judge/executioner thinks (running two children over with a car and feeling no remorse is to me worse than firing a pregnant servant who then goes on to kill herself, for instance). And is arbitrarily and single-handedly determining their guilt and doling out punishments not just as much (or even much worse) or a crime than they have committed? Conceited, self-righteous crime? Decide for yourself. Speaking of guilt - this novel has quite a bit to say on this subject. You see, many of the characters have already been judged and condemned by their own selves. Vera Claythorne and General Macarthur both are tormented by their guilt (and (view spoiler)[Vera actually becomes a direct victim of it, after all, becoming her own executioner in the rather creepy and effective scene (hide spoiler)] ). Interestingly, others, no less guilty, are not tormented by their conscience at all. But ultimately this does not matter at all for their survival; only the fact that they were deemed guilty ((view spoiler)[except for Vera, as I mentioned above. Remorseless Philip Lombard would not have cracked like she did, had he been the one holding the revolver a few minutes earlier (hide spoiler)] ). So should being tormented by guilt versus a cold-blooded killer factor at all in the administration of justice? These are the thoughts that kept running through my head as I was reading this excellent non-traditional critically-acclaimed specimen of mystery literature. And therefore bravo to Miss Christie for making me think and care - and not just mindlessly flipping pages to get to the bottom of the whodunit. Because 'WHO' was much less important to me than 'HOW' and 'WHY' - especially 'WHY'. For all of this, I give it the unflinching guilt-free 4 stars.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emily May

    I'm a big lover of Agatha Christie, she has written some fantastic murder mysteries and her stories never get tiring. But this is the one that just comes out on top every time. It partly, and quite amusingly, reminds me of that old American murder mystery in Sunset Beach. Basically, they're the only ones on this island and someone is killing them off one by one in accordance with the Ten Little Indians rhyme . And I swear I never saw it coming, and I'm usually very good at it. It's ju I'm a big lover of Agatha Christie, she has written some fantastic murder mysteries and her stories never get tiring. But this is the one that just comes out on top every time. It partly, and quite amusingly, reminds me of that old American murder mystery in Sunset Beach. Basically, they're the only ones on this island and someone is killing them off one by one in accordance with the Ten Little Indians rhyme . And I swear I never saw it coming, and I'm usually very good at it. It's just a very clever novel, full of mystery and suspense and easily quite frightening at times. I like how Agatha Christie doesn't have to write a 500 page novel with a massive back story, her mysteries are very simply put together but always clever and hard to decipher. I would recommend this book to everyone.

  5. 4 out of 5

    James

    5 stars to Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None. This is the book that started my absolute love of the mystery genre. I was addicted and must have read it 3 or 4 times over the course of the year. Between the poem, the deserted island, the plot twist, the count-down, the pure clandestine suspense... it couldn't get any better. Story Ten people receive a mystery letter from someone they don't know that indicates they should come to a remote island. Why would they go????? After arriving, they try to figure o/> 5 stars to Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None. This is the book that started my absolute love of the mystery genre. I was addicted and must have read it 3 or 4 times over the course of the year. Between the poem, the deserted island, the plot twist, the count-down, the pure clandestine suspense... it couldn't get any better. Story Ten people receive a mystery letter from someone they don't know that indicates they should come to a remote island. Why would they go????? After arriving, they try to figure out the connection between all of them while waiting for their mysterious host. After coming across a cute little poem about how ten little indians die, they decide they will wait it out until the next morning when the ferry comes back to take them home. But it will never come! Each guest suddenly dies matching the line from the poem... resulting in alliances and mistrust. Pure fun. In a masterful conclusion, the reader understands all the connections, learns why the killer chose them to die and develops a very distinct opinion on who was right and who was wrong in this story. Amazing! Strengths 1. Plot - can you get any better than telling the reader that 10 people will die and then guessing the order and the weapon? 2. Characters - All walks of life, all personalities. You'll love some and hate some! Weaknesses 1. Only that there wasn't a follow-up... Final Thoughts If you are a mystery fan, you must read this. If you've never read Agatha Christie, this must be your first - before you tackle Miss Marple or Hercule Poirot. You must understand the master before getting hooked on any specific protagonist in one of her other series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    PirateSteve

    One of the worlds best selling books of all time, Agatha Christie's "and Then There Were None" sets the standard for crime fiction. The book was first published under a different title in jolly old England, but even back in 1939 American publishers were far too politically correct to use a title they found so offensive. Still again, in 1964 and again in 1986 a third title was published but political correctness struck again. I read the book under the authors original title because I wanted to re One of the worlds best selling books of all time, Agatha Christie's "and Then There Were None" sets the standard for crime fiction. The book was first published under a different title in jolly old England, but even back in 1939 American publishers were far too politically correct to use a title they found so offensive. Still again, in 1964 and again in 1986 a third title was published but political correctness struck again. I read the book under the authors original title because I wanted to read it as she intended it. The book has inspired radio broadcast, stage adaptations, television mini series, several movies, board and video games. As the 1939 story begins, 8 unacquainted guest have been invited to a very large home on an isolated island off the coast of England for a type of holiday. When the water ferry drops them off they find their host has not yet arrived but there are two staff members there to meet their needs. Soon it is brought to their attention that all 8 guest along with the 2 staff members are accused of various murders from their past. Then the first of the guest drops dead. By the next morning another of the remaining 9 is found dead. There is surely a murderer on the island and as the story continues to unfold the reader is never given any information other than that which the guest may encounter. I didn't figure out who done it. I do know that I didn't do it. But you fellow reader ... the way you so innocently stopped to read this review. Perchance to see if any incriminating evidence has been uncovered.. Very suspicious, I say.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Reread: 2015 Because some Non-Crunchy Cool Classic Pantaloonless friends thought I read it wrong... Turns out, I did. This was a really good mystery! {insert long-winded apology with much groveling} Happy, guys? The story goes a bit like this: 10 strangers each get invitations from someone they think they know, to stay on an island resort. Hells yeah! Sunshine & sea air! The story goes a bit like this: 10 strangers each get invitations from someone they think they know, to stay on an island resort. Hells yeah! Sunshine & sea air! Well, resort is a bit of a misnomer. It's really a big house on an island. Still, it's famous for being a party place, and nobody in the group turns it down. BIG MISTAKE. Almost as soon as everyone is gathered together, a recorded voice booms out through the walls and accuses each of them of being a murderer. And not just...YOU'RE ALL MURDERERS! Nope, whoever it is appears to know specific details about each death, and why these particular people were responsible. Of course, everyone immediately starts proclaiming their innocence! Wha..? Noooo! That person died accidentally! I was never even a suspect! Who dares...?! Harrumph & bluster! However, within minutes one of them falls over dead. Suicide? Or something more nefarious?! As the body count rises, they have to face the facts that these aren't accidents. And with each new death coinciding with a children's rhyme that's tacked up in each room, all signs point to a self-appointed executioner in their midst. After they get organized and take a peek around, they realize that they are quite alone on this island. Their mysterious benefactor must be disguised as one of the guests, and is more than likely...the murderer. Dum, dum, duuuuum! The tension ratchets up with each body, and the guests start turning on each other in an attempt to ferret out the killer. Eventually, they decide they just need to calm down and survive till the police can get to the island. Good plan, right? But what if there isn't anyone left to tell the cops what happened? So whodunit? I ain't tellin'. Psst. The epilogue is really important.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte May

    “Watch and pray. The day of judgement is at hand.” Now I understand why Agatha is the Queen of crime! This was addictive. A group of people are all individually invited to an island for a summer holiday in Devon. None of them 100% sure who their mysterious host is. Things become even more peculiar when their host isn’t there when they arrive, and doesn’t show themselves at all. One by one the guests are killed, picked off, leaving the others terrified and paranoid. It was a fantastic mystery t “Watch and pray. The day of judgement is at hand.” Now I understand why Agatha is the Queen of crime! This was addictive. A group of people are all individually invited to an island for a summer holiday in Devon. None of them 100% sure who their mysterious host is. Things become even more peculiar when their host isn’t there when they arrive, and doesn’t show themselves at all. One by one the guests are killed, picked off, leaving the others terrified and paranoid. It was a fantastic mystery throughout. As tension becomes hysteria, the guests wonder who will be next, who is responsible for these murders and why? A fantastic read that leaves you guessing until the very end. “We shall none of us leave this island.” ****************************** So creepy! RTC

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brina

    This year I have decided to take part in a women's century challenge in the group catching up on classics where the participants read a book written in ten consecutive decades. I chose to focus on the 20th century and my 1930s selection is And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie. Although I had previously read some of her Hercule Poirot cases, this is my first stand alone mystery of Christie's that I have read. A suspenseful premise for a case, And Then There Were None left me on edge for th This year I have decided to take part in a women's century challenge in the group catching up on classics where the participants read a book written in ten consecutive decades. I chose to focus on the 20th century and my 1930s selection is And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie. Although I had previously read some of her Hercule Poirot cases, this is my first stand alone mystery of Christie's that I have read. A suspenseful premise for a case, And Then There Were None left me on edge for the duration of the book. Ten individuals who committed murder at one point in their lives have been invited to Soldier Island for a supposed holiday. Upon arrival, the participants note the quaintness of the island and the home which they are staying in. Yet, on top of the mantel in each bedroom is the poem "ten little Indians". In the communal dining room are ten salt shakers each representing a person and the same poem. As the group gathers for cocktail hour, a gramophone recording announces the crime each individual is guilty of committing. Shocked at first, each person comes to terms with the accusation and reveals what really happened to the group. Christie's participants represent a cross section of society including a judge, doctor, Scotland Yard police officer, retired general, mercenary, governess, and spinster. None of these primary participants believes themselves guilty of the crime because after all they were acquitted. Yet one of their party believes them all to be guilty, or they would not have been invited to Soldier Island. One by one the group is murdered, the island is searched, and the dwindling group realizes that there is a murderer in their midst. The death mirrors the poem on the wall, and as each person is killed, another salt shaker breaks. It is up to the remaining people to identify the murder. Unlike Hercule Poirot cases where Christie allows the reader to crack the case early on only to have Poirot peal back layers and layers to the case, in And Then There Were None, Dame Christie does not clue us as to who the murderer is. Even someone as myself who reads a fair number of mysteries was left captivated as to whodunit, allowing me to read quickly until the end of the book. The participants were also held in suspense, accusing each other of being the murderer. This lead to a revealing denouement, one that had me guessing until the last page. I have read many mysteries written by women, including many cases starring female private eyes and police detectives. Many of these mystery writers have Dame Agatha Christie to thank for paving their way as early as the 1920s. And Then There Were None first appeared in serial form, leaving its readers in suspense until the next installment appeared. A captivating mystery, I am open to reading more of Christie's stand alone cases, and rate this mystery 4 stars.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dita

    Are you kidding me? ALL OF THE STARS! EVERY STAR! Just brilliant!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Extraordinary and gripping novel! I knew that the best way to start reading the literary work by Agatha Christie was choosing her most known book. And There were none is the best-selling mystery novel of all time with 100 million of copies, and the fifth book in the list comprehending all genres. That is something to give to Agatha Christie the respect that she deserves. Initially this novel on UK was titled Ten Little Niggers, only because the original nursery rhyme was called that but it was obvi Extraordinary and gripping novel! I knew that the best way to start reading the literary work by Agatha Christie was choosing her most known book. And There were none is the best-selling mystery novel of all time with 100 million of copies, and the fifth book in the list comprehending all genres. That is something to give to Agatha Christie the respect that she deserves. Initially this novel on UK was titled Ten Little Niggers, only because the original nursery rhyme was called that but it was obviously seen as racist, then in USA was decided to change the title to Ten Little Indians, but again obviously as seen as racist again, so at the end the title was changed to And There were none, and the nursery rhyme inside the book was changed to "Ten Little Soldiers", curiously enough none member of any army so far as pointed out as racist that final change. I mean, the title was just because a widely known nursery rhyme and none character on the book was afro-american or native-american. To this, I want to comment that it's lucky that not many children would had more nightmares since a lot of nursery rhymes have truly scary lyrics. No wonder in stuff like A Nightmare on Elm Street and Saphire and Steel were used nursery rhymes with truly scary effects. Returning to the novel, it was a remarkable reading. Great atmosphere where you feel as trapped as those people on that island. I want to comment that at some point I figured it out who was the murderer, don't worry, I won't tell it, and I have no doubt that some would say: "Oh, sure! I believe you Sherlock!". However I do indeed discovered it. This is not my first mystery story. I have read several books in the genre and I have watched a lot of TV shows like Murder, She Wrote, Columbo, Criminal Minds, CSI: Miami, etc... And while that doesn't turn me into a detective, in my defense, I knew who was only because I focused on the "why" and not the "how" that certainly I didn't know that. You can say that I did an amateur criminal profile and that helped me to have a suspect of my own that it resulted true. Also, I had some advantage for being Spanish speaking since there is a clue that only can be detected due that not matter that I read the novel on English, but taking in account the very detail that it's indeed a printed novel, I catched something and putting together some clues. Well, I figured it out. Believe or not. It doesn't matter. Anyway, I think that many of the fun of reading this kind of mystery novels is trying to figure out the culprit during the process of reading the book. Not matter if you guess right or not, always it's rewarding when the mystery is explained. A delicious way to make your neurons to exercise. Again, knowing who was, or at least thinking that I knew who was, since obviously I couldn't confirm it until reading the whole book, it didn't help me to know how everything was made until it was explained on the novel. Definitely, Agatha Christie is the queen of mystery! Certainly, this novel isn't only a marvellous detective mystery book but also a truly scary horror story. Priceless setting for a scenario and fantastic twisted character developing. Appendix: (July 23rd, 2014) The clue that I found thanks that I am a born Spanish-language speaker: WARNING!!! WARNING!!! WARNING!!! WARNING!!! Read ONLY if you already read the novel, since this is a mega-spoiler telling who the culprit is! I seldom put spoilers in my reviews, but I wrote this appendix basically since I was contacted by several readers asking me about the "big clue" and well, while I don't mind to share it, well, also I don't want to find out later that it was written down in some other review as theirs, taking in account that it seems that only me were the one who noticed that. (view spoiler)[Ok, the big fuzz about the clue that I found is that the first character that you find in the novel is Mr. Justice Wargrave on the chapter one, you may say: "So what?", well, the mysterious couple who invited to all guests, the initials of both names of them are U.N.O., in the imaginary woman is "Una Nancy Owen" and the supposed husband is "U.N. Owen. U.N.O. that in Spanish can be spelled just like "uno" which means "one" on English. Maybe that a coincidence, but with Agatha Christie nothing can be left to chance, so I think that may be a clue targeted to the readers with knowledge about Spanish language. (hide spoiler)]

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kai

    “When the sea goes down, there will come from the mainland boats and men. And they will find ten dead bodies and an unsolved problem on Soldier Island.” My first Agatha Christie, and a good one indeed. And Then There Were None just recently came to my attention. Maybe it was the new mini-series or the many people suddenly reading this, but I was intrigued immediately. I can't wait to watch the series! Agatha Christie totally tricked me. I thought I had figured it out, but I was wrong. Thi “When the sea goes down, there will come from the mainland boats and men. And they will find ten dead bodies and an unsolved problem on Soldier Island.” My first Agatha Christie, and a good one indeed. And Then There Were None just recently came to my attention. Maybe it was the new mini-series or the many people suddenly reading this, but I was intrigued immediately. I can't wait to watch the series! Agatha Christie totally tricked me. I thought I had figured it out, but I was wrong. This novel turned out to be exactly what it promised. A murder mystery, a mad psychothriller of a book. I would have liked a little more detail and character depth, but I have nothing to criticise in general. Would highly recommend. Find more of my books on Instagram

  13. 5 out of 5

    Junta

    "Ten literary Goodreads reviewers chatting online; One bot was discovered and then there were Nine. Nine literary Goodreads reviewers on a thread until late; One lost his Wi-Fi signal and then there were Eight. Eight literary Goodreads reviewers groupreading Austen; One only read males and then there were Seven. Seven literary Goodreads reviewers averse to using pics; One blasphemed with GIFs and then there were Six. Six literary Goodreads reviewers bookt "Ten literary Goodreads reviewers chatting online; One bot was discovered and then there were Nine. Nine literary Goodreads reviewers on a thread until late; One lost his Wi-Fi signal and then there were Eight. Eight literary Goodreads reviewers groupreading Austen; One only read males and then there were Seven. Seven literary Goodreads reviewers averse to using pics; One blasphemed with GIFs and then there were Six. Six literary Goodreads reviewers booktubing live; One revealed too much and then there were Five. Five literary Goodreads reviewers trying out Coelho; One rushed back home and then there were Four. Four literary Goodreads reviewers adored Harper Lee; One sequel led to suicide and then there were Three. Three literary Goodreads reviewers re-reading Pooh; One thought it only for children and then there were Two. Two literary Goodreads reviewers engrossed in Hamsun; One died of hunger and then there was One. One literary Goodreads reviewer left all alone; He deleted his account and then there were None." Original: "Ten little soldier boys went out to dine; One choked his little self and then there were Nine. Nine little soldier boys sat up very late; One overslept himself and then there were Eight. Eight little soldier boys travelling in Devon; One said he'd stay there and then there were Seven. Seven little soldier boys chopping up sticks; One chopped himself in halves and then there were Six. Six little soldier boys playing with a hive; A bumblebee stung one and then there were Five. Five little soldier boys going in for law; One got in Chancery and then there were Four. Four little soldier boys going out to sea; A red herring swallowed one and then there were Three. Three little soldier boys walking in the Zoo; A big bear hugged one and then there were Two. Two little soldier boys sitting in the sun; One got frizzled up and then there was One. One little soldier boy left all alone; He went and hanged himself and then there were None." Loved the idea of this novel. October 21, 2015

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    $2.99 Kindle sale, Dec. 26, 2018. Every once in a while on Goodreads I find myself feeling compelled to make a True Confession, and here's another one: I'm not all that much of a Hercule Poirot fan. For someone who's read probably 30 or 40 Agatha Christie books over her lifetime, that's probably an odd thing. I like him okay, I don't DISlike him, but yeah, he kind of irks me sometimes. So when I'm picking up an Agatha Christie mystery, I'm always a little bit tickled when it doesn't involve Poirot. T $2.99 Kindle sale, Dec. 26, 2018. Every once in a while on Goodreads I find myself feeling compelled to make a True Confession, and here's another one: I'm not all that much of a Hercule Poirot fan. For someone who's read probably 30 or 40 Agatha Christie books over her lifetime, that's probably an odd thing. I like him okay, I don't DISlike him, but yeah, he kind of irks me sometimes. So when I'm picking up an Agatha Christie mystery, I'm always a little bit tickled when it doesn't involve Poirot. This is one of those books, so it already had a leg up on the competition when I started it. And here's the other thing: with all the Christie books I've read in my lifetime, there are only a handful that I've found really memorable. This, again, is one of those books. In fact, plotwise I would say it's my favorite Christie book of all time. Many Christie fans consider it her masterpiece. Eight very different people are invited to an isolated island off the coast of England. Fairly soon it becomes apparent that they all have one thing in common: they've all been accused of murder but were never convicted or brought to justice. Each person has gotten a written invitation to the island, tailored to their needs or situation, like a job offer or a holiday invitation, most of the invitations coming from someone they don't know who signs the invites as U.N. Owen. Together with the butler and cook who are already on the island, there are ten people. They gather for drinks and to meet their U.N.Known host. While they are waiting, a few things happen: 1. They notice a framed copy of the nursery rhyme "Ten Little Indians" hanging on the wall, in which the Indians* leave, die or disappear one by one, until there are none. There are also ten Indian figurines on the dining room table. 2. Mysteriously, a recorded voice begins to speak, describing each of the characters in turn and accusing them each of committing murder but evading justice . . . until now. 3. One of the guests laughs off the shock and quickly downs a drink. And immediately chokes and dies. One of the ten figurines is soon discovered to be broken, and the nursery rhyme reflects his manner of death ("One choked his little self and then there were nine"). So begins an intense tale, as the guests frantically try to protect themselves and figure out which of them is the killer (or is it someone else hiding on the island?) before they are all dead. And at the same time, they're all dealing with their own feelings of guilt to varying degrees. And the figurines keep disappearing--DUN! DUN! DUN! The psychological exploration in this book is great, beyond anything I recall reading in any other Christie mystery, and the reveal at the end completely surprised me. *Content note: For the record, some readers may have qualms with this nearly 80-year-old novel's dicey history of racial slurs and insensitivity. It was originally actually titled Ten Little Niggers, based on the British version of this poem, which apparently wasn't considered offensive enough not to use in England when the book was first published in 1939. For the American edition of the book, it was changed to "Ten Little Indians" and, later, "And Then There Were None" (which is the version I have, but still with the Indian poem and figurines) - better but still not great. I understand that many recent editions now use ten little soldiers for the poem.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mary ~Ravager of Tomes~

    And Then There Were None is one of Agatha Christie's most celebrated mystery novels, and purportedly one of the most difficult for her to write. I don't dislike this book. It seems to be a favorite among many, but it's very middle of the road for me as far as Mystery/Thriller books go. The Good: I enjoy the setup & how this mystery is structured. It's fun & easy to engage with in a "Gee, I sure am glad I'm not in their shoes" kind of way. It's written well with an accurate insight on human desperation & how p And Then There Were None is one of Agatha Christie's most celebrated mystery novels, and purportedly one of the most difficult for her to write. I don't dislike this book. It seems to be a favorite among many, but it's very middle of the road for me as far as Mystery/Thriller books go. The Good: I enjoy the setup & how this mystery is structured. It's fun & easy to engage with in a "Gee, I sure am glad I'm not in their shoes" kind of way. It's written well with an accurate insight on human desperation & how psychosomatic effects can drastically warp one's sense of control. The length (only 264 pages) & pacing of this novel is very appropriate. It gives adequate page space to the mystery & the characters, acquainting the reader quickly with the situation so that we can dive straight into the action. The Bad: I did not care about even one of these characters past seeing the creative ways the author would kill them off. They're developed & believable as people, but I never felt any type of connection or sympathy which I think can be quite important in a story like this. Sometimes the characters don't matter or can get away with being stereotypical cardboard cutouts, but that tends to shift the over into the torture porn arena & I don't believe for a second that is where Christie's book belongs. Probably the most disappointing part of my experience, I was not impressed with the conclusion of this mystery. Right off the bat, I didn't feel engaged with the actual solving of the problem because it felt as though I was kept at an arm's length from any of the potential clues. Call me an idiot, maybe this was obvious for other people? But I genuinely don't feel as though readers are given a chance to make even an a semi-educated guess about who the perpetrator is. It relies wholly on the very, very last section of the book to lay out the details for what they are & explain the unknown bits. It's very: "Oh, by the way here's what happened." Anti-climactic to say the least. When I'm reading a Mystery/Thriller, I want to feel as though I'm being challenged to figure out what's happening before the characters do. I'll be the first to admit I almost never guess the truth in its entirety, but that's beside the point. I was to the point where I was almost ready to believe something supernatural was happening. Not a great sign. When the truth is finally exposed, I had a hard time feeling as startled as I'm meant to feel because I've seen this story before in popular media. Now, this came out in the 1930's and so this isn't by any means the fault of the book itself. It probably came first in every instance I'm thinking of. But as a modern reader this didn't pack the same punch it might have if I were a reader of the 1930's. Anyhow, that's another classic under the belt!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    I can't wait to read this in one sit.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Aqsa (On Hiatus)

    Buddy Read with sweet Nasom :) (Spoilers are in spoiler tags!) There was something magical about an island-the mere word suggested fantasy. You lost touch with the world-an island was a world of its own. A world, perhaps, from which you might never return. What would you do if you were invited to a place raved about everywhere, a place where your friend, someone you met once, your colleague, or some old pal invited to you to? Or maybe if you were called in for employment, to be a secret/> Buddy Read with sweet Nasom :) (Spoilers are in spoiler tags!) There was something magical about an island-the mere word suggested fantasy. You lost touch with the world-an island was a world of its own. A world, perhaps, from which you might never return. What would you do if you were invited to a place raved about everywhere, a place where your friend, someone you met once, your colleague, or some old pal invited to you to? Or maybe if you were called in for employment, to be a secretary or detective or even a butler! Would you go? Why wouldn’t you, right? It’s your friend calling you, your old pal! Or it’s just another small job but with good money, why refuse it? But what if it weren’t what you thought it was? And what if you could never come back? "In the midst of life we are in death." Ten random people were called to The Indian Island, the famous Island, by either a friend or someone claiming to have met them, some were called for specific jobs, but it was all just a way to get them to there, with no way to go back! It’s when your sins come out in the open and death follows everyone! 'Be sure thy sin will find thee out.' Follow these strangers with a common horror in their past as they figure out who their host/hostess actually is and whether others are dying by accident/suicide or are they all being murdered! Follow the guests as the story builds and as they turn against each other in a fruitless attempt of finding the killer! They sat listlessly huddled together. And, surreptitiously, they watched each other. Watch their psychological break down as they avoid each other and yet try to stay together, and as they try to trust someone but suspect them all the same! With everything being out in the open and yet hidden! There was nothing hidden in this house, nothing concealed. It had no atmosphere about it. Somehow, that was the most frightening thing of all. What would you do as your fellow guests attempt suicide, get murdered, turned against each other or wait peacefully for the end, what would you do and who would you trust? There was no fear there now. Just emptiness P.S. I didn’t like it for the first three chapters (which are very short and a bit confusing-what with so many people!), so I’d advise those of you who haven’t read it to not DNF it and wait till the end of 4th chapter-it’ll pull you in! Reasons it wasn’t a 5-Star: (view spoiler)[So, yes, I figured out the relation of the deaths with the poem the moment I read it but obviously I couldn’t guess the murderer-the judge! I wasn’t entirely satisfied with the end-seemed a bit unrealistic, didn’t it?-but I enjoyed reading it! I found a couple of flaws with the story but I liked it nonetheless! Here is what I thought during my BR: Why didn’t they bury the bodies? I couldn't get my head around the fact the no one buried anyone-even the one's who died early! Odd, don't you think-don't say they were waiting for someone to rescue them and figure out the mystery before having them buried! I mean obviously they are dead bodies of strangers but still, Come On! I can't believe Mr. Rogers-he didn't seem like someone who lost his wife! Haha, I just realised, if they had buried the dead, the judge wouldn't have been able to kill the rest! 4 would've lived! It was maddening though, even I got a headache-no wonder they were all going crazy! And how perfect was the judge's throw on Blore! That was stupid of the judge-he could've missed! I knew they'd start confiding in one or two, sooner or later and suspect the rest-they are sure scared now! Yes, staying together is a good strategy but so is staying alone! If you stay together, you'd also be staying with the murderer (who killed the first 2 people with everyone present!) and staying alone is good unless the murderer gets his/her way to you! I'd suggest staying together anyway-you can at least keep an eye on everyone! I wouldn't confide tbh-I'd maybe confide with all or none at all! I'd be blunt too! I didn't expect it to be like that either! If the judge had to kill the criminals then why kill himself in the end? I mean he should've felt better and justified! It won’t be a 5 star due to these reasons, but still an enjoyable read :) (hide spoiler)]

  18. 4 out of 5

    Evgeny

    To talk about the plot of this book however briefly would give spoilers right away. For people who have not read them, spoilers kill Agatha Christie books. Basically there is a small isolated island bought by an American millionaire which was later sold to a mysterious party generating a lot of rumors about the latest buyer. A group of very different people ended up on the island. To talk about the plot of this book however briefly would give spoilers right away. For people who have not read them, spoilers kill Agatha Christie books. Basically there is a small isolated island bought by an American millionaire which was later sold to a mysterious party generating a lot of rumors about the latest buyer. A group of very different people ended up on the island. If you are familiar with the Dame of Mystery's writing you would guess there will be a murder. If you have read several books of her, you know she rarely stops at just one dead body. This is all. I insist that nobody comes anywhere close to Christie when it comes creating a complicated exciting and fair mystery - both before or after her, up to this day. British people seems to agree with me as they made her a Dame for her contribution to literature. I am sure quite a few readers from other countries fully agree. This book is considered to be her best by many. At this point I could just stop and would still consider my review to be complete and the reasons for my rating clearly explained. The images used are from the Soviet movie Desyat Negrityat (Десять негритят) which is still the only movie adaptation of the book which remain completely true to its source material. What is it about movie people insisting on making changes to a classic of mystery? Are they trying to improve the perfection? This is doomed to failure. The final conclusion: if you like mysteries or thrillers (this book successfully combines both) this one is a must read. Can you guess what is going on before the epilogue? It is actually quite simple if you think about it, but there are a lot of red herrings to hide the answer in the plain sight. My special thanks go to Erin for the book discussion.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mansuriah Hassan

    Wow! This is a masterpiece! Dame Agatha Christie's achievement is remarkable. She creates ten characters, all suspected of murder, who are lured to an island. She has them meet their deaths one by one as nominated in the nursery rhyme "Ten Little Indians" which is displayed in their rooms. She has each murder occur in a situation where almost all the other island guests might have had opportunity to commit it. Set on an isolated island without contact of the outside civilization, a group of ten strangers are invi Wow! This is a masterpiece! Dame Agatha Christie's achievement is remarkable. She creates ten characters, all suspected of murder, who are lured to an island. She has them meet their deaths one by one as nominated in the nursery rhyme "Ten Little Indians" which is displayed in their rooms. She has each murder occur in a situation where almost all the other island guests might have had opportunity to commit it. Set on an isolated island without contact of the outside civilization, a group of ten strangers are invited for a long weekend on Indian Island, a mile off the Devon coast. They include a doctor, a games mistress, a soldier of fortune, a rich playboy, a retired policeman, a judge, a spinster, a retired general and a married couple who are to be the servants. They arrive on a bleak rocky island to a completely modern house with all the amenities. The fires are welcoming, there is an ample supply of food, the servants are impeccable, but their host is absent. In each of the bedrooms, the "Ten Little Indians" nursery rhyme is posted on a prominent wall. It's a great book and is very scary with loads of suspense. A thriller that will definitely keep your pulse pounding. I love the setting on the island, with no phone or transportation. Just think, getting stuck on an island with a mad man. That sounds pretty creepy. This is my favourite book of all time! And Then There Were None probably ranks among the BEST works of crime fiction ever written. I highly recommend everyone to get a copy of this book :)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cece (ProblemsOfaBookNerd)

    SUCH a superb mystery. Wow.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Iryna *Book and Sword*

    Ten little Indian boys went out to dine; One choked his little self and then there were nine. No wonder this is considered to be the best book of Agatha Christie's ever - it is truly a masterpiece. Nine little Indian boys sat up very late; One overslept himself and then there were eight And I am not just saying it- I truly mean it. I didn't just discovered it and am not speaking on a high rush of that fresh new read feeling - this was a re-read for me. And I don't re-read books very often Ten little Indian boys went out to dine; One choked his little self and then there were nine. ​​No wonder this is considered to be the best book of Agatha Christie's ever - it is truly a masterpiece. Nine little Indian boys sat up very late; One overslept himself and then there were eight And I am not just saying it- I truly mean it. I didn't just discovered it and am not speaking on a high rush of that fresh new read feeling - this was a re-read for me. And I don't re-read books very often - only the BEST OF BEST makes my re-reads list. Eight little Indian boys travelling in Devon; One said he'd stay there and then there were seven. ​If you have read anything of Agatha Christie before and wasn't a big fan - read this. This novel is completely stand alone and it doesn't feature Miss Marple or Poirot, like all of her other books do. Despite being first published in 1939 this novel is timeless, it reads extremely easily. It's an absolute CLASSIC without that heavy classic feel. Seven little Indian boys chopping up sticks; One chopped himself in halves and then there were six. The book starts out with clever introductions to our 10 characters all of whom intertwine somehow on the way to the Soldier Island, to where they were all invited. And then - and then shit goes down! Six little Indian boys playing with a hive; A bumblebee stung one and then there were five. Christie plays with human psyche and emotions wonderfully in this book. She brings out guilt, paranoia and distrust. It's so tangible you can almost feel it seeping through the pages. Five little Indian boys going in for law; One got in Chancery and then there were four. I have mentioned that this ia a re-read for me. I read this for the first time about 5 years ago (at least) and because of this I couldn't really remember what happened. So, reading it again felt new and exciting! BUT, I also feel like even if I remembered the ending I'd still have enjoyed it just as much. Because then I'd have just looked for clues, for giveaways and hints on how to solve the mystery. Four little Indian boys going out to sea; A red herring swallowed one and then there were three. This book is one of my all time favorites, and to be honest not many books can beat that. I always find something to dislike if I read books more than once (as the more I read the more critical I get). Three little Indian boys walking in the Zoo; A big bear hugged one and then there were two. I found some things that I didn't think clear answers were given to in the book, but nothing major, and nothing that could have disappointed me. For this read focuses on atmosphere, on emotions and on quick pace of events that just don't give you time to catch your breath. Or to put the book away... Two little Indian boys sitting in the sun; One got frizzled up and then there was one. And because it is so atmospherically mysterious and creepy, it's a perfect October read! Highly, highly recommend! Bravo Agatha Christie, BRAVO! One little Indian boy left all alone; He went and hanged himself and then there were none. My WEBSITE My INSTAGRAM My WORDPRESS BLOG

  22. 5 out of 5

    Candi

    I read this book ages ago; I believe it was my very first Agatha Christie book. I recall searching through the shelves of the local library in the mystery section trying to find something I hadn’t already read. This was during a phase when all I wanted to read were mysteries and nothing else – I suppose I was attempting to create some sort of balance with the high school required reading curriculum. I have to admit that I don’t think I had ever heard of Agatha Christie until that moment. (My par I read this book ages ago; I believe it was my very first Agatha Christie book. I recall searching through the shelves of the local library in the mystery section trying to find something I hadn’t already read. This was during a phase when all I wanted to read were mysteries and nothing else – I suppose I was attempting to create some sort of balance with the high school required reading curriculum. I have to admit that I don’t think I had ever heard of Agatha Christie until that moment. (My parents and grandparents were non-readers, so I was generally on my own to discover new books and authors – unless it was assigned reading.) Imagine my delight when I noted a whole slew of her mysteries all lined up neatly on the shelf – more to look forward to if I liked my first! To make a long story short, I loved the book and to this day recalled the clever twist at the end. When one of my book groups chose to read this last month, I didn’t think I would manage to squeeze it in. Then I discovered the BBC audio production. I don’t generally listen to audio books; my mind tends to wander far too easily. However, since I’d read it before I thought this would be a fun option. And it was! But it was far too short! All of a sudden it ended and I thought there was something more to be heard! I know there was something missing… my memory of it all those years ago told me so. I wasn’t even sure whodunit when the audio ended. So I promptly returned to the library and signed out the actual book, which includes both an epilogue as well as a copy of a ‘manuscript’ found in a sealed bottle out at sea. Whew! All my questions were answered and it all came together quite brilliantly once again. What I came to realize was that my ‘audio book’ was more like a recording of a dramatization – missing all the little details I’d have read in the actual book, but with the addition of all the sound effects and plenty of engaging dialogue - ice tinkling in glasses, music fading, doors slamming, different voices for the various characters… but lacking the narration in between that helped make the story solid. An entertaining and very slick little mystery, And Then There Were None should appeal to most lovers of this genre. I recommend reading the actual book or the true audio book rather than the BBC dramatization, unless you are already familiar with the story. Otherwise, this version would make for great fun! 3.5 stars rounded up

  23. 4 out of 5

    Moira Russell

    I admit I am a late, reluctant and suspicious convert to Christie. I avoided her studiously as an adolescent, because dozens and dozens of her paperbacks were always on sale with equally cheap indistinguishable romances and other 'women's books,' and I wanted no part of those. I read Chandler, not Christie; Hammett, not Sayers; James, not Marsh. I even read a few Spillane books, for Chrissakes, at a friend's urging (UGH), but still no Christie. Those endless TV adaptations, with the dotty Miss Marple an I admit I am a late, reluctant and suspicious convert to Christie. I avoided her studiously as an adolescent, because dozens and dozens of her paperbacks were always on sale with equally cheap indistinguishable romances and other 'women's books,' and I wanted no part of those. I read Chandler, not Christie; Hammett, not Sayers; James, not Marsh. I even read a few Spillane books, for Chrissakes, at a friend's urging (UGH), but still no Christie. Those endless TV adaptations, with the dotty Miss Marple and dorky Poirot, didn't help either. I had her books written off - predictable - cozy - tricksy - unreal - feminine. I liked Patricia Cornwell and noir. Show me a grisly procedural and I'll sink into it like a warm bath. The result of this prejudice, of course, was that I never saw what was actually there and only cheated myself. But matters weren't helped when I took a (delightful) genre studies course in graduate school (The Singing Sands, Ashenden, Knight's Gambit, An Unsuitable Job for a Woman, Poe, Doyle....) and we had to read The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, about whom legendary snob Edmund Wilson famously asked: Who Cares? Not me. (Not that I cared for Wilson either.) I hated that book. But during that course I ran across something interesting. For my final topic I chose the work of P.D. James (and read all of her books published up til then - through Original Sin - in about a month; dizzying but v fun) and you couldn't miss emblazoned on all her paperbacks at the time, THE NEW QUEEN OF CRIME, SHE USURPS CHRISTIE'S THRONE, CAGEMATCH BETWEEN PHYLLIS AND AGATHA, TWO BITCHES ENTER ONE NOVELIST LEAVES, &c &c you get the picture. This was mainly very stupid marketing because James and Christie have almost nothing in common (even tho James's first, derivative novel had the classic locked-room scenario). But I read a lot of interviews with James, and while she was polite about Christie (well, she's British) I sensed something else: respect. Apparently her tone's changed a bit in her most recent nonfiction book about mysteries, but then she said something like: 'She is a conjurer with those cards, and each time you think you know which one she is turning face-up, and each time you are wrong.' Well, now that was interesting. Every time? And I discovered the answer is, yes, pretty much. Call it a trick, call it a gimmick, call it masterful puzzle-plotting, call it a kind of genius, whatever it is, it's frighteningly consistent. It is what Stephen King terms the 'gotta' in Misery raised almost to an art form. It is what Magnus Eisengrim describes in Robertson Davies' World of Wonders as what makes a great magician: 'A man who can stand stark naked in the middle of a crowd and keep it gaping for an hour while he manipulates a few coins, or cards, or billiard balls.' This would have been a far, far better book for me to read in that class that was almost fifteen years ago now (gosh). For one thing, it has a sharp, strong, original female central character (she's not quite a heroine); its gimmick is equally as good as Ackroyd's; and it is a dazzling distinctive example of the One-Of-Us-is-a-Murderer-But-Which-One plot. Even better, there is no trace of that horrific Socratic bore Hercule Poirot or any of his little grey cells. For all that critics harp on Christie's cardboard characters and outlandish setups, this book depends largely on characterization and atmosphere. Each of the ten people brought to a deserted, barren island is guilty to a greater or lesser degree of causing the death of another person, and the book becomes almost a meditation on - what is guilt? What is responsibility? The murderer isn't just randomly cutting people down, but manipulating them, and enjoying it. Even if they are all as guilty as she or he thinks they are, do they deserve to be picked off and psychologically tortured? What justifies passing sentence on someone else? These are not easy questions and Christie does not give easy answers. (Also trying to write a spoiler-free review of this is hard, yeesh.)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    My friend Amelie and I used this book as half of our corpus when we wrote our 1990 paper, An Implementable Semantics for Comparative Constructions . We spent several days combing through the text, extracting and categorizing every single occurrence of a comparative construction. So you'll appreciate that I know what I'm talking about when I say it's better than most murder mysteries.

  25. 5 out of 5

    mark monday

    You Chose Your Own Adventure! You are a man, you are a woman; you are judge, jury, and executioner. You are surrounded by murderers and assholes. Kill ‘em all! Then kill yourself. Your adventure is over. If you would like to start your life anew, choose http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kayla Dawn

    Read this in one evening, I think that says enough (I accidentally spoiled myself when I checked the page count but that didn't make me enjoy the book any less so.. yay? :D)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Ten Little Niggers = And Then There were none, Agatha Christie And Then There Were None is a mystery novel by English writer Agatha Christie, widely considered her masterpiece and described by her as the most difficult of her books to write. It was first published in the United Kingdom by the Collins Crime Club on 6 November 1939, as Ten Little Niggers, after the British blackface song, which serves as a major plot point. The US edition was not released until December 1939; its American rep Ten Little Niggers = And Then There were none‬, Agatha Christie And Then There Were None is a mystery novel by English writer Agatha Christie, widely considered her masterpiece and described by her as the most difficult of her books to write. It was first published in the United Kingdom by the Collins Crime Club on 6 November 1939, as Ten Little Niggers, after the British blackface song, which serves as a major plot point. The US edition was not released until December 1939; its American reprints and adaptations were all retitled And Then There Were None, after the last five words in the nursery rhyme "Ten Little Indians". عنوانها: ده بچه زنگی؛ ده بومی کوچک؛ ده سیاهپوست کوچولو؛ دیگر کسی آنجا باقی نماند، و آنگاه دیگر هیچ؛ کسی نماند دیگر؛ و سپس هیچ کس نبود؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: ماه فوریه سال 1982 میلادی عنوان: ده سیاهپوست کوچولو؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: بهمن فرزانه، تهران، کتابهای جیبی، 1345، در 203 ص؛ موضوع: داستانهای کارآگاهی از نویسندگان انگلیسی سده 20 م عنوان: و آنگاه دیگر هیچ؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: بهرا افراسیابی، تهران، سخن، 1372، در 204 ص؛ چاپ دوم 1373؛ عنوان: ده سیاهپوست کوچولو؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: محمد قصاع، تهران، آبنوس، 1373، در 271 ص؛ چاپ دیگر: تهران، صبورا، 1374، شابک: 9649175109؛ چاپ دوم 130؛ عنوان: دیگر کسی آنجا باقی نماند؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: پروانه دادبخش، مشهد، جاودان خرد، 1375، در 279 ص؛ عنوان: و سپس هیچکس نبود؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: ثریا قیصری، تهران، سمیر، 1375، در 248 ص؛ عنوان: ده بچه زنگی؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: خسرو مهربان سمیعی، تهران، هرمس، 1378، در 245 ص؛شابک: 9646641733؛ چاپ دوم 1379؛ چاپ سوم 1386، شابک: 9789646641730؛ چاپ دیگر: تهران، هرمس، چاپ پنجم 1392، چاپ ششم 1393؛ عنوان: ده بومی کوچک؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: ذبیح الله منصوری، تهران، دنیای کتاب، 1384، در 286 ص؛ شابک: 9643461947؛ عنوان: کسی نماند دیگر؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: سپیده حبیبی، تهران، نگارش کتاب الکترونیک، 1394، در 94 ص؛ ای.بوک؛ مصور، شابک: 9786008075509؛ ده تن، هفت مرد و سه زن، توسط افرادی به ظاهر متفاوت دعوت می‌شوند، که تعطیلات خود را در جزیره‌ ای دور افتاده، به نام «جزیره ی زنگی» بگذرانند. بعضی از آن‌ها پیشتر همدیگر را سر موضوعی می‌شناخته‌ اند؛ ولی بیشترشان پیش از رفتن به جزیره، هیچ‌گاه یکدیگر را ندیده‌ بودند. این ده نفر هر یک به گونه‌ ای در گذشته ی خود، باعث قتل یک فرد شده‌ اند. پس از گذشت مدتی در جزیره، آن‌ها متوجه می‌شوند، که همه از سوی یک فرد به آن جا دعوت شده‌ اند. فردی که با اینکه در جزیره نیست، از راز همه ی آن‌ها آگاه است؛ و اوضاع مغشوش می‌شود؛ وقتی که این فرد شروع به کشتن و قتل تک‌ تک آنها، به روشی عجیب می‌کند، و قربانیان خود را با اقتباس از یک شعر کودکانه، به نام ده سرخپوست کوچک به قتل می‌رساند. و ... ا. شربیانی

  28. 4 out of 5

    Celeste

    Ten little soldier boys went out to dine; One choked his little self and then there were Nine. Nine little soldier boys sat up very late; One overslept himself and then there were Eight. Eight little soldier boys traveling in Devon; One said he’d stay there and then there were Seven. Seven little soldier boys chopping up sticks; One chopped himself in halves and then there were Six. Six little soldier boys playing with a hive; A bumble bee stung one and then there were Five.< Ten little soldier boys went out to dine; 
One choked his little self and then there were Nine. Nine little soldier boys sat up very late; 
One overslept himself and then there were Eight. Eight little soldier boys traveling in Devon;
 One said he’d stay there and then there were Seven. Seven little soldier boys chopping up sticks; 
One chopped himself in halves and then there were Six. Six little soldier boys playing with a hive; 
A bumble bee stung one and then there were Five. Five little soldier boys going in for law; 
One got into chancery and then there were Four. Four little soldier boys going out to sea;
 A red herring swallowed one and then there were Three. Three little soldier boys walking in the Zoo;
 A big bear hugged one and then there were Two. Two little soldier boys sitting in the sun;
 One got frizzled up and then there was One. One little soldier boy left all alone; 
He went and hanged himself And then there were None. —Frank Green, 1869 This is the poem that dictates all of the action of Christie’s novel. Ten strangers are invited to Soldier Island under mysterious circumstances. When their unknown benefactor doesn’t show, things on the island get crazy. The guests start dying off, one by one, in eerie accordance with the Ten Little Soldier Boys poem that is posted in nearly every room of the estate. And Then There Were None is only my second experience with Agatha Christie, and I wasn’t disappointed. Just as Murder on the Orient Express left me guessing until the final chapter, I had absolutely no idea who was responsible for the murder and mayhem in And Then There Were None. I was honestly afraid that I would never find out whodunnit when I reached the end of the epilogue and still wasn’t given any answers. Thankfully answers were provided right at the very end of the novel, and I was completely blindsided by those answers. I might only have two of her books under my belt, but I already understand why Christie is considered the queen of the mystery genre. She plays things so close to the chest that it’s nearly impossible to guess anything until she feeds you the information you need. It’s amazing to me that books written this long ago can still be so surprising and mysterious and feel so fresh. I might’ve found a new favorite author! For more of my reviews, as well as my own fiction and thoughts on life, check out my blog, Celestial Musings.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂

    "I had written this book because it was so difficult to do that the idea had fascinated me. Ten people had to die without it becoming ridiculous or the murderer being obvious. I wrote the book after a tremendous amount of planning, and I was pleased with what I had made of it... ...the person who was really pleased with it was myself, for I knew better than any critic how difficult it had been." & Christie was so right to be pleased with this book! It is her mistresspiece and my favourite mystery "I had written this book because it was so difficult to do that the idea had fascinated me. Ten people had to die without it becoming ridiculous or the murderer being obvious. I wrote the book after a tremendous amount of planning, and I was pleased with what I had made of it... ...the person who was really pleased with it was myself, for I knew better than any critic how difficult it had been." & Christie was so right to be pleased with this book! It is her mistresspiece and my favourite mystery of all time! Brilliantly plotted and tightly planned - for tension and thrills you can't go past the moment when (view spoiler)[ the book is down to the final two people (hide spoiler)] My only plot criticism is (view spoiler)[ the murderer's selection of Vera was based on pretty weak evidence. (hide spoiler)] That won't take away from my enjoyment. But the casual racism in some of the text pretty shocking. He had fancied though that the little Jew had not been deceived - that was the damnable part about Jews, you couldn't deceive them about money - they knew! I'm not a fan of sanitising an author's work. Everyone has to go into a Christie prepared for racism (& classism & sexism in the way female servants are often portrayed - although not in this particular book.) But speaking of sanitising - the original title has been removed from the original title field for this book here on Goodreads. Given that a quick search will show other books with the same word in the title I find this puzzling. I know in my own country the word was still in use in the sixties (my mother quietly pulled my sisters & I aside & told us not to use it in games of tag.) & I do believe Christie didn't know how offensive it was in the States. (her publishers' apparent ignorance though is beyond baffling) Edit: Realised I never updated this. Problem was solved with original title (was Librarian error)& I try to check every week to make sure it hasn't been changed/deleted again. Edit 21/04/19 Oh boy, I hope this is mistake! I haven't checked for a month or so, then noticed the original title had gone. I went into the changelog & found this note; librarian note for this book (last edited by Goodreads at Apr 16, 2019 09:58AM) Please do not change this book's original title field. Failure to comply may result in the loss of your librarian status. Thank you, The Goodreads Team This makes zero sense, since editions of this book featuring the original (very offensive) name are still catalogued. & a simple search will show other books with this word in their title still listed here. I have emailed Support. I'm hoping this is a case of a staff member acting against policy, rather than more evidence that GR can no longer be trusted with our reading records. :( Edit: 24/04/19 Have heard from Goodreads & this was a staff error. Original (offensive) title has been put back in the system by another librarian. Good news, but I wonder if GR has ever given any thought to hiring experienced volunteer Librarians rather than the raw recruits they use now. I'll try to keep a better eye on this. :)

  30. 5 out of 5

    PattyMacDotComma

    4★ “So far the murderer has had an easy task, since his victims have been unsuspicious. From now on, it is our task to suspect each and every one amongst us. Forewarned is forearmed. Take no risks and be alert to danger. That is all." I had never read this classic “locked-room” mystery, which is actually an isolated-island mystery. Written in 1939, nearly 80 years ago, it’s obvious there will be no helicopters doing either retrievals or midnight drops of surprise visitors. And there’s no tele/>“So 4★ “So far the murderer has had an easy task, since his victims have been unsuspicious. From now on, it is our task to suspect each and every one amongst us. Forewarned is forearmed. Take no risks and be alert to danger. That is all." I had never read this classic “locked-room” mystery, which is actually an isolated-island mystery. Written in 1939, nearly 80 years ago, it’s obvious there will be no helicopters doing either retrievals or midnight drops of surprise visitors. And there’s no telephone communication, so when the weather turns, the island is truly isolated from the mainland. At one, point, a few (“remaining”) characters decide to heliograph the mainland, hoping someone will notice mirrors flashing code. But Christie has that covered, too. The island used to belong to an eccentric American, so mainlanders are used to ignoring the antics of the quirky parties held there. The story. Ten people have received personal invitations to holiday on Indian Island as the guests of someone from their past. When all finally arrive by boat and begin to compare notes, it’s obvious that nobody is quite sure who their host is. To greet them, there are figurines of ten little Indians on the dining table, and in each room there hangs a copy of a nursery rhyme, somewhat adapted for the occasion. It tells what happens to each little Indian until the last one is gone – and then there were none. As each “guest” succumbs to a different fate—well, no, the same fate, murder most foul—the remaining suspects/victims try to figure out how to stay together while staying safe from each other. One has a revolver (he’s an ex-copper, invited to keep an eye on things, he says). It’s a fiendishly clever plot with good reason to suspect everyone. Each of them has a secret in their murky past, and I must admit when I found out what they were, I reckoned they deserved to be scared out of their wits. And they were! “The candle was burning down. Looking to see if the matches were within easy reach of his hand, he blew it out. Strangely enough, he found the darkness disquieting. It was as though a thousand age-old fears awoke and struggled for supremacy in his brain.” I probably wouldn’t have finished them off, but the killer was determined to carry out his or her plan. I did have to suspend disbelief a bit, but then I have to remember when this took place and where, and how absolutely terrified the suspects/victims were. Worth a read if you’ve never read it.

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