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Computer One

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On a California campus in the early years of the twenty-first century, Professor Enzo Yakuda is on the verge of retirement. Although he is a Zen Buddhist, a lifetime's thought and study have led not to inner calm, but to an obsession which begins to haunt him and take over his life. Yakuda believes that he can prove that the self-repair function of Computer One, the intern On a California campus in the early years of the twenty-first century, Professor Enzo Yakuda is on the verge of retirement. Although he is a Zen Buddhist, a lifetime's thought and study have led not to inner calm, but to an obsession which begins to haunt him and take over his life. Yakuda believes that he can prove that the self-repair function of Computer One, the international civil computer network which runs just about everything on the planet, will cause an inevitable confrontation with mankind. His nightmare, however, is that in raising the alarm about this hidden danger he will inevitably precipitate the annihilation of the entire human race. Computer One is both a compelling novel and a terrifying scientific treatise on the near future. Its particular horror lies in the perfectly logical dreamworld of modern scientific theory, its compulsion deriving from a plot which moves like a Greek tragedy towards its chillingly inevitable climax. This first American edition contains a long, previously unpublished account, written by the author, concerning both the controversial origins and the startling nature of this explosive novel.


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On a California campus in the early years of the twenty-first century, Professor Enzo Yakuda is on the verge of retirement. Although he is a Zen Buddhist, a lifetime's thought and study have led not to inner calm, but to an obsession which begins to haunt him and take over his life. Yakuda believes that he can prove that the self-repair function of Computer One, the intern On a California campus in the early years of the twenty-first century, Professor Enzo Yakuda is on the verge of retirement. Although he is a Zen Buddhist, a lifetime's thought and study have led not to inner calm, but to an obsession which begins to haunt him and take over his life. Yakuda believes that he can prove that the self-repair function of Computer One, the international civil computer network which runs just about everything on the planet, will cause an inevitable confrontation with mankind. His nightmare, however, is that in raising the alarm about this hidden danger he will inevitably precipitate the annihilation of the entire human race. Computer One is both a compelling novel and a terrifying scientific treatise on the near future. Its particular horror lies in the perfectly logical dreamworld of modern scientific theory, its compulsion deriving from a plot which moves like a Greek tragedy towards its chillingly inevitable climax. This first American edition contains a long, previously unpublished account, written by the author, concerning both the controversial origins and the startling nature of this explosive novel.

30 review for Computer One

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Bronte Connor

    Ok, this is my first review here....sorry for my bad English. Even though this novel was written back in 1993/4, i just discovered this book like 2 years ago and then decide to buy it in amazon. Anyway, this is my opinion of this novel... if you really want to analyze about why was morally right for Skynet to try to eradicate us(humans)and the same philosophical question for the AI Hal 9000’s hostile approach toward its humans programmers and the AIs in GURPS Reign of Ok, this is my first review here....sorry for my bad English. Even though this novel was written back in 1993/4, i just discovered this book like 2 years ago and then decide to buy it in amazon. Anyway, this is my opinion of this novel... if you really want to analyze about why was morally right for Skynet to try to eradicate us(humans)and the same philosophical question for the AI Hal 9000’s hostile approach toward its humans programmers and the AIs in GURPS Reign of Steel and cybrids from the game Starsiege that also in tried to exterminate mankind, etc... THIS is the novel for such analytical subject. The analysis that I’m telling you that was spoken in this novel was wrote in a very rational and scientific way in this book(in my opinion), and it is the same Darwinian’s survival of the fitness subject that is also debated just like in another hard scifi novel(this time of an alien invasion scenario) that I read not too long ago called The Killing Star(witch I also recommend to read it) by Charles R. Pellegrino and George Zebrowski. This novel and The Killing Star novel both are REAL food for your mind or thoughts. Of those who also like stories of machines vs humans’ apocalyptic and/or post-apocalyptic stories, you won’t regret buying this novel. Even mister Arthur C. Clarke read this novel(when it was just released and new) and seem also to like it since he quote for the novel in the same cover "It really scared me...move over Hal!". I wish I could speak the author in person (by mail or chat) and congratulate him for such novel and express to him how much I like it. Ok, that is my critic and opinion of the novel, bye.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Woooooooooooah. What a Rand-ical trip, dude! This book is chock-full of empty theorizing, people just yammering at one another over any sort of thing they feel like, and really, really bad computer talk. Gods, the author like learned nothing about either people or computers before starting this book. No one really talks to one another, they're just sounding boards for other people's discourse. And the CS is painfully poor. I think I'm now less scared of the internet killing everyone than I was b Woooooooooooah. What a Rand-ical trip, dude! This book is chock-full of empty theorizing, people just yammering at one another over any sort of thing they feel like, and really, really bad computer talk. Gods, the author like learned nothing about either people or computers before starting this book. No one really talks to one another, they're just sounding boards for other people's discourse. And the CS is painfully poor. I think I'm now less scared of the internet killing everyone than I was before. It was like reading a book-length "Press Enter..." but not, because at least Varley knew what he was talking about. No one shall ever speak to me of this book again.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    This is one of the scariest books I have error read. Warrick is a modern George Orwell and this is one of a few selection of books that I have never had the guts to re-read. I've worked as an IT engineer for 15 and the parallels with technological development are profound.

  4. 5 out of 5

    George

    Like a great Murakami novel only WAY more sad love it because it more like what would actually happen.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Laura Roslin

    DNF Meh couldn't get into the characters

  6. 4 out of 5

    Steven Raszewski

    Very good. Spooky.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Henry Parry

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michael Buffaloe

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Teta

  10. 4 out of 5

    Julian

  11. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

  12. 4 out of 5

    poul williams

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joel

  14. 5 out of 5

    Zerofox

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tex Ripley

  16. 5 out of 5

    Theskateboard

  17. 4 out of 5

    James

  18. 5 out of 5

    Murtaza Gulamali

  19. 4 out of 5

    Philip Orange

  20. 5 out of 5

    Watney

  21. 5 out of 5

    MJ

  22. 4 out of 5

    Roll light

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michellie Ann

  24. 4 out of 5

    Vaselina

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ray Ogar

  26. 4 out of 5

    Robert Strupp

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ashhar Bustan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elize

  30. 4 out of 5

    Wiebke Kuhn

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