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Why "A" Students Work for "C" Students and "B" Students Work for the Government: Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Education for Parents

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Kiyosaki expands on his belief that the school system was created to churn out 'Es' / Employees... those "A Students" who read well, memorize well and test well... and not the creative thinkers, visionaries and dreamers –entrepreneurs-in-the-making... those "C Students who grow up to be the innovators and creators of new ideas, businesses, applications and products. < Kiyosaki expands on his belief that the school system was created to churn out 'Es' / Employees... those "A Students" who read well, memorize well and test well... and not the creative thinkers, visionaries and dreamers –entrepreneurs-in-the-making... those "C Students who grow up to be the innovators and creators of new ideas, businesses, applications and products. The book urges parents not to be obsessed with their kids' "letter grades" ("good grades" might only mean they or the student themselves were successful in jamming a square peg into a round hole...) and focus, instead, on concepts, ideas, and helping their child find their true genius, their special gift. The path they can pursue with a love and true passion. Robert showcases success stories of "C Students" who grew up to be phenomenal successes – and HIRED those "A Students"(attorneys, accountants, and other school-smart specialists) to work in their businesses... while the more average students, "B Students," often find themselves in government-type jobs... Not surprisingly, Kiyosaki will coin his own definitions of what "A," "B," and "C" stand for as he gives parents and their children bits of wisdom as well as insights and tools for navigating an ever-changing world... an Information Age world where the ability to change and adapt, understand relationships, and anticipate the future will shape their lives.


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Kiyosaki expands on his belief that the school system was created to churn out 'Es' / Employees... those "A Students" who read well, memorize well and test well... and not the creative thinkers, visionaries and dreamers –entrepreneurs-in-the-making... those "C Students who grow up to be the innovators and creators of new ideas, businesses, applications and products. < Kiyosaki expands on his belief that the school system was created to churn out 'Es' / Employees... those "A Students" who read well, memorize well and test well... and not the creative thinkers, visionaries and dreamers –entrepreneurs-in-the-making... those "C Students who grow up to be the innovators and creators of new ideas, businesses, applications and products. The book urges parents not to be obsessed with their kids' "letter grades" ("good grades" might only mean they or the student themselves were successful in jamming a square peg into a round hole...) and focus, instead, on concepts, ideas, and helping their child find their true genius, their special gift. The path they can pursue with a love and true passion. Robert showcases success stories of "C Students" who grew up to be phenomenal successes – and HIRED those "A Students"(attorneys, accountants, and other school-smart specialists) to work in their businesses... while the more average students, "B Students," often find themselves in government-type jobs... Not surprisingly, Kiyosaki will coin his own definitions of what "A," "B," and "C" stand for as he gives parents and their children bits of wisdom as well as insights and tools for navigating an ever-changing world... an Information Age world where the ability to change and adapt, understand relationships, and anticipate the future will shape their lives.

30 review for Why "A" Students Work for "C" Students and "B" Students Work for the Government: Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Education for Parents

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kirana Araya F.

    If Robert Kiyosaki described this book as "the most important book I've ever written", I would like to say that this is definitely the most important book I've ever read. It showcases success stories of "C Student" who grew up to be phenomenal successes and hired those "A Students" to work in their business.. while the more average students, "B Students", often find themselves in government-type jobs. Other than that, it made me think about what I've already seen with my own eyes and have experi If Robert Kiyosaki described this book as "the most important book I've ever written", I would like to say that this is definitely the most important book I've ever read. It showcases success stories of "C Student" who grew up to be phenomenal successes and hired those "A Students" to work in their business.. while the more average students, "B Students", often find themselves in government-type jobs. Other than that, it made me think about what I've already seen with my own eyes and have experienced as well. It's important being smart in school or having a good grades, but the most important thing is being able to translate what we learned in school to the real life. The book gave me a very good financial education, in order to avoid having grown ups always living pay check to pay check. I loved the book. Every people around the world really have to read this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    What I did everyday was read about 15 minutes a day. I mostly read in my 1 period class because we are supposed to read a independent reading book. I have also have read with my mom on this book on how clever this book tells you the logic on how bad and horrible on people not making their money work for them and people are working for their money. Robert Kiyosaki says that teachers should have their kids learn about how money works. There are countless of people who have not taken business What I did everyday was read about 15 minutes a day. I mostly read in my 1 period class because we are supposed to read a independent reading book. I have also have read with my mom on this book on how clever this book tells you the logic on how bad and horrible on people not making their money work for them and people are working for their money. Robert Kiyosaki says that teachers should have their kids learn about how money works. There are countless of people who have not taken business, or entrepreneurship. This book explains if teacher's keep teaching children to be in a rat race then people will always lose money. He explains that a rat race starts in college,then get's you more in depth by getting a job, and be the life of a self employee. I think that these guidelines are extremely helpful in to knowing how money work's. I even told my mom when I read how the bank works. This book was the third most interesting book I ever hear or read about and I'm glad I read it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Yvonne Walus

    My father was an entrepreneur. I spent my childhood alternating between lolling in luxury and fearing the bank would come repossess the bed I slept on. Consequently, I myself am a salaried employee with a blinding fear of running my own business. Until now, I've tried teaching my children that money doesn't buy happiness and that one shouldn't pursue money. This book has made me realise I should at least stop discouraging the kids every time they want to run a lemonade stand or bake muffins to s My father was an entrepreneur. I spent my childhood alternating between lolling in luxury and fearing the bank would come repossess the bed I slept on. Consequently, I myself am a salaried employee with a blinding fear of running my own business. Until now, I've tried teaching my children that money doesn't buy happiness and that one shouldn't pursue money. This book has made me realise I should at least stop discouraging the kids every time they want to run a lemonade stand or bake muffins to sell at the side of the road. A lot of the information in the book is repeated, and the edition I read could do with a good edit for typos - that's the only reason I'm not giving it 5/5.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Lee

    I lied, I didn't actually finish the book. That's how bad it was. I'm mad I wasted so much time in finishing as much as I did. Did anyone edit this book? The author repeated the same material and words in every chapter. It felt like rambles with very poor research.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marcela

    Let me start by saying that although I did like the book, I do wish that more attention was paid to grammar and spelling, but aside from that, I think this book is pretty good because it made me think about what I've already seen with my own eyes and have experienced as well. I've met people that are what I'd call above smart, but they don't seem to do very well once they are in the real world. They get amazing grades in school, but they are not able to translate the success they enjoyed in scho Let me start by saying that although I did like the book, I do wish that more attention was paid to grammar and spelling, but aside from that, I think this book is pretty good because it made me think about what I've already seen with my own eyes and have experienced as well. I've met people that are what I'd call above smart, but they don't seem to do very well once they are in the real world. They get amazing grades in school, but they are not able to translate the success they enjoyed in school to the workplace and yes, they do end up working for people/students that are usually C students. The author, Kiyosaki, also made a really good point when he spoke about how little we, students, know about finance by the time we finish school. I graduated with an MBA a couple of years ago, and from experience I can attest that there was no course taught in school that dealt with things such as: learning to manage your money, investing, real estate, etc. All those things, I've learned from books I got from the library, in other words, self-taught. Yes, we do and should teach children early on about money, finance, investing, etc., in order to avoid having grown ups always living pay check to pay check. I liked the book, but a little repetitive and in need of proofreading.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    I was really excited about this book but it turned out to be a big disappointment. There are virtually no new ideas if you've read the original "Rich Dad, Poor Dad", and I was annoyed by the constant repetition (yes, I know Romney paid less taxes than Obama...). Kiyosaki makes a good point that neither schools nor parents are training kids to be "C" students -- capitalists -- but other than advocating playing Monopoly or his Cash Flow 101 board game with kids, he offers few solutions. His "seven I was really excited about this book but it turned out to be a big disappointment. There are virtually no new ideas if you've read the original "Rich Dad, Poor Dad", and I was annoyed by the constant repetition (yes, I know Romney paid less taxes than Obama...). Kiyosaki makes a good point that neither schools nor parents are training kids to be "C" students -- capitalists -- but other than advocating playing Monopoly or his Cash Flow 101 board game with kids, he offers few solutions. His "seven words of money" -- concepts everyone should master relating to money -- would have been a good starting point however if he had included advice on how to teach them to kids: income, expense, assets [business, real estate, paper assets, commodities], liabilities, debt, cash flow. Then again maybe Monopoly does teach you everything!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marlise

    Well, there's nothing to learn here. While I really enjoyed some of Kiyosaki's other books, this one really lacks substance. He regurgitates and repeats and repeats and repeats (yep, it's annoying just like this run-on sentence) the same sentences over and over until you think you're reading in circles. The action steps for parents at the end of each chapter are not actually action steps, they are more like vague ideas all good parents already know they should do. Some practical ideas Well, there's nothing to learn here. While I really enjoyed some of Kiyosaki's other books, this one really lacks substance. He regurgitates and repeats and repeats and repeats (yep, it's annoying just like this run-on sentence) the same sentences over and over until you think you're reading in circles. The action steps for parents at the end of each chapter are not actually action steps, they are more like vague ideas all good parents already know they should do. Some practical ideas would have at least made the book worth its purchase price, but sadly, none are revealed. You would be much better off playing Kiyosaki's game Cashflow for Kids with your kids to teach them about money than to read this book. Move along, there's nothing to learn here.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Filled with excellent financial knowledge. May deter some from reading as it is rather lengthy. Excellent points. ..three sides to a coin, perspectives on wealth, financial home learning. This book will be in our parenting collection and I urge parents to even skim through and pick just a few points. pg 388"Every child has the potential to grow into a rich person, a poor person, or a middle-class person. Parents have the power to influence which one their child becomes." Earlier work: Rich Dad P Filled with excellent financial knowledge. May deter some from reading as it is rather lengthy. Excellent points. ..three sides to a coin, perspectives on wealth, financial home learning. This book will be in our parenting collection and I urge parents to even skim through and pick just a few points. pg 388"Every child has the potential to grow into a rich person, a poor person, or a middle-class person. Parents have the power to influence which one their child becomes." Earlier work: Rich Dad Poor Dad...Put your Brain in motion...say this sentence "I can't afford the things I want." Now say: "How can I afford the things I want?"

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mala Ashok

    Kiyosaki should be glad I'm an "A" student; because that is the only reason I persevered with his somewhat repetitive book. What he says is for the most part true but not all of it is "doable."Leveraging money to buy Real Estate sounds great but if the purchased property does not get rented, far from being passive income it'll become a liabilty. An interecting read but with some caution.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    3.5 Great, eye-opening information but redundant and rife with grammatical errors.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Piva

    Robert Kiyosaki's book is revolutionary. Why “A” students work for “C” students is simply a timeless book with regards to the dollar being off the gold standard. This book is a must-read for every person; it explains thoroughly (400 pages) about how to make money in today's society. Simple financial education that should be taught and valued the same, if not above the calculus and biochemistry that schools so highly regard as pertinent to our lives. This is my second time reading his book, I re Robert Kiyosaki's book is revolutionary. Why “A” students work for “C” students is simply a timeless book with regards to the dollar being off the gold standard. This book is a must-read for every person; it explains thoroughly (400 pages) about how to make money in today's society. Simple financial education that should be taught and valued the same, if not above the calculus and biochemistry that schools so highly regard as pertinent to our lives. This is my second time reading his book, I read it last year when I was 17 and I am now 18. And both times I learned a lot, while also retaining what I read by taking notes and actually partaking in conversations about what I read with my mom. Every kid, especially in today's era should read this. It could save you hundreds of thousands of dollars in the future and be your gateway into wealth. It teaches financial intelligence and stresses an array of different terms in an informative but interactively fun way. He taught me the different type of incomes, what the fed is, and many other things. I do not want to elaborate or get into any details about the book because I plan on making guides under my finance section to teach people in my writing style about money. Even though Roberts message is obviously getting out there because it is a bestseller, not everyone has heard or even read it. I need to do my duty to my conscious and Robert and to the world as a whole to spread his message through my website. In the next coming weeks I will be making finance guides to help the masses so they can become financial literate too. In turn it will help ingrain what he taught me, by teaching others. If we do not fix our education system and bring financial education to light then we are headed for disaster. As Robert said, we are not so much in a financial crisis but an educational crisis. This isn’t just a problem for America, rather for the world. While the Fed believes they can just print more money to stop the crisis we are in, Robert knows as do I that this isn’t a logical solution. That will just cause inflation, by raising all prices up and in turn hyperinflation might even occur. We need to start combating it now and get financial education in our schools. Where kids can learn about it from a young age. All polls have been taken and the majority of kids and parents want it to be taught in schools. That is the topic of money, which is paramount to furthering our progress of sweeping America and other countries out of the quasi-innate poverty that we see today. The thing that baffles me the most is that we go to school to ultimately get a job for money. Yet our schools teach us nothing about the prized-subject, money. This is counter-productive to the max. I believe the reason they do not teach the concept of money is that the rich control the education in America and do not want the masses understanding how to accrue wealth. The banks do not want us to know because they live on our debt (bad debt, not good one). So many powerful companies and politicians want the world to be ignorant about the concept of money so they will not push for more independence of educating our sons and daughters about it. That is why you, yourself have to take the initiate to learn what schools will not teach you to survive in this world. Good Luck. My guides will be coming out weekly so stay tuned.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Leila

    I've read two (this is my second) Robert Kiyosaki's books and I tend to like his writing. It's simple and straightforward and the information he provides is usually quite useful. However, I do not like his constant use of his "poor" dad as his prime example of financial failure and doom. I believe the departed (his dad) should not be spoken of so much if he is not around to defend his choices. Anyway, this book does not give you specifics step by step to financial freedom but it does explain the I've read two (this is my second) Robert Kiyosaki's books and I tend to like his writing. It's simple and straightforward and the information he provides is usually quite useful. However, I do not like his constant use of his "poor" dad as his prime example of financial failure and doom. I believe the departed (his dad) should not be spoken of so much if he is not around to defend his choices. Anyway, this book does not give you specifics step by step to financial freedom but it does explain the system in which we exist and how schools are the primary manufacturers of "employees" for the system. As an A student, most of what he described in terms of fear of failure, etc. resonated with me as I was an A student working for the government in the E/S quadrant (with a bunch of other A and B students) trying to get on the professional path (doctor). However, I quickly saw the fallacy of societal expectations and got on the road to financial freedom and am now an entrepreneur myself. If I had gone the professional (engineer, lawyer or doctor) and/or academia route, I probably would not be much entertained by this book as it touches some sensitive truths. But, at the same time, I think the percentage of A and C students who truly succeed is probably about the same. Not all C students will be successful and not all A students will work for C students. And, not all B students will work for the government. It's possible that most C students tend to go into the business world because it's practical and requires outstanding social skills that most A students aka bookworms don't seem to hone. I'd recommend this book purely for the content and Kiyosaki's interesting perspective. It's definitely brain food that will have you questioning some of your financial decisions such as college. I've met so many people who attend college without an idea of what they want to do with the degree (investing money and time that doesn't give good ROI) . I met so many doctors who didn't really like their job, engineers who didn't like their job and leave their industry for the financial and financial for the entrepreneurial world. Once you enter the B/I quadrant, it's nearly impossible to go back to the E/S quadrant.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Zachary

    This is an ode to capitalism and wealth acquisition masquerading as a self-help guide on financial literacy. The central thesis is that the best way to make money is to own a big business or, better still, invest and let your money work for you. The titular "A" students, he argues, lack the courage to take the risks to do those things and settle for earning paychecks. Of course, this argument requires accepting the unstated premise: that personal monetary gain should be the motivating This is an ode to capitalism and wealth acquisition masquerading as a self-help guide on financial literacy. The central thesis is that the best way to make money is to own a big business or, better still, invest and let your money work for you. The titular "A" students, he argues, lack the courage to take the risks to do those things and settle for earning paychecks. Of course, this argument requires accepting the unstated premise: that personal monetary gain should be the motivating factor in how a person lives their life. The reality is that not everyone shares that goal. Many people choose to sacrifice monetary riches to work in fields that improve the lives of others. Some people lack the drive, means, or even the desire to be a job creator. And it's a good thing! If everyone refused to be a mere employee, there would be no one to make up the work force of the large businesses he loves. The scant good ideas in this book (e.g. leveraging debt to work for you) are interesting enough but they do not warrant a book of this length. And they could surely be conveyed without denigrating good students and perpetuating the long-shot dream of wealth-through-entrepreneurship-instead-of-education. His chief examples of poor students who took risks and went on to be fabulously wealthy are people like Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerburg, once-in-a-generation successes who got rich on big ideas. Great stories, sure. But hardly a template for success.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Very inspirational. While I do not agree with everything in this book, it makes some good points and has great ideas. The book makes a point which many people, myself included, can relate to - that you do not have to be an A student at school to succeed later in life. Many of the greatest entrepeneurs were college dropouts or C students. The author constantly argues for financial education to be taught in schools, and considers the lack of financial education as one of the education system's key Very inspirational. While I do not agree with everything in this book, it makes some good points and has great ideas. The book makes a point which many people, myself included, can relate to - that you do not have to be an A student at school to succeed later in life. Many of the greatest entrepeneurs were college dropouts or C students. The author constantly argues for financial education to be taught in schools, and considers the lack of financial education as one of the education system's key problems. Schools tend to punish wrong answers, and don't consider mistakes a good thing, however the author argues that mistakes are important learning opportunities. Seeing things on both sides of the coin, and from both sides of the argument increases your intelligence. So in spite of disagreeing with some of the other things the author says in this book - such as criticisms of the welfare state - all in all I found it a very inspiring read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cyberpope

    The first of Kiyosaki's("Mr. Rich Dad, Poor Dad") books I've read & definitely will not be the last -- he has a comfortable writing style and gives a lot of good information while doing so. This particular volume explains why the excelling at academics students invariably wind up as employees of those who might not do well in traditional school, but have a foundation of financial education. I knew this book was primarily published as a come-on for his programs &/or The first of Kiyosaki's("Mr. Rich Dad, Poor Dad") books I've read & definitely will not be the last -- he has a comfortable writing style and gives a lot of good information while doing so. This particular volume explains why the excelling at academics students invariably wind up as employees of those who might not do well in traditional school, but have a foundation of financial education. I knew this book was primarily published as a come-on for his programs &/or other books, but it was such a good & informative read I didn't care -- I gleaned much useful info from it and am already better jazzed and prepared to start my own businesses that have been in the works for some time. Need motivation & encouragement to duck out of the Rat Race? Read this book. Now I'm going to find his others & read those, too.

  16. 5 out of 5

    AJ

    I could not give it more than two stars, for two reasons: First, it seems that Kiyosaki is paraphrsing his own original tenet, which I have already read in his "Rich Dad Poor Dad", but with sighltly different manner and style. Second, it is fraught with grammatical errors, and thus requiring more profreading and editing. I should, nevertheless, emphasize that Robert Kiyosaki is a wonderful and prolific writer, but it might be the right time for him to pause and delibarate before embarking o I could not give it more than two stars, for two reasons: First, it seems that Kiyosaki is paraphrsing his own original tenet, which I have already read in his "Rich Dad Poor Dad", but with sighltly different manner and style. Second, it is fraught with grammatical errors, and thus requiring more profreading and editing. I should, nevertheless, emphasize that Robert Kiyosaki is a wonderful and prolific writer, but it might be the right time for him to pause and delibarate before embarking on such an educational and financial task that would egender trivial drawbacks.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Keiko Kanno

    This book gave me a good financial education. I think this is a must-read especially for parents to educate their children about money. I think not everyone agrees that children should be taught about money from an early age, but Robert Kiyosaki says giving children a good grasp of finance is actually a very useful lesson to carry them through life.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Surbhi Mantri

    In short, the Author again n again tediously repeats that the traditional education is not preparing us for the real world n we need to look for financial education- but this book won't provide you that.

  19. 4 out of 5

    CK Lim

    I have read two of Robert Kiyosaki books. Repetitive information, and I don't agree with him in many ways. 2 books are more than enough. Never again.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stanley Lee

    Useful book on changing mindsets, and leveraging debt. Although I think he's a bit biased towards real estate investing.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Moe

    Good advice. Though it seems it's more of the same thing from the original book: Rich Dad Poor Dad. Once you read one of his books you may as well have read all.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Namran Hussin

    amazing insight for us as parent to position ourselves in our kids education.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michael Stark

    In the nonfiction book Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government by Robert Kiyosaki, the author teaches the reader how the educational system in schools today is just not cutting in terms of preparing our future generations to become financially independent or at the very least keeping our economy from another great depression. Kiyosaki teaches these lessons through recollections of his own experiences. As he we growing up he had two role models in his life. In the nonfiction book Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government by Robert Kiyosaki, the author teaches the reader how the educational system in schools today is just not cutting in terms of preparing our future generations to become financially independent or at the very least keeping our economy from another great depression. Kiyosaki teaches these lessons through recollections of his own experiences. As he we growing up he had two role models in his life. One of which was his own father whom was highly educated and had a decent salary. The other role model Kiyosaki had growing up was his best friend’s dad who was a self employed business man. Kiyosaki compares these two role models for every lesson he teaches and explains why his own father is always struggling for money despite him being highly educated. One of the most important lessons he teaches is why people struggle and what separates them from the successful. He words it like this; “The rich don’t work for money” (Kiyosaki 40). By this he means that you will never truly be rich by working a nine to five job. There is just not enough time in your life to be able to become rich from working a normal forty hours a week job. Even if it is a high paying job. I can heavily connect with because while I was growing up, my dad taught me the same lesson. My dad would always explain to me the benefits of being self employed. He would say that once his real estate business was set up he would continue to make money off of it whether he worked or not. Similarly to Kiyosaki, my father didn’t believe in job security either. He believes in taking risks and not relying on a paycheck that you could lose at any given moment. My father being the self employed man that he is made it very easy for me to connect with this book. This book is one of thirteen in The Rich Dad book series. I was very impressed with the amount of knowledge I received from reading this book. No other book has ever left me feeling as enlightened as this one did. I intend to read more books from The Rich Dad series. I have always been intrigued by the life of an entrepreneur and I was able to connect well with this book. I got to hear many first hand stories about Kiyosaki’s teachings growing up and how his mentor taught him the lessons to being rich. This book has encouraged me to take the same steps as Kiyosaki did in order to secure my financial future. Overall, this book has strengthened my goal of becoming an entrepreneur myself and left me with the hopes that one day I will have just as much success as Kiyosaki has.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Waseem

    This was a good book and could be rated 5 stars no doubt if you are completely new to the authors work - however I rated it 3 because I am familiar with much of Robert Kiyosaki's work and books... ... Which means I quickly realise when I find his work repetitive, re-hashed and the same old stuff written slightly differently which gets a bit boring and puts me off... ( don't get me wrong I believe in repetition as some would say it is " the mother of skill " ) - but really he should ei This was a good book and could be rated 5 stars no doubt if you are completely new to the authors work - however I rated it 3 because I am familiar with much of Robert Kiyosaki's work and books... ... Which means I quickly realise when I find his work repetitive, re-hashed and the same old stuff written slightly differently which gets a bit boring and puts me off... ( don't get me wrong I believe in repetition as some would say it is " the mother of skill " ) - but really he should either stop regurgitating the same old stories ! Nevertheless the authors original book " Rich Dad, Poor Dad " changed my life when I first read it many years ago - so been a loyal fan since ... To Our Continued Success! Waseem Mirza http://www.WaseemMirza.net

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marissa Kasang

    I like the away he applied the Biblical principles : to give is better than to receive; in this book he mentioned the power of generosity; and faith without works is dead. In entrepreneurship world, the entrepreneurs are tend to take a huge leap of faith which is facing the uncertainties of life that come along with risks. Mistakes are meant to be our lessons. The pain is excruciating indeed but the reward is incomparable. Another thing that I like the most about this book is playing games I like the away he applied the Biblical principles : to give is better than to receive; in this book he mentioned the power of generosity; and faith without works is dead. In entrepreneurship world, the entrepreneurs are tend to take a huge leap of faith which is facing the uncertainties of life that come along with risks. Mistakes are meant to be our lessons. The pain is excruciating indeed but the reward is incomparable. Another thing that I like the most about this book is playing games within the rules. This book doesn't teach about cheating and stuff like that but teaching about investing on things that will caused you to pay lesser tax; also exposing views of the world from different perspectives of people from different quadrants.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nikhil Mahadea

    This is an alright book. Kiyosaki is an amazing author. His books Rich Dad, Poor Dad and CashFlow Quadrant changed my life and I would give those books 4-5 stars. However, this books makes some giant assumptions and isn't backed by research. Kiyosaki's politics tho it makes sense isn't really backed by reseach. And if it is backed by research, it doesn't reference it. And if you do a quick google search you'll find that it's actually A students who go out and become entrepr This is an alright book. Kiyosaki is an amazing author. His books Rich Dad, Poor Dad and CashFlow Quadrant changed my life and I would give those books 4-5 stars. However, this books makes some giant assumptions and isn't backed by research. Kiyosaki's politics tho it makes sense isn't really backed by reseach. And if it is backed by research, it doesn't reference it. And if you do a quick google search you'll find that it's actually A students who go out and become entrepreneurs. The recent young, dropout social media entrepeneurs are just outliers. Most entrepreneurs, to my knowledge, create their business 40+. Do your research becuase he doesn't.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ethan

    Great book. Covers some history about the Federal Reserve Bank and why the dollar has lost so much value. It gives insight into Kiyosaki's opinions on debt and leveraging it to gain wealth. I was familiar with the Fed (and its problems) before, but seeing it from Kiyosaki's viewpoint was interesting. Some other reviews have said this repeats a lot from Rich Dad/Poor Dad, but as this was the first Kiyosaki book I have read, it was mostly new information to me (cashflow quadrants, etc.) Great book. Covers some history about the Federal Reserve Bank and why the dollar has lost so much value. It gives insight into Kiyosaki's opinions on debt and leveraging it to gain wealth. I was familiar with the Fed (and its problems) before, but seeing it from Kiyosaki's viewpoint was interesting. Some other reviews have said this repeats a lot from Rich Dad/Poor Dad, but as this was the first Kiyosaki book I have read, it was mostly new information to me (cashflow quadrants, etc.). I only knocked off one star because of the typos. It was also a bit repetitive, so although it was completely worth the initial reading, it is unlikely I'll read it again.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tommy

    The book was ok but it's largely just a repackaging of every other Kiyosaki book so realistically if you've read Rich Dad, Poor Dad you can pretty much skip this. Also continues to amaze me that how powerful his ideas are that he can continue to sell books that rehash the same ideas. Realistically, his writing is not even that good as he is incredibly redundant. But those are mostly just nitpicks. I think I'm done with Kiyosaki books. Might re-read Rich Dad, Poor Dad some day but I've got the gi The book was ok but it's largely just a repackaging of every other Kiyosaki book so realistically if you've read Rich Dad, Poor Dad you can pretty much skip this. Also continues to amaze me that how powerful his ideas are that he can continue to sell books that rehash the same ideas. Realistically, his writing is not even that good as he is incredibly redundant. But those are mostly just nitpicks. I think I'm done with Kiyosaki books. Might re-read Rich Dad, Poor Dad some day but I've got the gist of his schtick.

  29. 4 out of 5

    |Duke Miguel

    I have been deeply enlightened and I am grateful that I am reading this when I am. Kiyosaki talks about transforming your income, causing your money to work for you, using debt to get rich and most importantly, being financially educated. All these concepts of 'cash flow' and 'passive income' might seem foreign to one if one doesn't read this book, and even then, rereading it as I have done and am doing.This book is one of those books that you consult and peruse, in other words, you can ne I have been deeply enlightened and I am grateful that I am reading this when I am. Kiyosaki talks about transforming your income, causing your money to work for you, using debt to get rich and most importantly, being financially educated. All these concepts of 'cash flow' and 'passive income' might seem foreign to one if one doesn't read this book, and even then, rereading it as I have done and am doing.This book is one of those books that you consult and peruse, in other words, you can never truly say you have finished reading it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aivaras Milašauskas

    In general it is good, high level book inspiring to be an entrepreneur. Lot of statements and explanations are quite simple but make sense. Although, lot of content is directly related to U.S. Lot of facts are pointing only to U.S and make no value for readers outside states. Also, Rich Dad Poor Dad book content are mentioned basically in every chapter. So that Rich Dad Poor Dad book seems like some kind of pre-requisite :)

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