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Computer: A History of the Information Machine

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Computer: A History of the Information Machine, Second Edition traces the story of the computer, and shows how business and government were the first to explore its unlimited, information-processing potential. Old-fashioned entrepreneurship combined with scientific know-how inspired now famous computer engineers to create the technology that became IBM. Wartime needs drove Computer: A History of the Information Machine, Second Edition traces the story of the computer, and shows how business and government were the first to explore its unlimited, information-processing potential. Old-fashioned entrepreneurship combined with scientific know-how inspired now famous computer engineers to create the technology that became IBM. Wartime needs drove the giant ENIAC, the first fully electronic computer. Later, the PC enabled modes of computing that liberated people from room-sized, mainframe computers. This second edition now extends beyond the development of Microsoft Windows and the Internet, to include open source operating systems like Linux, and the rise again and fall and potential rise of the dot.com industries.


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Computer: A History of the Information Machine, Second Edition traces the story of the computer, and shows how business and government were the first to explore its unlimited, information-processing potential. Old-fashioned entrepreneurship combined with scientific know-how inspired now famous computer engineers to create the technology that became IBM. Wartime needs drove Computer: A History of the Information Machine, Second Edition traces the story of the computer, and shows how business and government were the first to explore its unlimited, information-processing potential. Old-fashioned entrepreneurship combined with scientific know-how inspired now famous computer engineers to create the technology that became IBM. Wartime needs drove the giant ENIAC, the first fully electronic computer. Later, the PC enabled modes of computing that liberated people from room-sized, mainframe computers. This second edition now extends beyond the development of Microsoft Windows and the Internet, to include open source operating systems like Linux, and the rise again and fall and potential rise of the dot.com industries.

30 review for Computer: A History of the Information Machine

  1. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Wolfson

    A nice overview. The detail on pre-digital computing methods distinguishes this history, as does its impartiality and its focus on business developments. Lots of information on Charles Babbage, punched-card systems, electromechanical and analog systems, and IBM,. Not very technical. It will explain very precisely how the computer came to be, not so much how it works. Stops about 1997. The Internet is covered, but it's described as primarily an e-mail system. Obviously thing A nice overview. The detail on pre-digital computing methods distinguishes this history, as does its impartiality and its focus on business developments. Lots of information on Charles Babbage, punched-card systems, electromechanical and analog systems, and IBM,. Not very technical. It will explain very precisely how the computer came to be, not so much how it works. Stops about 1997. The Internet is covered, but it's described as primarily an e-mail system. Obviously things have developed a bit since then. The result is that the Internet and the Web are woefully underrepresented, but there's no fault in that.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Timothy

    This clear and engaging book traces the history of the computer as far back as its 19th-century conceptual origins. By devoting so much space to the connections between digital computers and related technology, the authors manage to situate the computer within a clearly defined social and scientific context. The book loses some of its focus as it reaches the Internet era, which is probably harder to examine from a historical perspective. But overall, it is an excellent introduction to the subjec This clear and engaging book traces the history of the computer as far back as its 19th-century conceptual origins. By devoting so much space to the connections between digital computers and related technology, the authors manage to situate the computer within a clearly defined social and scientific context. The book loses some of its focus as it reaches the Internet era, which is probably harder to examine from a historical perspective. But overall, it is an excellent introduction to the subject by two scholars who successfully cater to the general reader.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    This book gives a decent overview of the history of computing. The authors have found room to illustrate important turns in history with amusing anecdotes. It does not deliver on its promises though, skimming over the importance of the early hypertext pioneers (Ted Nelson and Doug Engelbart) for personal computing, and omitting the development of open-source software altogether.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    A fascinating history of the development of computer technology. The only downside is that it was published in the mid-90s, so the story stops before so many of the amazing technologies of the last 15 years came about.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Decent effort, covers the history of computing up to early 2000s. The political statement at the end of the book should have been avoided, imho, as it's neither properly justified, nor does it fall within the scope of the book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Deschaines

    I think the book was good and helped me a lot through my senior project. I don't usually read historical books but this was the exception. The book was very informative but not enough to base my whole project on.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brendan McAuliffe

    Didn't read much of this , all stuff you've hear before

  8. 5 out of 5

    Readerrunner

    Great book. I feel that I have a much better understanding of the computers.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rod Zemke

    Enjoyed as I am very interested in the evolution of the computer.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sridhar Jammalamadaka

    Brilliantly narrated history of the Computer.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Peter Mcloughlin

    Very short history gives a balanced but skeletal history of computers, computing and the internet. None of the juicy stories here just a fairly sober if dry treatment.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Furr

    Somewhat dry but broad history of computers.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Onedio

    I'm writing my thesis about software piracy and security so i really need to read a lot of books... A lot... Thanks for sharing those tons of books... Certainly you are helping a tons os people...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alain van Hoof

    A very good overview with facts that add to the understanding of the history of computing.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mike Kokko

    This was probably the first "tech history" book I read - required reading as a freshman engineer at RPI in 2001 - and it got me hooked.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cameron Sung

    Very informative, but boring at times.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Yibin

    This book changes my life and my perception of my subject.

  18. 5 out of 5

    John

  19. 5 out of 5

    Blyvan

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marie Pascale Geist

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ilona

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bharrathi

  24. 4 out of 5

    cesar

  25. 5 out of 5

    Al

  26. 4 out of 5

    Anurag

  27. 4 out of 5

    Darlene De

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Eichorn

  29. 5 out of 5

    J. Carlos Navea

  30. 4 out of 5

    Roman

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