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La ligne verte, 3e épisode: Les mains de Caffey

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Octobre 1932, pénitencier d'État, Cold Mountain, Louisiane. Le bloc E, celui des condamnés à mort, reçoit un nouveau pensionnaire : John Caffey rejoint ceux qui attendent de franchir la ligne verte pour rencontrer la chaise électrique, Miss Cent Mille Volts. Mais Caffey n'est pas comme les autres. D'accord, on l'a retrouvé auprès des cadavres ensanglantés de deux petites f Octobre 1932, pénitencier d'État, Cold Mountain, Louisiane. Le bloc E, celui des condamnés à mort, reçoit un nouveau pensionnaire : John Caffey rejoint ceux qui attendent de franchir la ligne verte pour rencontrer la chaise électrique, Miss Cent Mille Volts. Mais Caffey n'est pas comme les autres. D'accord, on l'a retrouvé auprès des cadavres ensanglantés de deux petites filles, mais il est étrangement absent. Jusqu'au jour où Paul, le gardien-chef, tombe malade et alors une terrible vérité semble s'esquisser. Qui est ce prétendu meurtrier aux pouvoirs étranges ? Qui dresse Mister Jingles, l'étrange souris, bien trop intelligente ? Quand Paul commence à répondre à ces questions, il sent que personne dans le bloc E ne sortira indemne de la rencontre avec John Caffey. Renouant avec la tradition des feuilletonistes, Stephen King, le prolifique auteur de fantastique, propose un récit troublant, initialement en six volumes, entre roman noir et conte de fées, dont a été tiré un film, La Ligne verte, avec Tom Hanks. --Lisa B.


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Octobre 1932, pénitencier d'État, Cold Mountain, Louisiane. Le bloc E, celui des condamnés à mort, reçoit un nouveau pensionnaire : John Caffey rejoint ceux qui attendent de franchir la ligne verte pour rencontrer la chaise électrique, Miss Cent Mille Volts. Mais Caffey n'est pas comme les autres. D'accord, on l'a retrouvé auprès des cadavres ensanglantés de deux petites f Octobre 1932, pénitencier d'État, Cold Mountain, Louisiane. Le bloc E, celui des condamnés à mort, reçoit un nouveau pensionnaire : John Caffey rejoint ceux qui attendent de franchir la ligne verte pour rencontrer la chaise électrique, Miss Cent Mille Volts. Mais Caffey n'est pas comme les autres. D'accord, on l'a retrouvé auprès des cadavres ensanglantés de deux petites filles, mais il est étrangement absent. Jusqu'au jour où Paul, le gardien-chef, tombe malade et alors une terrible vérité semble s'esquisser. Qui est ce prétendu meurtrier aux pouvoirs étranges ? Qui dresse Mister Jingles, l'étrange souris, bien trop intelligente ? Quand Paul commence à répondre à ces questions, il sent que personne dans le bloc E ne sortira indemne de la rencontre avec John Caffey. Renouant avec la tradition des feuilletonistes, Stephen King, le prolifique auteur de fantastique, propose un récit troublant, initialement en six volumes, entre roman noir et conte de fées, dont a été tiré un film, La Ligne verte, avec Tom Hanks. --Lisa B.

30 review for La ligne verte, 3e épisode: Les mains de Caffey

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    Damn that reversal! Grrrr. I wanna slam that jerk. My first impression of this novella was that it was all about pissing away a miracle. Literally. But no, just that pissing IS the real miracle. I love it when I can walk away from a tale with a strong moral. ;) I thought the dog university was cute, and what they were doing for the poor guy on death row was really sweet, so of course when spoiler spoiler spoiler happened, I was Really Pissed. Literally.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jo Lisa

    I'm reading these as they were originally published... one at a time. I'm reading one each month. I have to say, I was at the end of this one and my mouth was left hanging open for several minutes! I have never seen the movie, so this is truly all a new story for me. I couldn't believe the end, even though the action itself made perfect sense. It was just so abrupt, cold, and heartbreaking! This has been my favorite one so far, but I know it is gonna destroy me when I am to the end of #6... I hi I'm reading these as they were originally published... one at a time. I'm reading one each month. I have to say, I was at the end of this one and my mouth was left hanging open for several minutes! I have never seen the movie, so this is truly all a new story for me. I couldn't believe the end, even though the action itself made perfect sense. It was just so abrupt, cold, and heartbreaking! This has been my favorite one so far, but I know it is gonna destroy me when I am to the end of #6... I highly recommend this!! :-)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steph

    I'm always in awe of King's ability to write characters. Even though you know they are criminals, you can't help but like them. Delacroix is a monster that killed several people, but you still feel for him, and his relationship with Mr.Jingles just makes him seem so harmless. Percy is a guard, he's supposed to be a good guy, but he's such a hateful character. Meanwhile, a guy nicknamed Brutal, is a gentle giant. Someone who quite possibly was a saint. I loved that line in the book. I am not I'm always in awe of King's ability to write characters. Even though you know they are criminals, you can't help but like them. Delacroix is a monster that killed several people, but you still feel for him, and his relationship with Mr.Jingles just makes him seem so harmless. Percy is a guard, he's supposed to be a good guy, but he's such a hateful character. Meanwhile, a guy nicknamed Brutal, is a gentle giant. Someone who quite possibly was a saint. I loved that line in the book. I am not looking forward to the next installment because it's Del's execution. I've seen the movie so I know what happens, and I reaaally don't want to read about it. 5/5

  4. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    Wow! I gasped out loud at the very end of this section!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kerra

    This was another great addition to the Green Mile series. I love how the beginning starts off with Paul in his old days discussing what made him think of certain occurances on the Mile, and how it made him remember that he needed to write about it and to not forget to include it in this story he is writting. Also I can't believe what part this section of the book leaves off at! It completely leaves you hanging in a most desparate part, where if this was when the books first came out and I was re This was another great addition to the Green Mile series. I love how the beginning starts off with Paul in his old days discussing what made him think of certain occurances on the Mile, and how it made him remember that he needed to write about it and to not forget to include it in this story he is writting. Also I can't believe what part this section of the book leaves off at! It completely leaves you hanging in a most desparate part, where if this was when the books first came out and I was reading this, it would have made me want to pull my hair out! Lol, it would have killed me until the next section came out. However, I am glad that I have the next section so close at hand. I believe I will be reading that right after this :)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kate Hastings

    First time I read this book it felt like I’d experienced most every emotion known to man. From palpable loathing to impotent frustration to heart hurt with free-falling tears. Well...second time ‘round...nothing has changed.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Luna Bookish

    This 3rd one was emotional as hell. I was sad, horrified and completely irate at times. Since this is the 3rd one, that is all I am going to say. Well, maybe I will tell you to read this.

  8. 5 out of 5

    itchy

    20october2019 a fellow trainee lent me a copy of this series back in 2002. then reread most probably in 2008, after 19september, when i was able to acquire the collected volume.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    John Coffey's unique gift is revealed and Paul's urinary infection is finally healed so we don't have to keep hearing about it. All's well that ends well, right? Nope, the ending of this installment rips your heart out with the death of a certain adorable someone just when things start to feel like they're going nicely. Percy is a real scumbag and I hope he gets what's coming for him.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    Looking back through what I've written, I see that I called Georgia Pines, where I now live, a nursing home. The folks who run the place wouldn't be very happy with that! According to the brochures they keep in the lobby and send out to prospective clients, it's a "state-of-the-art retirement complex for the elderly." It even has a Resource Center - the brochure says so. The folks who live here (the brochure doesn't call us "inmates," but sometimes I do) just call it the TV room. Folks thi Looking back through what I've written, I see that I called Georgia Pines, where I now live, a nursing home. The folks who run the place wouldn't be very happy with that! According to the brochures they keep in the lobby and send out to prospective clients, it's a "state-of-the-art retirement complex for the elderly." It even has a Resource Center - the brochure says so. The folks who live here (the brochure doesn't call us "inmates," but sometimes I do) just call it the TV room. Folks think I'm stand-offy because I don't go down to the TV room much in the day, but it's the programs I can't stand, not the folks. Oprah, Rikki Lake, Carnie Wilson, Rolanda - the world is falling down around our ears, and all these people care for is talking about fucking to women in short skirts and men with their shirts hanging open. Well, hell - judge not, lest ye be judged, the Bible says, so I'll get down off my soapbox. It's just that if I wanted to spend time with trailer trash, I'd move two miles down to the Happy Wheels Motor Court, where the police cars... I've been reading a lot of academic and quasi-academic texts lately. So when I got to the first page of Coffey's Hands, I could only smile. This is what I've been missing. Man, King is King. I can't believe I put off reading this for so long.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    This third installment continues to build the tension in the storyline introduced within the first two installments, even providing the reader with a mini-climactic ending. Still, I would have been very impatient while waiting a whole month to continue Paul Edgecombe's account of the harrowing events that took place during the fall of 1932 at Cold Mountain Penitentiary.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dallass

    Aaaarrgghhh, Mr. Jingles 😭 Part Three did not go well. Don’t get me wrong, I loved it. But that ending. King just reached into my chest and ripped out my heart (although kudos to him on a great cliff hanging moment). Now I have to wait another week to find out what happens. I am loving this!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ella

    I really enjoyed this part to the series because it had a lot of great character development and gave me a better understanding of what it was like in the penitentiary. The ending was a bit of a shocker but still really enjoyed it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dark-Draco

    Had to read this straight after the previous one to find out what happened. Great action in this one. The ending is horrible - but what a cliffhanger. Even better than the last one. A brilliant read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sara Shaw

    Wow, King's writing is epic, creepy and thrilling.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Really, really enjoyed the third book in this serial novel. It picked up a lot faster compared to the second book, which I NEEDED. Cannot wait to start the next one!

  17. 4 out of 5

    ❤❤Dee's Love of Books ❤❤

    Stephen King's style of writing is just awesome!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cody

    Very sad

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Wheeler

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. In case anyone was wondering, the death of Mr. Jingles is just as upsetting in the book as it is in the movie.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Morgan Paukner

    Percy is a monster !!! Oh my lord. I can't wait to start the next part.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Maki

    I am hooked and truly fascinated by the characters. Can’t wait to read the rest.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sonny Sehra

    “Later, going home, I realized they didn’t look alike at all; what made them seem to was the aftermath of stress and the lingering of sorrow. It’s strange how pain marks our faces, and makes us look like family.” I saw the movie before I read the books, I’m sorry. If you didn’t know, the movie is based on the book series by Stephen King. It was originally published in six parts, in different books. This part was a really short book but I read the complete serial novel. All six parts i “Later, going home, I realized they didn’t look alike at all; what made them seem to was the aftermath of stress and the lingering of sorrow. It’s strange how pain marks our faces, and makes us look like family.” I saw the movie before I read the books, I’m sorry. If you didn’t know, the movie is based on the book series by Stephen King. It was originally published in six parts, in different books. This part was a really short book but I read the complete serial novel. All six parts in one big book, so I had it all in my hands. I’ll review the series as separate because that’s how it originally was; and trust me – there will be tons of spoilers. I’m kind of upset that I saw the movie first but I couldn’t resist. My god, these books were truly addicting. Even if I did see the movie (which I should have seen after I finished the books, I’m sorry) it still was a breath-taking book series and there were a lot of parts that happened in the book that didn’t happen in the movie. This installment of The Green Mile series was my favorite by-far. It’s better than the first two books and was so addicting to read; this is where the plot started to move faster. Any Stephen King fan would love this and if you aren’t a fan of Mr. King (which I am); you’d still enjoy this. King is known for writing horror but this isn’t simply horror. This is an emotional dramatic thriller which does include some paranormal activity and bits of horror elements. We’re used to the characters now by this installment and the characters are very realistic; their personalities are breath-taking. The inmates and guards felt like I’ve known them my entire life, it’s very realistic. John Coffey shows his true power in this book. Our protagonist and narrator Paul Edgecombe had the biggest penis infection during his time as a guard in death row. King took some time to describe that in Paul’s words and you could feel his pain, even if you are a woman; you can have an image of what he felt like. Coffey heals his infection. It was such a magical moment, you couldn’t put it down. We all knew that there was something off about Coffey but reading this installment, it was hard to put down. What drives me insane is how this part ended. I liked the ending to this part and thank god I had all six parts in one book so I didn’t have to go out to buy the next part. It ended with a cliffhanger that left you gasping for breath, I couldn’t believe any of it but I actually could believe it because it all felt so realistic. King’s writing is as magical as this installment. It’s also the first part in the series to show Paul in modern times as an old man in the 1960’s elderly home needing to write about his time on The Green Mile (read my previous reviews). This was truly amazing. Plot: 8/10 Characters: 10/10 Style: 8/10 Overall: 9/10

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This story just gets more and more interesting as the pages turn. Now that all the core characters have been introduced, we're getting to know their personalities more. Paul, of course; Brutal, who's really not so brutal at all; Dean, who shows tact and composure in even the wildest situations; Harry, who is quite similar to Dean, though I'm no longer mixing them up; and Percy, ever the villain, even when he's wearing his good boy face. We've also gotten to know our inmates better: Wild Bill, wh This story just gets more and more interesting as the pages turn. Now that all the core characters have been introduced, we're getting to know their personalities more. Paul, of course; Brutal, who's really not so brutal at all; Dean, who shows tact and composure in even the wildest situations; Harry, who is quite similar to Dean, though I'm no longer mixing them up; and Percy, ever the villain, even when he's wearing his good boy face. We've also gotten to know our inmates better: Wild Bill, who was introduced at the end of The Mouse on the Mile, is just as wild as his nickname suggests and Paul had anticipated; and Delacroix, who's relationship with Mr. Jingles is endearing despite knowing who the man is. The only man who remains a complete mystery is John Coffey. All we the audience have really seen of him is Paul's first impression of him, the flashback of when he was found wailing over the two dead girls' bodies, and the only thing slightly revealing who or what he is: his healing of Paul's urinary infection. But therein lies the reason this story is so fascinating. As of yet, everything has been about the other characters, as mentioned above, but everything is still somehow about John Coffey, and that's what's so brilliant about Stephen King. He hasn't made John the lead character; in fact, he would be the most peripheral of the peripheral characters if not for Stephen's subtle but deliberate mentions of Paul glancing at John's reaction to something or future Paul, who serves as our narrator, making some comment referring to something that hasn't quite yet happened in his story. It's wonderfully written, though I suppose that's to be expected.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rick Hunter

    I'm reading these books for the first time since joining Goodreads. I had rated them all back when I first signed up for this site, but I was basing those ratings off of memory of the entire story. I had rated every book 5 stars. Since I've been reading the books again and reviewing each one on its own merits, this is the first one to receive a 5 star rating (I gave the first 2 books 4 stars). The first 2 books are good, but they only serve as the opening act and introduce us to all of the playe I'm reading these books for the first time since joining Goodreads. I had rated them all back when I first signed up for this site, but I was basing those ratings off of memory of the entire story. I had rated every book 5 stars. Since I've been reading the books again and reviewing each one on its own merits, this is the first one to receive a 5 star rating (I gave the first 2 books 4 stars). The first 2 books are good, but they only serve as the opening act and introduce us to all of the players. Not a whole lot happens in those two until the last few pages of book 2. This book is where the story really picks up. A large story generally has 3 acts: the intro, the conflict, and the resolution. If those 3 acts were a meal, the intro would be the appetizer that gets you hungry for more, the conflict would be the main entrée course, and the resolution would be dessert. This book is the beginning of the entrée and needs to be lingered over and savored instead of just being devoured in order to move on to what's next. I'm really taking my time with these books on this reading because I have nearly 20 more years of experience under my belt than I did the first time I read them. I remember the story being fantastic overall, but there are subtle things in the writing that I never would have picked up all those years ago when I was a much more voracious reader. This is one of the best overall stories I've ever read and everyone needs to read this at least once.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    This was actually one of the most interesting and captivating books that I have read from Stephen King & I highly recommend it for any King fans. I ended up getting this book from a thrift store and normally following the rules of serial books I was only able to get the last three books for the first three were nowhere in sight. As a result I started off reading "The Bad Death of Eduard Delacroix" first and I was caught up in the story, knowing the one main aspect of the book an This was actually one of the most interesting and captivating books that I have read from Stephen King & I highly recommend it for any King fans. I ended up getting this book from a thrift store and normally following the rules of serial books I was only able to get the last three books for the first three were nowhere in sight. As a result I started off reading "The Bad Death of Eduard Delacroix" first and I was caught up in the story, knowing the one main aspect of the book and yet not knowing how it would end. Due to life events I was only able to get to "Night Journey". And then I was able to start over this time from the beginning and actually read the whole series. The characters like most of King's older books are easy to get along with and have a very well-defined personality even with some of the minor characters. You are given a chance to enter a realistic world with very realistic people whether they are inmate, prison guards or the civilians who back up their men within this world. The best part of this book is the fact that it isn't really a horror story as King is well-known for but an emotional story of the paranormal with some horror elements thrown in. Whether you are enjoying the whole novel put together or the serial novel format this will be one book you cannot and will not want to put down for the ending is just like King - unexpected.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Justin Lahey

    Like a serial killer addicted to the thrill of the kill, my revisiting of Stephen King's serial novel The Green Mile has me like it did back in May 1996. I certainly remember thinking that the release of Part 3 (Coffey's Hands) would never come. Master King had us hooked, line and sinker, onto the happenings at Cold Mountain Pen, and especially on the unique E Block of the Green Mile, with its interesting crew and curious cast of inmates, and let us not forget a certain unusual rodent! But Part Like a serial killer addicted to the thrill of the kill, my revisiting of Stephen King's serial novel The Green Mile has me like it did back in May 1996. I certainly remember thinking that the release of Part 3 (Coffey's Hands) would never come. Master King had us hooked, line and sinker, onto the happenings at Cold Mountain Pen, and especially on the unique E Block of the Green Mile, with its interesting crew and curious cast of inmates, and let us not forget a certain unusual rodent! But Part 2 had ended on a pure adrenaline jolt, and yet we were only a third way to whatever conclusion King had planned (although maybe by the publication of part 2, King himself may not have known exactly how his serialized story would end !). Much like his characters (and is there a more perfectly crafted, larger than life character than John Coffey?!!), we were like pawns, and even though I already know what will happen, I still feel like I am his every whim on his chess board. Masterful to say the least! And just when you think you are almost halfway through a slowly building death row thriller... The master adds yet another twist in the form of a spiritual angle. Oh what does Part 4 have in store for me... Again?!!!!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    As I have stated in reviews for the other installments, this is my third or fourth re-read of King's novel in 6 parts. Book 3 is when you start getting some meat to the story. We are getting past the introductory stage, where we learn about the major players and a few minors and we are diving into the heart of the story at this point. Out of the first 3 novellas, this one gets the first 5 star rating. I couldn't recall what happened exactly in each part, as it is a jumbled mashup of novel a As I have stated in reviews for the other installments, this is my third or fourth re-read of King's novel in 6 parts. Book 3 is when you start getting some meat to the story. We are getting past the introductory stage, where we learn about the major players and a few minors and we are diving into the heart of the story at this point. Out of the first 3 novellas, this one gets the first 5 star rating. I couldn't recall what happened exactly in each part, as it is a jumbled mashup of novel and movie in my head, so even re-reading these, I am not sure what is about to happen, especially with the jumping back and forth in the time line. HOWEVER, after finishing this last night, I can vividly recall my reaction to this book, the first time around. It was the exact moment that I was furious that I didn't have a complete novel in my hand. The reaction I am sure that King was hoping to cause. Anger and some waterworks. I'm beyond ready for book #4.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bruce M

    The interesting thing about this re-read was that this particular chapter is arguably the best one of the six. Four or five of the most interesting plot points occur in Coffey's Hands. The story really gets cooking. Unfortunately, that also makes it one of the most memorable parts of what has been--for me, anyway--a very memorable story. So while I still find it interesting, and very enjoyable to read, this particular chapter has been the hardest so far to "get through" again... simply beca The interesting thing about this re-read was that this particular chapter is arguably the best one of the six. Four or five of the most interesting plot points occur in Coffey's Hands. The story really gets cooking. Unfortunately, that also makes it one of the most memorable parts of what has been--for me, anyway--a very memorable story. So while I still find it interesting, and very enjoyable to read, this particular chapter has been the hardest so far to "get through" again... simply because I felt like I knew every word that was coming. Despite having re-read many books before, this isn't a feeling I can recall having happened before. I'm really curious to see how the next three books entertain as I re-read them, since I feel like there's really only one or two important events that occur in each of them.

  29. 4 out of 5

    ♥ Marlene♥

    Oh good memories. Back in the days my dad gave me such a great gift. He gave me this book, part 1 and told me that from now on, I could go to the bookstore in town each month, to get the next part of the series. So every month I ran to the bookstore and immediately delved in. Never thinking it might be better to wait till I had all of them, before reading. couldn't, even if I wanted to. Oh good memories. Back in the days my dad gave me such a great gift. He gave me this book, part 1 and told me that from now on, I could go to the bookstore in town each month, to get the next part of the series. So every month I ran to the bookstore and immediately delved in. Never thinking it might be better to wait till I had all of them, before reading. couldn't, even if I wanted to. So unlike most people, I did not read the whole book in one, but I read it in 6 sessions. I am sure I re-read the whole thing as I always did with Stephen King's books. The only problem is, I have no clue which part is in which book, so I will give all of them the same amount of stars, and copy this review.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Wow, the serial format and fluid writing just has me whipping through these! I'd forgotten the Coffey-as-healer bit! This part of the story is a pretty obvious lead in, for the most part. Mr. Jingles is killed and Moores' wife has been diagnosed with brain cancer. Though I don't remember from the film, I'd guess their both going to get healed by Coffey somehow. Percy's nasty nature has shown through, making me dislike him more, but his "bad-guy" role is being dwarfed by Wharton. Some Wow, the serial format and fluid writing just has me whipping through these! I'd forgotten the Coffey-as-healer bit! This part of the story is a pretty obvious lead in, for the most part. Mr. Jingles is killed and Moores' wife has been diagnosed with brain cancer. Though I don't remember from the film, I'd guess their both going to get healed by Coffey somehow. Percy's nasty nature has shown through, making me dislike him more, but his "bad-guy" role is being dwarfed by Wharton. Some more comments are cropping up about how Delacroix's execution goes awry. I'm guessing Percy intentionally does something wrong to make it worse. (Do I remember something about the sponge not being wet?) Onward to part 4!

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