Hot Best Seller

Maîtresse de l'Empire: La Trilogie de l'Empire, T3 (FANTASY)

Availability: Ready to download

Dame Mara des Acoma, pair de l'empire, se sent enfin en sécurité, hors d'atteinte de ses ennemis pour la première fois de sa vie. Elle a tort. Une nouvelle tentative d'assassinat la frappe plus cruellement que jamais. Embrasée par le désir de vengeance, Mara repart en guerre. Car elle en est sûre: Jiro des Anasati, son vieux rival, est derrière ce crime. Mais ses plans Dame Mara des Acoma, pair de l'empire, se sent enfin en sécurité, hors d'atteinte de ses ennemis pour la première fois de sa vie. Elle a tort. Une nouvelle tentative d'assassinat la frappe plus cruellement que jamais. Embrasée par le désir de vengeance, Mara repart en guerre. Car elle en est sûre: Jiro des Anasati, son vieux rival, est derrière ce crime. Mais ses plans sont perturbés par l'Assemblée des magiciens qui, comme Mara commence à le comprendre, est le véritable pouvoir de l'empire. En quête d'alliés pour combattre ses ennemis et assurer la paix, Mara devra voyager au-delà des frontières de la civilisation, à la recherche d'un ancien secret. Rassemblant tout son courage et sa ruse, elle mènera la plus grande bataille de son existence: pour sa propre vie, son foyer et l'empire lui-même.


Compare

Dame Mara des Acoma, pair de l'empire, se sent enfin en sécurité, hors d'atteinte de ses ennemis pour la première fois de sa vie. Elle a tort. Une nouvelle tentative d'assassinat la frappe plus cruellement que jamais. Embrasée par le désir de vengeance, Mara repart en guerre. Car elle en est sûre: Jiro des Anasati, son vieux rival, est derrière ce crime. Mais ses plans Dame Mara des Acoma, pair de l'empire, se sent enfin en sécurité, hors d'atteinte de ses ennemis pour la première fois de sa vie. Elle a tort. Une nouvelle tentative d'assassinat la frappe plus cruellement que jamais. Embrasée par le désir de vengeance, Mara repart en guerre. Car elle en est sûre: Jiro des Anasati, son vieux rival, est derrière ce crime. Mais ses plans sont perturbés par l'Assemblée des magiciens qui, comme Mara commence à le comprendre, est le véritable pouvoir de l'empire. En quête d'alliés pour combattre ses ennemis et assurer la paix, Mara devra voyager au-delà des frontières de la civilisation, à la recherche d'un ancien secret. Rassemblant tout son courage et sa ruse, elle mènera la plus grande bataille de son existence: pour sa propre vie, son foyer et l'empire lui-même.

30 review for Maîtresse de l'Empire: La Trilogie de l'Empire, T3 (FANTASY)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Choko

    *** 4.75 *** Yes, there were parts that were a bit slow, there was too much sorrow at other times, and the political machinations were the most prevalent part of the trilogy, but as a whole, this is one of the best three books strung together I have ever read!!!! Loved every moment of it, even when it got preachy at the end and despite the tears and heartache it made me live through. It had some very cruel moments, but all of them were essential to the plot and none of the violence was ever *** 4.75 *** Yes, there were parts that were a bit slow, there was too much sorrow at other times, and the political machinations were the most prevalent part of the trilogy, but as a whole, this is one of the best three books strung together I have ever read!!!! Loved every moment of it, even when it got preachy at the end and despite the tears and heartache it made me live through. It had some very cruel moments, but all of them were essential to the plot and none of the violence was ever gratuitous. The writing was impeccable, beyond good, and the story was so gripping, that once you start you just can't put the book away! What an amazing, emotional and exciting ride this was! All who have not read it yet, what are you waiting for???? Go get it and make sure you read it in order. "...“He likes to humble our foes by making them seem ridiculous. As he said to me the other day, ‘Kill a man, and you cede him honor in the eyes of the gods. Laugh at him and you shame him'.”..." A more complete review might be forthcoming once I get rid of the book hangover... Now I wish you all Happy Reading and may you always find what you need in the pages of a Great Book!!!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Graeme Rodaughan

    5 stars. This is classic epic fantasy by a pair of masters of the genre. I could waste your time by recapping the plot* - so, instead I'll focus on the standouts that make this story an easy 5 stars. [1] This story is written to evoke emotions - you will feel a lot while reading this book, you will feel along with the characters, grief and sadness, joy and triumph, fear and courage, and a sense of wholeness as all threads are brought to their natural ends. [2] World building: Is Tolkienesque in 5 stars. This is classic epic fantasy by a pair of masters of the genre. I could waste your time by recapping the plot* - so, instead I'll focus on the standouts that make this story an easy 5 stars. [1] This story is written to evoke emotions - you will feel a lot while reading this book, you will feel along with the characters, grief and sadness, joy and triumph, fear and courage, and a sense of wholeness as all threads are brought to their natural ends. [2] World building: Is Tolkienesque in scope and quality. The society of the empire is rich in detail and meshes well with the story. It was completely believable and easily transports the reader to the world of Kelewan and it's exotic, but familiar people. [3] Alien species: The Cho-Ja would do just as well in a science fiction novel as an epic fantasy. They are far from "creature feature," props and help drive the narrative to its powerful conclusion. [4] Rich characterization: Mara especially is a complex character, at one and the same time, a figure of utmost goodness in a desperate world, and a Machiavellian player of great skill. She is not alone, lots of other characters are drawn with superb nuance and are a joy to engage with. This book, and the series as a whole are very special books and dear to my heart. This is probably the 4th time I've read them and I enjoy them each time. (oh yeah...) * What's the plot? Read it and enjoy finding out for yourself as much as I did.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mayim de Vries

    ”Now we must all play, or die.” This party started with a big bang but ended with fake vanilla. And dragged in between. Mistress of the Empire is the third, and the final volume of the Empire trilogy. We have seen the slow rise of Mara who from a redundant scion of the Acoma family, transformed into one of the most powerful forces to be reckoned with. It would seem that all the challenges have been met, all the threats neutralised, and that the Authors will have a hard time surprising us into ”Now we must all play, or die.” This party started with a big bang but ended with fake vanilla. And dragged in between. Mistress of the Empire is the third, and the final volume of the Empire trilogy. We have seen the slow rise of Mara who from a redundant scion of the Acoma family, transformed into one of the most powerful forces to be reckoned with. It would seem that all the challenges have been met, all the threats neutralised, and that the Authors will have a hard time surprising us into excitement again. Good news is that they managed that just fine. With one masterful stroke Mara’s world is falling apart and she herself is unravelling like a fabric washed just one time too many. I did enjoy that; in fact, watching her drive her own house to the brink of destruction and jeopardising everything she has worked for so hard was… well, it was fun (no, I assure you I don’t torment kittens when bored). One can get an impression that all three volumes talk about the same: Basically, a girl must find a way to save her life, while everyone around is plotting and scheming against her. And although in fact each of these stories follows a similar pattern, it must be noted that there are huge differences between them concerning, especially, the complexity of the intrigue and the way of increasing tension. The first book was great, the second good with a moderately authentic and polished ending. The third instalment is markedly uneven; on the one hand, the pacing is so slow that I have seen tectonic plates moving faster, on the other hand, it is luscious, sometimes up to exaggeration of detail. There were whole sections and subplots that bored and tired me. In the end, I found myself in the classic approach-avoidance conflict: whereas I wanted to finish the story, simultaneously, too many things were pushing me away. Mistress of the Empire is definitely more mature than its predecessors. This is possible, mainly due to the fact that the heroine is no longer an adolescent. But also, the world building is much more layered, the protagonists more nuanced, and the plot is also much more complicated, with numerous subplots developing in different POVs. If you liked members of the Mara household, you should be thrilled to have them finally speaking in their own voices. Also new aspects of the Empire and the wider universe will flip a couple of things upside down. You would think that especially the last one was a risky gamble because it could bare all the contradictory details, but it is obvious that the whole design was perfectly thought through and meticulously planned. Unfortunately, the third volume seems to be weaker than the previous ones. While it is great fantasy, full of surprising twists, interesting ideas, and perfect intrigues, it lacks something. Or perhaps to the contrary, it throttles the reader with overabundance. The weak point seems to be the motivation of the main heroine presented more as a divine saviour than a ruler, and the problem of pacing. The speed of events and huge leaps in time were serious drawbacks. More than once you can get lost in the chronology of events or simply lose the sync with the general timing. This, for me, signifies bad writing. Moreover, some threads were clearly redundant and, personally, I think they would lighten the read if anybody had half of Mara’s guts and eliminate them. However, it is still a great ending to a very good trilogy and the above does not diminish the value of the book, which is simply great to read up to the very end… which is so nauseatingly sweet that I needed to take one star down. I have not read anything by Mr Feist (yet!) but this book definitely strengthens the position of Janny Wurts at the vanguard of the best fantasy writers. I can only wish that more such heroes, such worlds and such stories are made alive on the pages of fantasy books. Anybody enjoying high, complex fantasy, strong female leads and world building based on the Eastern cultures, should mark the Empire trilogy or bump it up their “waiting to be read” list. Also in the series: 1. Daughter of the Empire ★★★★☆ 2. Servant of the Empire ★★★☆☆

  4. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    After three months, I am done with the Empire Trilogy and am looking forward to diving further into the Riftwar Cycle. If you're at all interested in Feist's work and the rest of the Riftwar Cycle, start with the Riftwar Saga Trilogy before you read the Empire Trilogy. It'll provide background info, I was lacking while reading it. It's not absolutely necessary but it'll add depth to the world. I would hate to spoil anyone on this lovely trilogy, which is why I'll keep the plot info to a minimum. After three months, I am done with the Empire Trilogy and am looking forward to diving further into the Riftwar Cycle. If you're at all interested in Feist's work and the rest of the Riftwar Cycle, start with the Riftwar Saga Trilogy before you read the Empire Trilogy. It'll provide background info, I was lacking while reading it. It's not absolutely necessary but it'll add depth to the world. I would hate to spoil anyone on this lovely trilogy, which is why I'll keep the plot info to a minimum. The trilogy is set in a world inspired by Asia. There's not a lot of magic, instead it's all about intrigue and politics. Mara is possibly the best female fantasy character I've encountered so far. She kicks ass, is intelligent, cunning and the entire tale is one big chess game filled with politics and betrayal. Mara does not use strength and violence to win this game but her wit. The entire cast of characters is well developed. The villains are intriguing and relatable. I enjoyed every part of this trilogy, even the romance. In fact this had a romance that warmed my heart and made me happy. (Rare, I'm usually grumpy!) Recommended to everyone who likes either Feist or Wurts, and who enjoys witty politicians betraying each other.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    The third in the trilogy started out so strong that I wanted to rage, weep, and throw the book against the wall. I really hate it when books tear me to shreds. The tragedy in the opening was a real nightmare for me and the characters in here, but more importantly, it drove a lot of the massive change to come. We are, after all, sitting on a trilogy that completely upends the entire society. Civil War, massive change for the Cho-Ji, and even the Council who are above the law, the High Magicians, The third in the trilogy started out so strong that I wanted to rage, weep, and throw the book against the wall. I really hate it when books tear me to shreds. The tragedy in the opening was a real nightmare for me and the characters in here, but more importantly, it drove a lot of the massive change to come. We are, after all, sitting on a trilogy that completely upends the entire society. Civil War, massive change for the Cho-Ji, and even the Council who are above the law, the High Magicians, and the Emperor will have to bow before it. Moreover, I should mention that this particular trilogy places fine emphasis on showing every single step, every important building block from a young girl just trying to save her house, to become indispensable to the Emperor, to become The Power of the whole land. It's impressive, and no doubt. This isn't some simple tale. It's all about politics, power bases, economics, spy networks, mortal enemies, revenge, deception, and total social upheaval. So yeah, it's impressive as hell. My only complaint was for a few of the slow bits. And I wasn't all that interested in the spymaster's love life. It might have been something cool but it just didn't turn out all that great for me. *shrug* But everything else was fantastic! :)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Troy G

    So concludes the best trilogy ever written. When I think about this book, in many ways I think of the supporting cast. I could retitle the book "Arakasi and Lujan" as those are the two character's whose plots most resonated with me. These two characters had perhaps the most drastic arc from the first novel in the trilogy when they were little more than outlaws. In this novel they are so very much more. More than they ever could have been without the intervention of Mara. That is her greatest So concludes the best trilogy ever written. When I think about this book, in many ways I think of the supporting cast. I could retitle the book "Arakasi and Lujan" as those are the two character's whose plots most resonated with me. These two characters had perhaps the most drastic arc from the first novel in the trilogy when they were little more than outlaws. In this novel they are so very much more. More than they ever could have been without the intervention of Mara. That is her greatest gift as a character. Mara is able to inspire those around her to be great. Were Lujan and Arakasi ever normal? Probably not, but the path they were on was destined to be of little consequence to the rest of the world. Empowered by Mara they rise to heights that were unimaginable to them at birth. The fate of social reform hinges on their decisions and advice. Much more so than it does any action directly taken by Mara. There was no doubt that Mara's meteoric rise would continue in this novel, and it does. The journey it takes has consequences to her, to those around her, and to the greater empire she represents. Those consequences are where the story lies, and the path of her rise contains twists and turns as one might expect. The world of the Tsunami is expanded on last time in this novel. As always, Raymond Feist's talent for world building is obvious. The new lands explored are vivid, fresh, and interesting. There are callbacks to other books from his Midkimea universe that are rewarding to those who have read them. I strongly recommend this book to everyone, but you should first read the other two in the trilogy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    4 Stars The final volume of the Empire trilogy, Mistress of the Empire brings events full circle, closing out the series strongly. The last book ended with Mara comfortable and secure, at the top of Tsurani society with her enemy house finally defeated. That comfort doesn’t last long as her house in thrown into disarray and once again she is forced to fight. The stakes are raised this time as she fights not only to save her house but her culture. I’ll confess, at the end of the second book in the 4 Stars The final volume of the Empire trilogy, Mistress of the Empire brings events full circle, closing out the series strongly. The last book ended with Mara comfortable and secure, at the top of Tsurani society with her enemy house finally defeated. That comfort doesn’t last long as her house in thrown into disarray and once again she is forced to fight. The stakes are raised this time as she fights not only to save her house but her culture. I’ll confess, at the end of the second book in the trilogy it felt like there was nowhere left to go with the story. Her rival house was defeated, and Mara finally had the security she had fought for ever since her father and brother died. I was pleasantly surprised at how the third book managed to tie together various threads that had been started in previous books, not just in terms of personal arcs but several different themes as well, such as personal freedoms and rights. One of the strengths of this series is the characterizations. Each character is distinct, and showed noticeable development throughout the series. There was one thing nagging me about the series, and it took me until the last book to put my figure on what it is. While it was definitely accomplished, I didn’t particularly enjoy the writing style. Things sometimes felt over explained, and in general it felt a bit wordy. The last two books seemed like they could have been trimmed down without the story suffering. Overall though, that is a fairly minor complaint. I enjoyed the series, and I think fans of the original Riftwar series will as well.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    A great conclusion to one of the best trilogies I've ever read. It did have a bit too much sorrow at times and a tad too much political intrigue at others but on the whole, it was an amazing read which has earned a place among my all-time-favourites.

  9. 4 out of 5

    YouKneeK

    Mistress of the Empire is the final book in The Empire Trilogy. As I’ve mentioned before, I first read this about 20 years ago. I remembered very little of it, particularly from the later books, just that I had really loved it at the time. My reaction was similar this time around. It was a great read. I had a bit of a rough start with this book, and struggled a little through the first 100 pages or so. Mara took some actions early on that I didn’t like. I don’t think her actions were unrealistic Mistress of the Empire is the final book in The Empire Trilogy. As I’ve mentioned before, I first read this about 20 years ago. I remembered very little of it, particularly from the later books, just that I had really loved it at the time. My reaction was similar this time around. It was a great read. I had a bit of a rough start with this book, and struggled a little through the first 100 pages or so. Mara took some actions early on that I didn’t like. I don’t think her actions were unrealistic given the circumstances and her personality, but I found them frustrating to read about and I missed her more calculated choices from the earlier books. Once that started to turn back around, my interest was caught again. I thought the book grew steadily more exciting as it approached the end. This was a satisfying conclusion to the story, and I really enjoyed how everything worked out politically. I thought the last little bit at the very end was a bit too convenient, but I didn’t necessarily dislike it, I was just a little apathetic about it. I loved seeing the progression of Mara’s character as she re-examined her culture and her own decisions throughout the story, although there was one decision I wished she had thought back upon with regret at least once. I enjoyed all the political intrigue, and the occasional battle scenes were also written well and fun to read. It’s not an uproariously funny series, but there are nice bits of humor sprinkled throughout that made me laugh. There are several great characters, some poignant moments, and difficult choices that I thought added depth to the story. I’m rating this at 4.5 stars, but rounding down to 4 on Goodreads, mostly due to my difficulties at the beginning. I want to elaborate on my above comment about the decision Mara should have thought back upon with regret. I’ll have to put that in spoiler tags: (view spoiler)[Mara spent quite a bit of time regretting her part in Bunto’s death, and I do think that was something she should regret. However, I thought something that she should have regretted even more was the time in the first book when she had several slaves killed for nothing more than being in the wrong place at the wrong time and hearing information she didn’t want others to know. Bunto at least had some role in his own downfall and was a generally scummy person, but the slaves were innocent so far as we knew and represented several lives lost. I enjoyed seeing Mara’s views on honor and freedom evolve over the series, but I think it would have added some weight to her newfound convictions about slavery to see her remember and regret that particular decision. (hide spoiler)]

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ojo

    Oh what a feeling! I haven't felt this good in a long, long while. Empire Trilogy excels where others barely manage to impress. It's more than brilliant. It's astounding. Satisfying. It's officially one of my best ever series in epic fantasy. I'm ranking it up there, in the lofty heights, in the the company of the likes of ASoIaF, Kingkiller, WoT, Malazan and SoT. I already knew I was going to give this book a solid 5 stars from the opening few pages, such was the stunning start. At this point Oh what a feeling! I haven't felt this good in a long, long while. Empire Trilogy excels where others barely manage to impress. It's more than brilliant. It's astounding. Satisfying. It's officially one of my best ever series in epic fantasy. I'm ranking it up there, in the lofty heights, in the the company of the likes of ASoIaF, Kingkiller, WoT, Malazan and SoT. I already knew I was going to give this book a solid 5 stars from the opening few pages, such was the stunning start. At this point usually, you begin to see the plot patterns and it's possible to predict endings. Maybe it's because the series is authored by not one but two masters of the genre is why it turned out so different. If I felt that a lot happened in the two preceeding books, the events in this book came as a delightful shock. Not once did I anticipate how things turned out, certainly not the way they did. There was more focus on previously peripheral characters as the plot began to really thicken. There's a whole lot of character development and a whole lot more action, more than the two previous books combined. Fans of G.R.R Martin will be pleased by this unique take in political thrill that uses exceptional world-building and a setting-plot system that rivals even that of WoT despite it being relatively short: a trilogy. It's one great book, with a greatly satisfying ending. The main protagonist is one that will remain in my memory forever. Look no more unto YA for great female characters. Here is a brilliant female lead unencumbered by the tropes of romance and occasionally frustrating softhearted acts of stupidity characterised by most YA and Urban Fantasy female leads. Here is a female character that can stand side by side with the likes of Tyrion Lannister, Gandalf the Grey, Matrim Cauthon and Anomander Rake in terms of sheer brilliance, wit, passion, power and brutality. Ladies and gentlemen of the epic fantasy fandom, I present to you Mara of House Acoma. I like to call her Aunty Mara, haha. This book comes highly recommended. If Raymond and Janny can come up with this, then I encourage more top fantasy authors to do more collaborations. The prospect is absolutely mouth watering for us fans. P.S: This is the best book I've read this year! Beats House of Chains by a mile.... And a half!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Suraj

    A great ending to a superb saga. With a very satisfying ending and a very thrilling storyline, a must read for anyone who enjoys reading a good story.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    A fabulous finish to a great trilogy. I've read & enjoyed other books & series by both authors, but I think that together, they were even better. Thanks, Janny & Ray!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michael Y. Patuwo

    I have strongly mixed opinions about this books; parts of it excite me so much that I thought 'this is a truly magnificent scene', while other parts made me fume with irritation and disbelief. Let's start with the good part. Mistress of the Empire started with a BANG! that left me unable to put the book down for a few chapters because of how powerful its impact was on the story and characters. Later in the book another tragic surprise roped me in with a similar intensity, and the fast-paced I have strongly mixed opinions about this books; parts of it excite me so much that I thought 'this is a truly magnificent scene', while other parts made me fume with irritation and disbelief. Let's start with the good part. Mistress of the Empire started with a BANG! that left me unable to put the book down for a few chapters because of how powerful its impact was on the story and characters. Later in the book another tragic surprise roped me in with a similar intensity, and the fast-paced action scenes that followed after was kept my interest going for at least a hundred pages more. It was very pleasant and made me fall in love with this book... if only it lasted throughout the experience. Unfortunately snail-paced interludes bog the plot down, and I often question whether these chapters are truly necessary to the book's plot. I skipped entire scenes where nothing but banal political discussions happened, and later as events unfolded I realised that I have not missed anything at all. Why even have chapters written from the point of view of Jiro? He did nothing but sit around and plot, and later it turned out that he did not achieved much with all the plotting he had done (in fact, it almost did not matter at all). I also found a gaping flaw with Jiro's character. What sort of 'intelligent' man would harbour a grudge against a lady who chose his mentally inferior brother as a husband to win political favour (and intentionally caused his death, too)? Jiro was petty, impatient, murderous, harsh, unforgiving, vindictive, and so prone to bouts of fury that I did not for a moment believe that he was 'cunning' or 'intelligent.' And here comes my biggest problem with the book, which shaved off that 2 stars out of the 5/5 that I would have given if things had been otherwise. What the hell is with the magician Assembly? If Tsunarians had any brains at all, they would fight against the Assembly to the last drop of the their blood if only to end their tyrannical rule over the land. The magicians were extremely powerful, extremely dangerous and so infinitely murderous that as I read on I held to the belief that they needed to be obliterated by any means possible. But the ending had left me utterly dissatisfied. Even the 'good' mages were no better: they did nothing as entire armies were incinerated in the most graphic way possible, instead retreating back to their petty, ponderous discussions instead of taking severe actions against the members of the Assembly who had taken human lives for no good reasons at all. I hate Tapek, I hate Hochepapa, I hate Milamber, and I hate the book for not having them systematically ripped apart as the events of the book came to an end. Instead we get a nonsense divine-protection Deus Ex Machina as a solution to the book's climax. So there it is, a mixture of 1-star and 5-star elements of the book that compelled me to give Mistress of the Empire a 3-star rating. I loved this series, and it had some truly insightful plot and interesting characters in it, but the first book, in my opinion, was the masterpiece of the trilogy.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Very good, rather lengthy, but superb!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    One of the best trilogies in fantasy I have ever read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sumant

    Not many series endings have given me the experience but with the book Servant of the empire, I can say that the ending left me feeling content.All the story lines got a proper ending in this book.Also we discover lot of new things regarding cho-ja and tsuruanni in this book. The previous books consisted of given insights into characters who are working against Mara.But this book offers insights into male counterparts who are working for Mara.The most interesting insights are the ones given by Not many series endings have given me the experience but with the book Servant of the empire, I can say that the ending left me feeling content.All the story lines got a proper ending in this book.Also we discover lot of new things regarding cho-ja and tsuruanni in this book. The previous books consisted of given insights into characters who are working against Mara.But this book offers insights into male counterparts who are working for Mara.The most interesting insights are the ones given by Arakasi and Lujan. The major plots on this book are focused on 1.Mara vs Hamoi tong 2.Arakasi's insight. 3.Mara vs Jiroh 4.Mara vs Magicians Let me give a brief regarding each of the above points 1.Mara vs Hamoi tong As we know from the last book that the Hamoi tong have pledged a vow of revenge against Mara, and the book opens with one of their assassination attempt gone wrong.But the assassins manage to kill someone important to Mara and that leaves her devastated. Although Hokanu starts suspecting Jiroh immediately we know that the Hamoi tong are acting on their own against Mara.As Mara is servant of the empire we have a state funeral for the fallen person, during which Mara in her state of grief attacks Jiroh and gives him opportunity to further widen the rift between the traditionalist faction and Maraist faction. Hokanu and Mara give a call to their clan for a final fight against Jiroh, but the magicians interfere in the middle and manage to stop the war.They take a promise from both Jiroh and Mara that they will not take arms against each other.Mara finds this interference too much and gives Arakasi a mission to find out more about these magicians by penetrating their city. Another tool which the authors have used wisely throughout the books is the time jumps they manage to jump a few years ahead time and again so that the story keeps progressing smoothly. 2.Arakasi's insight. As years pass Mara seems to recover some what from the tragedy which struck her at the start of the book, and soon she becomes pregnant with Hokanu's child.But the threat of Hamoi tong is still there and too have been abiding their time and have manage to concoct a more sinister plot against Mara. They approach Mara posing as traders and they poison her, meanwhile Arakasi has done many futile attempts to enter into the city of magicians.But when he hears about Mara's poisoning he rushes to her side and manages to find a cure for the poison through his network.We are given a lot of insights into Arakasi's network and workings during this part of the story.It is definitely a page turner to read how intelligence works on human basis when they don't have electronic intelligence in this world. As Mara recovers from her poison she gives Arakasi the most difficult mission in the series which is to infiltrate Hamoi tong and kills its leader i.e Obertan. Arakasi proceeds on this mission in a systematic way and descriptions regarding how he infiltrates their fortress and destroys them in the process was one of the best parts in this book. 3.Mara vs Jiroh Meanwhile Jiroh has become a force to be reckoned with in the empire and has manage to unite all the traditionalist faction behind him, the traditionalist are basically a faction who want the council to be reinstated and also want the seat of warlord restored so that they can go back to their bloody days of game of council. Mara is exceedingly frustrated with this, and with magicians ultimatum to her against Jiroh she has hands tied behind her.She is trying to find a solution to this problem, and during her one meet with the cho ja queen she finds a lot regarding the magicians.But the cho ja queen is reluctant to give her all the answers and asks her to journey to another land in order to find all the answers. 4.Mara vs Magicians The assembly of magicians is itself divided regarding Mara as half think that she should be kept in check as she has become too powerful for their own good, while the other half support her rebellious measures regarding tsuruanni way of life.The magicians have kept a watch on her 24x7. But Mara manages to give them a slip under pretext that she has taken a shelter in a temple for self discovery.The voyage changes Mara perceptions regarding the magicians. All in all I really loved empire trilogy and was quite surprised that wurts and feist did not collaborate further for writing such amazing books.I am definitely going to read riftwar saga by feist, and wars of light and shadow by wurts.I give this book 4/5 stars.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Steve R

    Assassinations, poisonings, rivalries of established houses,wars of vengeance, claims to an imperial throne,difficult relations with an Assembly, a heartfelt love story and an unexpected reunion of long lost lovers highlight this third and final volume n the series. Although not well remembered, nonetheless recommended as an exceptionally intricate interweaving of many different characters, themes and plot lines.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ayesa

    Definitely the best book out of the entire trilogy. Unlike its predecessor, in this book Mara remained at the forefront of the plot and challenged opposition in a way that was unexpected, action-packed, and most of all, heartfelt. Out of all the books I've read, Mara is the most multidimensional character I've ever come across and in this book, you see all of those sides flourish with every page. She is vulnerable and caring yet carries with her an inner strength and calm (traits less often Definitely the best book out of the entire trilogy. Unlike its predecessor, in this book Mara remained at the forefront of the plot and challenged opposition in a way that was unexpected, action-packed, and most of all, heartfelt. Out of all the books I've read, Mara is the most multidimensional character I've ever come across and in this book, you see all of those sides flourish with every page. She is vulnerable and caring yet carries with her an inner strength and calm (traits less often associated with female characters). She is bold yet understanding. She is frail and stubborn. Despite all these qualities, I love how she endures her plight, the extreme losses she suffers, the challenges with her husband Hokanu, all while steadfastly playing the Great Game. In no part in the book do we forget that she is human, but in spite of this readers are also reminded of the strength borne in her. I love that readers are often reminded of how beautiful Mara is during this story--and that she has never been more beautiful in her many years of wisdom, in fact. From Hokanu to the most menacing of magicians, she is adored for her beauty and wit, and the power she has gained as a consequence of both. Since I failed to read the trilogy one after the other, and chose to read it across a some years, I feel as if I grew up with Mara, and too soon her story outgrew me. And, if I could, I would love to read about her journeys forever. From the sixteen year-old forced to take the Acoma mantle to the wise Good Servant and Mistress she is now, like the characters in the story with her, I am filled with pride of her startlingly meteoric ascension and how intricately her life was handled by the authors. I can't imagine living my life without experiencing Mara's perilous yet rewarding journey, and I have my dad to thank for it. Thanks to him, I have a clearer version of the type of person I want to be--and that, I think, is one of the best gifts a parent could give to their kid. Now, I hope to share Mara with other people in my life, too, for many years to come. Amongst all of my favorite characters, I'm proud to say Mara has left an irrevocable imprint on who I am and who I want to be. Oftentimes, reading this novel broke my heart and I ached for Mara to be happy. Knowing now the ending, I applaud Feist and Wurts in how they cared for her in the fairest way possible. The character I know and love is not left without scars, and I say that makes for a better conclusion to this amazing trilogy. Happy Fathers Day, Papa! Thank you for sharing Kelewan with me! :) Luv, Bulilit

  19. 5 out of 5

    Frank

    No spoilers. Great conclusion to a three book series of political, and ruling family treachery. Wonderful character and world building through out the series.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    The first quarter of the final book in the series is not good. The death of Mara's son through the hands of an assassin drives her mad with grief which leads her to attempt to go to war with her nemesis Jiro of the Anasatzi. The way this first quarter of the book is written is confusing and lacklustre, but does set up the rest of the story which is Mara vs the Black Robes and Assassins and Anasatzi. The other three-quarters of the book is utterly brilliant, totally gripping and in places The first quarter of the final book in the series is not good. The death of Mara's son through the hands of an assassin drives her mad with grief which leads her to attempt to go to war with her nemesis Jiro of the Anasatzi. The way this first quarter of the book is written is confusing and lacklustre, but does set up the rest of the story which is Mara vs the Black Robes and Assassins and Anasatzi. The other three-quarters of the book is utterly brilliant, totally gripping and in places heartwrenchingly sad. The intricate story which has many threads (and doesn't solely focus on Mara unlike the other two books) takes Mara out of Tsuranuanni into the land of the Thuril where she discovers a number of secrets and oppressions which have been keeping the Tsurani in the destructive Great Game for centuries. Here for the first and only time in a Feist novel is somewhere where two women talk between themselves about matters of importance that are not to do with men. I did give a great cheer at this as I was wondering if Feist even knew that women could talk to each other about serious subjects!! The finale of the book is gripping and heartwrenching in equal parts. Definitely worth reading!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Pauline

    I need to file this last book into my pile of "what a terrible last book in a series" books. I had to trudge my way through a majority of this one. The beginning of the book was pretty good. I had been disappointed with the second book in this series and was hoping for this to end with a bang. Unfortunately it did not and now I can't decide if this was a good investment of my time or not. I still love the characters but it just got bogged down with so much excess that it lost that spark that I need to file this last book into my pile of "what a terrible last book in a series" books. I had to trudge my way through a majority of this one. The beginning of the book was pretty good. I had been disappointed with the second book in this series and was hoping for this to end with a bang. Unfortunately it did not and now I can't decide if this was a good investment of my time or not. I still love the characters but it just got bogged down with so much excess that it lost that spark that first grabbed me. There was too many time jumps and things happening off-screen which lead to a jumbled mess of information being spoon fed to you. At times I almost felt as if it was a completely different duo writing. Where did the heart-stopping, pulse-racing prose and situations disappear to? Also, I really disliked Kevin in the second book. So reading about him again was not my cup of tea. Overall it started out as a really promising series, hit a bump, then nosedived into a cliff.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Barefoot Danger

    I cannot say enough bad things about this book. Here's a drinking game: Drink anytime an old person is described as "wizened", someone counts off things on their fingers (if they're not actually counting anything, chug), anytime someone inclines their head, all chapters that begin with "[Noun] [verb]ed," and any time you want to slit your wrists. Awful. This book was awful. The authors have obviously never taken the advice "Show, don't tell." Chapters are divided arbitrarily. It will take three I cannot say enough bad things about this book. Here's a drinking game: Drink anytime an old person is described as "wizened", someone counts off things on their fingers (if they're not actually counting anything, chug), anytime someone inclines their head, all chapters that begin with "[Noun] [verb]ed," and any time you want to slit your wrists. Awful. This book was awful. The authors have obviously never taken the advice "Show, don't tell." Chapters are divided arbitrarily. It will take three chapters (100 pages or so) to cover five minutes of "action", and then in three sentences, five years will have gone by. The characters are all ridiculously stupid, except when they're supposed to be clever and cunning. This book is an insult to the written word.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    Tragedy after bad thing after setback after disaster happen to Mara, and at first it’s so bad she goes a little catatonic, and then makes some SEVERE missteps. Then, Mara being the awesome heroine she is, she decides if the system is broken, she’s just going to have to pull the whole thing down, and proceeds to do so. An Epic Quest at its finest, with the stakes sky high, and heroine who will do anything to protect those she loves.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mieneke

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Mistress of the Empire is the concluding volume in the Empire trilogy. It is a wonderfully satisfying ending to a fantastic story and one of the best fantasy series out there. It takes Mara to the height of power, but also the depth of despair and brought me to tears on several occasions. Discussing the book will of necessity provide spoilers for the previous two books, though I will strive to keep them to a minimum. We rejoin Mara's story about five years after the events told in Servant of the Mistress of the Empire is the concluding volume in the Empire trilogy. It is a wonderfully satisfying ending to a fantastic story and one of the best fantasy series out there. It takes Mara to the height of power, but also the depth of despair and brought me to tears on several occasions. Discussing the book will of necessity provide spoilers for the previous two books, though I will strive to keep them to a minimum. We rejoin Mara's story about five years after the events told in Servant of the Empire . The baby she was expecting at the end of the previous book has been born a son, whom she's named Justin and together with him, Ayaki and her new husband Hokanu she's made a home at the former Minwanabi estate. It's a peaceful and happy life, though not without ripples as turns out in almost the first pages of the book. Mara loses her heir, her beloved oldest son Ayaki, to an assassin's attack as, even though the High Council has been disbanded and the Warlord's office abolished in favour of absolute rule by the Emperor, the Great Game continues and Mara is its biggest target. From this traumatic event the Lady's almost miraculous luck seems to fade away as events go evermore against Mara's favour. And we're once more thrown into the political morass that is Tsuranuanni. The authors broaden our knowledge of the world by having Mara travel beyond the Empire's borders and those of its neighbours into unknown territory and discovering more about the Cho-ja and their history and culture. I found this insectoid culture fascinating and the added depth only served to enrich this matriarchal society. The Cho-ja city of Chakaha and the secrets Mara unearths there are beautifully rendered and it was one of my favourite parts of this book. The concept of hive-memory – stored in a communal consciousness that will remain as long as there are living Cho-ja – with its perfect recall and what this means for a society's development – especially the way it's juxtaposed to humanity's fragmentary and often manipulated sense of history – is fascinating and I loved the way Wurts and Feist employ it to further the plot. We don't just get a closer look at the Cho-ja; we also see more of the Assembly. While those who've read Magician might already be familiar with much of what we're shown in the book, for those who haven't it should be a welcome area of further exploration. What I enjoyed mostly is the closer look we got at familiar faces, both from the previous Empire books and from Magician. We also learn that although they proclaim to stand outside the law and to act for the good of the Empire, in fact the Assembly is just as much part of the Great Game as the nobles and much of what they do is for their own greater glory and power. But there are those who would wish a return to unstifled progress and as unobtrusively as possible support Mara's reformist cause. And with that word, reform, we touch on one of the key themes of this series. Mara embodies change and reform: she is a rare and unique phenomenon, a Ruling Lady in her own right. A Ruling Lady, who isn't afraid to try some new to save the existence of her House and one who is profoundly influenced by the philosophical ideas of another culture. Mara's open mind manages to bring down an Empire that has withstood generations of war and strife, just because no one can predict what she'll do next. She shocks by granting mercy and allowing herself to give in to her more human emotions, but whenever she veers from the norm, that's when she gains the most. And throughout the narrative we see her come to the realisation that what is killing her country is stagnation, in every sense. She sets herself against this and it is this that gains her her greatest enemies, Jiro of the Anasati and the Traditionalist Faction and ultimately the Assembly, whose traditionalist nature is given voice most loudly by the young Black Robe Tapek. What rereading Mistress of the Empire has confronted me with, is my changed outlook on life now that I'm a parent. Where before Ayaki's loss and Mara's difficulties Mara in giving birth to a new heir made me feel sad for her, this time around these deaths killed me. I was in tears several times while reading those passages, just because I now could relate to the deep and unflinching love Mara feels for her children. Maya's forced iron control and Hokanu's quiet grief just broke my heart. What made these losses so profoundly interesting in the narrative was the question of how they affected Mara's thought process and decisions. Are the actions she takes in this book those of a mother protecting the lives and future of her children or those of a Servant protecting the Empire? Or is the second only a lucky by-product in as much as it overlaps the saving of Justin and Kasuma? What is clear is that Mara is willing to sacrifice almost anyone and everything to give her children a better future. There are many deaths of beloved and faithful servants, deaths that didn't leave me unaffected; especially the final chapter brought me to tears. There is a tragedy to Mara's ultimate triumph that is bittersweet and once again affirms that nothing is gained without cost. Then again, the rewards of great risk are accordingly great as we witness in the cases of Lujan and Arakasi, who are rewarded in ways they wouldn't have dreamed of when we first met them. Mistress of the Empire is a fantastic conclusion to Mara's story. The story is a classic that shows exactly what epic fantasy can be at its best, at once sweeping and personal. It also contains some of the most wonderful portrayals of female characters out there in epic fantasy. This reread has firmly cemented this series as one of my all-time favourites and one I'm sure I can have my girls read it in fifteen years’ time without it having lost anything due to age. If you never read anything Midkemian, read this. As for me, I need to track down some of Wurts' solo books; if they are as good as the Empire series, I'm in for a brilliant read. *** This review is part of my Midkemia Reread, in which I read all the books Raymond E. Feist wrote, set in the world of Midkemia. For more on the why and how of this series of reviews, check out Midkemia Reread: An Introduction.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Gascoyne

    This one was much better than the second, but still not quite as good as the first; maybe 3.5 stars rounded up to 4 because it did hold my interest. The absence of Kevin removed most of the euro-centric/almost racist stuff that I found distasteful in the second. There was even a tiny hint that the Emperor might be gay! But the overall sexual politics were still rather conservative and out-dated for my taste. I most enjoyed the way we got to know the mysterious spy master a lot more, and the This one was much better than the second, but still not quite as good as the first; maybe 3.5 stars rounded up to 4 because it did hold my interest. The absence of Kevin removed most of the euro-centric/almost racist stuff that I found distasteful in the second. There was even a tiny hint that the Emperor might be gay! But the overall sexual politics were still rather conservative and out-dated for my taste. I most enjoyed the way we got to know the mysterious spy master a lot more, and the sub-plot in which he goes after the "tong" of assassins was gripping. It's still too long and could have been reduced by about 1/3 by eliminating all the long scenes in which Mara or someone else reminds themselves all the wrongs that have been done and how badly they want to win the political Game. I also very much enjoyed learning more about the cho-ja; that plot-line probably helped win the book an extra star.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gergana

    If I should give my rating stars I will give 10 not 5 stars.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I am not ashamed to admit that if I never see this trilogy again, it'll be too soon. The authors turn everything they've written in the previous two books on its head, just for the sake of making us feel pity for Mara, who is even more self-serving in this one than in the other two, even though the authors have tried to disguise it as grief. Over-padded, over-bloated, ridiculous political wrangling doesn't equal plot unless there is also a story to sustain it, and there's nothing like that here, I am not ashamed to admit that if I never see this trilogy again, it'll be too soon. The authors turn everything they've written in the previous two books on its head, just for the sake of making us feel pity for Mara, who is even more self-serving in this one than in the other two, even though the authors have tried to disguise it as grief. Over-padded, over-bloated, ridiculous political wrangling doesn't equal plot unless there is also a story to sustain it, and there's nothing like that here, except a rehash of the first two, just with different names. Mara gets revenge, and that's pretty much it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    livvingitup

    Tragedy befalls the renowned Servant of the Empire, and dark forces are determined to destroy every thing Mara holds dear. Yet she dreams of liberating her people, and won't allow any bloodshed to deter her. Once again we are presented with a brilliant book laced with intrigue, bloodshed, revenge and love. Civil War and the treacherous Assembly of Magicians threatens to plunge Mara's world into chaos. Everything about this book was perfectly executed. Great detail and planning is evident Tragedy befalls the renowned Servant of the Empire, and dark forces are determined to destroy every thing Mara holds dear. Yet she dreams of liberating her people, and won't allow any bloodshed to deter her. Once again we are presented with a brilliant book laced with intrigue, bloodshed, revenge and love. Civil War and the treacherous Assembly of Magicians threatens to plunge Mara's world into chaos. Everything about this book was perfectly executed. Great detail and planning is evident throughout the entire novel, with so many plot twists and intricacies. The multiple POVs strengthened the characters and kept me insanely intrigued. The writing was literally perfection. The entire novel was vividly detailed and brimming with enthralling action. Mara's character only continued to thrive in this book and her development was phenomenal. She's changed so much since the first book. No longer does she take things for granted or bask in her omnipotence. She sympathizes with those scorned and marred by poverty. She strives to liberate the slaves and to abolish oppression. She dreams of a future of equal freedom. Mara doesn't allow the traditionalists to hinder her, and her strength allows her to persist. Another key aspect I noticed about her is how she identifies negative aspects of herself. Not many characters do that. And that's what inhibits development. So I cannot express my love for this dynamic character. Mara is the epitome of the strong female character trope. Now I need to discuss the way the authors challenge a patriarchal society with their strong and willful female characters. Thuril was a new world we got to discover, and this world is very similar to Mara's; women are subservient. Yet, despite what the men believe, they are not. They command. They have real power. They are an influence. So it was incredible and empowering to read about more women who break society's chains and become their person. Overall, I'm going to miss reading this book. Of opening the pages and being transported to this world of deceit and power. A world that left me in awe. A world that changed me as a reader.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jan Bond

    Feist and Wurts have a composed an epic fantasy that left me in awe of their writing abilities. I read the Empire trilogy when they were first published. I was so happy to run across them again in e-book format. I loved Daughter of the Empire, Servant of the Empire, and the final one, Mistress of the Empire. The story begins with the young female protagonist, Mara of the Great House Acoma, about to dedicate her life to a temple. Her father and brother have been killed and she suddenly inherits Feist and Wurts have a composed an epic fantasy that left me in awe of their writing abilities. I read the Empire trilogy when they were first published. I was so happy to run across them again in e-book format. I loved Daughter of the Empire, Servant of the Empire, and the final one, Mistress of the Empire. The story begins with the young female protagonist, Mara of the Great House Acoma, about to dedicate her life to a temple. Her father and brother have been killed and she suddenly inherits leadership of her clan. She knows nothing of the Tsurani Game of the Council which rules with murderous violence furthered by so called traditions that encompass a culture of honor. Mara is a strong woman, not given to moaning and groaning, who is open minded enough to learn from others outside of the roles and traditions of the game. Each volume left me feeling amazed at her astuteness for saving her house and recognizing that the traditions of honor have been perverted and there must be a better way of life. I think it is one of the best fantasies written and is a with relief that Feist finally has a strong female character so strongly represented - which might be Wurts's influence.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Geir Skårland

    I think everyone who has read the great fantasy classics longs to find new books that give the same experience. And have many experiences of disappointments. Through my searches, I have concluded that it’s not just the genre. It also has a lot to do with the writing and the humanity of the truly great stories. A good fantasy novel has to touch something in the real world. This one does. Through this book, I have been pleased, provoked, thrilled, impressed and touched. There is both goodness and I think everyone who has read the great fantasy classics longs to find new books that give the same experience. And have many experiences of disappointments. Through my searches, I have concluded that it’s not just the genre. It also has a lot to do with the writing and the humanity of the truly great stories. A good fantasy novel has to touch something in the real world. This one does. Through this book, I have been pleased, provoked, thrilled, impressed and touched. There is both goodness and justice at stake, and it is not primarily swordplay or magic, but relationships, communication and wise choices that decide the outcome. The characters have depth and the language is good. In the audiobook I have listened to, Tanya Rodrigues does an excellent performance, giving both colour and power to the story, without ever stepping to much in front of the characters’ own voices. The book is not quite as epic as The Lord of the Rings, or quite as fun as Harry Potter, but within its scope, I’d say it earns a place as a fantasy classic.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.