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Kick-Ass Omnibus 1 [Collezione 100% Cult comics]

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Il fumetto che ha ispirato il film!Avete mai voluto essere un supereroe? Dave Lizewski sì. Solo che, a differenza di altri, non si è limitato a sognarlo. Scelto un nome, "Kick-Ass", e indossato un costume, ha deciso di rendere la sua vita più interessante, magari aiutando qualcuno. Senza superpoteri e circondato dai criminali più violenti di New York, tuttavia, potrebbe aver fatto male i cofilm!Avete Il fumetto che ha ispirato il film!Avete mai voluto essere un supereroe? Dave Lizewski sì. Solo che, a differenza di altri, non si è limitato a sognarlo. Scelto un nome, "Kick-Ass", e indossato un costume, ha deciso di rendere la sua vita più interessante, magari aiutando qualcuno. Senza superpoteri e circondato dai criminali più violenti di New York, tuttavia, potrebbe aver fatto male i conti. Dave imparerà a caro prezzo che la sua attività notturna è stupida oltre che pericolosa, eppure non potrà fare a meno di continuare a indossare la maschera. Riuscirà a sopravvivere alla partnership con la letale Hit-Girl e il duro Big Daddy, alla rivalità con il nuovo supereroe cittadino, Red Mist, e alla mafia, già sulle sue tracce? Questo eBook contiene i numeri da 1 a 8 della serie Kick-Ass, pubblicata negli USA da Icon, un'introduzione di Rob Liefeld, le biografie degli autori, sketch preparatori e tutte le copertine originali.


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Il fumetto che ha ispirato il film!Avete mai voluto essere un supereroe? Dave Lizewski sì. Solo che, a differenza di altri, non si è limitato a sognarlo. Scelto un nome, "Kick-Ass", e indossato un costume, ha deciso di rendere la sua vita più interessante, magari aiutando qualcuno. Senza superpoteri e circondato dai criminali più violenti di New York, tuttavia, potrebbe aver fatto male i cofilm!Avete Il fumetto che ha ispirato il film!Avete mai voluto essere un supereroe? Dave Lizewski sì. Solo che, a differenza di altri, non si è limitato a sognarlo. Scelto un nome, "Kick-Ass", e indossato un costume, ha deciso di rendere la sua vita più interessante, magari aiutando qualcuno. Senza superpoteri e circondato dai criminali più violenti di New York, tuttavia, potrebbe aver fatto male i conti. Dave imparerà a caro prezzo che la sua attività notturna è stupida oltre che pericolosa, eppure non potrà fare a meno di continuare a indossare la maschera. Riuscirà a sopravvivere alla partnership con la letale Hit-Girl e il duro Big Daddy, alla rivalità con il nuovo supereroe cittadino, Red Mist, e alla mafia, già sulle sue tracce? Questo eBook contiene i numeri da 1 a 8 della serie Kick-Ass, pubblicata negli USA da Icon, un'introduzione di Rob Liefeld, le biografie degli autori, sketch preparatori e tutte le copertine originali.

30 review for Kick-Ass Omnibus 1 [Collezione 100% Cult comics]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jayson

    (A-) 83% | Very Good Notes: Very Itchy & Scratchy, it’s nuts: a salty teenage fantasy, with heart beneath its blood and guts and rollicking vulgarity.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Re-Read 2016 My 16 year old son wanted to read this, which made it easy for me to have another go at it, and see if I still thought it was a fun bit of savagery. It was! Poor idiot kid...I could totally see this shit happening to me if I ever decided to put on a wet suit and fight crime. PS- My kid loved it. He even made me go back to the library to get Kick-Ass 2 and Hit-Girl. Original Review: 2011 Wow! I'll admit it. I reallyHit-Girl.Original Re-Read 2016 My 16 year old son wanted to read this, which made it easy for me to have another go at it, and see if I still thought it was a fun bit of savagery. It was! Poor idiot kid...I could totally see this shit happening to me if I ever decided to put on a wet suit and fight crime. PS- My kid loved it. He even made me go back to the library to get Kick-Ass 2 and Hit-Girl. Original Review: 2011 Wow! I'll admit it. I really thought I'd hate this one. I'm more of a violence lite kind of girl, and Kick-Ass definitely does not go easy on the gore. Never in million years would I have thought I'd enjoy seeing a 10 year old ninja-girl carve up mobsters like a psychotic Cuisinart. But I did. So there. Now, I'd like to say that there was some strong underlying social commentary that was woven into the fabric of the story. That way, I could at least pretend there was a morally superior reason that I liked it. Sadly, there's not. Don't get me wrong, the story was great, but it's not going to make you want to be a better person or anything. Yep, it's pretty much just evil brain candy. Yum.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kemper

    I’ve got to be one sick puppy. Only a twisted individual could find great entertainment in watching a pre-teen girl slaughter gangsters while wearing a costume and cursing like a sailor. (As a bonus, I’m now scared of my niece. She is about that age, and she does gymnastics and dance so she’s got all these crazy flippy-flip moves. Thanks to being raised with video games, she’s also got reflexes like a fighter pilot. God help us all if she goes dark side.) But while I loved I’ve got to be one sick puppy. Only a twisted individual could find great entertainment in watching a pre-teen girl slaughter gangsters while wearing a costume and cursing like a sailor. (As a bonus, I’m now scared of my niece. She is about that age, and she does gymnastics and dance so she’s got all these crazy flippy-flip moves. Thanks to being raised with video games, she’s also got reflexes like a fighter pilot. God help us all if she goes dark side.) But while I loved the movie version of Kick-Ass, it left me a little uncertain about what it was trying to say. At times, the story of a nerdlinger who puts on a costume and gets beaten like a rented mule on a regular basis seemed like an indictment of trying to live in a comic book fantasy, but when Hit Girl and Big Daddy go ballistic, it seemed to be all about celebrating the Woo-Hoo! factor of splashy over-the-top violence. After reading the comic, I know that Millar meant it to be about fan boys who took their comics too seriously getting a hard cold dose of reality. Maybe the changes were necessary for the movie to even get made (because it almost didn’t happen), and it’s still a great flick. But the comic has a more consistent vibe and deliberately stripped out all of the Hollywood cool that you find in most books, and obviously, in the movies. So if you’re like me and don’t have a problem with watching or reading about a young girl acting as a foul mouthed killing machine, then enjoy both the comic and the movie. If you think that it’s wrong….well, I can’t really argue, but quit looking down your nose at me!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shelby *trains flying monkeys*

    It's happened-I've turned into a comic book nerd. I was one when a child and now I've gotten sucked back into that abyss..and I like it. This book was pure awesomeness. Dave is just that nerdy kid. He reads comic books and hangs out with his friends when not fantasizing about his biology teacher. His mom has recently passed away and his dad works long hours at night. Dave realizes it doesn't take trauma to make you a super hero: just loneliness and despair. So he suits up. Dave does not have an easy time It's happened-I've turned into a comic book nerd. I was one when a child and now I've gotten sucked back into that abyss..and I like it. This book was pure awesomeness. Dave is just that nerdy kid. He reads comic books and hangs out with his friends when not fantasizing about his biology teacher. His mom has recently passed away and his dad works long hours at night. Dave realizes it doesn't take trauma to make you a super hero: just loneliness and despair. So he suits up. Dave does not have an easy time with the whole superhero thing. He gets the crap beat out of him. A whole lot. Poor kid. He tries to hang up the crime fighting hat but then along comes a guy dressed up like a superhero named "Red Mist", that kinda pisses off our Kick-Ass hero so he dons the suit again and they team up. Now this book is violent as shit. You have a 10 year old girl who cusses more than I do. However, this book is one of my favorite comics that I have read so far. *whispers read this*

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro

    This comic book really kicks... butt!!! LEARNING ABOUT IT I hadn't read the original comic book story until later having watched the film adaptation. In fact, right after watched the movie, it was like "Oh, my God!!! Why the heck I haven't read that?!!!" So, I bought then, the TPB, since sadly, I guessed that it was gonna be impossible to get the single issues of the miniseries already too late after publication. But, I guess fate favored to the real fans, since some months later, This comic book really kicks... butt!!! LEARNING ABOUT IT I hadn't read the original comic book story until later having watched the film adaptation. In fact, right after watched the movie, it was like "Oh, my God!!! Why the heck I haven't read that?!!!" So, I bought then, the TPB, since sadly, I guessed that it was gonna be impossible to get the single issues of the miniseries already too late after publication. But, I guess fate favored to the real fans, since some months later, between two local comic book stores (one still active, another which closed some time ago), I was able to get the single issues and even in ridiculous low prices (sometimes even under printed original price) and that not only made me quite happy for having that jewels of the comic book universe, but also, helping me to increase the average value of my comic book collection ;) THE WRITER BEHIND IT I was already fan of Mark Millar as writer thanks to works like Superman: Red Son and The Ultimates (Years 1 & 2) (luckily too in single issues), but definitely Kick-Ass was the icing of the cake, it was the title that really puts him in "my book" as a "Top10" writer in the genre of comic books to me. Later I got TPBs of other stuff by him like Civil War and Wanted and he always delivered! Always something superb to read. KICKING IT!!! Writer: Mark Millar Illustrator: John Romita, Jr. Kick-Ass is the story of the young Dave Lizewski who after reading just too much comic books, asking himself the big question... Why the heck nobody had tried before to be a real super-hero in real life? So, Dave got into a costume, adopting the codename of "Kick-Ass" and meet the dangerous world of crime. Soon enough, he knew why the heck nobody tried to to such insane task. But, even with severe setbacks in the beginning, in the moment less expected he found out that indeed there were real superheroes out there, and they were THE REAL DEAL. Enter: Big Daddy and Hit-Girl And the universe of comic books was never the same... it got better!!! Kick-Ass is indeed a smart tale where people can realized how would be in real life trying such daring feat of becoming a costumed crime-fighter, all its greatness, but also all its dangers and bloody consequences. This story isn't shy of showing how the grim real life with sadistic mobsters and corrupt cops can smash the naive Dave Lizewski and his fantasy of a world with heroes. But in the middle of a fire of sadness, an unlikely friendship will be forged and the world will tremble!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Raeleen Lemay

    Re-read August 2017 Still great! I'm so glad to be back in this world. I've missed it ever since the second movie came out! ..........…………………… If you loved the movie as much as I did, I would definitely recommend checking this out! I should warn you though, it contains a ton of swearing and gory stuff (I love it.)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    What’s more entertaining: a murderous, gun-toting, foul mouthed raccoon or a murderous, sword wielding, foul mouthed little girl dressed like a superhero? Frankly, it’s a toss-up. Dave Lizewski is a bored, depressed, comic book reading teenager, who goes beyond just reading and fantasizing about superheroes. He dons a costume, sneaks out of his house and fights crime. And promptly gets beaten up. Comics have come a long way from romanticizing super hero exploits. The notion that someo What’s more entertaining: a murderous, gun-toting, foul mouthed raccoon or a murderous, sword wielding, foul mouthed little girl dressed like a superhero? Frankly, it’s a toss-up. Dave Lizewski is a bored, depressed, comic book reading teenager, who goes beyond just reading and fantasizing about superheroes. He dons a costume, sneaks out of his house and fights crime. And promptly gets beaten up. Comics have come a long way from romanticizing super hero exploits. The notion that someone could get dressed and effortlessly pound thugs and super villains and not get scratched or bruised is antiquated. This series takes a further step back and examines what would happen if your average Joe Citizen becomes a costume wearing vigilante. It’s not pretty. Aside from the adulation you might get on social media sites and being able to boost your ego and self-worth a little, getting sliced, diced and broken seems like a steep price to pay. And Dave Lizewski continues to pony up. Millar creates a thoughtful look at the allure and ultimate realities of being a super-hero. My one quibble would be with the art. I’ve never been a fan of John Romita, Jr., but using his cartoony art, instead of someone whose style is more realistic, I would assume, further separates and anesthetizes the reader from the ongoing violence and gore. Highly recommended.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Doing a re-read with these new editions out from Image. Millar and Romita take a real world approach to what would happen if a teenage comic book reader actually put on a costume and tried to fight crime. They'd get their ass kicked repeatedly. Romita doesn't pull any punches either. Every punch is illustrated in full bloody, pulped glory. My one gripe is Romita draws all the teenagers and kids with huge heads. They look like bobbleheads. Then Millar throws us a curveball with Hit-Girl. Here is Doing a re-read with these new editions out from Image. Millar and Romita take a real world approach to what would happen if a teenage comic book reader actually put on a costume and tried to fight crime. They'd get their ass kicked repeatedly. Romita doesn't pull any punches either. Every punch is illustrated in full bloody, pulped glory. My one gripe is Romita draws all the teenagers and kids with huge heads. They look like bobbleheads. Then Millar throws us a curveball with Hit-Girl. Here is this little girl who is slicing limbs off left and right. It's fantastic, even if the real world approach is suddenly left by the wayside. I found myself rooting for this crazy little nutjob, especially since Dave is a real douche with no redeeming qualities whatsoever. The book may be called Kick-Ass, but Hit-Girl is the true star of these books.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    I laughed my ass off at this. Everyone in Perkins thought I was a crazy person....

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dylan

    There’s a great line in Kick-Ass, the film adaptation, where comic-book-nerd turned vigilante-superhero Dave Lizewski proclaims to his friends “Jesus, guys, doesn’t it bug you? Thousands of people want to be Paris Hilton and nobody wants to be Spiderman”. Dave’s query cuts to the core of Kick-Ass (still the film), which beneath all the flayed limbs and gored bodies, is about doing the “right” thing, about standing up for what’s right and trying to make a difference. The superficial pleasures of Paris Hilton’s li There’s a great line in Kick-Ass, the film adaptation, where comic-book-nerd turned vigilante-superhero Dave Lizewski proclaims to his friends “Jesus, guys, doesn’t it bug you? Thousands of people want to be Paris Hilton and nobody wants to be Spiderman”. Dave’s query cuts to the core of Kick-Ass (still the film), which beneath all the flayed limbs and gored bodies, is about doing the “right” thing, about standing up for what’s right and trying to make a difference. The superficial pleasures of Paris Hilton’s life aren’t something to be aspired to – helping others is, and that superhero lore often doesn’t correlate with the real world is something Dave will have to learn along the way through his foray into vigilantism. A similar line is featured in Kick-Ass, Mark Millar’s graphic novel, but it’s no longer so great. Mark Millar’s Dave Lizewski isn’t the same naive altruistic hero, but a self-absorbed loner whose ascent into superherodom is guided solely by the power-trips and ego-boosts he gets from running around in a mask at night. He isn’t in it for the “little guy”, he’s in it for the Myspace friends and press coverage, and says as much several times throughout the book. Dave would rather be Spiderman than Paris Hilton not because he wants to help people, but because shooting web is “cooler” than putting out sex-tapes. He fumes when the media find a new vigilante to follow; he gloats about how great saving a cat will be for his reputation. Millar’s graphic novel is the piece of nihilism critics unfairly derided the film as, not that there’s anything inherently wrong with that. Much of Kick-Ass is an examination of the delusions of fanboys, the obsessive loners who find solace and refuge from insecurity in the tales of superheroes. It’s also an exploration of what superheroes would be like in reality, not guided by near un-human levels of altruism, but by the same insecurities, fantasies and psychological issues the rest of us suffer from. While this may not be as feel-good as Matthew Vaughn’s approach in the film, it has the potential to be a much more thoughtful work. Unfortunately Millar makes it quite clear from the off-set that besides a few brilliant moments, he’s content reveling in the gutter. Millar jumps from one bloody altercation to the next at breakneck speed, which is a shame because the real interest lies in the characters and the idea. Entire months of the storyline are condensed into a line or two, but the final battle extends for a good sixth of the book. This reads more like a blueprint to the film at times rather than a developed story in it's own right. There’s no sense of character beyond Dave, no sense of story beyond the most basic outline and no aspirations beyond mindless violence and shock-humor that could have been relegated to any number of lesser-ideas. The constant gore is tiring, as well as the lame attempts at shocking by any means (lets have a 9-year-old say the c-word!) and Millar’s fetish for testicular-violence is just strange, taken to the point where there’s even a character named “Ball-Buster Bobby”. Kick-Ass, the film, has Dave go after a mafia king-pin to atone for the consequences of his superhero shenanigans - Kick-Ass, the comic, has Dave go after a mafia king-pin to avenge his "balls". I know which one I prefer.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Like a a lot of people I had seen the movie before reading the comic and thought it would be redundant but that was nicely far from the truth. It's very similar to the movie but there were enough differences to keep me engaged. Tale is about a high school kid who becomes an actual superhero but finds himself mostly getting beat up as he tries to protect people. His first incident is so bad he ends up in the E.R. But somehow he keeps going and inspires other people to later become superheroes and Like a a lot of people I had seen the movie before reading the comic and thought it would be redundant but that was nicely far from the truth. It's very similar to the movie but there were enough differences to keep me engaged. Tale is about a high school kid who becomes an actual superhero but finds himself mostly getting beat up as he tries to protect people. His first incident is so bad he ends up in the E.R. But somehow he keeps going and inspires other people to later become superheroes and there's this craze that takes place. Just like the movie there's a lot of gore and swearing but unlike the movie this one has some explicit sex scenes. The ending for the love story is far more vague and tragic than in the film. The artwork had some nice touches. I was quite impressed the comic drew me in even after I had seen the movie. Most novels couldn't make that claim. STORY/PLOTTING: B plus to A minus; ARTWORK: A minus; CHARACTERS/DIALOGUE: B plus; WHEN READ: mid February 2012; OVERALL GRADE: B plus to A minus.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Donovan

    Dave Lizewski is a smug, lying, know-it-all douchebag. He’s a lower-middle-class entitled white kid with a father, friends, freedom, yet he creeps on women, beats up minorities, obsesses over his own fame, and somehow thinks of himself as desperate and lonely enough to prove himself. What a hero! If the least empathetic hero ever isn’t enough, his world is filled with cliché gangsters and gratuitous, unenjoyable violence. Nothing to keep me reading here except JRJR’s artwork.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    A lonely young man decides to right the wrongs of the world the only way he knows how - by dressing up as a superhero called Kick Ass and wandering the streets for crime! News of his exploits spreads via YouTube and Facebook and soon he is a celebrity but not before he's beaten nearly to death during his first encounter with crime. He soon finds other "superheroes" though - the Red Mist, another young man with a costume but no real powers, and Hit Girl, a 12 year old girl with mad martial arts s A lonely young man decides to right the wrongs of the world the only way he knows how - by dressing up as a superhero called Kick Ass and wandering the streets for crime! News of his exploits spreads via YouTube and Facebook and soon he is a celebrity but not before he's beaten nearly to death during his first encounter with crime. He soon finds other "superheroes" though - the Red Mist, another young man with a costume but no real powers, and Hit Girl, a 12 year old girl with mad martial arts skills and a masked gun toting father. All roads lead to a mafia boss and Kick Ass soon finds out what it means to be a superhero. It's an excellent concept and Mark Millar writes a fun, witty script with dark overtones of a disenfranchised society. The characters are excellent and the story barrels along at a fast pace. Millar is quick to point out where comics heroes ends and real world heroes begins which adds to the overall strength of the book. John Romita's drawings are also top notch with a lot of gore to offset the cutesy "kids in costumes" concept. The book is almost the same as the film but with one notable exception - Hit Girl's father's motivations. They changed it to fit a more mainstream cinema crowd but Millar's original idea is fascinating and speaks volumes about the idea that grown-ups are supposedly grown up. An excellent comic book with a great script and fantastic art, forget any preconceptions you may have, this is as good if not better than Marvel and DC superheroes. Can't wait for the sequel.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ronyell

    Introduction: Now, I will admit that I honestly have not heard about Mark Millar’s famous series “Kick-Ass” until I heard about the movie that came out. Even though I have not seen the movie yet as of this review, I was interested in checking out the comic book it was based off of before watching the movie and I must admit; I was TOTALLY blown away by this really creative concept of a comic book! What is this story about? Dave Lizewski was your average high school teenage boy who is not that popular, but is not thatbook! Introduction: Now, I will admit that I honestly have not heard about Mark Millar’s famous series “Kick-Ass” until I heard about the movie that came out. Even though I have not seen the movie yet as of this review, I was interested in checking out the comic book it was based off of before watching the movie and I must admit; I was TOTALLY blown away by this really creative concept of a comic book! What is this story about? Dave Lizewski was your average high school teenage boy who is not that popular, but is not that unpopular either. He also happens to be a huge fan of comic books in general and he loved the fact that the superheroes in the comic books would always save the day in the end. So, when Dave decided that he would like to become a superhero himself, he became the legendary crime fighter “Kick-Ass” and would go out into the city to save the citizens from the various criminals that pop up. Unfortunately, Dave will soon learn the hard way that being a superhero is not all that easy when he becomes famous and he ends up meeting with other masked vigilantes who may or may not be a threat to him. What I loved about this story: Mark Millar’s writing: I have read Mark Millar’s works before (his run on “Ultimate X-Men” and “Old Man Logan”) and so far, I had enjoyed most of his work. Now that I finally read “Kick-Ass,” I really appreciate Mark Millar’s unique storytelling even more! I loved the way that Mark Millar wrote Dave Lizewski as being a teenage boy who is genre savvy enough to learn that being a superhero can be a dangerous and risky job, but he goes through with it anyway since he has a strong desire to become a superhero. I also loved the fact that Dave Lizewski became a superhero, not because he was affected by some kind of radiation that gave him powers or because he came from another planet, but because he was bored and he just wanted to be a superhero. This motivation really gave a more creative spin on the superhero genre and I loved the way that Dave mentioned so many fictional superheroes that inspired him to become a superhero. I also loved the way that Mark Millar mentioned so many Marvel superheroes in this story, especially Spider-Man and Wolverine. My favorite mention of the Marvel superheroes was when Dave mentions about how Joss Whedon’s run on “Astonishing X-Men” managed to surpass “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” which he happens to be a big fan of “Buffy the Vampire Slayer!” I also really loved the character Hit-Girl, who Dave meets later on in the book as she seems to be the opposite of Dave, as she would kill anyone in an extremely gruesome manner while Dave, still trying to get used to being a superhero, refuses to kill people (not only that, but Hit-Girl is only TEN YEARS OLD and yet she is able to kill absolutely anyone with ease)! John Romita Jr.’s artwork: Now, I am a little fifty-fifty with John Romita Jr’s artwork in this comic as I have seen his artwork before in the 1980s issues of “Uncanny X-Men” and they were pretty stellar in those issues. However, there were some problems I had with the artwork in this book, which I will explain in the cons section. But, what I did like about John Romita Jr.’s artwork in this comic is that the action scenes where the characters get bloodied up are extremely vivid in detail and I actually cringed whenever the characters are getting killed or tortured. What made me feel uncomfortable about this story: For anyone who does not like gory violence and strong language, this comic definitely has lots of gore and language that might offend anyone who does not like reading such material. Also, one of the issues I had with John Romita Jr’s artwork was that the characters look a bit too noodle-like in appearance and it distracted me a bit from the story. Since this is a dark and gritty story, I would have expected to see the characters look a bit more realistic to really convey the darkness of this story. Also, I felt that the characters look a bit too old for their respective ages, such as Hit-Girl being only ten years old, but yet, she looks to be close to twelve or thirteen years old. Final Thoughts: Overall, “Kick-Ass” is a truly brilliant graphic novel that really details the realistic side of being a superhero and I am definitely looking forward to the second volume of this series! Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    4.5 stars. I really debated between 4 and 5 stars on this one and settled at 4.5 (with the possiblility that I may bump it up to 5.0 at some later date). However, this rating comes with a strong warning. Any parent that lets their kids (meaning in this case anyone under 25) read this book deserves to be spanked (I'm 39 and I may still be too young to read this). This is foul-mouthed, gruesome, violent, violent, did I mention violent, story about kids doing things that kids should never do, namely dressi 4.5 stars. I really debated between 4 and 5 stars on this one and settled at 4.5 (with the possiblility that I may bump it up to 5.0 at some later date). However, this rating comes with a strong warning. Any parent that lets their kids (meaning in this case anyone under 25) read this book deserves to be spanked (I'm 39 and I may still be too young to read this). This is foul-mouthed, gruesome, violent, violent, did I mention violent, story about kids doing things that kids should never do, namely dressing up like super heroes and going out at night to beat up and kill criminals. That said, I thought it was INCREDIBLY well written and a very clever story. If reading my warning and knowing what you are getting into doesn't put you off then I think I can say pretty confidently that you will really like this book as it is quality writing, great art and an engaging, if very violent, story. It is in the same mold as graphic novels like The Name of the Game(i.e., the Boys) by Garth Ennis, Gone To Texas(i.e., the Preacher) by Garth Ennis and Watchmen by Alan Moore (though Watchmen is pretty tame by comparison). Highly Recommended (with caveats)!!!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    Biggest waste of my time. If you're autistic like me, don't bother reading. It's ableist as hell. Sucky part is I was actually looking forward to reading it

  17. 4 out of 5

    Pramod Nair

    "I always wondered why nobody did it before me. I mean, all those comic book movies and television shows, you'd think at least one eccentric loner would have stitched himself a costume. Is everyday life really so exciting? Are schools and offices really so thrilling that I'm the only one who ever fantasized about this? C'mon. Be honest with yourself. We all planned to be a superhero at some point in our lives." - Dave Lizewski, a.k.a Kick-Ass Kick-Ass from Mark Miller - of Marvel Comics fame – is the story of/>"I "I always wondered why nobody did it before me. I mean, all those comic book movies and television shows, you'd think at least one eccentric loner would have stitched himself a costume. Is everyday life really so exciting? Are schools and offices really so thrilling that I'm the only one who ever fantasized about this? C'mon. Be honest with yourself. We all planned to be a superhero at some point in our lives." - Dave Lizewski, a.k.a Kick-Ass Kick-Ass from Mark Miller - of Marvel Comics fame – is the story of Dave Lizewski, a regular high school kid, who always wanted to be a super hero. He dons himself in a self-designed suit and tries to deliver justice for people in his neighborhood. But things don’t go well for him from the start and the reader is in for a visual mayhem of blood, gore, wicked humor and supreme violence. This is a comic book, which takes a dig at other comic book heroes and is extremely brutal and dark in its contents. Each frame of the cartoon panels pulsate with action sequences drenched in blood and viscera illustrated in brilliant artwork by John Romita Jr. If you are a fan of the Kick-Ass movie then this will be a comic book worth reading. If you abhor violence then this is a book that is to be avoided as it is bleeding violence. Suitable for mature audience only.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Roy

    This was a great read. Story was so similar to the film but definitely had its differences. I actually liked the novel more. The artwork was oh so gory and colourful. Great work from Romita Jr. Cant wait for the next volume.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Markus

    The fact that the two children on the cover are covered in blood is almost fair warning -- as much as they could put on a picture everyone will see. This is one of the most graphic, grisly comics I've ever seen. I had to ask a friend if I'd been out of the comic scene so long that this was now the norm. He assured me it wasn't. The extensive gore is the point of this narration. Kick-Ass is a young man who wants to be a superhero. This story is trying very hard to show what that would The fact that the two children on the cover are covered in blood is almost fair warning -- as much as they could put on a picture everyone will see. This is one of the most graphic, grisly comics I've ever seen. I had to ask a friend if I'd been out of the comic scene so long that this was now the norm. He assured me it wasn't. The extensive gore is the point of this narration. Kick-Ass is a young man who wants to be a superhero. This story is trying very hard to show what that would mean in real life. It means that real fights are messy and repulsive, and that people who die in those fights don't do so neatly. It means that courage and determination mean very little against superior fire power. It means that if you've never fought before and you decide to jump into the ring without training or backup, you're going to get the crap beaten out of you. It means that violence is, well, violent. It means that many comic books have been lying to us by glossing over this last point. That's what makes them so entertaining. And it's what makes reading Kick-Ass so difficult. One more point. I don't know how she's portrayed in the movie, but make no mistake: There is nothing cute about Hit Girl. Her upbringing has been so saturated with violence that she smiles sweetly as she crushes a man to death. Well, we know she's a freak as soon as we find out that she's being -- yep! -- homeschooled. By a father who "tells her everything she needs to know": extensive details about weaponry, what to do when a junkie pulls a forty-five, and the dictionary definition of a Democrat ("a ****ed-up prick who will march for the right to murder babies, but hold candlelight vigils for serial killers"). Yes, I understand why how her father raised her was important to the plot; but I'm never thrilled to find yet another story with the message that when you need the ultimate freak, find a homeschooler. Anyway. This story says what it needs to say extremely effectively. What it needs to say is quite disturbing. Don't pick this up lightly, and do NOT give it to your kids without reading it first.

  20. 5 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    I had seen the movie before and really liked it but this here comic book is even better. What’s it about? A highschool aged teen named Dave Lizewski is obsessed with superheroes and comic books. One day he wonders why nobody has tried to be a real life superhero so what does he do? Make himself a costume and become a real life superhero. Why it gets 5 stars: The story is very interesting and well written! The artwork is fantastic. The characters are very I had seen the movie before and really liked it but this here comic book is even better. What’s it about? A highschool aged teen named Dave Lizewski is obsessed with superheroes and comic books. One day he wonders why nobody has tried to be a real life superhero so what does he do? Make himself a costume and become a real life superhero. Why it gets 5 stars: The story is very interesting and well written! The artwork is fantastic. The characters are very interesting. I’m pretty sure 90% of people reading this will relate to Dave (though will probably not try being a real life superhero or (view spoiler)[ pretending they’re gay around their crush (unless of course they are gay in which case there’s no pretending needed). (hide spoiler)] There’s a character duo I won’t say much about but they are a couple of the best anti-hero characters I’ve seen in awhile. There’s lots of bad-ass, intense and gory (even more than the movie) action. Also some of the most batshit crazy action in comics! This book does things that will surprise many readers, mostly because they aren’t the things you would expect from this story. I’ll admit I wasn’t AS surprised since I had seen the movie (they aren’t entirely the same but not entirely different either) but it’s still a good example of twisty storytelling. This book is very humorous. Lots of crazy situations, dark humor and even a bit of political satire. I appreciated how much this book celebrates nerdy stuff, how fantastic comics are and the comic community. It was actually good and authentic. It wasn’t one of these “look at me I have a game controller and superhero shirt, tee-hee, so nerdy!” cringe things, it was good. The dialogue is well done and like I mentioned with the nerdy stuff, authentic. The teens sound like teens, the nerdy stuff sounds like actual nerdy stuff, etc. Overall: This book is fantastic and I highly recommend it to people who want a different (though more fucked up) kind of superhero comic! The story is good, the art is fantastic, it’s very exciting and the characters are interesting characters who are very well written. This comic lives up to the name! 5/5

  21. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    I agree with Mykle's review: the book is fine, but the movie is a clear improvement. The story flowed better, and I thought all the important changes to the story were good ideas. In particular, the romance with Katie was more fun, and so was the ending. Above all, though, the film medium allowed many sight gags that were impossible in comic-strip form. Starting with Hit-Girl's amazing balletic routines as she dispatches dozens of huge, heavily-armed opponents in hilariously bloody fa I agree with Mykle's review: the book is fine, but the movie is a clear improvement. The story flowed better, and I thought all the important changes to the story were good ideas. In particular, the romance with Katie was more fun, and so was the ending. Above all, though, the film medium allowed many sight gags that were impossible in comic-strip form. Starting with Hit-Girl's amazing balletic routines as she dispatches dozens of huge, heavily-armed opponents in hilariously bloody fashion. They made the movie for me, and in print form they're just hinted at. You may argue that that's more subtle, but, trust me, subtlety is not what Kick-Ass is about. Three stars for the book, at least four for the film!

  22. 4 out of 5

    kristen b ♡

    god this was so good and entertaining. a little gory and pretty explicit but that’s pretty rare to see in comic books now so it made it even more enjoyable. everything is so censored so no one gets their feelings hurt but this....isn’t! kick-ass has the most relatable origin story of any superhero — a fan. he has a pretty boring life and is a total loser. he gets beat up the first couple times he’s on the streets. hit-girl and big daddy are the best! big daddy’s twist origi god this was so good and entertaining. a little gory and pretty explicit but that’s pretty rare to see in comic books now so it made it even more enjoyable. everything is so censored so no one gets their feelings hurt but this....isn’t! kick-ass has the most relatable origin story of any superhero — a fan. he has a pretty boring life and is a total loser. he gets beat up the first couple times he’s on the streets. hit-girl and big daddy are the best! big daddy’s twist origin is also so relatable to us comic fans. and overall, the “plot twist” of this comic was actually more twist like than others. you really don’t see it coming! such a classic.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dang Ole' Dan Can Dangle

    "Why do people want to be Paris Hilton and nobody wants to be Spider-Man?" This is a question that a young, comic-loving Dave not only asks but acts on, eventually taking up the guise of the crime-fighting Kick-Ass. But he's no Spider-Man. No, no, no, far from it. In fact he's more Paris Hilton than he is Peter Parker. Sure, he shares similarities with Spidey, mostly youth and immaturity, but he's lacking what fundamentally makes Spider-Man the hero that he is: responsibility. It comes free of charg "Why do people want to be Paris Hilton and nobody wants to be Spider-Man?" This is a question that a young, comic-loving Dave not only asks but acts on, eventually taking up the guise of the crime-fighting Kick-Ass. But he's no Spider-Man. No, no, no, far from it. In fact he's more Paris Hilton than he is Peter Parker. Sure, he shares similarities with Spidey, mostly youth and immaturity, but he's lacking what fundamentally makes Spider-Man the hero that he is: responsibility. It comes free of charge with power, ya know. But, alas, little Dave lacks powers as well. Granted, at first Spider-Man used his power for personal gain and eventually vengeance, but eventually ole' Spidey found his inner altruism. Dave hasn't, and perhaps never will. Perhaps there was a better question Dave could have asked; perhaps he should have wondered what being Spider-Man, or any sort of hero, really entails. Kick-Ass makes a point to show that it takes place in the real world. Not the world of comic books, but the world of people influenced by comic books. We quickly learn that, unlike in Spidey's world, when you walk up to a criminal he will stab you and when you get stabbed blood indeed will come out. The real world is filled with more blood and violence and less justice and heroism. Which is precisely why there are more Paris Hiltons than there are Spider-Mans. Dave, too, wants to be Paris Hilton, he just goes about it by grabbing a mask and pretending he's doing something different. He's delusional. If Paris Hilton represents popularity, adoration, iconism, and self-indulgence, then Dave fits the bill perfectly. His motivation is the amount of friends he can get on Myspace, building his reputation and ego, and winning girls. He even gets jealous when a new "superhero" becomes more popular than him on TV. He wants to be a celebrity, not a hero, he just happens to think that a mask makes him look cooler than a chihuahua in a handbag does. Dave has not a shred of good intentions in him. He barely even hints at doing what he does to help people or better society or anything like that. He's a loser in a world that values popularity over righteousness and instead of trying to change such a world he merely tries to fit in. No one in this graphic novel is a likable character, and Dave is no exception. He's relatable, sure--if I was sent a picture of the girl I loved sucking someone else's dick I might cry about it, but I'll probably jerk off to it as well. Dave represents the dark, ugly parts of ourselves, and no one likes the dark and ugly parts of themselves, else they wouldn't be so ill-lighted and unappealing. Here's where the comic runs into some issues (no pun intended). Mark Millar's writing just isn't strong enough to flesh out such ideas. There's some shining moments of hope that bring promise to the story and reveal its potential, but on the whole it mostly fails. Watchmen already showed us in the 80s that when the concept of superheroes is applied to reality you don't get the black-and-white heroes-and-villains, but instead you get a big gray area with confused, delusional people in costumes. Kick-Ass has those same delusional characters (I don't think shoving a katana through someone for prank-calling their ex-girlfriend is a defensible vision of justice) but in Kick-Ass the comic itself seems to hold the same delusions as its main character. The concept had the potential to be powerful, but Millar fails to connect, especially in the ending. (view spoiler)[Kick-Ass is still alive and his superhero career will go on and in the sequel he will have a blatant costumed villain to fight. Kick-Ass didn't learn anything, he didn't have his Uncle Ben moment. He's still in it for the fame and adoration--he's still not a hero. But yet he's still pretending to be and the writing still treats him as if he is. Well, what a shitty fucking ending. (hide spoiler)] The concepts, ideas, and characters never go anywhere, the potential is never met, and the whole book is mindless rather than impactful. It's a book that decides to ignore the opportunity for thought-provoking themes or deep character psychology and instead gives us page after page of kids bloodying people with their weapons, never having to suffer important consequences or face any sort of revelation or ever even question their actions. The main character faces struggles and hardships but rather than serving to develop and transform the character the hardships only act as interruptions to the vigilante violence. When his bones heal he does the same thing he did before they were broken--so why did his bones need to break in the story? for realism? Phooey! That'd be confusing blood and curse words for maturity. Realism is not shown through a character getting stabbed, realism is shown through a character reacting to getting stabbed. It's not a bad graphic novel, it really isn't, I'd even call it better than most. I'm glad I read it and I enjoyed the time I spent doing so. It's just nothing too special in my eyes and is disappointing in that it missed so much potential and even what it did well ended up seeming convoluted in purpose. There's no depth to this story. It's mindless fun, which would be fine if it didn't pretend to be realistic or gritty. It shoves potential aside for the sake of cliches. This isn't a reworking of the superhero tale. It's an amoral Spider-Man with gore, a dumbed-down Watchmen, a young adult story pretending to be grown-up. Mildly enjoyable, but utterly disappointing. [I intend to add some comments on the book's sequel along with its film adaptation as soon as I get around to reading/watching them. Also I haven't proof-read this yet due to tiredness/laziness, so please bare with any errors and/or idiotic remarks until I revise it]

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    Ah well, such is life. Unusual thing for me to say here, skip the graphic novel/book and just see the movie. I never saw the movie based on the Kick Ass comic book. I wasn't that fussed about it. Then Kick Ass 2 came out so when Kick Ass came on TV I thought, "what the hey, see what it's like". It's not a bad movie. It's a little graphic. I didn't get bugged about the violence as it was pretty much in context...except for one scene: (view spoiler)Ah well, such is life. Unusual thing for me to say here, skip the graphic novel/book and just see the movie. I never saw the movie based on the Kick Ass comic book. I wasn't that fussed about it. Then Kick Ass 2 came out so when Kick Ass came on TV I thought, "what the hey, see what it's like". It's not a bad movie. It's a little graphic. I didn't get bugged about the violence as it was pretty much in context...except for one scene: (view spoiler)[ After threatening a crook who's trapped in his car in a crusher, and he talks Big Daddy and Hit Girl crush him anyway...somewhat gleefully. That is a bit disturbing as Hit Girl is about 11 years old. (hide spoiler)] So I got the books Kick Ass and Kick Ass 2 from the library. Yeah. The graphic violence I noted???? ramp it up to about the tenth power. I assume that the artists must have bought out all the available red ink and paint for miles around. You have basically the same story here only cruder crude...whatever. Big Daddy rather than resembling Bat Man (as he does in the movie) looks more like Jason, Michael Myers or Leather Face. The drawing/painting of this huge hulking figure holding a chain saw standing over Hit Girl is a bit more disturbing than Nic Cage as a falsely imprisoned cop striking back at the criminal who destroyed his family. So...about the same story as the movie, just the pages are splattered with a lot (that's a LOT) of red ink and images of human organs bouncing off walls and stuff. Just a darker more negative take. I would go into the progression/deterioration of comic books that led to this sort of thing, but I doubt many of you want to read it. Though I may say something in my remarks about "Kick Ass 2".

  25. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    I kind of conflated the Jackass and Kick-Ass franchises in my head without having had more than a passing familiarity (i.e., film trailers, quick book ads) with either of them. As it turns out, both are funny, violent, and undermine the idea of what it means to be a "man." Like Shakespeare's Prince Hal with Falstaff, we get to debate the nature of true courage and manhood, and choose Falstaff's buffoonery. So Kick-ass is so violent and the language so bad that I had to hide the language and pict I kind of conflated the Jackass and Kick-Ass franchises in my head without having had more than a passing familiarity (i.e., film trailers, quick book ads) with either of them. As it turns out, both are funny, violent, and undermine the idea of what it means to be a "man." Like Shakespeare's Prince Hal with Falstaff, we get to debate the nature of true courage and manhood, and choose Falstaff's buffoonery. So Kick-ass is so violent and the language so bad that I had to hide the language and pictures from 8 year old Henry as I was trying to read it (and later, had to hide myself away to finish it). It IS sort of Jackass for Superhero lovers, in a way, as we get to see what it would due like for teens to take on the mob… you end up in the hospital, natch! But the idea from the makers of Superman through Jeffrey Brown through today, that nerds, losers, weaklings who want to prove they are tough(and maybe do good in the world) will put on a costume and fight the bad guys and overcome their own weaknesses and accomplish some good… well, that is there, with a kind of cynical edge, since these boys are not just altruistic do-gooders… but mainly this is entertainment and not a serious reflection on superhero-dom. It's played for fun and laughs, and pretty much works, though I like Jeffrey Brown's less violent and profane version of this approach to Kick-Ass. But I liked it more than I thought I would, and the art is really great (okay, there IS a lot of bright red blood color in it, a warning to the squeamish…) from John Romita.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    OK so um...is it sacreligious to say I preferred the movie version? At least there Dave seems to maintain some connection to reality, here he's just a nobody, even his friends are assholes. The comic book version is not as fleshed out I guess? Or maybe the movie version just fleshed him out too much. He's supposed to be that empty and shallow? I guess so. The movie was funny when it was over the top as a joke, the book actually ends up being sadder. Funny thing is the violence in this book is so OK so um...is it sacreligious to say I preferred the movie version? At least there Dave seems to maintain some connection to reality, here he's just a nobody, even his friends are assholes. The comic book version is not as fleshed out I guess? Or maybe the movie version just fleshed him out too much. He's supposed to be that empty and shallow? I guess so. The movie was funny when it was over the top as a joke, the book actually ends up being sadder. Funny thing is the violence in this book is so ridiculous over the top that it gets to the point where you just skim because what will 4 extra panels of a guy getting punched in the face tell you really? Nothing. I did like the way things went with the love interest in the book more than the movie... It either means the movie was stupendous, or the book wasn't really that close to the movie, because I found this to be not as fun or entertaining, this is more of a sad pathetic reality...and maybe that's the point of it all, one gigantic social commentary? Either way, I wouldn't rush out for this one.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Anti-hero sarcasm at it's best. Kick-ass breaks the fourth wall and bombs the reader with genuine dark humor about the stuff he himself thinks of when reading superhero comics. All that in juicy violence that turns up to be more fun that gruesome with Romita's simple and fast paced art. It fast, funny and unconvetional. Go for it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mykle

    I was totally blown away by the movie. By childish ultra-violence, yes. With reservations regarding a totally unbelievable character, yes. But still, the movie seemed to aspire to all the great and awful heights of real superhero comics, while simultaneously investigating the comic fandom mindset and the nature of real vs. comic book violence, and it was really interesting intellectually while also totally, hard-core-pornographically stimulating to that awful part of me that rejoyces in movie vi I was totally blown away by the movie. By childish ultra-violence, yes. With reservations regarding a totally unbelievable character, yes. But still, the movie seemed to aspire to all the great and awful heights of real superhero comics, while simultaneously investigating the comic fandom mindset and the nature of real vs. comic book violence, and it was really interesting intellectually while also totally, hard-core-pornographically stimulating to that awful part of me that rejoyces in movie violence, and the acting was superb across the board, and the fight choreography was on a par with the best stuff John Woo ever did. So I figured the comic book had to be even better -- because books are better than films, right? But it wasn't, really. The writing was, actually, quite good -- and the movie really used every single good line from the comic. In fact the film expands the comic, instead of condensing it. I gather that the comic was already sold as a film before it was even done as a comic, so perhaps the comic itself is some kind of afterthought? Maybe the comic was adapted from the screenplay, not vise versa? I dunno, the art on the page didn't measure up to the cinematography on the screen, and for a comic-book adaptation, that's just wrong. Anyway ... go see the movie! There are great things in this book, but they're all in the movie alongside even more great things.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Artemy

    Meh. The beginning was cool, but honestly, this story is very shallow and incredibly cheesy. Also, metal plate in the head does not mean you can take that kind of beating and stay a normally functioning human, or possibly even alive, after. Otherwise, it is pretty gross to read, and I couldn't possibly give a crap about any of the characters (I couldn't even remember the name of the main dude). As is the case with many of Millar's books, this one relies very heavily on its shock value with Meh. The beginning was cool, but honestly, this story is very shallow and incredibly cheesy. Also, metal plate in the head does not mean you can take that kind of beating and stay a normally functioning human, or possibly even alive, after. Otherwise, it is pretty gross to read, and I couldn't possibly give a crap about any of the characters (I couldn't even remember the name of the main dude). As is the case with many of Millar's books, this one relies very heavily on its shock value with all the boobs, cursing and guts. Do not get me wrong, I don't have anything against brutality and adult themes in my comics. After all, Jason Aaron's Punisher and Garth Ennis' Preacher are among my most favourite comics ever. But in those titles, the violence was there for a reason. Here, it's just a bunch of comics geeks who decided they should go slice mobsters with swords. It feels as if this book is written by a hormone-crazy teenager boy who gets beat up a lot and doesn't get any, otherwise known as the main character of this story. I really liked John Romita Jr.'s art, though. There is something about his style that I really dig, even though I can see how some people might not like it. And he does draw some quality gore and human insides blown to bits. If there is one thing that is good about Kick-Ass, it is definitely the artwork.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ariel Acupan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My first reaction to this is, WTF!? This is one sick, gory, bloody, gritty, and a in-your-face Graphic Novel. I can't help myself but to compare the movie from the graphic novel. Graphic Novel: -As Dave put it, the two (Hit Girl and Big Daddy) has legit origin but as it turns out before Big Daddy was killed, he admitted that he was only a fanboy same as Dave and he only wants the life of Mindy to be different, to be exciting. So he created a life w/ the two of them as a crime-fighter vigilante o My first reaction to this is, WTF!? This is one sick, gory, bloody, gritty, and a in-your-face Graphic Novel. I can't help myself but to compare the movie from the graphic novel. Graphic Novel: -As Dave put it, the two (Hit Girl and Big Daddy) has legit origin but as it turns out before Big Daddy was killed, he admitted that he was only a fanboy same as Dave and he only wants the life of Mindy to be different, to be exciting. So he created a life w/ the two of them as a crime-fighter vigilante out to revenge the death of her mother. -Dave didn't get the girl, instead when he admitted to Katie that he is not gay, he got bit up again. Movie: -Big Daddy was a former cop who was framed up for the crimes committed by the drug lord Frank D'Amico. After he has been released from jail, w/ her daugther they've killed the drug lord's man to paralize his operation but it only lead to the death of big daddy. -By admitting that he was Kick-ass, Katie and Dave make out and she became her girlfriend. Both the graphic novel and the movie was great. Dave is a superhero that does not need superpowers to help others. He only needs to "KICK-ASS".

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