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Complete Shorter Fiction

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For the first time in one volume, this complete collection of all the short fiction Oscar Wilde published contains such social and literary parodies as "Lord Arthur Savile's Crime" and "The Canterville Ghost;" such well-known fairy tales as "The Happy Prince," "The Young King," and "The Fisherman and his Soul;" an imaginary portrait of the dedicatee of Shakespeare's For the first time in one volume, this complete collection of all the short fiction Oscar Wilde published contains such social and literary parodies as "Lord Arthur Savile's Crime" and "The Canterville Ghost;" such well-known fairy tales as "The Happy Prince," "The Young King," and "The Fisherman and his Soul;" an imaginary portrait of the dedicatee of Shakespeare's Sonnets entitled "The Portrait of Mr. W.H.;" and the parables Wilde referred to as "Poems in Prose," including "The Artist," "The House of Judgment," and "The Teacher of Wisdom."


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For the first time in one volume, this complete collection of all the short fiction Oscar Wilde published contains such social and literary parodies as "Lord Arthur Savile's Crime" and "The Canterville Ghost;" such well-known fairy tales as "The Happy Prince," "The Young King," and "The Fisherman and his Soul;" an imaginary portrait of the dedicatee of Shakespeare's For the first time in one volume, this complete collection of all the short fiction Oscar Wilde published contains such social and literary parodies as "Lord Arthur Savile's Crime" and "The Canterville Ghost;" such well-known fairy tales as "The Happy Prince," "The Young King," and "The Fisherman and his Soul;" an imaginary portrait of the dedicatee of Shakespeare's Sonnets entitled "The Portrait of Mr. W.H.;" and the parables Wilde referred to as "Poems in Prose," including "The Artist," "The House of Judgment," and "The Teacher of Wisdom."

30 review for Complete Shorter Fiction

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ana

    Lord Arthur Savile's Crime and Other Stories Lord Arthur Savile's Crime - Lord Arthur Savile, is introduced by Lady Windermere to Mr Septimus R. Podgers, a chiromantist, who reads his palm and tells him that it is his destiny to be a murderer. (4 stars) The Sphinx without a Secret - When Lord Muchison catches sight of a mysterious and beautiful lady in a carriage on London's Bond Street, he is captivated and spends the next few days on the lookout for her again. (3 stars) The Canterville Ghost - (3 Lord Arthur Savile's Crime and Other Stories Lord Arthur Savile's Crime - Lord Arthur Savile, is introduced by Lady Windermere to Mr Septimus R. Podgers, a chiromantist, who reads his palm and tells him that it is his destiny to be a murderer. (4 stars) The Sphinx without a Secret - When Lord Muchison catches sight of a mysterious and beautiful lady in a carriage on London's Bond Street, he is captivated and spends the next few days on the lookout for her again. (3 stars) The Canterville Ghost - (3 stars) The Model Millionaire - Hughie Erskine has a problem. He is madly in love with Laura Merton, but both of them are flat broke and unable to marry. Then a beggar makes an appearance. (2 stars) The Happy Prince and Other Tales and A House of Pomegranates collections are reviewed here (4 stars) The Portrait of Mr. W. H. - (4 stars) Poems in Prose The Artist, The Disciple, The Master, The House of Judgement, The Teacher of Wisdom (3 stars) The Doer of Good (4 stars)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ben Loory

    i don't think i've ever used the word "exquisite" before, especially in relation to anyone's writing, but the writing in these stories really is exquisite. the stories themselves are flawlessly conceived and executed; every other line a perfect quotable paradox. my only complaint is that it all got a little claustrophobic after all. so perfect, so finely-wrought, so heartbreakingly sad, so clever... it was all just a little bit too just-so. there are no car chases, no fistfights, no people i don't think i've ever used the word "exquisite" before, especially in relation to anyone's writing, but the writing in these stories really is exquisite. the stories themselves are flawlessly conceived and executed; every other line a perfect quotable paradox. my only complaint is that it all got a little claustrophobic after all. so perfect, so finely-wrought, so heartbreakingly sad, so clever... it was all just a little bit too just-so. there are no car chases, no fistfights, no people yelling in the streets, no drunks screaming off bridges into the night... for all the talk of obscenity and decadence that surrounds wilde's name, he really is an exceedingly tasteful and polite writer. sorta made me want to go bowling. best parts: the half-page prose poem "the artist," the scooby-dooish "canterville ghost," and this horrifying tale about a little bird who presses its breast against a thorn in order to make the roses red...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rao Javed

    Wilde Wilde shinning bring, in the literature of every time What mortal hand or eye could frame thy fearful symmetry

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laurel

    Great stories made all the better by Frank Muller's excellent audio narration. Loved the mix of eeriness along with Wilde's classic, clever humor.

  5. 4 out of 5

    F.R.

    I’ve always had a suspicion that Oscar Wilde is a prime example of style over substance. Yes the writing is arch and clever, the epigrams are well crafted and plentiful – but is there really anything else there? Is his fiction merely just an excuse for Oscar to show off his brilliant intelligence and keen wit? Is there much else going on behind that? It’s something I raise knowing I’ll never reach a satisfactory answer, but this collection does contain examples for both the defence and the I’ve always had a suspicion that Oscar Wilde is a prime example of style over substance. Yes the writing is arch and clever, the epigrams are well crafted and plentiful – but is there really anything else there? Is his fiction merely just an excuse for Oscar to show off his brilliant intelligence and keen wit? Is there much else going on behind that? It’s something I raise knowing I’ll never reach a satisfactory answer, but this collection does contain examples for both the defence and the prosecution. Take ‘The Portrait of Mr W.H.’, which is about literary theories and frauds built onto Shakespeare’s name. In other hands this could have been a serious and thoughtful essay, and whereas Wilde is bright enough to see there are serious points to be made, he mainly chooses to be flip and glib and shy away from them all. Furthermore the twists are obvious, the literary theory feels like it’s been clumsily inserted and the whole thing ends up resembling no more than the work of a clever sixth former. But then we come to ‘Lord Arthur Saville’s Crime’, which is a cracking tale and one of the best ruminations on fate which exists in fiction. Although it’s clearly written by Wilde, it has the required seriousness to tackle the subject but also a dainty lightness in the prose. It’s a tale I greatly admire. The same is true for ‘The Canterville Ghost’, which is the kind of comic ghost story that Charles Addams or Tim Burton would enjoy. Again it’s Wilde, but hasn’t been subsumed by the Wildean. The jury on style over substance therefore remains out. Also of note in this collection are the children’s tales – ‘The Happy Prince’ and so on. Years after I first read them I remain unconvinced though. Yes they have their moments and there’s a nice line of cruelty within them, but they always feel somewhat pompous and sanctimonious to me. And Wilde doesn’t do hectoring all that well. There are a number of other insubstantial sketches in this book, but the presence of ‘Lord Arthur Saville’s Crime’ and ‘The Canterville Ghost’ means that even a doubter like myself has to acknowledge that there were moments when Wilde was as brilliant as he though he was.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Furqan

    Although, I prefer Wilde's plays over his stories, this is a splendid collection of Wilde's short fiction. The stories written for children are my most favourite ones. They all are brilliantly crafted and achingly sweet, ending on a rather melancholy note. As you would expect from children stories, they all contain some kind of moral lessons, most of them promoting Christian values of self-sacrifice, charity, love and friendship. Often I had my heart in my mouth whenever a beautiful phrase or Although, I prefer Wilde's plays over his stories, this is a splendid collection of Wilde's short fiction. The stories written for children are my most favourite ones. They all are brilliantly crafted and achingly sweet, ending on a rather melancholy note. As you would expect from children stories, they all contain some kind of moral lessons, most of them promoting Christian values of self-sacrifice, charity, love and friendship. Often I had my heart in my mouth whenever a beautiful phrase or scene would come up. E.g. "'Death is a great price to pay for a red rose,' cried the Nightingale, 'and Life is very dear to all. It is pleasant to sit in the green wood, and to watch the Sun in his chariot of gold, and the Moon in her chariot of pearl. Sweet is the scent of the hawthorn, and sweet are the bluebells that hide in the valley, and the heather that blows on the hill. Yet Love is better than Life, and what is the heart of a bird compared to the heart of a man?'" (The Nightingale and the Rose) or "'I am going to House of Death. Death is the brother of Sleep, is he not?' And he kissed the Happy Prince on the lips, and fell down dead at his feet." (The Happy Prince) I've still got left to read few of Wilde's stories which he wrote for adults, though I didn't really relish The Portrait Of Mr W H. It had a promising beginning but it started to read like a monotonous literary essay on Shakespeare's sonnets, so I end up skimming through half of the story... [I shall update my review later.]

  7. 5 out of 5

    Daisy

    Awesome! I don't think I could ask for more from a short story collection. These stories were thought-provoking, original, beautiful, inspiring... it was brilliant. Yes, some stories were better than others but that's an occupational hazard with short story collections, and I didn't mind a bit of light and shade. Oscar Wilde's writing is just amazing - the descriptions, the characterisation (particularly the way the characters react to things) - I love it. My favourite stories were Lord Arthur Awesome! I don't think I could ask for more from a short story collection. These stories were thought-provoking, original, beautiful, inspiring... it was brilliant. Yes, some stories were better than others but that's an occupational hazard with short story collections, and I didn't mind a bit of light and shade. Oscar Wilde's writing is just amazing - the descriptions, the characterisation (particularly the way the characters react to things) - I love it. My favourite stories were Lord Arthur Saville's Crime (anyone who read and loved The Picture of Dorian Gray would love this story), The Happy Prince and The Portrait of Mr. W. H. The latter I would definitely recommend to any Shakespeare fan - the new perspective it brings to his sonnets and really just his life are so thought-provoking and creative and just wow. I also enjoyed all the references to Greek mythology, which, like Shakespeare, is another subject I'm obsessed with. Oscar Wilde never fails to blow my mind with his beautiful writing, creative stories and emotive visions. I am extremely glad I read this book!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Doug

    The short stories here aren't all that great, honestly. Oscar Wilde is great at quips and epigrams, but many of the stories here don't show that. Probably the story 'Lord Arthur Savile's Crime' is the best one here, and 'The Canterville Ghost' is a close second. But many of his other stories are cutesy fairy tales, apparently written for children, and they just don't do much for me. I got bored and couldn't even finish parts of his collection. When the stories are good, they're great -- but The short stories here aren't all that great, honestly. Oscar Wilde is great at quips and epigrams, but many of the stories here don't show that. Probably the story 'Lord Arthur Savile's Crime' is the best one here, and 'The Canterville Ghost' is a close second. But many of his other stories are cutesy fairy tales, apparently written for children, and they just don't do much for me. I got bored and couldn't even finish parts of his collection. When the stories are good, they're great -- but they're not often good, and many of them are rather uninteresting and boring.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sonia

    I've been reading a story here and there for a while. My favourite stories were The Remarkable Rocket and The Portrait of Mr. W. H. I'm glad of the notes as they really helped.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Iz

    3.5 Loved the first and last story the most

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    Plot: Oscar Wilde’s complete short stories is exactly what it sounds like on the cover. It is a variety of stories following different narratives, all of which have a key focus on morals and teachings. Appearing to make them designed for children rather than adults. The stories all vary in length with some being 1 or 2 pages long and others such as the happy prince were longer with more detail. The happy prince was properly my favourite story as the morals were so prominent with the focus point Plot: Oscar Wilde’s complete short stories is exactly what it sounds like on the cover. It is a variety of stories following different narratives, all of which have a key focus on morals and teachings. Appearing to make them designed for children rather than adults. The stories all vary in length with some being 1 or 2 pages long and others such as the happy prince were longer with more detail. The happy prince was properly my favourite story as the morals were so prominent with the focus point being everyone deserves to be looked after and wealth should not be the main factor to life. It follows the story of a statue who is embossed with rich jewels and a bird. The statue wants to help the people of his city who are struggling in there day to day lives and the statue looks to the bird to help him. There is a constant theme of magical realism which is present throughout the different stories and in Oscar Wilde’s stories in general appear to have this element of magical realism.

  12. 5 out of 5

    ZX

    This book is a collection of short stories by Oscar Wilde. There are a total of 11 stories, the longest story of which is "The Fisherman and His Soul" at 38 pages. A lot of the stories included tackles moral issues - about being helpful, humble, gracious etc. I feel that the stories did not exactly highlight the strength of Wilde's writings to me. Additionally, although they are easy to comprehend, I do feel that some of Wilde's stories are a bit draggy and lengthy - too much of details. The This book is a collection of short stories by Oscar Wilde. There are a total of 11 stories, the longest story of which is "The Fisherman and His Soul" at 38 pages. A lot of the stories included tackles moral issues - about being helpful, humble, gracious etc. I feel that the stories did not exactly highlight the strength of Wilde's writings to me. Additionally, although they are easy to comprehend, I do feel that some of Wilde's stories are a bit draggy and lengthy - too much of details. The book only features a very slim introduction of Oscar Wilde and the stories included. There are no annotations or notes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kafil Recherche

    Great book! Firstly, it includes my favorite nobel The Picture of Dorian Gray: a great nobel. And, all the other stories are also great.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gary Mcfarlane

    Although, "old" is current: " ...the King gave orders that the page's salary was to be doubled. As he received no salary at all this was not of much use to him, but it was considered a great honour, and was duly published in the Court Gazette."

  15. 4 out of 5

    Maru Peng

    a decent collection

  16. 4 out of 5

    qershore

    3.75/5 I really enjoyed Wilde's short stories and had a fantastic time reading all of them. Here are my rambling thoughts on all the stories. I didn't rate the poems in prose I've read because they were really short, and, to be honest, I didn't feel like rating them. Don't read any further because there are many many spoilers here Lord Arthur Savile's Crime 3/5 This is the first short story from Wilde that I've ever read and I quite enjoyed it, though, I must say it wasn't the best short story 3.75/5 I really enjoyed Wilde's short stories and had a fantastic time reading all of them. Here are my rambling thoughts on all the stories. I didn't rate the poems in prose I've read because they were really short, and, to be honest, I didn't feel like rating them. Don't read any further because there are many many spoilers here Lord Arthur Savile's Crime 3/5 This is the first short story from Wilde that I've ever read and I quite enjoyed it, though, I must say it wasn't the best short story I've read. I like how Lord Arthur kept trying to murder someone, but his plans kept failing. When he did manage to kill someone, it was revealed that he [Mr. Podgers] was an imposter all along. The Sphinx without a Secret 3.5/5 It was a solid read for me, though it felt a little flat to me because I expected more than I got. It was a really short story about the narrators old friend Lord Murchison, who met a woman, Lady Alroy, with whom he fell in love with. But the secrecy surrounding her made him suspicious of her. He wanted to uncover her secrets, but after a fight, he went to Norway. In the meantime, Lady Alroy caught a cold and died of congestion of the lungs. Plagued by sorrow, he decided to uncover her secret and found out there is none. After telling his story to the narrator, he asks him if he thinks there is a secret, which he [the narrator] negates. He thinks that Lady Alroy had a passion for secrecy and a mania for mystery, but ultimately was a Sphinx without a secret. The Canterville Ghost 4.5/5 I really liked this story. It combines horror with comedy and I quite enjoyed it. All the past residents of Canterville are frightened by the ghost and have mostly died, because of suicide, murder or something else. The Otis family, though, isn't scared of the ghost, making him feel insulted and disrespected lol, which is why he wants vengeance. Throughout the story the ghost fails to frighten the family and I found it very funny how he was portrayed, especially since he's supposed to be this frightening creature haunting the Canterville Chase, but ultimately is being ridiculed. He became depressed I think? and asked Virgina to help him lift the curse off of him, which she did. After a long search for her, she was found and told everybody that the ghost, Sir Simon has finally died after haunting Canterville Chase for 300 years. At the end she and her lover marry and live happily ever after. The Model Millionaire 5/5 I really liked the message in this short story. It shows how being good-hearted and empathetic will pay in the end and that you don't need to have a lot of money to be happy. The Happy Prince 4.5/5 Lovely story about the Happy Prince, who is now a statue and sees the misery of his people in the city. Being deeply influenced by them, he cries everyday until a Swallow comes along who needs shelter for the night. The Happy Prince asks him to give a seamstress his ruby to which the Swallow agrees. After doing the good deed he wants to go to Egypt for the winter, but the Happy Prince wants him to stay for another night, which he does. After giving the poor two of his blue sapphire eyes, the Prince will be forever blind, which is why the Swallow decides to stay with him. Day after day they give the poor a golden leaf, of which the Happy Prince is made of. Now he isn't a beautiful statue and the bird, suffering from the cold weather is going to die and kisses the Happy Prince goodbye, whereupon the Happy Prince's heart made of lead breaks. Now, the mayor wants to melt the statue, but the heart will not melt, which is why he throws it away with the bird. God asks one of his angels to bring him the two most precious things of this city and the angel comes back with the heart made of lead and the bird. God is pleased and gives The Happy Prince and the Swallow a Place in his garden of Paradise. The Nightingale and the Rose 5/5 Wow. It saddens me that Nightingale's sacrifice is useless. She sacrificed her life for the student's love because it must be true love, right? But the ungratefulness of the professor's daughter makes the Nightingales life go to waste. The Selfish Giant 3/5 It wasn't bad, but I didn't like this one as much as the other stories. It shows how selfishness can negatively change your life and that by being unselfish you will encounter the best years in your life because you spread love. The Devoted Friend 3.5/5 I would've given it a better rating, but the story was so frustrating. *sigh* What do you consider a devoted friend? Do you consider yourself one? What does friendship really mean and how can you be a good friend to your friends? The Water-Rat wants a devoted friend, but he doesn't understand what it takes to be one. When asked what he would do in return, he doesn't understand. The Green Linnet tells him a story about poor little Hans who is kind-hearted and his devoted friend Hugh the Miller. Miller goes on and on about being a good friend, but in reality he is anything but a good friend. He takes things from Hans without ever returning the favour. He never visits Hans on his bad days. He doesn't help Hans when he needs his help. But that's what makes him a good friend, right? He takes advantage of Hans over and over and over again and Hans never complains. Which leads to Hans dying while trying to help Miller, which he, at the end, doesn't even really appreciate??? This story made me mad because we all know people that are like this piece of shit. I know it's just a story, but I was frustrated nevertheless. And to top it of the damn Water-Rat didn't even get the moral of the story. Noice. The Remarkable Rocket 2/5 I didn't like this story at all. It is about a rocket with an inflated ego, who thinks he is better than anyone else. He likes to hear himself talk and doesn't want to listen to anybody else than himself. Funnily enough, he doesn't take off at the wedding of the Prince and is thrown away and even then he thinks he's superior to everyone he meets. Later on, the oh so remarkable rocket gets lit and does take off, but nobody sees it. such a sad story, I shed a tear The Portrait of Mr. W. H 3/5 'Twas okay. I have nothing to say about this besides that firstly Cyril Graham and then Lord Erskine were obsessed with who Mr. W. H. (Willie Hughes) was and I found it funny that in Wilde's other short story "The Model Millionaire" the protagonist's name is Hughie Erskine. I don't know if there really is a connection there, but it's still funny to me. The Young King 3.5/5 I liked this story very much, but I do prefer his other works over this. The Young King shows the problematic between the rich and the poor and how they are codependent. But after having three nightmares about his folk and how poorly and miserably they live, he decides to not conform to the standard that nobility holds him to. He defies those standards and is being acknowledged as the true king and having a face of an angel. The Birthday of the Infanta 4/5 I feel deeply sorry for the poor little Dwarf. The Fisherman and his Soul 4/5 I liked this story very much. I loved how the soul was portrayed and how it is in need of a heart to stay pure, but without it it turned evil and made the Fisherman do horrible things at first, but the power of love is so much stronger than the temptations the soul offers. The Star-Child 4/5 Arrogance is quite a common pattern in good-looking people that think they're better than everybody else because of they're looks. The Star-Child, though, learned that his behavior and arrogance isn't something to be proud of and sought out the forgiveness of his birth mother after being turned into an ugly boy. He learns to take pity on the less fortunate ones and therefore regains not only his looks, but also the forgiveness of his mother, who turned out to be the Queen. I didn't really like the end of the story. Like, after ruling for only three years of his life in the palace, he dies and the ruler, who came after him, was evil. I don't really understand why it had to end that way.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    In most of his fairy tales and short stories Oscar Wilde attempted a seriousness, even a sobriety, that did not quite jell with the sardonic, witty persona he was developing. My theory on the nature of Wilde's tragedy is that his persona gained inner reality, as opposed to being merely a veneer to amuse and increase sales of his books, while the serious values suffered atrophy. The serious values are conveyed in a few of the fairy tales, particularly "The Happy Prince" and "The Rose and the In most of his fairy tales and short stories Oscar Wilde attempted a seriousness, even a sobriety, that did not quite jell with the sardonic, witty persona he was developing. My theory on the nature of Wilde's tragedy is that his persona gained inner reality, as opposed to being merely a veneer to amuse and increase sales of his books, while the serious values suffered atrophy. The serious values are conveyed in a few of the fairy tales, particularly "The Happy Prince" and "The Rose and the Nightingale," through a combination of humorous irony and fierce poignancy redolent of Hans Christian Anderson. These values come to the fore completely in "The Canterville Ghost." The editor, Ian Small, claims this is a parody of ghost stories, but it is really, despite much humor, a somber, heartfelt story of redemption made possible by a child's faith. It's the star of all of his short fiction. Stories like "Lord Arthur Savile's Crime" and "The Model Millionaire" are, for my money, piffle; these are parodies, and heartless ones. But, as Oscar Wilde is the author, all the stories are for that reason indispensable.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Edward

    Chronology Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Texts The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888) --The Happy Prince --The Nightingale and the Rose --The Selfish Giant --The Devoted Friend --The Remarkable Rocket --The Portrait of Mr. W. H. (1889) A House of Pomegranates (1891) --The Young King --The Birthday of the Infanta --The Fisherman and his Soul --The Star-Child Lord Arthur Savile's Crime and Other Stories (1891) --Lord Arthur Savile's Crime --The Sphinx Without a Secret --The Canterville Ghost --The Model Chronology Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Texts The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888) --The Happy Prince --The Nightingale and the Rose --The Selfish Giant --The Devoted Friend --The Remarkable Rocket --The Portrait of Mr. W. H. (1889) A House of Pomegranates (1891) --The Young King --The Birthday of the Infanta --The Fisherman and his Soul --The Star-Child Lord Arthur Savile's Crime and Other Stories (1891) --Lord Arthur Savile's Crime --The Sphinx Without a Secret --The Canterville Ghost --The Model Millionaire Poems in Prose (1894) --The Artist --The Doer of Good --The Disciple --The Master --The House of Judgement --The Teacher of Wisdom --'Elder-tree' (fragment) Notes

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cleo

    This volume contains all of Oscar Wilde's shorter works, including his fairy tales, which I had already read. The rest of it was new to me, although frankly there wasn't that much of it. The fairy tales are quite lovely though, by turns lyrical and cynical. They always seem to be heading the way most fairy tales do, but then there's a sharp and bitter twist, such as in "The Nightingale and the Rose". The nightingale's sacrifice and suffering is all for nothing because of a flighty young woman. This volume contains all of Oscar Wilde's shorter works, including his fairy tales, which I had already read. The rest of it was new to me, although frankly there wasn't that much of it. The fairy tales are quite lovely though, by turns lyrical and cynical. They always seem to be heading the way most fairy tales do, but then there's a sharp and bitter twist, such as in "The Nightingale and the Rose". The nightingale's sacrifice and suffering is all for nothing because of a flighty young woman. This book collects everything from the fairy tales to ghost stories, detective fiction, and, (what Wilde's most known for) comedies of manners. It was probably my least favorite collection of Wilde's works, but it's a still important to read. 3.5 stars.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Qhuay

    I really ejoyed this book, even though we can't say the stories have happy endings. In fact, it was quite the contrary. But all of them had important messages to give us and that gave a whole new meaning to everything that happened. My favourites were The Happy Prince , The Nightingale And The Rose and The Selfish Giant . They were all stories of selfless love and who can resist that?

  21. 5 out of 5

    Oviya

    3 As it often goes with anthologies, I didn't like everything. but I loved some. The ones that I loved : 1. The Happy Prince 2. The Selfish Giant 3. The Fisherman and his Soul 4. The Young King 5. The Model Millionaire 6. The Artist This is NOT in any particular order.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Margie

    Not what I was expecting. A few of the stories demonstrated the social commentary I was expecting, but on the whole the stories were more Aesop than Saki. Beautiful writing, and interesting if one is a fan or scholar of Wilde, but a bit of an odd hodgepodge.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ajinkya Kale

    PROLOGUE : The charm of Oscar Wilde radiates from each line. His humour, philosophy and cheerfulness in each word are really heart touching. He has such beautiful elegance in his writing –that can even shame a woman! Wilde’s stories invoke wisdom and tranquillity. He has an easy yet descriptive style. He not only builds up the ambience through details of surroundings but also captures necessaryemotions, and yes indeed the all-importantMORALof the story. There’s an interesting thing to note the PROLOGUE : The charm of Oscar Wilde radiates from each line. His humour, philosophy and cheerfulness in each word are really heart touching. He has such beautiful elegance in his writing –that can even shame a woman! Wilde’s stories invoke wisdom and tranquillity. He has an easy yet descriptive style.  He not only builds up the ambience through details of surroundings but also captures necessary emotions, and yes indeed the all-important MORAL of the story. 📖 There’s an interesting thing to note the MORALS’ too. They are not the textbook definitions of the ‘good’s triumph over evil’ and all that rhetoric. They instead of sarcastic, deep, abrupt and heart-breaking. Powerful stuff!⚡ “The beauty is in the details” – Jim Jarmusch REVIEW Stories like-The Model Millionaire, The Happy Prince and The Fisherman and His Soul- speaks of human sentiments. Desire. Redemption. Love. Narcissism. Temptation. "I can resist everything except temptation"– Oscar Wilde The Remarkable Rocket, The Nightingale and the Rose- are lovable fictions. They provide us easy-to-grasp morals and are deeply sagacious.   RECOMMENDATION I personally felt that this book is a gem💎 in terms of the rich literature and canny wisdom it provides. The early 19th-century writing style doesn’t seem boring or hazy at all; it just gets beautiful and blossoming each page you read. The short stories are short, crisp and loveable. I would recommend to anyone who has an inclination towards essence of beauty, details, humour and love 💖 PS Check out my Book Review Review for its complete review: https://thereviewtank.wordpress.com/2... Please leave your comments on this work folks <3!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Always enjoyed watching Oscar Wilde’s work performed, though I have never enjoyed reading his work until now. This collection of fables, fairy tales, short stories and poems as prose provide remarkable insight into a remarkable person. They reveal a man deeply sentimental, deeply sensitive, and reluctantly cynical. He expects so much of humanity and yet is disappointed when we fall short time and time again. Seems to me his famous wit was a wall protecting the vulnerable man inside from what he Always enjoyed watching Oscar Wilde’s work performed, though I have never enjoyed reading his work until now. This collection of fables, fairy tales, short stories and poems as prose provide remarkable insight into a remarkable person. They reveal a man deeply sentimental, deeply sensitive, and reluctantly cynical. He expects so much of humanity and yet is disappointed when we fall short time and time again. Seems to me his famous wit was a wall protecting the vulnerable man inside from what he viewed as a shallow and often cruel world. The fables and fairy tales started off a little slow, but by the time I worked my way through all the stories and the prose I gained a new appreciation for the layers of meaning I missed initially. Also, the stories are frequently very funny, especially The Canterville Ghost and The Remarkable Rocket. 4.5 stars (this isn’t the edition I read but close enough)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    NB- I was just reading Dorian Gray- not the whole book of short stories. I really enjoyed Dorian Gray. I had watched the film beforehand, and had been wanting to read something by Oscar Wilde for some time. It was eloquent, witty and thoughtful, with a lot of themes that seemed to me quite translatable to modern day. There are definitely a lot of people today whose focus on their image could be addressed with this poignant, short account of how beauty and youth truly are not everything. Also, I NB- I was just reading Dorian Gray- not the whole book of short stories. I really enjoyed Dorian Gray. I had watched the film beforehand, and had been wanting to read something by Oscar Wilde for some time. It was eloquent, witty and thoughtful, with a lot of themes that seemed to me quite translatable to modern day. There are definitely a lot of people today whose focus on their image could be addressed with this poignant, short account of how beauty and youth truly are not everything. Also, I loved the character of Henry/ Harry, with his wistful views on life, art and women. He cracked me up with how completely pompous he was.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Richp

    Satire does not always translate well over the passage of more than a century, and this is almost all satire. In addition, complete short stories of so-and-so collections almost always contain a number of mediocrities; Sturgeon's law applies, and while authors can toss their misses in the waste paper bin, hungry ones often get some of them published. There are some very good tales here. There is a review here by F.R. which coincides with my opinion, but is better written and in more detail.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Naliza Fahro-Rozi

    For the first time in one volume, this complete collection of all the short fiction Oscar Wilde published contains such social and literary parodies as "Lord Arthur Savile's Crime" and "The Canterville Ghost;" such well-known fairy tales as "The Happy Prince," "The Young King," and "The Fisherman and his Soul;" an imaginary portrait of the dedicatee of Shakespeare's Sonnets entitled "The Portrait of Mr. W.H.;" and the parables Wilde referred to as "Poems in Prose," including "The Artist," "The For the first time in one volume, this complete collection of all the short fiction Oscar Wilde published contains such social and literary parodies as "Lord Arthur Savile's Crime" and "The Canterville Ghost;" such well-known fairy tales as "The Happy Prince," "The Young King," and "The Fisherman and his Soul;" an imaginary portrait of the dedicatee of Shakespeare's Sonnets entitled "The Portrait of Mr. W.H.;" and the parables Wilde referred to as "Poems in Prose," including "The Artist," "The House of Judgment," and "The Teacher of Wisdom."

  28. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    I love Oscar Wilde's plays, especially The Importance of Being Earnest, so I was surprised by the tone of most of the stories in this book, which are rather bleak. Many are like fairy tales, but more like Hans Christian Andersen's stories, which reflect unhappy decisions and death. A couple of the stories involve the same social milieu as Wilde's plays. The most amusing story is The Canterville Ghost, where a family of materialistic Americans manage to defeat an aristocratic British ghost. I I love Oscar Wilde's plays, especially The Importance of Being Earnest, so I was surprised by the tone of most of the stories in this book, which are rather bleak. Many are like fairy tales, but more like Hans Christian Andersen's stories, which reflect unhappy decisions and death. A couple of the stories involve the same social milieu as Wilde's plays. The most amusing story is The Canterville Ghost, where a family of materialistic Americans manage to defeat an aristocratic British ghost. I think that there was an old movie based on this story.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chris M.H

    I've only read a few other authors short stories and I found only a few to be worthy of significant praise and attention while many can be all but forgotten. From Oscar Wilde almost all, in this book at least, were something to marvel at. The first 3/4 of the stories are magnificent, full of extravagance and wit, with no shortage of moral teachings and grave but appreciative warnings. The last quarter were less to my liking, with Lord Arthur Savile's crime being the hardest to rally behind but I've only read a few other authors short stories and I found only a few to be worthy of significant praise and attention while many can be all but forgotten. From Oscar Wilde almost all, in this book at least, were something to marvel at. The first 3/4 of the stories are magnificent, full of extravagance and wit, with no shortage of moral teachings and grave but appreciative warnings. The last quarter were less to my liking, with Lord Arthur Savile's crime being the hardest to rally behind but even so this whole collection is beautiful.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Every once in a while, something is so pure and well written it makes you cry. The Happy Prince, The Nightingale and the Rose, absolutely reinforce why Wilde is one of my favorite writers. It is hauntingly beautiful prose. I do think beauty is in every line he writes. And there is also much sadness to it. It is like diving into his soul, and I don't know why I delayed reading it so long after reading Dorian Gray and his plays. I will certainly go back to this tales.

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