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Walden In Plain and Simple English: Includes Study Guide, Complete Unabridged Book, Historical Context, Biography, and Character Index

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Книга, которую вы открыли, поможет изучить последовательность и логическое развитие взглядов и воззрений американского философа и писателя-романтика Генри Дэвида Торо, «смотрителя ливней и снежных бурь», как окрестил себя он сам, или «бакалавра природы», как называл его глава трансценденталистского кружка философ Ральф Уолдо Эмерсон. Итак, весной 1845 года 27-летний автор, Книга, которую вы открыли, поможет изучить последовательность и логическое развитие взглядов и воззрений американского философа и писателя-романтика Генри Дэвида Торо, «смотрителя ливней и снежных бурь», как окрестил себя он сам, или «бакалавра природы», как называл его глава трансценденталистского кружка философ Ральф Уолдо Эмерсон. Итак, весной 1845 года 27-летний автор, проникнувшись философскими идеями Эмерсона, концепциями свободы личности, взаимоотношения духа и природы, решил поставить эксперимент по изоляции от общества и сосредоточении на самом себе и своих нуждах. Он поселился на окраине Конкорда (штат Массачусетс) в построенной им самим хижине


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Книга, которую вы открыли, поможет изучить последовательность и логическое развитие взглядов и воззрений американского философа и писателя-романтика Генри Дэвида Торо, «смотрителя ливней и снежных бурь», как окрестил себя он сам, или «бакалавра природы», как называл его глава трансценденталистского кружка философ Ральф Уолдо Эмерсон. Итак, весной 1845 года 27-летний автор, Книга, которую вы открыли, поможет изучить последовательность и логическое развитие взглядов и воззрений американского философа и писателя-романтика Генри Дэвида Торо, «смотрителя ливней и снежных бурь», как окрестил себя он сам, или «бакалавра природы», как называл его глава трансценденталистского кружка философ Ральф Уолдо Эмерсон. Итак, весной 1845 года 27-летний автор, проникнувшись философскими идеями Эмерсона, концепциями свободы личности, взаимоотношения духа и природы, решил поставить эксперимент по изоляции от общества и сосредоточении на самом себе и своих нуждах. Он поселился на окраине Конкорда (штат Массачусетс) в построенной им самим хижине

59 review for Walden In Plain and Simple English: Includes Study Guide, Complete Unabridged Book, Historical Context, Biography, and Character Index

  1. 5 out of 5

    Riku Sayuj

    The first half is written by Thoreau, the accomplished philosopher and soars much above my humble powers of comprehension; the second half is written by Thoreau, the amateur naturalist and swims much below my capacity for interest. After reading about the influence the book had on Gandhi, I had attempted reading Walden many (roughly four) times before and each time had to give up before the tenth page due to the onrush of new ideas that enveloped me. I put away the book each time with lots of The first half is written by Thoreau, the accomplished philosopher and soars much above my humble powers of comprehension; the second half is written by Thoreau, the amateur naturalist and swims much below my capacity for interest. After reading about the influence the book had on Gandhi, I had attempted reading Walden many (roughly four) times before and each time had to give up before the tenth page due to the onrush of new ideas that enveloped me. I put away the book each time with lots of food for thought and always hoped to finish it one day. Now after finally finishing the book, while I was elated and elevated by the book, I just wish that Thoreau had stuck to telling about the affairs of men and their degraded ways of living and about his alternate views. Maybe even a detailed account of his days and how it affected him would have been fine but when he decided to write whole chapters about how to do bean cultivation and how to measure the depth of a pond with rudimentary methods and theorizing about the reason for the unusual depth of walden and about the habits of wild hens, sadly, I lost interest. I trudged through the last chapters and managed to finish it out of a sense of obligation built up over years of awe about the book. The concluding chapter, to an extent, rewarded me for my persistence and toil. In this final chapter, he comes back to the real purpose of the book: to drill home a simple idea - "I learned this, at least, by my experiment; that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours. He will put some things behind, will pass an invisible boundary; new, universal, and more liberal laws will begin to establish themselves around and within him; or the old laws will be expanded, and interpreted in his favor in a more liberal sense, and he will live with the license of a higher order of beings." This I think was the core philosophy of the book - if you pursue the ideal direction/vision you have of how your life should be, and not how convention dictates it should be, then you will find success and satisfaction on a scale unimaginable through those conventional routes or to those conventional minds. I will of course be re-reading the book at some point and thankfully I will know which parts to skip without any remorse.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Or "The Guy Who Liked to Go Outside and Do Stuff". If Thoreau were alive today, I bet he'd be one of those guys who won't shut up about how he "doesn't even own" a television. Curiously, however, I don't think he'd smell bad. And he'd find Radiohead neither overrated nor God's gift to modern music. Just a talented band with a few fairly interesting ideas.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I will go against the grain of society here and say that this was not worth it. There are a few gems of wisdom in here, maybe the Cliffs Notes or a HEAVILY abridged version would be more tolerable. Here's what I didn't like: Thoreau went off to "live by himself", when in actuality he was a mere 2 miles away from town and could hear the train whistle daily. Not exactly out there roughing it. He lived in a shack on land that a friend of his owned so he was basically a squatter. Most of the food he I will go against the grain of society here and say that this was not worth it. There are a few gems of wisdom in here, maybe the Cliffs Notes or a HEAVILY abridged version would be more tolerable. Here's what I didn't like: Thoreau went off to "live by himself", when in actuality he was a mere 2 miles away from town and could hear the train whistle daily. Not exactly out there roughing it. He lived in a shack on land that a friend of his owned so he was basically a squatter. Most of the food he ate he was given by townsfolk who were alternately intrigued by his way of living or felt sorry for him. These are the same people he is judging for their way of life, yet he is dependent on them! Also, and this may be just because I already strive for a simplified life, hardly a one of his truisms felt fresh or inspiring to me. It was a book full of self importance and judgement on society, not a man I would want to have an afternoon chat with. I understand that at the time, his ideas were totally out there and revolutionary, but he is too bombastic about the whole thing, as if he himself had single handedly figured it all out. I was seriously dissapointed and hope Emerson will be better.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Clare

    Reading Walden was kind of like eating bran flakes: You know it's good for you, and to some degree you enjoy the wholesomeness of it, but it's not always particularly exciting. The parts of this book that I loved (the philosophy, which always held my interest even though I sometimes didn't agree with Thoreau), I really loved, and the parts that I hated (the ten pages where he waxes poetic about his bean fields, for instance), I really hated. I also got the impression that Thoreau was the kind of Reading Walden was kind of like eating bran flakes: You know it's good for you, and to some degree you enjoy the wholesomeness of it, but it's not always particularly exciting. The parts of this book that I loved (the philosophy, which always held my interest even though I sometimes didn't agree with Thoreau), I really loved, and the parts that I hated (the ten pages where he waxes poetic about his bean fields, for instance), I really hated. I also got the impression that Thoreau was the kind of guy I could never be friends with. In Into the Wild (which I read at the same time during intervals when Walden became too much to bear), Jon Krakauer describes Thoreau as "staid and prissy." I agree, and I'd also add "holier than thou." At many points in the book, his attitude seems to be, "If you're not living your life exactly like me, then you're just stupid." Which aggravated me because, while I can see the merit of his way of life, I don't necessarily think one has to take it to the extremes he did to reap the same benefits. That said, there were parts of his philosophy that I want to try to carry out in my own life, and I know that this is a book that I'll refer to again and again throughout my life. But will I ever read the whole thing through again? Doubtful.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Henry Avila

    The never quite understood philosophy of a man who swam against the current of mainstream beliefs. Sorry I borrowed these words from comments about another review, a good friend, not stealing though, these are my own scribbles, repeating the impressions here. Henry David Thoreau a native of Concord, Massachusetts, a pencil maker, the family business which financed his expensive Harvard education and published the at first neglected books. A disciple of Ralph Waldo Emerson and at his urging in The never quite understood philosophy of a man who swam against the current of mainstream beliefs. Sorry I borrowed these words from comments about another review, a good friend, not stealing though, these are my own scribbles, repeating the impressions here. Henry David Thoreau a native of Concord, Massachusetts, a pencil maker, the family business which financed his expensive Harvard education and published the at first neglected books. A disciple of Ralph Waldo Emerson and at his urging in 1845, built a log cabin that he lived in for two years on the shore of Walden Pond ( it was his friend's land). Thoreau first day the 4th of July a good omen, future generations will be greatly influenced by his writings "The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation", " Perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer", " All good things are wild, and free". The beauty of the lake, its peacefulness, the surrounding forest, plants, animals, birds in the sky , fish in the water all contribute to the enchanting magic, such thoughts by Mr. Thoreau were formed in a large part by his stay in paradise here. Curiosity his greatest strength and worse enemy, fellow citizens considered the unconventional person odd and maybe unhinged. However the gentleman by himself erected a very comfortable home, small but cozy, kept him warm in the winter and cool in summer, and during the very heavy , fearsome, rather frightening to say the least, rains storms... not a drop fell inside; even keeping furniture dry for his modest needs. In the frigid winter when the pond freezes he walks to the middle and measures its depth by dropping a rock tied to a string after punching a hole in the ice...102 feet deep . He was never lonely, friends and acquaintances frequently came to see the strange man to his annoyance, too much, he felt happiest alone looking at the blue and sometimes green lake always changing color. Viewing a hawk in the air diving and rising, repeatedly just joyful to be alive, this was what he believed also, nature is glorious, nothing better on Earth. A solitary figure looms, inside a little boat floating on the water's surface, contended, not caring if he Thoreau caught any fish, watching hour after hour dazzling birds on trees, animals searching for food some put outside by him for them to eat, observing the wild untamed creatures, writing down their habits , on paper, fascinated. Nonetheless a newfangled contraption, a train roars nearby, so-called civilization creeps closer. This book celebrates the magnificence of the world, and man's destroying its beauty, this must not occur, prevent this crime and preserve nature, Mr. Thoreau believes and the Legend began with a single man in the woods...Still people want to make money, they will try by any means to do, the constant dilemma...beauty or profit? An important work for those interested and should be read. Besides Henry David Thoreau was a fine writer and terrific onlooker...who preferred to sniff a flower, than stomping on it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris Bradshaw

    When Henry Thoreau went to Walden Pond in 1845, I wonder what he really thought he was doing there. I wonder if he had second thoughts about the whole idea; although when he began it was July, and July is a good month to be outdoors, whatever the weather. The man, and what he did and how he lived and what he lived for have always been a source of inspiration to me, and to many others... Walden is much more than one man's account of the years he spent in the woods communing with nature; it is a When Henry Thoreau went to Walden Pond in 1845, I wonder what he really thought he was doing there. I wonder if he had second thoughts about the whole idea; although when he began it was July, and July is a good month to be outdoors, whatever the weather. The man, and what he did and how he lived and what he lived for have always been a source of inspiration to me, and to many others... Walden is much more than one man's account of the years he spent in the woods communing with nature; it is a statement of defiance. Thoreau was educated at Harvard, and spent some time as a teacher where he despaired of the idea of classroom learning. He had a great respect for the Native Americans, admiring their hardiness and skill. He couldn't understand why people thought of them as inferior. To him, they were wise and strong and more in tune with reality than the farmer with his insulated life. He loved wisdom, and spoke of an enlightened society based on compassion and simplicity. He did not align himself explicitly with any religious view...he was a philosophical person. Solitude was what he valued, not just because he was a thinker, but also because he believed it made you a better person, a more independent mind. These ideas, and the kind of existence they represent, are important for me because I think that we're losing something very crucial...not just in the physical loss of the natural environment, but also in the spiritual environment, which is reliant upon it. If it was obvious 150 years ago, it is now the de facto reality, and the question is: what will it be like 150 years from now? So...what are we supposed to do about it? You can see how huge the problem is: global warming, overpopulation, poverty, corporate hegemony... You look at it all, and it floors you; you can't see the edges of it because it's all around you, everywhere. It's just how things are...it's what you're used to seeing. And it's horrible, but that's also accepted to a certain degree...the wrongness of it is tolerated because people feel powerless, or bogged down, or maybe they're just tired of trying...all valid points and very understandable ones. I think Henry would look at it as a consequence of a compulsively complicated culture, and once you look at the massiveness of what we have done, the sheer size of our footprint, maybe you can see it too. Going to the woods ain't gonna cut it... But for the people who feel the way Henry felt, who see what he saw in the deep waters of Walden Pond, the option of inaction is no option at all. The real power of his words is in the actions of those they inspire...the good people doing the hard work of trying to make this culture a less complicated one, and maybe they'll succeed and maybe they won't...the value is in the attempt. It begins with an idea; ideas are the seeds of change, they are what our culture rests upon. But, like a seed, they will become nothing without the proper attention and care. The best one's change the world, the worst one's bring the world to it's knees...which is where we are now. Is it a good idea to continue polluting the planet when we know that it will kill us in the end? No, but that continues. Is it a good idea to pamper the wealthy and tax the poor? No, but that continues. People see these things and forget about Walden Pond because it seems small and ineffectual. It says something about the spirit of a society when the best ideas are purposefully abandoned for shiny, complicated, bad one's. But the people who benefit most from the bad ideas are the people who are effectively running the show. And so they dress them up and give them interesting titles and wrap them in exciting packages and peddle them as good one's. Henry built his home with the trees he took from the forest surrounding the pond at Walden. He built it with tools he borrowed from his neighbors, in good faith, and used recycled materials for what he couldn't get from the woods. It was a good house and it kept him warm in the winter, cool in the summer and dry when it rained. The great wisdom of his life was in how he lived it, with care and appreciation and respect for what was in his environment. Is it a good idea to live as a student, no matter your age? Yes, and also to be a teacher of good ideas, as Henry was. Thoreau stayed at Walden Pond for two years, wrote extensively in his journal, then left. He could have stayed, I suppose, but solitude is not something which benefits forever. I think he says as much, though I'm not sure. He stayed long enough to learn what he needed to, then he moved on. There is wisdom in that, too. Take what you need and leave the rest. Things are changing, despite how it seems sometimes. People are angry. They're tired of being scared. Maybe they won't go to the woods; maybe that's not even an option anymore. The "woods" now are more a state of mind, a world view. Whatever happens, Walden will be there, as full of good ideas as it ever was...because a truly good idea will always be good, no matter what the censors say.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

    Poetic prose or prosaic poetry? Either way a beautiful work. It has the social commentary of a husbandry lesson and the spiritual depth of a prayer. It's also apparently timeless. Thoreau's ideas about simplicity and spiritual cleanliness are as relevant today as they were in the 1840s. I cannot help but mention a college English professor's description of him: "he lived in a shack out on the outskirts of town - he was a bum". Still makes laugh.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    I've read Walden many times now since that first time in high school. I will always love this book, and it reveals itself anew with each reading. When I first encountered Thoreau in high school, his words rang in my soul like a prophet's manifesto. I admired what seemed to be his unique courage and absolute integrity. He inspired me to want to "live deliberately," but I knew that a solitary life in a cabin was beyond my abilities. His will seemed so much more resolute than anything I could ever I've read Walden many times now since that first time in high school. I will always love this book, and it reveals itself anew with each reading. When I first encountered Thoreau in high school, his words rang in my soul like a prophet's manifesto. I admired what seemed to be his unique courage and absolute integrity. He inspired me to want to "live deliberately," but I knew that a solitary life in a cabin was beyond my abilities. His will seemed so much more resolute than anything I could ever be capable of. That was a couple of decades ago. What struck on this latest recent reading is just how much this is a young man's book. The voice is that of an idealist, a passionate and lonely misfit who longs for a better way to live and for more authentic relationships with others as well as with himself. I know now that Thoreau lived more like an energetic slacker than a true renunciate. He was too principled to work as a schoolmaster (he refused to beat his charges), and there wasn't much he cared to do apart from reading, writing, and observing nature closely. He didn't have a family to take care of, and his parents were indulgent of his wishes. His life at Walden was bracing, but it wasn't filled with hardships. His cabin was just a short walk from Concord, and Thoreau went home for Sunday dinners and stayed at the Emersons' place when it got too cold. His folks took care of his laundry. His life of simplicity was strictly voluntary, and he had numerous safety nets. While these facts make Henry David a bit less intimidating, they also make him more recognizable as a human being. I like this young man, with his snobbery and his idealism, but I know that as a flesh-and-blood person he would have been hard to get to know, and even harder to love. He was probably afraid of intimacy, and even more afraid of failing to live up to his exacting standards. Thoreau was fascinated with purity. His disgust for "brute" appetites is something that we now think we understand as related to a fear of sexuality. He was deeply interested in Hindu dietary laws, and had an aversion to all forms of consumption. For him, the ideal was to become so pure that a few drops of nectar would be sufficient sustenance. Like Thoreau, I'm an ethical vegetarian, so I understand somewhat that urge toward purity. But my appetites are huge, and my life is in many ways a big, sloppy, comfortable mess. In contrast, Thoreau wanted to be free of all social constraints, free of the taint of commerce, free to be "wild." But his vision of wildness was of a clean, solitary life. He didn't want to merge or mingle with anything or anyone. The descriptions of Walden and the surrounding landscapes are sublime. They will never get stale, and I enjoy them even more now that I live a few miles from Concord and have visited the pond in different seasons. I look forward to reading this beautiful book again in a few years. I wonder what I'll notice next time?

  9. 5 out of 5

    John Wiswell

    Woefully overwritten to the point where most modern readers who might be moved by Thoreau’s transcendentalism will be put off by the prose alone. If that doesn’t get them, his elitist attitude probably will. Thoreau took Ralph Waldo Emerson’s ideals of choosing for yourself and added, “but you’re an idiot if you don’t choose mine.” Too many of his asides are condescending views of society or normal people, evidencing that Thoreau was stuck on other people even if he claimed to be independent or Woefully overwritten to the point where most modern readers who might be moved by Thoreau’s transcendentalism will be put off by the prose alone. If that doesn’t get them, his elitist attitude probably will. Thoreau took Ralph Waldo Emerson’s ideals of choosing for yourself and added, “but you’re an idiot if you don’t choose mine.” Too many of his asides are condescending views of society or normal people, evidencing that Thoreau was stuck on other people even if he claimed to be independent or above them. Every few years I’ll fool myself into thinking this book isn’t as bad as I remember, but even last month when I helped a girl with her paper on it, I was reminded that it truly is a dreadful love affair between a writer and his own thoughts. For a clearer, shorter, nearly crystallized version of Thoreau's thoughts in his own words and illustrated by some firmer anecdotes, see his "Civil Disobedience."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    I love Thoreau's ideals. Taking care of nature is of paramount importance, especially these days as technology flings us farther and faster into the future than we've ever gone before. I also love Walden because I grew up near the pond and would pass it on my way into Boston back in the days when I was a young English major in college. Back then I looked upon this book and its ethos as a rallying banner for people who gave a shit about Mother Earth. Given a bit of reflection after a more recent I love Thoreau's ideals. Taking care of nature is of paramount importance, especially these days as technology flings us farther and faster into the future than we've ever gone before. I also love Walden because I grew up near the pond and would pass it on my way into Boston back in the days when I was a young English major in college. Back then I looked upon this book and its ethos as a rallying banner for people who gave a shit about Mother Earth. Given a bit of reflection after a more recent reread, I feel like there's a hitch in Thoreau's practical theory. I mean, he went out there and survived in a cabin in the woods for a couple years and then wrote a book saying that everyone is capable of doing the same, and he got a little uppity about the people who did not. However, with no one else to care for but himself, Thoreau's wilderness trials weren't the same as what they'd be if you had to do this your whole life with no reprieve and a family in tow. Plus, even though it was a rougher landscape back then, spending a little time in the rural Massachusetts suburbs doesn't cut it, imo. Heck, even back then he could have hopped a train passing on the tracks adjacent to the pond and been back in Boston within the hour. However, that doesn't wholly detract from my warm fuzzy feelings for Walden and what it stands for.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Emily May

    If you find yourself having difficulty sleeping, this book is a fantastic cure for insomnia. Just writing a review about it makes me want to lie my head down and close my eyes. That being said, I suppose Thoreau's pretentious, self-righteous douchebaggery was extremely revolutionary for the time it was written. He went to live in a shack in the woods and decided that gave him the right to impart truisms about life. Some of them are almost interesting, too, except that Thoreau's prose is so If you find yourself having difficulty sleeping, this book is a fantastic cure for insomnia. Just writing a review about it makes me want to lie my head down and close my eyes. That being said, I suppose Thoreau's pretentious, self-righteous douchebaggery was extremely revolutionary for the time it was written. He went to live in a shack in the woods and decided that gave him the right to impart truisms about life. Some of them are almost interesting, too, except that Thoreau's prose is so overwritten and dull that you have to work really hard to dig out the gems underneath.

  12. 4 out of 5

    James

    Book Review Walden, an American classic...few of us have likely read all 350+ pages, unless you were an English major. For most, perhaps 10-15 pages in high school or a college literature course introduced you to Thoreau and Walden. Famed philosopher and thinker, it's a book that transports you to nature and the simplicities of life... helping to discover who you are, what you want and where things are going. A bit of an existential crisis, so to speak. It's a good book. I have nothing Book Review Walden, an American classic...few of us have likely read all 350+ pages, unless you were an English major. For most, perhaps 10-15 pages in high school or a college literature course introduced you to Thoreau and Walden. Famed philosopher and thinker, it's a book that transports you to nature and the simplicities of life... helping to discover who you are, what you want and where things are going. A bit of an existential crisis, so to speak. It's a good book. I have nothing against it, but it didn't resonate with me as much as I'd have liked. I tend to be character and plot-based, when it comes to literature I enjoy. The main character, besides Thoreau, was passion/life/searching... it's not a work of fiction, tho some may take it that way. Perhaps a collection of essays, early journal writing. Blogging? All in all, beautiful language. Great images. Lots to think about. Worth reading those 10 to 15 pages. But unless you are into philosophy, it'll be a hard read. I'm a thinker, but not in this way. I'm glad I read the full text... and a few pages several times for comparative purposes in different courses. Take a little on for yourself. About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators. [polldaddy poll=9729544] [polldaddy poll=9719251]

  13. 4 out of 5

    Luís C.

    Thoreau makes us an apology for a healthy life away from the bustle of cities and constraints of modern society and castrating. Life as it should savor with nothing and everything around us and beyond us when we want others through profit prohibit enjoyment. Unlike many philosophers understandable for a pretentious intellectual minority, Thoreau speaks true to all of the original life that we live simply and "naturally poetic." An indispensable bible!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Thoreau and I have an essential difference of philosophy: I am an Epicurean, and he's an asshole. A puritan may go to his brown-bread crust with as gross an appetite as ever an alderman to his turtle. Not that food which entereth into the mouth defileth a man, but the appetite with which it is eaten. It is neither the quality nor the quantity, but the devotion to sensual savors. Walden has some great moments. I appreciate that Thoreau was not just the original hippie, but the original of a Thoreau and I have an essential difference of philosophy: I am an Epicurean, and he's an asshole. A puritan may go to his brown-bread crust with as gross an appetite as ever an alderman to his turtle. Not that food which entereth into the mouth defileth a man, but the appetite with which it is eaten. It is neither the quality nor the quantity, but the devotion to sensual savors. Walden has some great moments. I appreciate that Thoreau was not just the original hippie, but the original of a particularly cool kind of hippie: the practical kind. I grew up around people like this in Western Mass - people who were really running small farms, building their own shit, forging their own ways - hippies with skills, as opposed to the groovy kind. They're a terrific sort of people. Doing the stuff of life yourself is great. And I've always loved that most famous quote, "The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation." No matter what's going on for me, it makes me feel good. When things aren't going well, it makes me feel less alone. When things are going great it makes me feel smugly superior, and that's nice too. I heart introverts I liked parts of the Solitude chapter. Everyone's probably heard this quote:To be in company, even with the best, is soon wearisome and dissipating. I love to be alone. I never found the companion that was so companionable as solitude.But here's a passage I like even more:We meet at very short intervals, not having had time to acquire any new value for each other. We meet at meals three times a day,and give each other a new taste of that old musty cheese that we are. We have had to agree on a certain set of rules, called etiquette and politeness, to make this frequent meeting tolerable and that we need not come to open war.Ha..."give each other a new taste of that old musty cheese that we are." Awesome. And he doesn't fuck around My edition includes On Civil Disobedience, wherein Thoreau - who, as you may know, went to jail for refusing to pay his taxes in protest of the criminal Mexican War - does some pretty fire and brimstone shit:When a whole country is unjustly overrun and conquered by a foreign army, and subjected to military laws, I think that it is not too soon for honest men to rebel and revolutionize. What makes this duty so much more urgent is the fact that the country so overrun is not our own, but ours is the invading army...Even voting for the right is doing nothing for it. It is only expressing to men feebly your desire that it should prevail. A wise man will not leave the right to the mercy of chance, nor wish it to prevail through the power of the majority. There is but little virtue in the action of masses of men.Kinda makes you feel like a wiener, still complaining about Al Gore, right? Thoreau was a badass. But he's sortof obnoxious I think one thing that bugs me is, he's constantly banging on about how easy life would be if everyone just did like he did. And partly, as he says himself, that's because he "simplifies" - he gives up almost every luxury, so it's much easier to meet his needs. I don't think he even has the internet, so that alone saves him like $40 a month. But partly it strikes me as dishonest. There's a smugness about Walden that puts me off. It's particularly grating in the Baker Farm chapter, where he lectures a poor guy with a wife and three kids about how much easier life would be if they just did it Thoreau's way. And I was like a) what if this dude thinks his kids should eat anything besides beans? and b) if you get cold you just go to your mom's house for the weekend, so your whole shtick is a little bit disingenuous, homie. Thoreau has a big safety net. Even the land he's living on is borrowed from Emerson. The poor Irish guy has no such advantages. There may be a reason for his weirdness. My book club got in a long and interesting discussion of whether Thoreau may have had Asperger's Syndrome. More on that here and here, and if you Google "Thoreau Asperger's" you'll find plenty more. There's even a whole book called Writers on the Spectrum: How Autism and Asperger Syndrome Have Influenced Literary Writing that throws in Dickinson, Yeats and Melville for good measure. I don't consider myself qualified to have an opinion about this, but it's a fun thing to bring up at your next dinner party. And he's pretty long-winded I mean, at one point towards the end he goes on for like five pages about sand. "I feel as if I were nearer to the vitals of the globe, for this sandy overflow is something such a foliaceous mass as the vitals of the animal body." Whaaaat the fuck, Thoreau, shut up. So it's tough to know what to make of this book. I rarely enjoyed reading it, but I underlined like half of it. (Okay, sometimes it was just so I wouldn't forget what an asshole he is.) He's often right, but always annoying. There's a lot going on here, and much of it is worthwhile, but I can't exactly recommend it to you, because I doubt you'll like it. I didn't. I respected it. But I didn't like it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    What a beautiful meditation on nature and simple living! It's been about 25 years since I picked up Thoreau, and paging through Walden this time I realized I had never read the entire book before. Instead, I had only read excerpts that were included in a literature anthology. While a lot of this book's famous quotes come from early chapters, to fully appreciate Walden you need to read the whole text. Besides his thoughts about trying to live a more meaningful and deliberate life, there are some What a beautiful meditation on nature and simple living! It's been about 25 years since I picked up Thoreau, and paging through Walden this time I realized I had never read the entire book before. Instead, I had only read excerpts that were included in a literature anthology. While a lot of this book's famous quotes come from early chapters, to fully appreciate Walden you need to read the whole text. Besides his thoughts about trying to live a more meaningful and deliberate life, there are some beautiful descriptions of the woods where he lived, and the reader really gets a sense of what life was like near Walden pond back in 1845. (The book wasn't published until 1854, but Thoreau's experiment started years earlier.) "I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life, living is so dear; nor did I wish to practise resignation, unless it was quite necessary. I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life, to cut a broad swath and shave close, to drive life into a corner, and reduce it to its lowest terms." I've been interested in simplicity and mindfulness for years now, and it felt good to revisit this seminal work. While reading, I was struck by how relevant Thoreau's themes were, despite having been written before the American Civil War. For example, he mentions his concern that so many clothes are being made by factories and the problem of underpaid workers and overpaid corporate bosses -- still a problem today. He talks about people relying too much on meat for their meals-- still a problem, and a habit that isn't environmentally sustainable. Most importantly, Thoreau meditates on how people fritter away their lives on pursuits that aren't meaningful -- definitely still a problem, and now it's magnified a hundredfold thanks to the easy distraction of smartphones. The modern Thoreau might write, "I put away my phone because I wanted to live deliberately; I didn't want to live my life through a screen." I read a gorgeous edition of this book that included photographs of Walden Woods by Scot Miller. Seeing the beautiful pictures added a sense of place to my reading, and made it even more meaningful. I highly recommended Walden to anyone interested in mindfulness, simplicity or nature writing. Favorite Quotes [from the Introduction by Edward O. Wilson] "Wildness is precious because it persists independently of humanity; it fulfills us but does not need us, and all we can do is choose whether to preserve it or destroy it. Nature is a refuge and an anchor, not an alien world, because it is the birthplace and cradle of the human species." "I see young men, my townsmen, whose misfortune it is to have inherited farms, houses, barns, cattle, and farming tools; for these are more easily acquired than got rid of." "The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation." "It is never too late to give up our prejudices. No way of thinking or doing, however ancient, can be trusted without proof." "Most of the luxuries, and many of the so-called comforts of life, are not only not indispensable, but positive hindrences to the elevation of mankind. With respect to luxuries and comforts, the wisest have ever lived a more simple and meagre life than the poor." "I say, beware of all enterprises that require new clothes." "I cannot believe that our factory system is the best mode by which mean may get clothing. The condition of the operatives is becoming every day more like that of the English; and it cannot be wondered at, since, as far as I have heard or observed, the principal object is, not that mankind may be well and honestly clad, but, unquestionably, that the corporations may be enriched." "And when the farmer has got his house, he may not be the richer but the poorer for it, and it be the house that has got him." "There is some of the same fitness in a man's building his own house that there is in a bird's building its own nest. Who knows but if men constructed their dwellings with their own hands, and provided food for themselves and families simply and honestly enough, the poetic faculty would be universally developed, as birds universally sing when they are so engaged? ... Shall we forever resign the pleasure of construction to the carpenter?" "In short, I am convinced, both by faith and experience, that to maintain one's self on this earth is not a hardship but a pastime, if we will live simply and wisely." "We must learn to reawaken and keep ourselves awake, not by mechanical aids, but by an infinite expectation of the dawn, which does not forsake us in our soundest sleep." "Our life is frittered away by detail ... Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!" "I am sure I never read any memorable news in a newspaper. If we read of one man robbed, or murdered, or killed by accident, or one house burned, or one vessel wrecked, or one steamboat blown up, or one cow run over on the Western Railroad, or one mad dog killed, or one lot of grasshoppers in the winter -- we never need read of another. One is enough. If you are acquainted with the principle, what do you care for a myriad instances and applications? To a philosopher all news, as it is called, is gossip, and they who edit and read it are old women over their tea." "Let us spend one day as deliberately as Nature, and not be thrown off the track by every nutshell and mosquito's wing that falls on the rails. Let us rise early and fast, or break fast, gently and without perturbation; let company come and let company go, let the bells ring and the children cry -- determined to make a day of it." "To read well, that is, to read true books in a true spirit, is a noble exercise, and one that will task the reader more than any exercise which the customs of the day esteem." "A written word is the choicest of relics. It is something at once intimate with us and more universal than any other work of art. It is the work of art nearest to life itself." "I had this advantage, at least, in my mode of life, over those who were obliged to look abroad for amusement, to society and the theatre, that my life itself was become my amusement never ceased to be novel. It was a drama of many scenes and without an end ... Follow your genius closely enough, and it will not fail to show you a fresh prospect every hour." "What sort of space is that which separates a man from his fellows and makes him solitary? I have found that no exertion of the legs can bring two minds much nearer to one another." "Society is commonly too cheap. We meet at very short intervals, not having had time to acquire any new value for each other ... We have had to agree on a certain set of rules, called etiquette and politeness, to make this frequent meeting tolerable and that we need not come to open war." "I am convinced, that if all men were to live as simply as I then did, thieving and robbery would be unknown." "If the day and the night are such that you greet them with joy, and life emits a fragrance like flowers and sweet-scented herbs, is more elastic, more starry, more immortal -- that is your success. All nature is your congratulation, and you have cause momentarily to bless yourself." "Our whole life is startlingly moral. There is never an instant's truce between virtue and vice." "Heaven is under our feet as well as over our heads." "Our village life would stagnate if it were not for the unexplored forests and meadows which surround it. We need the tonic of wildness." "Why should we be in such desperate haste to succeed and in such desperate enterprises? If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer." "Rather than love, than money, than fame, give me truth. I sat at a table where were rich food and wine in abundance, and obsequious attendance, but sincerity and truth were not; and I went away hungry from the inhospitable board."

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    This utopian text by Thoreau is absolutely beautiful and something to read when you are in those sloughs of life. It will pick you up and transport you as if you, as I have done, were standing on the edge of Walden Pond (near Concord, Mass) and observing its beautiful circular shape before wading in and swimming across this natural monument (saved from developers in the 90s by a group of environmentalists including Robbie Robertson if memory serves). The prose is limpid and perfectly balanced This utopian text by Thoreau is absolutely beautiful and something to read when you are in those sloughs of life. It will pick you up and transport you as if you, as I have done, were standing on the edge of Walden Pond (near Concord, Mass) and observing its beautiful circular shape before wading in and swimming across this natural monument (saved from developers in the 90s by a group of environmentalists including Robbie Robertson if memory serves). The prose is limpid and perfectly balanced and you really do feel like dropping your iPhone in the toilet and selling all your possessions to live in a cabin...well, until you realize that you just threw away $800...It is a breath of fresh air and remains an classic.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mister Jones

    The very first time I read Walden my immediate response was to begin torching its pages one by one and sacrificing each page as literary cow paddies written by a pompous celibate pretentious boob who masqueraded as self-appointed demigogue for the collective conscience of the gods; and of course, when read this way it certainly fits at times Thoreau's rhetoric. Many years later, I took my paperback copy off my shelf and was ready to pack it up to be dropped off at the nearest thrift shop, but The very first time I read Walden my immediate response was to begin torching its pages one by one and sacrificing each page as literary cow paddies written by a pompous celibate pretentious boob who masqueraded as self-appointed demigogue for the collective conscience of the gods; and of course, when read this way it certainly fits at times Thoreau's rhetoric. Many years later, I took my paperback copy off my shelf and was ready to pack it up to be dropped off at the nearest thrift shop, but then as I sat on my floor with my fat old textbooks and other worn clothing ready for donation. I begin reading Walden again, and there's just something about it that resonates from another time, another place, and another writer. Thoreau's conceit can certainly be provocative, but I think he wants that to be exactly the case for his readers; he's mourning the interaction of souls as modernity encroaches upon both the physical landscape and the landscape of the mind. Living in the woods, facing himself and nature on a equal foothold can be a daunting task, but Thoreau writes about it and makes it so much a part of himself. He wants to be heard within the deepest regions of our souls. Walden is a spiritual work about our world and ourselves, and our failure to connect the two. At least Thoreau tried, and Walden shines in that attempt.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amor Towles

    FIVE EXPANSIVE BOOKS SET IN CLOSE QUARTERS (#4) This summer, the Wall Street Journal asked me to pick five books I admired that were somehow reminiscent of A GENTLEMAN IN MOSCOW. To that end, I wrote on five works in which the action is confined to a small space, but in which the reader somehow experiences the world. Here is #4: Ironically, one of the most timely pieces of close-quarters literature is a work written over 150 years ago in which the author voluntarily commits himself to a one-room FIVE EXPANSIVE BOOKS SET IN CLOSE QUARTERS (#4) This summer, the Wall Street Journal asked me to pick five books I admired that were somehow reminiscent of A GENTLEMAN IN MOSCOW. To that end, I wrote on five works in which the action is confined to a small space, but in which the reader somehow experiences the world. Here is #4: Ironically, one of the most timely pieces of close-quarters literature is a work written over 150 years ago in which the author voluntarily commits himself to a one-room cabin on the outskirts of town. In Walden Henry David Thoreau isolates himself in the woods to avoid the distractions of ‘modern life’ such as the headlines of newspapers, the gossip of neighbors, and the endless desire for possessions. What he finds in his isolation is not a cessation of life, but a bounding of the spirit. By dampening the insistent noise of the town, he frees himself to dwell on nature, poetry, mythology, philosophy or, in a word, eternity. If Thoreau shook his head with dismay at the distractions in Concord circa 1850, imagine what he would think of our world today! With a 24-hour news cycle, voracious social networks, and vast libraries of entertainment downloadable in the instant, there has never been greater merit in retreating from daily life, if even for an hour. But if reading Walden from end-to-end is not your cup of tea, fear not. Reading a few pages of the book at random can provide the perfect antidote to a hectic day.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Life in the Woods = Walden, Henry David Thoreau Walden is a book by Henry David Thoreau, First published in 1854. The text is a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings. The work is part personal declaration of independence, social experiment, voyage of spiritual discovery, satire, and a manual for self-reliance. Walden details Thoreau's experiences over the course of two years, two months, and two days in a cabin he built near Walden Pond amidst woodland owned by his friend and Life in the Woods = Walden, Henry David Thoreau Walden is a book by Henry David Thoreau, First published in 1854. The text is a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings. The work is part personal declaration of independence, social experiment, voyage of spiritual discovery, satire, and a manual for self-reliance. Walden details Thoreau's experiences over the course of two years, two months, and two days in a cabin he built near Walden Pond amidst woodland owned by his friend and mentor Ralph Waldo Emerson, near Concord, Massachusetts. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز هفتم ماه اکتبر سال 2017 میلادی عنوان: والدن؛ نویسنده: هنری دیوید ثورو؛ مترجم: علیرضا بهشتی؛ تهران: روزنه، 1395؛ در 570 ص؛ شابک: 9789643345914؛ موضوع: صحرا و بیابان - ایالات متحده امریکا - ماساچوست - والدن وود - سده 19 م عنوان: والدن؛ نویسنده: هنری دیوید تارو (ثورو)؛ مترجم: علی‌رضا طاق‌دره؛ تهران: دیار، ‏‫1395؛ در 464 ص؛ شابک: 9786006712147؛ چاپ دیگر: تهران : شهرآب: آینده سازان، ‏‫‏‏‏1396؛ 471 ص؛ شابک: 9789643143275؛ والدن، نخستین بار با عنوان: «والدن؛ یا زندگی در جنگل» با نگارگری «هنری دیوید ثورو»، در سال 1854 میلادی، منتشر شد. «ثورو» به مدت دو سال و دو ماه و دو روز، در کلبه‌ ای چوبی، کنار دریاچه ی «والدن»، در «کنکورد، ماساچوست»، زندگی کرد. او این کلبه را بدست خود در زمین‌های دوستش: «رالف والدو امرسون»، ساخت. «ثورو» در کتابش، از این دو سال و دو ماه و دو روز می‌گویند، و اینکه چگونه با الهام‌ گرفتن از طبیعت، به اندیشیدن درباره ی اجتماع، و روابط میان انسان‌ها پرداخته‌ است. رسیدن به زندگی ساده، و خودکفایی، از دیگر اهداف «ثورو»، در انجام این آزمایش بوده‌ است. این تجربه ی «ثورو»، از فلسفه ی تعالی‌گرایی سرچشمه گرفته، که از موضوعات بنیادین دوران «رومانتیسم آمریکایی» بوده‌ است. همانگونه که «ثورو» در کتابش بیان کرده، این کلبه در سه مایلی شهر زادگاهش قرار داشته‌ است. دوستداران آثار «ثورو»، برای بهره‌ بردن از طبع لطیف و نگاه موشکافانه ی ایشان نسبت به پدیده‌هاست، که آثار ایشان را می‌خوانند. «ثورو» شیوه‌ هایی از زندگی سعادتمند، و سرپناهی برای رستگاری از عصر سرسام‌زد ی دوره ی خود (و پس از خود) را برای خوانشگر پیشنهاد می‌کند. کتاب در هجده فصل تنظیم شده، که هر کدام به موضوعی اختصاص دارد؛ همانند «مزرعۀ لوبیا»، «برکه‌ ها»، «همسایگانی از وحوش» که توصیفی هستند، و دیگر فصلها همانند «اقتصاد» و «قوانین متعالی‌تر» ساختاری بیانی و استدلالی دارند. ا. شربیانی

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I had high hopes for this book written by a self-imposed hermit living in the woods. However, this is actually just the thoughts of an ignorantly privileged dude who thinks there's only one correct way to live your life and won't shut up about it. Whilst Thoreau had many ideas that horrifyingly still apply to our lives today, 170 years later, he presents them with a defensive and pompous tone. It was probably to the detriment of Walden that Thoreau published his thoughts almost 10 years after I had high hopes for this book written by a self-imposed hermit living in the woods. However, this is actually just the thoughts of an ignorantly privileged dude who thinks there's only one correct way to live your life and won't shut up about it. Whilst Thoreau had many ideas that horrifyingly still apply to our lives today, 170 years later, he presents them with a defensive and pompous tone. It was probably to the detriment of Walden that Thoreau published his thoughts almost 10 years after living in the woods. The essays, instead of being beautifully in the moment, seemed contrived and uppity. His writing style was not easy to follow as he bewilderingly blended verbose nature writing with mathematical figures and preachy ideals in difficult prose. I could not tell you what most of the essays contained as I had trouble focusing and wasn't motivated to concentrate. Perhaps I'll get more out of this one day, but for now Thoreau and I are not friends.

  21. 4 out of 5

    booklady

    Walden has really slowed me down. I love how Thoreau makes me see things. It takes time to see, to hear, and to use the senses properly. Usually, I’m in too much of a hurry to really look, listen, smell and savor. When I able to now, I’m looking at the little things around me and thinking about a certain pond... While reading Walden you can expect to enter another realm. During my recent journey there I developed an appreciation of so much which I might otherwise have discounted as detail or Walden has really slowed me down. I love how Thoreau makes me see things. It takes time to see, to hear, and to use the senses properly. Usually, I’m in too much of a hurry to really look, listen, smell and savor. When I able to now, I’m looking at the little things around me and thinking about a certain pond... While reading Walden you can expect to enter another realm. During my recent journey there I developed an appreciation of so much which I might otherwise have discounted as detail or background, except it isn’t. It’s the stuff of this beautiful world we live in ... but what is so easy to overlook in our single-minded rush to the next meeting, appointment or ‘have-to-do’. With these Walden-washed eyes and ears I’ve discovered a new joy in reading, in just being and in knowing how much does not depend on me. The author has shared a perspective on the variations of visitors, bird songs and the true value of solitude. Thoreau’s meditations draw me into memories of playing hooky on warm sunny days ... or maybe just dreams of doing so. He describes scenes, little furry creatures and the battlefields of ants, and in the next breath philosophizes about Time and Nature. His rules on culinary simplicity would send Julia Child into apoplexy! While the romantic side of my nature is drawn to his loaf of crusty bread and cold spring water, I don’t think I could long adhere to his monk-like menu of no coffee, tea, wine or meat. Thoreau can wander from one topic to another and back again, frequently seeming off track and irrelevant except that I suspect he might claim relevancy is overrated and not relevant itself. As such, chapter titles are misleading, topics overlapping and meandering, some portions being better than others. And yet—for me at least—even the chapters with uninteresting titles contain quiet little gems of delight. Reading Walden is often like a long visit with an old friend, old as in age and old as in known for a long time. Because this relationship is both deep and durable, you anticipate lengthy visits without fixed agendas, and yet the unpredictable quirkiness of the shared conversation is its greatest recommendation. Thoreau was the original naturalist, environmentalist and proponent of the motto, ‘Live simply so that others may simply live.’ He was a poet, philosopher, dreamer and observer of life. He was all these things but I think mostly he was someone who wanted to drink life to the very last drop—in the very best sense. I read and listened to most chapters of this book, returning to favorites even three times. Gord Mackenzie did a superb job reading this for LibriVox, making me feel as if Mr. Thoreau was addressing me in person. The wonder of Walden is that we can travel there any time by opening this book. No need for Trojan Horses (trains) or any of those other modern machines which would despoil the natural beauty of this sacred place.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Whitney Atkinson

    If I hadn't been reading this for class and skim reading it at 4 AM in a panic to find lines to talk about during class, this would definitely be five stars. But of all the classics I've read--especially essay collections that are usually dry--this one was actually immensely enjoyable! Thoreau created such a complex and interesting blend of social commentary, memoir, and call to action. It revealed a lot about myself that I need to improve on, and it also brought new perspectives of appreciating If I hadn't been reading this for class and skim reading it at 4 AM in a panic to find lines to talk about during class, this would definitely be five stars. But of all the classics I've read--especially essay collections that are usually dry--this one was actually immensely enjoyable! Thoreau created such a complex and interesting blend of social commentary, memoir, and call to action. It revealed a lot about myself that I need to improve on, and it also brought new perspectives of appreciating nature that I hadn't considered. My favorite quote in the entire book--though there are DOZENS I highlighted--was this: The stars are the apexes of what wonderful triangles! What distant and different beings in the various mansions of the universe are contemplating the same one at the same moment! . . . Could a greater miracle take place than for us to look through each other's eyes for an instant?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rosie Nguyễn

    Chắc đây là quyển sách hay nhứt tui từng đọc á. Tui cảm thấy vậy. Ờ mà không. Lý trí thì nói là chắc chắn là có những quyển khác hay và hay hơn rồi, tui phải biết chứ. Nhưng mà đọc quyển này xong thì cảm xúc lên cao ngất trời làm lu mờ tất cả những quyển sách khác làm tui chỉ biết Walden thôi. Walden ơi Walden ơi. Sách nói về những đề tài mà ngày xưa thời ông này viết quyển này chưa chắc là đã được quan tâm nhiều (nghe nói cuộc đời viết lách của ổng không ít lần rơi vào trường hợp sách viết rất Chắc đây là quyển sách hay nhứt tui từng đọc á. Tui cảm thấy vậy. Ờ mà không. Lý trí thì nói là chắc chắn là có những quyển khác hay và hay hơn rồi, tui phải biết chứ. Nhưng mà đọc quyển này xong thì cảm xúc lên cao ngất trời làm lu mờ tất cả những quyển sách khác làm tui chỉ biết Walden thôi. Walden ơi Walden ơi. Sách nói về những đề tài mà ngày xưa thời ông này viết quyển này chưa chắc là đã được quan tâm nhiều (nghe nói cuộc đời viết lách của ổng không ít lần rơi vào trường hợp sách viết rất hay mà bán không hề chạy, hổng bao nhiêu người chịu mua), nhưng mà trong thời buổi ngày nay thì đều là những đề tài rất nóng hổi. Ví dụ như về tác hại của chủ nghĩa tiêu dùng, quay về với cái gốc tốt lành tĩnh lặng của Mẹ Thiên Nhiên, minimalism, sống một cuộc đời thanh đạm đơn giản về vật chất mà phong phú về tinh thần, đi vào phát triển nội tâm bên trong của con người thay vì tìm kiếm câu trả lời bên ngoài, đề cao lối sống ẩn dật cô độc như cư sĩ. Sách có nhiều câu cực kỳ đắt giá, đúng là những gì tui đang tìm kiếm, về ý nghĩa của đời người, người ta sinh ra để làm gì, về bản chất của lao động trí óc và lao động tay chân, về đọc sách. Có những đoạn miêu tả cảnh thiên nhiên nhẹ nhàng, tinh tế với ngôn từ hay không tả sao cho hết, đến nỗi vừa đọc tui vừa ấp tay ôm quyển sách vào lòng mơ mộng, hoặc đọc một vài trang lại ngồi áp má lên những trang giấy và dừng lại hít thở vì thấy sao mà đẹp đẽ quá. Quyển này đọc xong gạch chân ghi chú bung bét hết cả lên vì quá nhiều suy nghĩ và cảm xúc. Nói là hay nhưng mà khó đọc vãi nồi. Tui đọc lê lết mất hơn 2 tháng mới xong và phải cố lắm. Vì những câu phức với từ ngữ, ý tưởng khá khó hiểu. Có chỗ mà một câu văn dài tới cả nửa trang giấy. Và câu này với câu liền kề nó có khi chả liên quan gì nhau, chỉ có liên quan trong suy nghĩ kỳ lạ của tác giả. Mặc khác là ông tác giả kiến thức quá phong phú và sâu sắc, ổng trích dẫn đông tây kim cổ từ Khổng Tử Lão Tử qua thần thoại Hy Lạp La Mã, qua Bhagavad Gita tới kinh Cựu Ước Tân Ước, rồi còn Shakespeare và một ngàn không trăm lẻ tám các ông bà tác giả khác. Tóm lại một câu là tui muốn trở thành một người như ông tác giả.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Phạm Ngọc Hà

    Vào rừng trong hai năm hai tháng hai ngày, Thoreau có một khoảng cách thuận lợi để chiêm nghiệm cuộc sống trước đây - cái mà hầu hết mọi người đang sống, kể cả tới tận bây giờ. Từ đó ông có nhiều bàn luận phủ nhận giá trị của văn minh, tiền bạc, tài sản, đám đông, từ thiện, lòng yêu nước, nghề nghiệp, kiếm sống, ... Một chi tiết mà mình rất thích là khi Thoreau băn khoăn nên làm công việc gì. Ông có 2 lựa chọn: buôn bán và dạy học. Buôn bán thì dễ tha hóa con người và mất nhiều thời gian để Vào rừng trong hai năm hai tháng hai ngày, Thoreau có một khoảng cách thuận lợi để chiêm nghiệm cuộc sống trước đây - cái mà hầu hết mọi người đang sống, kể cả tới tận bây giờ. Từ đó ông có nhiều bàn luận phủ nhận giá trị của văn minh, tiền bạc, tài sản, đám đông, từ thiện, lòng yêu nước, nghề nghiệp, kiếm sống, ... Một chi tiết mà mình rất thích là khi Thoreau băn khoăn nên làm công việc gì. Ông có 2 lựa chọn: buôn bán và dạy học. Buôn bán thì dễ tha hóa con người và mất nhiều thời gian để thành thạo, còn đi dạy thì phí tổn tăng vượt cả thu nhập vì ông phải ăn mặc theo quy định và mất quá nhiều thời gian soạn bài. Cuối cùng ông sống bằng cách là chỉ làm nông trong 6 tuần để toàn bộ thời gian còn lại được nghỉ ngơi và nghiên cứu. Bởi vì theo Thoreau thì sống không phải lao khổ mà là sự tiêu khiển. Chúng ta không cần phải cực nhọc kiếm sống để "một ngày nào đó" sống cuộc sống mình muốn, mà hãy ngay lập tức sống cuộc sống đó. Đời sống không khó khăn, chật vật như ta nghĩ nếu biết đơn giản nó lại. Thoreau phủ nhận rất nhiều thứ. Vậy ông tin gì? Ông tin vào vẻ đẹp của tự nhiên nhưng không ca ngợi, tôn sùng. Ông làm bạn với tự nhiên một cách bình tĩnh. Ông tin rằng con người cần phải được sống tự do, không lệ thuộc "đầm lầy và vũng cát lún" của đám đông và xã hội. Con người có thể chứa toàn bộ xã hội, đế chế, thành quách trong tâm trí của anh ta, và đến lượt mình, "một đợt thủy triều dâng lên hạ xuống đằng sau một con người có thể cuốn trôi đế quốc Anh như một mảnh vỏ bào". Con người chưa bao giờ lệ thuộc vào tổ chức. Ông tin rằng cao quý nhất chính là thế giới tư tưởng của con người, lương tri con người. Phải ra sức mà chăm sóc cho thế giới đó. Người biết làm bạn với tư tưởng của mình thì không bao giờ cô độc. Để chăm sóc cho tâm trí thì Thoreau tin rằng tốt nhất nên đọc - tiếp xúc với chiều sâu của ngôn ngữ viết chứ không phải ngôn ngữ nói - và phải đọc những tác phẩm lớn nhất, tốt nhất mà những thời đại đã qua có được. Ông tin rằng con người phải theo đuổi sự thật, sống thẳng thắn với chính mình, đừng che giấu bản thân như con sâu ẩn mình trong đám lá. Theo đuổi chính bản thân mình để tìm đến sự thật là mục đích lớn nhất của cuộc đời. Ông tin rằng chúng ta không có nghĩa vụ làm cho mọi người hiểu mình. Ông cũng tin rằng cần phải tránh các lối mòn và làm mới trải nghiệm của bản thân một cách liên tục. Đó là lý do ông ra khỏi rừng. ... Những điều Thoreau nói không mới ở thời điểm này. Nghĩa là chúng ta có thể nghe những điều trên mòn cả ra rồi ấy. Nhưng tác giả trình bày nhiệt tình và cực đoan, với một ngôn ngữ nghiêm nghị, đó là điều mình thích. Cuốn sách đến với mình quá đúng thời điểm, để mình tin vào sự cực đoan của bản thân và can đảm sống hơn.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Darwin8u

    I rarely read books twice, but I already feel the need to come sit by the shores of this book again and again. Expansive and infinitely quotable, Walden is one of those books that shakes not just the ground you are standing on, but seems to shake the Sun as well. Certainly there are parts of this book that are unrealistic, a little bit crankish, and even a little too self-aware. However, it is also beautiful, magnificent, and compelling in Thoreau's desire to see man seek the greater, more I rarely read books twice, but I already feel the need to come sit by the shores of this book again and again. Expansive and infinitely quotable, Walden is one of those books that shakes not just the ground you are standing on, but seems to shake the Sun as well. Certainly there are parts of this book that are unrealistic, a little bit crankish, and even a little too self-aware. However, it is also beautiful, magnificent, and compelling in Thoreau's desire to see man seek the greater, more compelling wilderness within.

  26. 5 out of 5

    • Lindsey Dahling •

    YEAH, YOU WERE A TOTAL MOUNTAIN MAN HIPPIE LIVING IN EMERSON’S YARD WHILE YOUR MOM DID YOUR LAUNDRY AND YOUR FRIENDS CAME OVER FOR TEA, THOREAU. AND I AM 100% POSITIVE MY RESENTMENT STEMS FROM A LIT COURSE I TOOK IN COLLEGE WHERE I WAS FORCED TO READ THOREAU’S ESSAYS AND LISTEN TO MY PEERS DISCUSS HOW BRILLIANTLY AUTHENTIC THIS WAS AND HOW THEY COULD NOT WAIT TO READ MOBY DICK NEXT WEEK. NO ONE IS EXCITED TO READ MOBY DICK, OKAY.* NO ONE. *Matilda and Ms. Honey are excited to read Moby Dick at the YEAH, YOU WERE A TOTAL MOUNTAIN MAN HIPPIE LIVING IN EMERSON’S YARD WHILE YOUR MOM DID YOUR LAUNDRY AND YOUR FRIENDS CAME OVER FOR TEA, THOREAU. AND I AM 100% POSITIVE MY RESENTMENT STEMS FROM A LIT COURSE I TOOK IN COLLEGE WHERE I WAS FORCED TO READ THOREAU’S ESSAYS AND LISTEN TO MY PEERS DISCUSS HOW BRILLIANTLY AUTHENTIC THIS WAS AND HOW THEY COULD NOT WAIT TO READ MOBY DICK NEXT WEEK. NO ONE IS EXCITED TO READ MOBY DICK, OKAY.* NO ONE. *Matilda and Ms. Honey are excited to read Moby Dick at the end of the movie, BUT THEY ARE THE ONLY EXCEPTIONS.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Igrowastreesgrow

    This book is not long at all but took me forever to get through. This may be a short book but was a long runoff of thoughts that I would have thought more appropriate for a private journal rather than a book for the public. It felt torturous at times to get through it. I would have enjoyed it a lot more if it had been shorter with the points he was trying to get across being more concentrated. However, over all it had good thoughts and information. I'm glad I've read it but I do not think I will This book is not long at all but took me forever to get through. This may be a short book but was a long runoff of thoughts that I would have thought more appropriate for a private journal rather than a book for the public. It felt torturous at times to get through it. I would have enjoyed it a lot more if it had been shorter with the points he was trying to get across being more concentrated. However, over all it had good thoughts and information. I'm glad I've read it but I do not think I will ever read it again.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Scarlet

    This was my first attempt at philosophy, and although there are lots of great ideas and some beautifully phrased passages here, the meandering structure of it impeded my enjoyment. I guess philosophical essays are not quite my thing. I'm still glad I read it though - my boyfriend loves this book and lent me his own much-read copy - so now I won't be totally lost when he refers to snippets from this book in our conversations! 3.5

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    His whole 'back to nature' & simplistic look at life do have their appeal. I don't subscribe to transcendentalism, but did find his musings broken up by the seasons to be interesting. Like most philosophers, his view on life tends to ignore minor details (like reality) that don't fit into his worldview, but he does stay in the real world most of the time. Luckily, he had some money, good health & people he could borrow from. I don't particularly like the man, though. His comments on His whole 'back to nature' & simplistic look at life do have their appeal. I don't subscribe to transcendentalism, but did find his musings broken up by the seasons to be interesting. Like most philosophers, his view on life tends to ignore minor details (like reality) that don't fit into his worldview, but he does stay in the real world most of the time. Luckily, he had some money, good health & people he could borrow from. I don't particularly like the man, though. His comments on marriage being "a ball & chain" for the man were absolutely offensive. It's no wonder he never married or had kids. His self-centered nature wouldn't allow for such distractions. Even more offensive was the way he treated the axe he borrowed. I don't care much for tool borrowers anyway, having had too many people borrow mine over the years & then 'treat them as if they were their own'. That means they beat them up or never return them. That's exactly what Thoreau did, ruined a fine axe as if it was of no consequence. An axe in 1845 was a useful & fairly expensive tool. Generally, handles were handmade by the owner to their pattern. Often the axe head was handmade by the local smith. It required folding one piece of softer steel or iron to create the hole for the handle & then welding the ends back together. Then a higher quality piece of steel was forged on to the blade end. Different tempering was required for the two pieces. Thoreau used his borrowed axe to both build his cabin & grub roots out with. Usually only a very old axe was used for the latter since hitting rocks & dirt dulled it quickly & shortened its life. After breaking the handle, he BURNED the old handle out of the head, which ruined any temper it had. His ill-fitting replacement handle required him to soak it in water, which expands the wood to fit, but does so only briefly. Once dry, the fit is even looser since the expanding wood fibers are crushed by the iron head. Yuck! Anyway, this is why I was often distracted from his discourse on nature - I wanted to throttle him too often.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

  31. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

  32. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

  33. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

  34. 4 out of 5

    Kelli

  35. 5 out of 5

    Caitlyn

  36. 5 out of 5

    Gail

  37. 4 out of 5

    sierra

  38. 4 out of 5

    marilyn

  39. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas T-R IV

    First chapter titled "Economy" was great but went downhill from there.

  40. 4 out of 5

    Layla

  41. 5 out of 5

    Jake

  42. 5 out of 5

    M

  43. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

  44. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  45. 5 out of 5

    Joe Ross

  46. 4 out of 5

    jin

  47. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  48. 4 out of 5

    Charlie Tapp

  49. 5 out of 5

    Tziporah

  50. 4 out of 5

    Ted

  51. 5 out of 5

    John

  52. 5 out of 5

    colleen

  53. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

  54. 5 out of 5

    Seth K

  55. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  56. 5 out of 5

    Jackii

  57. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

  58. 5 out of 5

    Jen Hsieh

  59. 5 out of 5

    jen dunlap

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