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The Umbrella Academy, Vol. 3: Hotel Oblivion

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With a new Netflix series, the best-selling graphic novels return--with the original creators! Gerard Way (My Chemical Romance, Doom Patrol) and Gabriel Bá (Two Brothers, Casanova) have earned awards and accolades on their separate projects, and finally return to their breakout 2007 hit, for the latest chapter in the bizarre lives of their former teen superhero With a new Netflix series, the best-selling graphic novels return--with the original creators! Gerard Way (My Chemical Romance, Doom Patrol) and Gabriel Bá (Two Brothers, Casanova) have earned awards and accolades on their separate projects, and finally return to their breakout 2007 hit, for the latest chapter in the bizarre lives of their former teen superhero team. Faced with an increasing number of lunatics with superpowers eager to fight his own wunderkind brood, Sir Reginald Hargreeves developed the ultimate solution ... Now, just a few years after Hargreeves's death, his Umbrella Academy is scattered. Number Five is a hired gun, Kraken is stalking big game, Rumor is dealing with the wreckage of her marriage, an out-of-shape Spaceboy runs around the streets of Tokyo, Vanya continues her physical therapy after being shot in the head--and no one wants to even talk about what Séance is up to ... The award-winning and best-selling superhero series returns, stranger than ever--And their past is coming back to hunt them.


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With a new Netflix series, the best-selling graphic novels return--with the original creators! Gerard Way (My Chemical Romance, Doom Patrol) and Gabriel Bá (Two Brothers, Casanova) have earned awards and accolades on their separate projects, and finally return to their breakout 2007 hit, for the latest chapter in the bizarre lives of their former teen superhero With a new Netflix series, the best-selling graphic novels return--with the original creators! Gerard Way (My Chemical Romance, Doom Patrol) and Gabriel Bá (Two Brothers, Casanova) have earned awards and accolades on their separate projects, and finally return to their breakout 2007 hit, for the latest chapter in the bizarre lives of their former teen superhero team. Faced with an increasing number of lunatics with superpowers eager to fight his own wunderkind brood, Sir Reginald Hargreeves developed the ultimate solution ... Now, just a few years after Hargreeves's death, his Umbrella Academy is scattered. Number Five is a hired gun, Kraken is stalking big game, Rumor is dealing with the wreckage of her marriage, an out-of-shape Spaceboy runs around the streets of Tokyo, Vanya continues her physical therapy after being shot in the head--and no one wants to even talk about what Séance is up to ... The award-winning and best-selling superhero series returns, stranger than ever--And their past is coming back to hunt them.

30 review for The Umbrella Academy, Vol. 3: Hotel Oblivion

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    This felt very scattershot and unfocused, like Way had ten years of ideas jotted down and threw every one of them at us. Ba's art suffers in some of the big battle scenes. It's difficult to make out the action in these panels. The entire book seemed like prologue for a future volume, particularly the way this ended in a cliffhanger.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alice

    The artwork is definitely the redeeming quality of this comic, sadly not nearly enough. It was nice to get back in touch with the members of The Umbrella Academy, but to what purpose?? This volume was all over the place! It started with all the characters in different places, doing their own thing (of course explanations are never thought necessary so don't start looking for them here) and only met up for a final, and linked, resolution THAT DIDN'T HAPPEN. The volume ends with an unnec The artwork is definitely the redeeming quality of this comic, sadly not nearly enough. It was nice to get back in touch with the members of The Umbrella Academy, but to what purpose?? This volume was all over the place! It started with all the characters in different places, doing their own thing (of course explanations are never thought necessary so don't start looking for them here) and only met up for a final, and linked, resolution THAT DIDN'T HAPPEN. The volume ends with an unnecessary cliffhanger, as if all the new questions left unanswered weren't enough. I'm so upset with this comic building up expectations it doesn't live up to. I've said it once and I'll say it again: I enjoyed the tv show a lot more. sorry not sorry

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Nonsense, gibberish and gobbledygook eventually give way to a prison break and mindless slugfest. I read the first two volumes a decade ago, had no recall of what happened last, and was not helped out much by the storytelling here as to who anyone was or why they were doing what they were doing. I had reservations when I checked this out from the library as I recall having negative opinions about the first two, but I read it anyway because it is in the graphic novel category of the Go Nonsense, gibberish and gobbledygook eventually give way to a prison break and mindless slugfest. I read the first two volumes a decade ago, had no recall of what happened last, and was not helped out much by the storytelling here as to who anyone was or why they were doing what they were doing. I had reservations when I checked this out from the library as I recall having negative opinions about the first two, but I read it anyway because it is in the graphic novel category of the Goodreads Choice Awards and because I sort of liked the Netflix series I watched earlier this year, but I shall avoid future volumes and maybe just stick to watching the show from here on out.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael Cook

    It's been a decade since the second volume of Gerard Way's wonderfully weird superhero series, The Umbrella Academy, hit stores and it's been almost as long since the title of this third volume was announced. Since that initial announcement, there had been a lot of radio silence as Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá got busy with other projects. Thankfully, though, this third volume of The Umbrella Academy has come out and, in many ways, it feels like no time has passed. It's very much the third installment in this ongoing series - andof Theseries, The It's been a decade since the second volume of Gerard Way's wonderfully weird superhero series, The Umbrella Academy, hit stores and it's been almost as long since the title of this third volume was announced. Since that initial announcement, there had been a lot of radio silence as Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá got busy with other projects. Thankfully, though, this third volume of The Umbrella Academy has come out and, in many ways, it feels like no time has passed. It's very much the third installment in this ongoing series - and that's both a good thing and a bad thing. Viewers of the recent Netflix adaptation of The Umbrella Academy might be surprised to find just how strange the comics are. The TV show wasn't exactly "normal", but the comics have always been their own special blend of strange and this third volume of the series continues that strangeness perfectly from the very first page. The Umbrella Academy has always been more about the journey than the actual story being told and that remains true for Hotel Oblivion. At the center of this story lies a prison in a pocket dimension that holds all of the Umbrella Academy's defeated villains. In the wake of the events of the previous volume, Dallas, The Umbrella Academy is fractured. They've all gone off in their own directions but the events within this volume will bring them together again, perhaps on an even stronger footing than ever before. The first several issues allow readers a chance to really explore what's going on with each of the characters and those end up being the best parts of the series. The mystery introduced at the beginning is interesting, but these characters and their relationships with each other are the best parts of this series and that remains true with this series. Each character gets a new, interesting development in their overall arcs and I'm really excited to see how they continue to grow - especially Allison and Vanya. Like the previous two volumes of The Umbrella Academy, it takes Hotel Oblivion the vast majority of its 7-issue run for the plot to really make itself known and for the various dangling threads to start to coalesce into a discernible whole. This can be frustrating for those who read the series month-to-month (or, as happened frequently in this run, month-to-gap-month-to-release month as the series featured a few delays. It can often feel like nothing is really happening and the series is just dragging its feet, but as the final two issues of the series unfold, you quickly realize that those slower-paced earlier issues were laying the foundation for the bombastic finale. Unfortunately, as is often the case with The Umbrella Academy, the ending does end up feeling a bit rushed, which robs it of a bit of its excitement. Additionally, for the first time, Hotel Oblivion ends on a pretty major cliffhanger which does rob the series of feeling like an entirely complete story. We are left with the promise that a new series will start early next year, but it does end up feeling like a bit of a let down if you've read each issue as they've come out between October 2018 and June 2019. That being said, it's still an interesting story and the final issue beautifully sets up future stories to explore the world of The Umbrella Academy in even more new and exciting ways. A highlight for this series has always been Gabriel Bá's artwork and that remains the case here. He perfectly blends Way's more surreal writing style with the level of groundedness that is needed to ensure readers can connect with all of this weirdness. Bá excels at portraying giant action sequences and creating really interesting locales. Every single page of this series is a joy to behold and Bá has clearly only gotten better as the years have gone on and he's immersed himself even more in this world. Bá, also, isn't afraid to show the violence that often accompanies this series - but he frequently keeps it from feeling too grotesque. It's always highly stylized - as is his style in general - and it turns these potentially gross images into true beauty. Additionally, this series, in particular, has really given Bá the opportunity to play around with character design. With so many villains held prisoner within the Hotel Oblivion, each of them needed a design and most of them never appeared for more than a few panels, yet Bá manages to make each of them feel like wholly distinct characters, each with their own history and power set. His imagination is boundless and it runs freely throughout this series. All in all, The Umbrella Academy: Hotel Oblivion is a welcome return to this deeply creative and interesting world from Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá. While it still contains many of the same problems that impacted the previous volumes, it's a whole lot of fun. The sheer creativity and strangeness present within these pages makes this comic feel unlike anything else currently being published. The ending of the story does leave a bit to be desired, but it perfectly sets up the next series (which has been promised for release next year) so that can be forgiven. Gabriel Bá's artwork continues to be the shining star of this series. Every single page of the series is a joy to behold and I'm just so happy to see the return of this truly remarkable series. Hopefully with the success of the Netflix adaptation, the comic will continue to see increased success. I love the new elements Way and Bá introduced in this volume and I'm really excited to see where they take it with the next one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marc *Dark Reader of the Woods*

    After a ten year break, brought back from comic book cancellation to ride the marketing wave of the Netflix series, we get a continuation of the prior volumes of The Umbrella Academy. Not much has changed... Art: fabulous. Dramatic blocking. Vivid colors. Psychedelic scenes reminiscent of Jack Kirby's most mind-bendy work. Bloody as all get out. Points for Gabriel Ba. Story: a mess. Stilted, random, unengaging. Completely devoid of character development, other than a shave After a ten year break, brought back from comic book cancellation to ride the marketing wave of the Netflix series, we get a continuation of the prior volumes of The Umbrella Academy. Not much has changed... Art: fabulous. Dramatic blocking. Vivid colors. Psychedelic scenes reminiscent of Jack Kirby's most mind-bendy work. Bloody as all get out. Points for Gabriel Ba. Story: a mess. Stilted, random, unengaging. Completely devoid of character development, other than a shave and a haircut for Spaceboy. Meaningless enemy character concepts. Masturbatory. And another dang cliffhanger... ugh I am so not interested in another volume.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris Greensmith

    "Gross--! There's never an umbrella around when you need one." Meh, this was OK, i feel it kept teetering on the edge of being something great but never made it. There was no more character development, and I think that could be because the amount of characters that appeared in this compared to the other two runs has at least tripled. There were a lot of threads that were left blowing ion the wind, so I feel there may be more issues to come, well I know there will be with that cliff hanger endi "Gross--! There's never an umbrella around when you need one." Meh, this was OK, i feel it kept teetering on the edge of being something great but never made it. There was no more character development, and I think that could be because the amount of characters that appeared in this compared to the other two runs has at least tripled. There were a lot of threads that were left blowing ion the wind, so I feel there may be more issues to come, well I know there will be with that cliff hanger ending, Number 1!?...3🌟

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shog Al Maskery

    I finished it faster than what I thought! Im still a beginner in the world of reading comics so it’s a good sign that I was able to get through it all. I can’t wait to ready volume three to put the puzzle pieces together.

  8. 4 out of 5

    i.

    Continuing, almost directly, from the Volume Two: Dallas, Hotel Oblivion continues to expand the world of the Hargreeves siblings, both internal and external. In this volume, children thread through the plot, motivating multiple arcs forward. An infant child is the motivating factor for Umbrella Academy villains to plot an escape from the titular Hotel Oblivion. A child of an Umbrella Academy nemesis becomes a new nemesis. And, as always, the Hargreeves children aren't doing well, with Vanya still in re Continuing, almost directly, from the Volume Two: Dallas, Hotel Oblivion continues to expand the world of the Hargreeves siblings, both internal and external. In this volume, children thread through the plot, motivating multiple arcs forward. An infant child is the motivating factor for Umbrella Academy villains to plot an escape from the titular Hotel Oblivion. A child of an Umbrella Academy nemesis becomes a new nemesis. And, as always, the Hargreeves children aren't doing well, with Vanya still in recovery after her stint as apocalypse-bringer, Alison struggling with her personal life (involving her own child, to boot), Klaus trapped in a Satanic Biker cult, and so on. While the Hargreeves siblings are, more or less, in the same positions as they have been throughout the series, they seem in no way static or one-note, especially as their relationships, emotions, and non-superhero lives are more fleshed-out in this volume. As usual, Way's writing is emotive and weird in all the right ways, and Gabriel Bá's art is stellar. Nick Filardi's color work adds a life to this series that is ever-so-fitting for the hyper-reality of this world, especially as it acts as a critique of the tropes and moments unshown in other superhero team books. I wouldn't argue that Hotel Oblivion is the strongest book of the series so far, but it definitely has a character depth to it that felt different from those of previous books. That said, this arc very much does feel like a chapter of an ongoing project, unlike the previous ones. The cliffhanger ending telegraphs that, yes, but even in spite of the great character development work in this arc, there are some characters that get more time and development than others, some plot points that feel rushed (even for Way's "Just-go-with-it" ethos of this book, which I do love!), and some threads left hanging that--given the revelation of the last panel--may or may not be resolved. I have to reread Apocalypse Suite and Dallas for a fuller picture, but generally, there do feel like more remaining unknowns in this book than others. And in a way, knowing--or, at least, hoping--that there is more Umbrella Academy on the way, that's okay. Overall, Hotel Oblivion is both wonderfully weird and hauntingly human, and I am excited to see where in this world Way and Bá take us next.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. If you thought that writers who gave up on their series are not likely to come back to continue where they left off, here comes another creative team who looks to prove you wrong and make a comeback in the comic book business. After a decade of waiting, with each individual issue released intermittently, the dynamic duo that developed the hit comic book series that is now an original Netflix TV series is back with their third volume, just as explosivel You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. If you thought that writers who gave up on their series are not likely to come back to continue where they left off, here comes another creative team who looks to prove you wrong and make a comeback in the comic book business. After a decade of waiting, with each individual issue released intermittently, the dynamic duo that developed the hit comic book series that is now an original Netflix TV series is back with their third volume, just as explosively ridiculous, bizarre and splashy as ever. Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá now look to revisit their heroes by steering this story into some of the rowdiest directions unimaginable while keeping the complex family dynamics at the foundation of Hotel Oblivion. What is The Umbrella Academy: Hotel Oblivion about? Taking place after the events in Dallas, the story now looks at a suspicious and ambitious creation by the founding father of the Umbrella Academy, Sir Reginald Hargreeves, that is the mysterious Hotel Oblivion. While the idea behind it is mind-boggling, it now comes back to haunt our heroes, a fractured team troubled by recent events who have not had the chance to reconnect in a while. In fact, Number Five is back as a hired gun doing the unimaginable, Spaceboy is battling crime as an out-of-shape crime-stopper in the streets of Tokyo, Vanya struggles through her physical therapy following the near-fatal injury she was inflicted, Rumor continues to reflect on her marriage, Séance remains in a pitiful state as he deals with questionable individuals and the Kraken is off looking for answers. With only their bond as a family still holding them together, they are once again brought to reassemble their broken selves to face new revelations that are bound to change their lives. While fans of this original series have waited pretty long for this volume to finally release (and probably not the last), it doesn’t deliver the dramatic and sensational return you’d have wished for it. The story introduces many new characters while splitting it in almost half a dozen arcs that imperfectly stitches together by the end, leaving you in awe at the unwarranted cliffhanger. It’s only around the halfway mark that the story finally starts to make any sense, although it isn’t surprising with this series to see its readers being tossed around in unpredictable directions, as they finally grasp Sir Hargreeves intention behind the Hotel Oblivion and what is actually going on in this volume. Nonetheless, the underlying theme of family continues to run through this series but unfortunately see a lot less development as the focus is centered around setting the table for what will come next. What’s interesting about this volume is that it doesn’t necessarily look to blow anyone’s minds by revolutionizing the genre but it does introduce the Afterspace, an unknown portion of the universe, which essentially expands the world in uncharted territory. It is not surprising from Gerard Way to pull the story in that direction, considering that the previous volume looked into time traveling. What this volume indubitably does for this series is getting the pieces moving once again for something fun to come in the next story arc. Where this volume does not disappoint, however, is Gabriel Bá’s artwork, beautifully complemented by Nick Filardi’s colouring. It continues to portray the colourful, frenzied and anarchic universe in which unfolds this series, and they achieve it with even more vitality and glamour this time around. The Umbrella Academy: Hotel Oblivion is an exuberant yet unstable continuation of the dysfunctional superhero family’s story as it shovels up buried truths culminating to a confrontation with a reality they are unprepared to face. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  10. 4 out of 5

    Václav

    I will keep it simple - I don't get the popularity of this comics. Way's writing is weak, chaotic, it's a jumble of incoherent inspirations and fractions and I had a hard time to enjoy it as a whole. And as a bonus, Bá's art is somehow lacking everything I liked about it in Daytripper. So I may like few ideas here but despise it as a whole and be disappointed but not annoyed with art. But on top of that, I personally hate this kind of endings - not really closing the arc but giving a major cliff I will keep it simple - I don't get the popularity of this comics. Way's writing is weak, chaotic, it's a jumble of incoherent inspirations and fractions and I had a hard time to enjoy it as a whole. And as a bonus, Bá's art is somehow lacking everything I liked about it in Daytripper. So I may like few ideas here but despise it as a whole and be disappointed but not annoyed with art. But on top of that, I personally hate this kind of endings - not really closing the arc but giving a major cliffhanger. This is maybe a good ending between the issues. But not between arcs. I would honestly like to give one star, but sincerely - it's not that bad. It's just not good. At least not for me.

  11. 5 out of 5

    David Dalton

    Being new to the Umbrella Academy, I didn't realize that the series has been around for so long, or the long gap between volumes 2 and 3. Thanks to my digital library I have been able to read all 3 volumes within the space of a couple of months. This is definitely a very off-beat series. I will have to check out the Netflix series for sure. This vol did end on a cliff-hanger. Any plans for another volume or is this truly the end of the line for the Umbrella Academy? Might depend on the Netflix r Being new to the Umbrella Academy, I didn't realize that the series has been around for so long, or the long gap between volumes 2 and 3. Thanks to my digital library I have been able to read all 3 volumes within the space of a couple of months. This is definitely a very off-beat series. I will have to check out the Netflix series for sure. This vol did end on a cliff-hanger. Any plans for another volume or is this truly the end of the line for the Umbrella Academy? Might depend on the Netflix ratings?

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    This book feels like an excuse for Way to let his freak flag fly and create a bunch of supervillains - just a bunch of one-note weirdos (this one has an eye for a head, these two have cat heads, etc) without any backstory or any depth. So it's more of the same, really. The ending might make the next arc more interesting, as it brings the story back to the family, which seems to be the only element in UA that has any layers. I still like Gabriel Ba's artwork, but this volume This book feels like an excuse for Way to let his freak flag fly and create a bunch of supervillains - just a bunch of one-note weirdos (this one has an eye for a head, these two have cat heads, etc) without any backstory or any depth. So it's more of the same, really. The ending might make the next arc more interesting, as it brings the story back to the family, which seems to be the only element in UA that has any layers. I still like Gabriel Ba's artwork, but this volume also shows his limits - with a large amount of characters, sometimes his art becomes a bit too crude, and action scenes become hard to follow. 2,5 stars (Read as seven single issues)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chloe Simpson-White

    I have loved this series so far! It is wonderful to see the plot thicken and have several different story lines and vantage points at once! It is safe to say that have become obsessed! I cannot wait to see the rest of the story unfold and develop

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    After waiting many years for the continuation of The Umbrella Academy, I was not disappointed. I was a bit lost with what was going on in some parts, but it mostly all came together. Number 5 is still my favorite. Content warning: bloody violence, a sex scene and language 2019 challenge: a book written by a musician

  15. 4 out of 5

    Clare Carter

    So this volume was uh, real weird but so are the other two and I was able to follow this one SLIGHTLY more than the other two so that's a bonus. The show still shines like a billion times brighter in my heart but the art and craziness of these comics will always keep me reading them, even if they're not necessarily my favorites. Again, though, Klaus is like 2.98 of the stars on this rating lol I love him so muchhhh

  16. 4 out of 5

    OonaReads

    Read for Spookathon Challenge: ‘A Spooky Setting’

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    I think 'disjointed' is the word for this one. The real heart of the Umbrella Academy has always been the relationship between the family, and this volume eskews all of that in favour of keeping them all separate until the last minute, and even then doesn't have them interact much. I'll admit, the way Way manages to thread all of the separate plot lines into one big battle at the end is pretty clever, but I wanted more. More of the characters being themselves, more about Hotel Oblivion itself, a I think 'disjointed' is the word for this one. The real heart of the Umbrella Academy has always been the relationship between the family, and this volume eskews all of that in favour of keeping them all separate until the last minute, and even then doesn't have them interact much. I'll admit, the way Way manages to thread all of the separate plot lines into one big battle at the end is pretty clever, but I wanted more. More of the characters being themselves, more about Hotel Oblivion itself, and just, I guess? It's still fun. But it feels wrote, rather than innovative like it did the first two times around. The ending definitely opens up a lot of possibilities, but we really shouldn't have had to have an entire storyline to get us there.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nina The Fussy Reader

    I really do love these characters and their backstory, but this volume felt like too much. I understand that they want to keep the story fresh and exciting and get bigger and bigger with each volume, but this one was rather unintelligible. There was so much going on it was hard to keep up. Sure, I know this is a superhero comic and it needs to be fast, fun and exciting, but honestly, I would have been just as happy with less action and more character development. Would have loved to have seen a I really do love these characters and their backstory, but this volume felt like too much. I understand that they want to keep the story fresh and exciting and get bigger and bigger with each volume, but this one was rather unintelligible. There was so much going on it was hard to keep up. Sure, I know this is a superhero comic and it needs to be fast, fun and exciting, but honestly, I would have been just as happy with less action and more character development. Would have loved to have seen a little deeper into their lives and pasts, seen more of their feelings. But like I said, so much happened and so little was explained. I enjoyed the idea of the Hotel Oblivion, but, I dunno, the whole thing was lacking a wow factor to me. The scenes I enjoyed most were when the family were all together, just trying to act like a normal family, for instance, the hospital scene. Loved that. Ultimately, what I love about these comics is the kooky family dynamic, and though we get plenty of this in volumes one and two, it’s severely lacking in this one. I’ve been following these comics since they first came out many years ago in my teenage years, so after all this time, I want to see these characters grow a little more. There’s such potential for these characters but it felt like they were suffocated by the over-the-top storyline. And there were so many characters and I didn’t understand why some of them were receiving so much page time, taking it away from the characters we actually care about. Sometimes less is more. That being said, I still liked it. Fun and fast and hopefully things slow down a little in the next volume. The artwork remains awesome, graphic and visually exciting. However, if you want deep characterisation and a more in-depth look at the family dynamic, you’d probably get on better with the Netflix show.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gaz Watson

    Love the first 2 volumes, but this 3rd volume was just odd. No real story, no real point, the art and characters are as good as ever, but even though it was all quite pointless.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I'm counting this as finished for not even though the final issue doesn't come out until June 5th.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Almeyda Tara

    I love the art so much, but for real tho, the plot is messy in this one. The places keep switching and it makes me so confused.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Eya ☾

    I had to read most of this twice to understand it and I still didn't. I was confused most of the time. Hopefully everything starts to make sense in the next 2 issues. I might change my rating then.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Arjun Iyer

    Blurb: Gives you a room with a view and a half. Hotel Oblivion is a welcome departure from its two predecessors, Apocalypse Suite and Dallas, in that unlike them, Hotel Oblivion isn't a self-contained story. It is in fact a statement of intent by its creators to see the wonderful world of the Umbrella Academy expand. For me, the art of Gabriel Ba has always been one of the biggest points of appreciation of the whole series, and Hotel Oblivion continues its stellar record of deliverin Blurb: Gives you a room with a view and a half. Hotel Oblivion is a welcome departure from its two predecessors, Apocalypse Suite and Dallas, in that unlike them, Hotel Oblivion isn't a self-contained story. It is in fact a statement of intent by its creators to see the wonderful world of the Umbrella Academy expand. For me, the art of Gabriel Ba has always been one of the biggest points of appreciation of the whole series, and Hotel Oblivion continues its stellar record of delivering panels that are hectic but never crowded. When it comes to the story, Gerard Way successfully expands the universe and beyond and removes some of the veils that cover the life and exploits of the enigmatic "Monocle", Sir Reginald Hargreeves. What I felt lacking in the story is the sense of an ending. Granted, there isn't meant to be an ending since the events of Hotel Oblivion are setting things up for the next story-arc. However, I couldn't help but feel like someone who was reading an excellent story and suddenly found the final chapters missing from the book. Was this outcome Gerard Way's intention? If so, he's succeeded beyond expectations. Will the siblings of The Umbrella Academy survive the fallout of Hotel Oblivion? I can't wait to check-in and find out.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jillian

    As a writer and artist, reading every volume of The Umbrella Academy is so fresh and new, because the art and stories are like nothing ever before, and Hotel Oblivion just intensified the originality of Gerard and Gabriel’s work! These are not just comics about superheroes, these are stories about family, about identity, about who you are when the path set for you is no longer the one you’re walking. These are stories about if you can redeem yourself if you did bad things or if someone can be pu As a writer and artist, reading every volume of The Umbrella Academy is so fresh and new, because the art and stories are like nothing ever before, and Hotel Oblivion just intensified the originality of Gerard and Gabriel’s work! These are not just comics about superheroes, these are stories about family, about identity, about who you are when the path set for you is no longer the one you’re walking. These are stories about if you can redeem yourself if you did bad things or if someone can be pushed to the point where they no longer want to see any good in the world. This world questions what it means to be family, what it means to be heroes, what it means to use your power. It explores the gray morality of every human for there is no pure good or evil in anybody. It explores who you are because of your past vs who you could’ve been if things had gone differently. The Umbrella Academy beautifully explores the complexities of humanity while being an action packed tale of superheroes and villains, and their lives after we know them in their prime.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Arkham Reviews

    This volume did take a bit of getting into as it felt quite disjointed, spreading out the protagonists and introducing a new set of villains without preamble. It was a bit like trying to dive into a long running series at random, only knowing that that I hadn't missed anything that came before and I must admit that I felt lost for a good couple of issues. However, it is amazing how well things came together. The personal development of the characters in this volume - particularly Alis This volume did take a bit of getting into as it felt quite disjointed, spreading out the protagonists and introducing a new set of villains without preamble. It was a bit like trying to dive into a long running series at random, only knowing that that I hadn't missed anything that came before and I must admit that I felt lost for a good couple of issues. However, it is amazing how well things came together. The personal development of the characters in this volume - particularly Alison and Vanya - is subtle and it was very satisfying how the plot threads eventually converged on a very exciting climax. I also really loved what this volume set up. While I'm a little sad that there is no fourth season currently in the works, I am excited to find out what Way intends to do with this as the cliffhanger is more than a little tantalising. The sketchy art may not be to everyone's taste but I still think that this gives the series a lot of character. I really can't wait to see where things will go next.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá are back with more of the weirdest superhero family you've ever seen. I loved seeing these characters again, after a hiatus of nearly ten years. Hotel Oblivion picks up in the aftermath of the Dallas arc, with the Umbrella Academy still recovering from time travel. Plot threads that began in the first two volumes are continued through book three, with Mr. Perseus and Doctor Terminal returning to threaten the family once more. There's some elements here that we've seen p Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá are back with more of the weirdest superhero family you've ever seen. I loved seeing these characters again, after a hiatus of nearly ten years. Hotel Oblivion picks up in the aftermath of the Dallas arc, with the Umbrella Academy still recovering from time travel. Plot threads that began in the first two volumes are continued through book three, with Mr. Perseus and Doctor Terminal returning to threaten the family once more. There's some elements here that we've seen pop up in the Netflix adaptation, as Way laid out quite of bit of his ongoing plans for the comics to give the showrunners room to work. There are also lots of loose ends left at the end of this volume, and I'm thrilled to know that it's because there is so much more planned to come. The world of The Umbrella Academy is big, and we're really just getting started (again). (Read as single issues)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Delivering all the madness and mayhem that has defined this series from the start, "Hotel Oblivion" delivers the return of the Academy quite unlike anything that has come before. Opening with a more scattered story than the previous volumes, the new arc follows the characters as they find their way in the aftermath of their previous conflicts--with the world and with each other. But when the secrets of their father's Hotel Oblivion are revealed, these misfit heroes find themselves ver Delivering all the madness and mayhem that has defined this series from the start, "Hotel Oblivion" delivers the return of the Academy quite unlike anything that has come before. Opening with a more scattered story than the previous volumes, the new arc follows the characters as they find their way in the aftermath of their previous conflicts--with the world and with each other. But when the secrets of their father's Hotel Oblivion are revealed, these misfit heroes find themselves very literally confronting the fallout of their past victories and defeats. The art continues to deliver, and the ending feels as though Way has some very bold surprises still to deliver.

  28. 4 out of 5

    jordan

    I like how nothing makes sense until it slowly does (and then promptly doesn’t again). It’s a fun sort of chaos that forces the reader to accept just being along for the ride. It’s a true apocalypse story, but one that could benefit from slowing down a bit. (And you’re really gonna leave us with a cliffhanger like that, man???)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Heaven Ashlee

    That ending...yesssssss

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mathew Duncan

    I don’t really understand what I just read. The first and second volumes made more sense to me and felt much more clear. Maybe a re-read is in order.

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