Hot Best Seller

The Nordic Cookbook

Availability: Ready to download

The Nordic Cookbook offers an unprecedented look at the rich culinary offerings of the Nordic region with 700 recipes collected by the acclaimed Swedish chef Magnus Nilsson. The Nordic Cookbook, richly illustrated with the personal photography of internationally acclaimed chef Magnus Nilsson, unravels the mysteries of Nordic ingredients and introduces the region's culinary The Nordic Cookbook offers an unprecedented look at the rich culinary offerings of the Nordic region with 700 recipes collected by the acclaimed Swedish chef Magnus Nilsson. The Nordic Cookbook, richly illustrated with the personal photography of internationally acclaimed chef Magnus Nilsson, unravels the mysteries of Nordic ingredients and introduces the region's culinary history and cooking techniques. Included in this beautiful book are more than 700 authentic recipes Magnus collected while travelling extensively throughout the Nordic countries – Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Finland, Greenland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden – enhanced by atmospheric photographs of its landscapes and people. His beautiful photographs feature in the book alongside images of the finished dishes by Erik Olsson, the photographer behind Fäviken. With Magnus as a guide, everyone can prepare classic Nordic dishes and also explore new ones. The Nordic Cookbook introduces readers to the familiar (gravlax, meatballs and lingonberry jam) and the lesser-known aspects of Nordic cuisine (rose-hip soup, pork roasted with prunes, and juniper beer). Organized by food type, The Nordic Cookbook covers every type of Nordic dish including meat, fish, vegetables, breads, pastries and desserts. These recipes are achievable for home cooks of all abilities and are accompanied by narrative texts on Nordic culinary history, ingredients and techniques including smoking and home preserving. Additional essays explore classic dishes made for special occasions and key seasonal events, such as the Midsummer feast. The Nordic Cookbook joins Phaidon's national cuisine series, which includes Mexico, India, Thailand, Peru and others, and is the most comprehensive source on home cooking from the Nordic countries.


Compare

The Nordic Cookbook offers an unprecedented look at the rich culinary offerings of the Nordic region with 700 recipes collected by the acclaimed Swedish chef Magnus Nilsson. The Nordic Cookbook, richly illustrated with the personal photography of internationally acclaimed chef Magnus Nilsson, unravels the mysteries of Nordic ingredients and introduces the region's culinary The Nordic Cookbook offers an unprecedented look at the rich culinary offerings of the Nordic region with 700 recipes collected by the acclaimed Swedish chef Magnus Nilsson. The Nordic Cookbook, richly illustrated with the personal photography of internationally acclaimed chef Magnus Nilsson, unravels the mysteries of Nordic ingredients and introduces the region's culinary history and cooking techniques. Included in this beautiful book are more than 700 authentic recipes Magnus collected while travelling extensively throughout the Nordic countries – Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Finland, Greenland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden – enhanced by atmospheric photographs of its landscapes and people. His beautiful photographs feature in the book alongside images of the finished dishes by Erik Olsson, the photographer behind Fäviken. With Magnus as a guide, everyone can prepare classic Nordic dishes and also explore new ones. The Nordic Cookbook introduces readers to the familiar (gravlax, meatballs and lingonberry jam) and the lesser-known aspects of Nordic cuisine (rose-hip soup, pork roasted with prunes, and juniper beer). Organized by food type, The Nordic Cookbook covers every type of Nordic dish including meat, fish, vegetables, breads, pastries and desserts. These recipes are achievable for home cooks of all abilities and are accompanied by narrative texts on Nordic culinary history, ingredients and techniques including smoking and home preserving. Additional essays explore classic dishes made for special occasions and key seasonal events, such as the Midsummer feast. The Nordic Cookbook joins Phaidon's national cuisine series, which includes Mexico, India, Thailand, Peru and others, and is the most comprehensive source on home cooking from the Nordic countries.

30 review for The Nordic Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Penny

    I have a large shelf of cookery books but there's nothing remotely 'Nordic' about any of them. So I was curious to have a good look through this one. I ordered it in from our local Library service and the first thing I noticed was the sheer size and weight of it - nearly 750 pages and massive! I can't help thinking that the size is somehow proving some sort of point? Does someone who is bothering to read a Nordic cookbook need to be told (and I quote) 'overcooked broccoli is just not very nice'? I have a large shelf of cookery books but there's nothing remotely 'Nordic' about any of them. So I was curious to have a good look through this one. I ordered it in from our local Library service and the first thing I noticed was the sheer size and weight of it - nearly 750 pages and massive! I can't help thinking that the size is somehow proving some sort of point? Does someone who is bothering to read a Nordic cookbook need to be told (and I quote) 'overcooked broccoli is just not very nice'? Or that putting soup in a blender makes it smoother? It even told you how to cook Brussels sprouts (boil in salted water for 10 minutes, or in my mother's case, two hours). I could quote dozens of other examples of comments that are just so obvious they surely don't need to be said! However, after the disappointment of the vegetable section, I was totally enthralled by the meat and fish recipes. 4 examples - Boiled Seal intestines with blubber and crowberries Roasted or braised Northern Fulmar chicks Boiled or braised pilot whale Puffin stuffed with cake Now surely some of these are endangered species? I'm trying to think about the reaction if puffin appeared on a menu in England (where they are on the Amber List of endangered birds). So yes, an interesting read but I won't be spending £30 to own this, and some of the recipes definitely made me feel very uncomfortable.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Robert Collins

    This a fantastic cook book because it has some many photos of the area it has landscape not just recipes this a vast collection of Colour & facts that are really interesting. If you love cooking that is different & changing that makes you want to scream Fuck me this one hell of a book

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cissa

    I love this cookbook! It was a holiday gift to me, and so thoughtful and perfect! I've only started browsing through it as it deserves, but have already- in less than a week!- made 2 recipes from it. Both the julekaka (a Norwegian Christmas bread that's a holiday tradition around here), and the red cabbage with apples which we just has with our Yuletide roast goose, turned out perfectly. And since our local Scandinavian store closed, I am eager to try making rye crispbread, lefse, and other thing I love this cookbook! It was a holiday gift to me, and so thoughtful and perfect! I've only started browsing through it as it deserves, but have already- in less than a week!- made 2 recipes from it. Both the julekaka (a Norwegian Christmas bread that's a holiday tradition around here), and the red cabbage with apples which we just has with our Yuletide roast goose, turned out perfectly. And since our local Scandinavian store closed, I am eager to try making rye crispbread, lefse, and other things! And, someday, I will even make lutefisk from scratch... Anyway- if you have a Scandinavian heritage, or it's a part of your family- this is a thorough look at what the historic foods of the Nordic countries are, and most are quite accessible and look delicious. I am completely thrilled by it, and I haven't even started to browse the pastry recipes! Very recommended for people who have an interest, including in historic foods.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bequi

    For those who might be interested in furthering their cultural knowledge, The Nordic Cook Book is fantastic. It's more of a cultural history book than a fully functional cook book though there are many recipes that can be made today. I once made the modern Swedish comfort dish Chilli Creamed Chicken and Banana Casserole, very different flavor mix than my American palate is used to but, it was pretty tasty! I picked one of the stranger dishes because I'm adventurous like that but, there are many For those who might be interested in furthering their cultural knowledge, The Nordic Cook Book is fantastic. It's more of a cultural history book than a fully functional cook book though there are many recipes that can be made today. I once made the modern Swedish comfort dish Chilli Creamed Chicken and Banana Casserole, very different flavor mix than my American palate is used to but, it was pretty tasty! I picked one of the stranger dishes because I'm adventurous like that but, there are many recipes that are more suitable to a general palate and my family and I have greatly enjoyed those as well. However, there are also many centuries old recipes for which you probably can't even get the ingredients any more. You'll find a whole section on Marine Mammals and Seafood, in that section you can find such delicacies as Boiled Seal Intestines with Blubber and Crowberries. This section opens up with a description of a modern day pilot whale hunt along with a very graphic photo of the sea turned red with the blood of the slaughter. It's a fascinating look at Nordic culture both past and present, I highly recommend it to anyone who wants to delve a little deeper into getting a sense of what the daily home life of the Norse people was and is like.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Simpson

    This book is beyond comprehensive, offering a full range of recipes from all across the Nordic region. There's also a fair bit of history and background to the recipes and cuisine/food culture. The book does slant somewhat toward Swedish, but that's not surprising given that the author is Swedish. The quality is a little more mixed. A lot of Nordic cooking is simple, and many of the recipes reflect. More than a few recipes boil down to "take a piece of meat, add some vegetables, salt, and some s This book is beyond comprehensive, offering a full range of recipes from all across the Nordic region. There's also a fair bit of history and background to the recipes and cuisine/food culture. The book does slant somewhat toward Swedish, but that's not surprising given that the author is Swedish. The quality is a little more mixed. A lot of Nordic cooking is simple, and many of the recipes reflect. More than a few recipes boil down to "take a piece of meat, add some vegetables, salt, and some seasonings, and cook it". It's authentic, but some readers may be disappointed that there isn't more "pizazz".

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stacia

    I love this cookbook. Not only does Mr. Nilsson explain that Nordic cooking is a bit broad for a single cookbook, he says he wouldn't have wanted anyone else to write it. The research he conducted is admirable, and, if you care about food at all read this book. And cook some of the recipes. It's hefty, it's well designed as you might expect from the publisher, and feels authoritative.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Charity

    some people read cookbooks for fun. i'm not one of those people. however, i do like reading about interesting people and intersting food, so thus, this. i've been following Nilsson for a long time, and this book surpassed anything i thought it would be. narrative, anthropoligical, thoughtful, and an incredible collection of knowledge.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dayna

    I honestly did read this. There is a lot of cultural context to the recipes, which is fascinating. That and the beautiful photos make it well worth paging through the entire 600+ pages of the book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    The Nordic Cookbook by famed Swedish Chef Magnus Nilsson is expansive to a point where you could swap out the Joy of Cooking (or any other vast cooking reference book) for this tome of cooking techniques and recipes. Do you want to know how to hardboil an egg? Nordic Cookbook has you covered. Need to make some mayonnaise? This book has a recipe for that too. Want to serve Rotten Shark and Smoking Fish Over Sheep’s Dung to your friends and family, you evil bastard? Then you should probably read T The Nordic Cookbook by famed Swedish Chef Magnus Nilsson is expansive to a point where you could swap out the Joy of Cooking (or any other vast cooking reference book) for this tome of cooking techniques and recipes. Do you want to know how to hardboil an egg? Nordic Cookbook has you covered. Need to make some mayonnaise? This book has a recipe for that too. Want to serve Rotten Shark and Smoking Fish Over Sheep’s Dung to your friends and family, you evil bastard? Then you should probably read The Nordic Cookbook. This is the first massive, reference-style, survey of an entire culinary tradition, book that I’ve ever read cover to cover, but I’m really glad I did. Nilsson shares his experience with this tradition not through the eyes of a professional chef, but through someone deeply passionate about the Nordic culture and the family recipes that have been passed down over hundreds of years. It is clear how much love and effort went into making this cookbook, and the lessons I learned from its 700ish pages can be easily applied to much of my own home cooking. As for the recipes themselves, as a technical matter, I occasionally found some of the directions to be weirdly specific, “Arrange the fish…in the position it swims when alive” or dangerously spare, as in the case of many of the pickling and preserving recipes that seem to lack steps for sanitation processes other than sending lutefisk samples to a chemist to make sure what you’ve made isn’t full of botulism. Another issue that I found across every recipe that I tried from this book is that its cooking times/temps are oddly, obviously way off. It wasn’t much of a hindrance for me since I cook quite a lot, but more of a novice home cook could get salmonella when roasting a chicken for only 20 minutes at 200 °F. And maybe Swedes really like watery potato soup, but I had to cook mine down over an hour to get the right consistency instead of the 20ish minutes stated in the recipe. Another recipe for a beef stew would have had me roast the beef to a solid brick of coal if I had left it in the dutch oven for as long as it recommended. I find these mistakes puzzling, but I am willing to overlook them because, at the end of the day, the audacity of this book is just so damned charming. And, if I’ve learned anything from The Nordic Cookbook, I now know how to prepare a puffin if I can ever catch one of those liar penguins.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    This book is quite an undertaking with over 700 recipes. It’s like someone tried to create a North American cookbook that includes all the recipes that are important across the diverse nation in a form that all could agree is accurate. Impossible, but it’s pretty cool to traverse the Nordic work through this admittedly limited curated collection (that is huge but still, as Nilsson acknowledges, incomplete). Nordic, in this context, refers to Greenland, Iceland, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, This book is quite an undertaking with over 700 recipes. It’s like someone tried to create a North American cookbook that includes all the recipes that are important across the diverse nation in a form that all could agree is accurate. Impossible, but it’s pretty cool to traverse the Nordic work through this admittedly limited curated collection (that is huge but still, as Nilsson acknowledges, incomplete). Nordic, in this context, refers to Greenland, Iceland, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, and the Faroe Islands, including the Roma and Sami people. Nilsson admirably provides a history of the area that shows the cultural intersections and is worth reading if you are interested in Scandinavian countries. Dramatic pictures highlight the landscape, dishes and ingredients. The pictures of dishes are very helpful in order to see what is meant by a recipe like “Swedish reduced curds”. Drawings of equipment and techniques are scattered throughout the book. Recipes are for both very easy dishes like a fried egg (which gets a five paragraph discussion) to the more complex like boiled seal intestines. But the emphasis is on savoring the flavor of the main ingredient rather then adding lots of spices or flavorings, and most dishes are simple like roasted carrots or creamed spinach. Occasionally he includes parsley, cinnamon, allspice or perhaps mustard or soy sauce. In some dishes he includes the different varieties across countries with, for example, six split pea soup recipes, and many rye bread recipes. Recipes are clear though some ingredients may not be specific in quantity, a handful of salt or a little potato starch, for example. And many unusual ingredients are included though with 700 recipes, it’s easy to find those that fit your palate. Most dishes are explained. And a surprising number can be made in almost any kitchen, while others most people will never attempt or want to attempt like rotten shark. This is really a reference book that helps readers understand the breadth and diversity if Nordic cuisine. But there are some recipes that look good, a variety of meatballs and beef patties, stews and casseroles, pancakes of all kinds both thick and thin, and a variety of yeast and quick breads. Desserts are also approachable with a variety of cookies and cakes. There is a glossary in the back.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sally Reid

    I have owned this book now for three years. Have I cooked anything out of it? A few things, yes, and they were delicious. I have made potato porridge, glogg, a few baked goods, and meatballs from this book, as well as used some of his recipes as foundations on which to build other dishes. It's one of the ones I reach for if I want to make something "staple". But while the food I've managed to recreate from these recipes is wonderful, the five star rating I have given this book is purely based on I have owned this book now for three years. Have I cooked anything out of it? A few things, yes, and they were delicious. I have made potato porridge, glogg, a few baked goods, and meatballs from this book, as well as used some of his recipes as foundations on which to build other dishes. It's one of the ones I reach for if I want to make something "staple". But while the food I've managed to recreate from these recipes is wonderful, the five star rating I have given this book is purely based on the respect due to Magnus Nilsson for putting it together in the first place. This huge cookbook represents years of passion, expertise, research, and devotion to his region's cuisine that you would be hard-pressed to find anywhere else. There is history here, and love, and true craftsmanship. The photos and anecdotes are lovely, and the sheer breadth of recipes on display here is truly impressive. This might not be the best choice of cookbook if you're looking for a Nordic-food primer--it's a little too overwhelming for that--but if you love regional food and what it says about a culture and what that culture says about humanity as a whole, you will likely adore this book the way I do. Highly recommended.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    It will take me a year to really read this cookbook, but in the few short weeks it has been in my library I have relished the photos, enjoyed Nilsson's story behind writing the book, and made the Icelandic Oatmeal pancakes weekly. There are countless recipes here to try, including Icelandic Fish & Potato Mash (appears to be the amazing dish I had on our travels to Iceland) an Pepparkakor, which are a Swedish version of Gingerbread cookies. My son flagged this recipe, out of 739 pages -- the It will take me a year to really read this cookbook, but in the few short weeks it has been in my library I have relished the photos, enjoyed Nilsson's story behind writing the book, and made the Icelandic Oatmeal pancakes weekly. There are countless recipes here to try, including Icelandic Fish & Potato Mash (appears to be the amazing dish I had on our travels to Iceland) an Pepparkakor, which are a Swedish version of Gingerbread cookies. My son flagged this recipe, out of 739 pages -- the cookie was a favorite of my late father, whom my son never knew. The cookbook contains a recipe with variations among the Nordic countries: Greenland, Iceland, Faroe Islands, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland. The same meal may have slight ingredient or preparation style from country to country. Well worth the $50 price-tag. And I've already made a note to purchase Nilsson's The Nordic Baking Book, scheduled for release October 2019 (at about 400 pages only).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Well, this is a tome, so please don't try to read it in bed. I read it mostly for the historical information on Nordic cuisine, but also for a trip down memory lane. I found tecipes for my grandma's rømmegrøt, fiskeboller, and potatelefse. Less welcome was the recipe for lutefisken. That Christmas memory i can do without. ;-) For Nordic afficianados or those of Nordic heritage, highly recommended.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    Do you also read 700 page cookbooks cover to cover when the seasons change to cold and the world is a dark place and you just want to look at pictures of deeeeep rural Norway and read about how to cook sheep colostrum? Fun! Me too. This is the second time I've read this cookbook and it is my favorite cookbook of all time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Waggy

    There are a few little typos here and there but it’s a wonderful book. I plan to do a lot of traveling in the Scandinavia/Nordic regions so this helps to prepare me a lot when it comes to food. Also it’s just delicious overall and I really like how there’s a history given with most if not all the recipes as well as their names in the countries languages.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Autumn Jean

    I love the history of dishes that pairs well with the very beautiful photos. Like the author says in the introduction, you won't use all 700+ recipes but there is a lot to work with. I've made some pretty delicious things so far.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Cleaves

    This book has gotten me interested in cooking again. Particularly wonderful were the integrated discussions of historical context concerning the recipes. Brilliant.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Donna Hutt Stapfer Bell

    Huge, massive as a hardback, this is an reference work masquerading as a coffeetable cooking-art book. Name it, either in one of the Scandinavian languages or English, and you will find it here.

  19. 4 out of 5

    liz williams

    Beautiful book

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I was looking for more recipe less exploration of Norway But if you want to learn about the culture while you cook the food it wasn't bad

  21. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    When I pre-requested “The Nordic Cookbook” prior to its arrival at the library, I didn’t check the page count. Although oversize format is not unusual for cookbooks, this 767-page volume was quite a surprise. It’s the largest cookbook I’ve ever worked with, and navigating its bulk for cooking purposes is challenging, though somewhat mitigated by its two bound-in bookmarks. Author Magnus Nilsson is head chef at the top Zagat-rated Swedish restaurant Fäviken, but this is much more than a cookbook. When I pre-requested “The Nordic Cookbook” prior to its arrival at the library, I didn’t check the page count. Although oversize format is not unusual for cookbooks, this 767-page volume was quite a surprise. It’s the largest cookbook I’ve ever worked with, and navigating its bulk for cooking purposes is challenging, though somewhat mitigated by its two bound-in bookmarks. Author Magnus Nilsson is head chef at the top Zagat-rated Swedish restaurant Fäviken, but this is much more than a cookbook. It’s the history and anthropology of Scandinavia discussed through traditional foods, with recipes to illustrate the discourse. Nilsson includes not only the popular countries—Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Finland—but also the Faroe Islands, Iceland, and even Greenland. The author’s landscape and people photos provide a context for his writing, setting the mood and depicting the traditions of these cold and starkly beautiful countries. The recipes are not geared towards Americans, but towards Scandinavians and those who appreciate them. Not all can be reproduced in an American kitchen. Ingredients such as woodcock, sprats, seabird eggs, seal, reindeer, and pilot whale are native to specific areas of Scandinavia and simply not available elsewhere. Such recipes provide a peek into a different way of living and eating, in harsher, more remote environments where the growing season is short and imported goods rare and costly. Other recipes, like Swedish lutefisk and Icelandic rotten shark, are part of Scandinavian cultures that are considered less than delicious elsewhere. Still, many dishes can be made and enjoyed in an American kitchen. Vinaigrette cabbage salad traditionally accompanies pizza in Sweden, and is a healthful addition worth considering for pizza night. Carrot soup, potato pancakes, sweet and sour braised red cabbage, fresh cucumber pickles, Swedish meatballs, smoked homemade sausages, and beef and vegetable soup with dumplings, for example, would be enjoyed by most Americans. And of course, the sweets—such as Danish pastries, Norwegian Christmas cake, strawberry layer cake, fruit soup, and Finnish almond rum torte—are much loved throughout the world. Many of the sauces will interest the American palate, like egg sauce for fish, dill mayonnaise, horseradish sauce, and citronette and berry sauces. Finally, beverages such as aquavit, mulled wine, and gløgg have universal appeal, especially in cold weather. Anyone who is interested in Scandinavian culture beyond the countries commonly covered by the media will be pleased to read this book. Those of Scandinavian descent might be particularly interested. People who want to learn about historical and contemporary Scandinavian foods will of course enjoy it. Readers who want more in-depth discussion of native Scandinavian foods than is available in the usual Scandinavian cookbooks will appreciate the effort that Nilsson put into his research as well as his straightforward and concise, yet personal and appealing writing style.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This cookbook seems a little (actually a lot) intimidating at 768 pages. But, wow, is it comprehensive. It has nearly all of the Swedish and Norwegian recipes my grandma makes, and surprisingly they are very similar. Highlights include the "Blood & Offal" section, the Swedish, Norwegian, Danish and Icelandic names for every recipe, and a recipe for Puffin (sorry book lovers). The absolute best pages are 414-415 where it discusses the varieties of Nordic Hot Dogs (aka Scandinavian street food This cookbook seems a little (actually a lot) intimidating at 768 pages. But, wow, is it comprehensive. It has nearly all of the Swedish and Norwegian recipes my grandma makes, and surprisingly they are very similar. Highlights include the "Blood & Offal" section, the Swedish, Norwegian, Danish and Icelandic names for every recipe, and a recipe for Puffin (sorry book lovers). The absolute best pages are 414-415 where it discusses the varieties of Nordic Hot Dogs (aka Scandinavian street food). This is an amazing reference book, especially as I plan a Julbord.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne King

    I received this book today (1/5/2016) about 3 weeks after I browsed through Nilsson's first book "Faviken." (Please see my review of this book under "favorites.") My first impression was "Magnus has done it again!" However, as compared to the earlier work, I don't think Phaedon did as well by this publication. The paper is of lesser quality which cheapens the photography so essential to a Nilsson book. However I am happy to see that, once again, Nilsson has written a cookbook within a book and a I received this book today (1/5/2016) about 3 weeks after I browsed through Nilsson's first book "Faviken." (Please see my review of this book under "favorites.") My first impression was "Magnus has done it again!" However, as compared to the earlier work, I don't think Phaedon did as well by this publication. The paper is of lesser quality which cheapens the photography so essential to a Nilsson book. However I am happy to see that, once again, Nilsson has written a cookbook within a book and as with the first, this book will spend its life with my books not my cookbooks. I will expand on this review as I spend more time browsing this mighty (700 page) volume. We are promised more accessible recipes and on first glance this appears to be true. The documentaries I mention in my "Faviken" review prepare you for the visits Magnus makes to the beautiful Faroe Islands. It is amazing that this volume appears only 3 years after the first; Magnus is only 32 now. I'm flabbergasted that in the interim he has managed to tour all the Nordic countries, asked hundreds of questions of 2000+ individuals, run his restaurant 5 nights per week, sourced, prepped, and stored his ingredients, raised 3 children and, somehow in his spare time, wrote this book. It seems Swedes get a lot done during those 20 hour Nordic nights!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    Who knew there were so many ways to cook eel? And who really wanted to know? In case you do wish to cook eel, this ginormous, 768 page tome includes 6 eel recipes including "Fresh Eel Cooked on Straw" and "Eel Baked over Smouldering Beech or Juniper Twigs". If you are looking for a recipe for Icelandic Rotten Shark or Danish Blood Sausage or Boiled Seal Intestines with Blubber and Crowberries then this is totally the cookbook for you! If you happen to live in a Nordic country and have access to Who knew there were so many ways to cook eel? And who really wanted to know? In case you do wish to cook eel, this ginormous, 768 page tome includes 6 eel recipes including "Fresh Eel Cooked on Straw" and "Eel Baked over Smouldering Beech or Juniper Twigs". If you are looking for a recipe for Icelandic Rotten Shark or Danish Blood Sausage or Boiled Seal Intestines with Blubber and Crowberries then this is totally the cookbook for you! If you happen to live in a Nordic country and have access to Icelandic Moss, you may wish to make Icelandic Moss Soup from the recipe in this handy guide or perhaps you want to cook and eat some puffins. Sadly, there is a lovely photograph of some poor dead puffins who are "ready to be plucked." The book includes many photographs which range from interesting and odd to the quaint, and some are rather disturbing. There is quite a bit of cultural information included with the recipes which is quite interesting and the recipes seem to be well-written and should be easy to follow. More than merely a cookbook, this is a cultural lesson about Nordic cultures.

  25. 4 out of 5

    False

    The first cookbook I read promoting Nordic cooking was "Noma: Time and Place in Nordic Cuisine' by Rene Redzepi, published in 2010. It was an oversized book, beautifully printed, weighed a small ton and I swear had recipes involving twigs and moss. It was laughable, but the Danes were dead serious. Fijord food, my Viking bros. A few weeks ago, I checked out "The Nordic Cook Book" by Magnus Nilsson. Again, beautifully published with a pale ribbon bookmark stitched into the spine and lovely photog The first cookbook I read promoting Nordic cooking was "Noma: Time and Place in Nordic Cuisine' by Rene Redzepi, published in 2010. It was an oversized book, beautifully printed, weighed a small ton and I swear had recipes involving twigs and moss. It was laughable, but the Danes were dead serious. Fijord food, my Viking bros. A few weeks ago, I checked out "The Nordic Cook Book" by Magnus Nilsson. Again, beautifully published with a pale ribbon bookmark stitched into the spine and lovely photographs, but as I told the librarian, "I am only checking out this book because it weighs so much," and that it does. It weighs 5.4 pounds, but feels closer to 10. I'll probably copy one recipe to try, "just because," but what's really fascinating is that within the Table of Contents there are chapters for "Marine Mammals and Seafood," and "Blood and Offal." I've photographed some of the recipes: Blood Pancakes, Boiled Pilot Whale with Blubber and Potatoes, Sami Reindeer Heart Stew. Boiled Seal Intestines with Blubber and Crowberries. Seal Soup. Pillaging takes protein, y'all.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Hannah McEntire

    Loved every second. Phaidon doesn't fail to deliver again. The forward was awesome, self-aware, sophisticated, and slightly irreverent; like the steriotypical personality of a Scandinavian/Nord/Dane , a bit unchatty, a bit judgmental, and a bit too real. But refreshingly honest. Photography was spot on. Loved that the recipes are in both Metric and SI, seems more realistic. The recipes sometimes call for things that are hard to find, but a good balance of things that might require and extra groce Loved every second. Phaidon doesn't fail to deliver again. The forward was awesome, self-aware, sophisticated, and slightly irreverent; like the steriotypical personality of a Scandinavian/Nord/Dane , a bit unchatty, a bit judgmental, and a bit too real. But refreshingly honest. Photography was spot on. Loved that the recipes are in both Metric and SI, seems more realistic. The recipes sometimes call for things that are hard to find, but a good balance of things that might require and extra grocery trip to an international market, a few things a friend from the country might have to send you, i.e. amazon. Can't wait to try a few more, but the Sugared Brown Potatoes were delicious. Good luck!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    While it isn't a cookbook that I want to cook anything from, it was entertaining in the extreme. The recipes are fairly site-specific and not necessarily transferable worldwide, but the cultural background provided was entertaining and well written, with a sort of flair not often found in books of this type. Engrossing, and occasionally odd; lots of fermented foods I wasn't familiar with, particularly the many ways of preparing pilot whale and skate. My favorite bits of trivia were that historica While it isn't a cookbook that I want to cook anything from, it was entertaining in the extreme. The recipes are fairly site-specific and not necessarily transferable worldwide, but the cultural background provided was entertaining and well written, with a sort of flair not often found in books of this type. Engrossing, and occasionally odd; lots of fermented foods I wasn't familiar with, particularly the many ways of preparing pilot whale and skate. My favorite bits of trivia were that historically, older sausages were dyed red to show that they were of poor quality and that beer was illegal in Iceland until 1989. Fun book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kym

    So this is really an encyclopedia of all things Nordic that have to do with cooking. There are tons of recipes which include regional variation. There are things to cook that I didn't even know people ate. (See the sausage section.) Everything to know about northern seas fish are in this book. I was happy to see the cookie section. There are photos, but they will show 6 or so different dishes from above. These are not Instagram-styled photos. Other photos show the country and people of the Nordi So this is really an encyclopedia of all things Nordic that have to do with cooking. There are tons of recipes which include regional variation. There are things to cook that I didn't even know people ate. (See the sausage section.) Everything to know about northern seas fish are in this book. I was happy to see the cookie section. There are photos, but they will show 6 or so different dishes from above. These are not Instagram-styled photos. Other photos show the country and people of the Nordic lands. This is a must-have for people of Nordic descent. Everyone else will find it immensely fascinating.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Beautiful photographs of Nordic landscapes and foods illustrate this huge compendium of every aspect of Nordic cuisine. The author carefully notes differences and similarities in recipes from the various Scandinavian countries and shares fascinating stories and memories about the recipes included. As the recipes are given in imperial measurements and involve some ingredients that are hard to find here, I only noted a couple of them to try...Danish Burning Love being one of them. Mashed potatoes, Beautiful photographs of Nordic landscapes and foods illustrate this huge compendium of every aspect of Nordic cuisine. The author carefully notes differences and similarities in recipes from the various Scandinavian countries and shares fascinating stories and memories about the recipes included. As the recipes are given in imperial measurements and involve some ingredients that are hard to find here, I only noted a couple of them to try...Danish Burning Love being one of them. Mashed potatoes, bacon, onions, name...what's not to like?!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kashi

    I love this book. Great example of what a good regional cookbook should be. 600 recipes from the Nordic countries, many straight-forward with a strong appreciation for the simple and local. Some a bit exotic for my taste, like sheep's head or testicles. Nonetheless a very good cookbook with more than just recipes. The photographs are beautiful and there are lots of interesting stories (like cliff hanging to harvest seabird eggs while risking being the vile , red, spray of their protectors).

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.