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A History of Pictures: From the Cave to the Computer Screen

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A picture, says David Hockney, is the only way that we can communicate what we see. Here, in a collaboration with art critic Martin Gayford, he explores the many ways that artists have pictured the world, sharing sparkling insights and ideas that will delight every art lover and art maker. Readers who thrilled to Hockney’s Secret Knowledge know that he has an uncanny ability to get A picture, says David Hockney, is the only way that we can communicate what we see. Here, in a collaboration with art critic Martin Gayford, he explores the many ways that artists have pictured the world, sharing sparkling insights and ideas that will delight every art lover and art maker. Readers who thrilled to Hockney’s Secret Knowledge know that he has an uncanny ability to get into the minds of artists. In A History of Pictures he covers far more ground, getting at the roots of visual expression and technique through hundreds of images—from cave paintings to frames from movies—that are reproduced. It’s a joyful celebration of one of humanity’s oldest impulses.


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A picture, says David Hockney, is the only way that we can communicate what we see. Here, in a collaboration with art critic Martin Gayford, he explores the many ways that artists have pictured the world, sharing sparkling insights and ideas that will delight every art lover and art maker. Readers who thrilled to Hockney’s Secret Knowledge know that he has an uncanny ability to get A picture, says David Hockney, is the only way that we can communicate what we see. Here, in a collaboration with art critic Martin Gayford, he explores the many ways that artists have pictured the world, sharing sparkling insights and ideas that will delight every art lover and art maker. Readers who thrilled to Hockney’s Secret Knowledge know that he has an uncanny ability to get into the minds of artists. In A History of Pictures he covers far more ground, getting at the roots of visual expression and technique through hundreds of images—from cave paintings to frames from movies—that are reproduced. It’s a joyful celebration of one of humanity’s oldest impulses.

30 review for A History of Pictures: From the Cave to the Computer Screen

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jason Coleman

    Hockney and Spectator art critic Martin Gayford pretend to sit down and have a long conversation about the visual arts. The book is actually a very deliberately organized argument for the primacy of the human eye and memory in the creation of art, something that has gotten lost in the couple hundred years since photography seemed to achieve "what things look like." The camera is indeed hard to shake off, but Hockney and Gayford are pointed on its limits, mostly in the way it sees quite unlike the human eye. Th Hockney and Spectator art critic Martin Gayford pretend to sit down and have a long conversation about the visual arts. The book is actually a very deliberately organized argument for the primacy of the human eye and memory in the creation of art, something that has gotten lost in the couple hundred years since photography seemed to achieve "what things look like." The camera is indeed hard to shake off, but Hockney and Gayford are pointed on its limits, mostly in the way it sees quite unlike the human eye. They're not scolds, though—check Hockney's own extensive photographic work—and they don't seek to dismiss photography, or even that old shortcut the camera obscura, which they make clear required its own kind of skill (or in the case of Vermeer, genius). They simply want to escape the tyranny of photography, its domineering—and limiting—status. In their defense of eye and mind, they even question the advances of perspective, which also claimed to "correct" the picture. The book offers several examples of Byzantine and especially Chinese art, which often evoked experience more viscerally than later, perspective-enslaved works. (A secondary motive behind the book seems to be cultivating Hockney's own rep. He's identified as "perhaps the most critically acclaimed and universally popular artist of our age" on the jacket flap, and if you have a problem with his placing reproductions of his works beside those of Rublev or Dufy or Hopper, literally beside them, you probably better take a pass on this thing. It wasn’t a problem for me.) Hockney and Gayford have their favorites (who doesn’t?)—van Eyck comes off better here than Caravaggio, Ingres better than Gérôme, and, addressing Nude Descending a Staircase, Hockney offers this concise little distinction in favor of Pablo: "Duchamp's picture is about the movement of the nude. Picasso's Cubism is more profound. He was concerned with the movement of the spectator"—but the book is extremely diverse, and generous, in its examples. There's even some good news: just as representational art eventually overcame what looked not so long ago like a sure triumph of abstraction, the coauthors predict a big comeback for painting in general, the domination of photography suddenly vulnerable in a digital era where the pliability of images is obvious to anyone.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dramatika

    Such a delightful wonderful book on history of pictures. A beautifully written in a simple dialogue an artist and an art historian, this book is easy to read for anyone without any prior knowledge on art or its history. A great side effect of reading this book is extreme desire to see all these painting mentioned, even if you saw them before, again and again! I'm too busy at work to allow a short trip to St Petersburg's Hermitage , so a short dash to local Moscow museum will suffice for now . I Such a delightful wonderful book on history of pictures. A beautifully written in a simple dialogue an artist and an art historian, this book is easy to read for anyone without any prior knowledge on art or its history. A great side effect of reading this book is extreme desire to see all these painting mentioned, even if you saw them before, again and again! I'm too busy at work to allow a short trip to St Petersburg's Hermitage , so a short dash to local Moscow museum will suffice for now . I was also lucky to view an exhibit on Talbot early photography and to see for myself how these pictures look ( very very small ). Exciting and very approachable study on such a complex subject, a true gem of a book! Read this book and go see pictures in a very different light!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Marjorie Ingall

    An idiosyncratic look at art history, in the form of a conversation between a painter (Hockney) and an art critic (Martin Gayford). The book is illustrated by a young woman (Rose Blake) whose parents are Hockney's friends; she draws Hockney and Gayford as adults and herself as a much smaller child (at the time of the book's publication she was 29 or 30). Mmph. There are lots of Hockney's works depicted, way more than any other artist's; it's un peu celebratory of Hockney's genius. Like, de trop. An idiosyncratic look at art history, in the form of a conversation between a painter (Hockney) and an art critic (Martin Gayford). The book is illustrated by a young woman (Rose Blake) whose parents are Hockney's friends; she draws Hockney and Gayford as adults and herself as a much smaller child (at the time of the book's publication she was 29 or 30). Mmph. There are lots of Hockney's works depicted, way more than any other artist's; it's un peu celebratory of Hockney's genius. Like, de trop. That said, I do love the flow of the book -- it's never boring (that's a huge feat!), and organizing it around aspects of seeing (light, perspective, reflections, etc.) is really smart. I like the inclusion of photography and motion pictures, even though the treatment of them feels super-cursory. Which, OK, I get it, it's a survey book. BUT as you might expect from a book by two old white guys, the artists mentioned are overwhelmingly white and male. There are references to Asian art, but the artists are mostly unnamed, and Asian art is only discussed insofar as it influenced Western artists. There's a mini-handful of women, like mini-M&Ms. I don't think there are any African artists in here at all.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Trish Graboske

    So many art books are written by art historians, and what they have to say offers a lot of context and insight. However, David Hockney is an artist, and artists provide entirely different ways of looking at art from art historians. It is always fascinating to visit an art gallery with a thoughtful artist! This book is like that. Martin Gayford is an art critic, also not an art historian. To me, the whole book is full of fresh insight (note: I have an art history degree).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tutankhamun18

    A fast read- I think because of the beautiful format it is written in: a conversation between David Hockney and Martin Gayford, taking you throught the history of Pictures. This book is both a random collection of thoughts and a well pieced together argument. While you read through the conversations, being struck by a clever insight or interesting fact or beautifully reproduced image, you wont even notice until you have finished that they are no longer talking about cabe art but renaissance, not A fast read- I think because of the beautiful format it is written in: a conversation between David Hockney and Martin Gayford, taking you throught the history of Pictures. This book is both a random collection of thoughts and a well pieced together argument. While you read through the conversations, being struck by a clever insight or interesting fact or beautifully reproduced image, you wont even notice until you have finished that they are no longer talking about cabe art but renaissance, not the camera obscura but the kodak and not a painting but the film industry. How then can you argue that paintings and pictures are seperate? They are one and the human involvement with them is the same... theyare just different mediums. I read this in a day almost in one sitting(just stopping for tea, chats and food). Such a lovely coffee table book to have. I must say that although it seemed to have less information that Secret Knowledge, I felt its argument more convincing and its perusal more enjoyable.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nathalie

    I am really enjoying this book. You can find my full review, along with some pictures of different spreads, at my blog: http://www.flatandframed.com/history-pictures-david-hockney-martin-gayford/. In fact, I like the book so much that I didn't even finish it yet. Instead, I am taking my time to really explore the pictures and understand the arguments presented by the authors. In a system of alternating paragraphs, you are reading along with the conversation between Hockney & Gayford. This format really worked for me, it was like eavesdropping on two art lovers discu I am really enjoying this book. You can find my full review, along with some pictures of different spreads, at my blog: http://www.flatandframed.com/history-pictures-david-hockney-martin-gayford/. In fact, I like the book so much that I didn't even finish it yet. Instead, I am taking my time to really explore the pictures and understand the arguments presented by the authors. In a system of alternating paragraphs, you are reading along with the conversation between Hockney & Gayford. This format really worked for me, it was like eavesdropping on two art lovers discussing pictures. The book is very accessible, also to people without art history knowledge, but will still give you new insights into the broad world of pictures (from painting, drawing, photography to movies, animations, etc.).

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mary Leikvold

    So fun to read! The format is an actual conversation - a long conversation - between the artist David Hockney and the art critic Martin Gayford. They don't consider art by genre or by century but more across genres and time periods. They find the most intriguing and exciting connections. At one point Hockney compares a camel in a painting by Giotto to work done at Disney studios! It's a delight to read, the writing and the ideas are fresh and thought provoking. Charming. The book is amply and ge So fun to read! The format is an actual conversation - a long conversation - between the artist David Hockney and the art critic Martin Gayford. They don't consider art by genre or by century but more across genres and time periods. They find the most intriguing and exciting connections. At one point Hockney compares a camel in a painting by Giotto to work done at Disney studios! It's a delight to read, the writing and the ideas are fresh and thought provoking. Charming. The book is amply and generously loaded with good quality reproductions so you can see what they're talking about. I love this book. I recommend it highly.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    A history of pictures by David Hockney The history of pictures begins in the caves and ends, with a computer screen. Who knows where it will go next? But one thing is certain, the challenge remains the same: how do you represent the three-dimensional world on a two-dimensional surface? David Hockney was born on July 9, 1937, in Bradford, England. He studied at Bradford Grammar School and then Regional College of Art. He won prizes and recognition. He began at that time pain A history of pictures by David Hockney The history of pictures begins in the caves and ends, with a computer screen. Who knows where it will go next? But one thing is certain, the challenge remains the same: how do you represent the three-dimensional world on a two-dimensional surface? David Hockney was born on July 9, 1937, in Bradford, England. He studied at Bradford Grammar School and then Regional College of Art. He won prizes and recognition. He began at that time painting with oils. He developed a personal artwork. In 1957 he took the National Diploma in Design Examination, and then he enrolled in the Painting School of the Royal College in London. Hockey began painting about his sexual orientation. In the 1960s, he discovered and lived in America. He met contemporary famous artists. He particularly appreciated California. He taught at the University of Iowa. He used photography. In 1966, he met Peter Schlesinger and experienced his first true romance until 1971. The canvas Portrait of an artist (pool with two figures), comes within the scope of this period. After, David Hockney suffered from depression. In the 1980s he turned to photo collage, began series of self-portraits. In the 1990s he experimented with rising technologies. A 1972 painting by David Hockney soared to $90.3 million at Christie's on Thursday, smashing the record for the highest price ever paid at auction for a work by a living artist. With Christie's commission, "Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures)," surpassed the auction house's pre-sale estimate of about $80 million, following a bidding war between two determined would-be buyers once the work hit $70 million. Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures) is a large acrylic-on-canvas pop art painting by British artist David Hockney, completed in May 1972. It measures 7 ft × 10 ft (2.1 m × 3.0 m), and depicts two figures: one swimming underwater and one clothed male figure looking down at the swimmer. In November 2018, it sold for US$90.3 million, the highest price ever paid at auction for a work by a living artist. In the foreground, on the left-hand side, we can see a swimming pool with a swimmer. The water is really clear with a transparent effect. We can observe two slightly different shades of blue. The movement of water is symbolized by curved white lines. On the right-hand side, Peter Schlesinger, in a red suit, is standing up on pool side. He is looking at the swimmer but doesn’t look expressive. In the middle distance and in the background, nature and green colours are dominant. It’s really verdant. In the vegetation we also have touches of ochre. However, the background is drabber as if it is foggy. It represents different hills and mountains that David Hockney could have seen in the south of France. A horizontal line divides the canvas into two parts ; the bottom part is composed with geometric shapes. The swimmer represents a horizontal line too whereas Peter Schlesinger, figure draws a vertical line. Hills and tiling suggest oblique lines. The general atmosphere is rather harmonious, peaceful. The 10 most expensive works of art sold at auction 15 November 2017 Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi sold for $400 million at Christie’s ($450.3m, including auction house premium) 2 May 2012 One of four versions of The Scream created by Munch and the only one that is privately owned. The painting sold for $119,922,500 30 April 2010 Picasso’s Nude, Green Leaves and Bust (1932) sold at Christie's in New York for $106,482,500 12 January 2010 L’homme qui Marche I (1961) by Alberto Giacometti sold for £65,001,250 ($105,182,398) at Sotheby’s in London 5 May 2004 Picasso’s Boy With a Pipe (1905) sold at Sotheby's in New York for $104,168,000 8 November 2006 Gustav Klimt’s Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer II (1912)went under the hammer at Christie’s New York and sold for $87,936,000 14 April 2008 Francis Bacon’s Triptych (1976) sold for $85.9m to oligarch Roman Abramovich 12 November 2010 A Chinese 18th century Qianlong dynasty porcelain vase sold for £53,100,000 ($85,921,461) at Bainbridge’s auction house in London 22 March 2006 Dora Maar au Chat (1941) by Pablo Picasso sold for £51,560,080 ($83,429,503) at Sotheby's in London 15 May 1990 Portrait of Dr Paul Gachet (1890) by Vincent van Gogh sold for $82,500,000 (£50,985,692) at Christie’s in New York

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ian Smith

    A HISTORY OF PICTURES by David Hockney and Martin Gayford – Thames and Hudson Review by Ian Smith This book has a sub title inside “From the Cave to the Computer Screen”. No more apt sub title has there ever been. I chose this book after hours at Dymocks and to say I am pleased would be a gross understatement. It fulfilled my expectations and then some. It is a study of “pictures” through the ages but they both have a belief that the word covers everything from cave man images to A HISTORY OF PICTURES by David Hockney and Martin Gayford – Thames and Hudson Review by Ian Smith This book has a sub title inside “From the Cave to the Computer Screen”. No more apt sub title has there ever been. I chose this book after hours at Dymocks and to say I am pleased would be a gross understatement. It fulfilled my expectations and then some. It is a study of “pictures” through the ages but they both have a belief that the word covers everything from cave man images to manipulating photos on the computer screen, something I’ve always held to be true. However, with the font of knowledge they have jointly accumulated over the decades they go into fascinating detail of artistic pieces, formulating opinions as to how they work and how man evolved into the many forms of pictures we can view today. It’s surprising just how frequently light coming through a small hole and then supplanting a reverse image on a panel (see camera) comes into painting centuries before it had a name. The other thing is mirrors (see Van Eyck, Campin and Velasquez) and how they were included, utilized and offer a different perspective, especially when they’re not totally flat. Comparisons with the lighting in a Caravaggio, for example, are readily made with that used in modern day film studios and indeed, having recently seen the latest incarnation of “Murder on the Orient Express”, it was like Caravaggio himself was organizing the lighting. In fact, one of their quotes is that “Photography is a child of painting”. How techniques morphed into one another or artists digressed totally from the norm are all part of this insightful volume. That Chinese art does not have a fixed viewpoint, but is based on moving focus is another thing I learnt. That Brunelleschi, the great Renaissance architect famed for the dome in Florence, was also the one who “discovered” perspective in painting was another revelation. How oil painting on canvas became the norm because there was plenty of the latter to be had in Renaissance Venice where they relied on sea freight. And I loved the quote by Rembrandt, “If I want to relieve my spirit then I should seek not honour but freedom”. How that can be transplanted into so many of the activities of daily life! We are living through an evolution of pictures as profound as anything in the past. What you can do with photoshop leads us into the future and the past at the same time and then more fertile minds than ours will come up with something we had never envisaged. This is not, as you may have gathered, something to be read overnight. It is, like a gourmet meal, something to be savoured again and again in morsels that tantalize the brain. If you’re into art in any form, you will treasure this work and return to it throughout your life to dwell on the wonders within.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Danny Jumpertz

    A stimulating and enlightening read. British artist David Hockney expands on his study of optics and lenses (Secret Knowledge 2001) and their profound influence on painting and picture making. The book is beautifully illustrated with high resolution art reproductions and is refreshingly free of jargon. Written in a conversational "to and fro" style between Hockney and art historian and critic Martin Gayford the chapters provide an overview of pictures, images and artworks. After an inspiring int A stimulating and enlightening read. British artist David Hockney expands on his study of optics and lenses (Secret Knowledge 2001) and their profound influence on painting and picture making. The book is beautifully illustrated with high resolution art reproductions and is refreshingly free of jargon. Written in a conversational "to and fro" style between Hockney and art historian and critic Martin Gayford the chapters provide an overview of pictures, images and artworks. After an inspiring introduction, they consider the artist's point of view - the folding of our multi-dimensional world onto a flat two dimensional representation. "Every picture ever made has rules, even the ones made by a surveillance camera in a car park. There's a limit to what it can see. Someone has put it there, arranged that it would cover a certain area. There is nothing automatic about it: someone had to choose its point of view." This personal composition represents someone's reality. This book masterfully explores how and what we see and the myriad ways images have been translated onto two dimensional surfaces.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Curt Bobbitt

    Browsing a borrowed copy of this book led to the following quotation: "In a photograph it's the same time on every part of the surface. That's not true in a painting. It's not true even in a painting made from a photograph. That makes a considerable difference. It's why you can't look at a photograph for too long. In the end, it is just a fraction of a second, so you don't see the subject in layers. The portrait of me by Lucien Freud [included adjacent to the paragraph] took a hundred and twenty Browsing a borrowed copy of this book led to the following quotation: "In a photograph it's the same time on every part of the surface. That's not true in a painting. It's not true even in a painting made from a photograph. That makes a considerable difference. It's why you can't look at a photograph for too long. In the end, it is just a fraction of a second, so you don't see the subject in layers. The portrait of me by Lucien Freud [included adjacent to the paragraph] took a hundred and twenty hours of sittings and you see all that time layered into the painting. That's why it's infinitely more interesting than a photograph" (78).

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Lambert-Maberly

    Weird and boring, unfortunately--was hoping for the usual panoply of the rich history of art, this time from an interesting new perspective, but an odd bias cropped up early and it was an uncomfortable read (until I stopped). I don't care that artists once used a camera obscura, it's not the shocking twist the authors seem to think it is. (Note: 5 stars = amazing, wonderful, 4 = very good book, 3 = decent read, 2 = disappointing, 1 = awful, just awful. I'm fairly good at picking for myself so en Weird and boring, unfortunately--was hoping for the usual panoply of the rich history of art, this time from an interesting new perspective, but an odd bias cropped up early and it was an uncomfortable read (until I stopped). I don't care that artists once used a camera obscura, it's not the shocking twist the authors seem to think it is. (Note: 5 stars = amazing, wonderful, 4 = very good book, 3 = decent read, 2 = disappointing, 1 = awful, just awful. I'm fairly good at picking for myself so end up with a lot of 4s). I feel a lot of readers automatically render any book they enjoy 5, but I grade on a curve!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Allison Parker

    Not a comprehensive history, more of a written conversation about different elements of mostly two-dimensional art. The lovely and informative musings come from contemporary, working artist David Hockney, and art critic Martin Gayford. Darling and often amusing illustrations decorate the pages around prints of well-known and lesser-known artworks, including some of those by Hockney. I really only knew his pool paintings (A BIGGER SPLASH) before this work; I'm intrigued enough to explore more of Not a comprehensive history, more of a written conversation about different elements of mostly two-dimensional art. The lovely and informative musings come from contemporary, working artist David Hockney, and art critic Martin Gayford. Darling and often amusing illustrations decorate the pages around prints of well-known and lesser-known artworks, including some of those by Hockney. I really only knew his pool paintings (A BIGGER SPLASH) before this work; I'm intrigued enough to explore more of his paintings.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lily

    Very accessible art technique and history book, basically a conversation detailing the history of optics, painting, photography, and film. I enjoyed all the visual examples and the casualness of the tone. It is a mixture of science and theory and the history of seeing and reexamines what exactly a "picture" is and the many way perspective is formed and played with. I think I have become better at seeing and appreciating technique. Reminiscent in some way of John Berger's Ways of Seeing.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ian Banks

    Freaking loved this: so informative and interesting that I forgave it the sin of not announcing that there were bibliographical notes for each chapter. There's a lot of Hockney's own work featured in it but he uses his powers for good and illustrates how he used each technique in the advancement of art to create his own work. Especially interesting are the chapters on the camera obscura, which I had no idea was so widespread.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    While this was interesting and informative, it was exhausting to turn page after page and see the glaring omission of art made by women and non-white men. That the authors didn't acknowledge this made it all the more cringe-worthy. And, while Hockney is progressive insofar as he doesn't miss an opportunity to mention that he sometimes draws on an iPad, he is quick to dismiss the legitimacy and power of photography and film.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Brennan

    I read this after attending a David Hockney exhibition in Melbourne. It's a conversation between Hockney and Gayford and this format works really well. Hockney brings his experience and knowledge of craft and Gayford provides a lot of historical context. Was great to read this after viewing the pictures and helped to stir up the imagination.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gps

    This is a marvelous book, worth treasuring and reading, reflecting, and then re-reading...all in small doses as it the text and the artworks cover so many centuries. artist and critic in conversation ennoble and enhance this conversation, and provide plenty of insights to the thoughtful and reflective reader

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shiralea Woodhouse

    Really interesting "conversation" about pictures and how humans represent the world they see in general. I'm no artist, but it was still easy to follow in general. The artists talking do seem particularly fond of their own works! Not actually sure too many kids would pick this up on their own.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mason

    A brilliantly enjoyable ride through the history of images in art, from primitive murals to iPads. Hockney and Gayford make a perfect pair, leveraging their varied expertise to dispel myths around absolute truth in pictures, even when they claim to depict 'reality.'

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    An excellent introduction to the world of pictures in all their forms. The book is written as a conversation between the authors and explains art without the pretentious nonsense of so many art books. If like me, you are a novice, then this book is an excellent introduction to the history of art.

  22. 5 out of 5

    ems

    i think my expectations were just a little too high -- as all the other reviewers are saying, this would be a great coffee table book

  23. 5 out of 5

    Juan Mari

    A good book of art Ir you like art and want to know something about how it progressed through the years in a very likely way, just read this book

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Bange

    Recommended for grades 5-9.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Yellowoasis

    I feel like I’ve just spent a month basking in the glorious company of two amazing people, learning all about the history of pictures. A must-read for anyone interested in art and pictures. Just lovely. My only criticism, and it feels rather mean-spirited, is that when they refer to particular works, the image is often overleaf. It would have been wonderful to have the image on the same page as the text, for ease of reference. But a minor quibble, which does nothing to detract from the over I feel like I’ve just spent a month basking in the glorious company of two amazing people, learning all about the history of pictures. A must-read for anyone interested in art and pictures. Just lovely. My only criticism, and it feels rather mean-spirited, is that when they refer to particular works, the image is often overleaf. It would have been wonderful to have the image on the same page as the text, for ease of reference. But a minor quibble, which does nothing to detract from the overall beauty of the book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Prince

    Information in this book was so interesting and helpful. I felt like I was sitting in on a conversation between these two very knowledgeable gentlemen. The only downside being that a vast majority of it was a not so humble humble brag. Hockney featured A LOT of his own work.... like, we get it Hockney. You are famous and talented. Just sayin'.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

    I won a copy of this book from Goodreads. This is a fabulous coffee table book. I began reading it and could not put it down. I plan to share the book with a family member who has recently began sketching.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gareth Schweitzer

    A good easy read with stunning images. Hockney continues to shed light on "picture making" as opposed to "art making" highlighting the technologies that have driven and evolved the way pictures over the centuries have been made and seen.

  29. 5 out of 5

    John Eddleston

    Excellent book - well observed and considered.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rafa Willisch

    this book will help you to understand how painting and photography evolved and influenced eacch other

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