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Stonewall: A Building. An Uprising. A Revolution

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Celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising with the very first picture book to tell of its historic and inspiring role in the gay civil rights movement. From Rob Sanders, author of the acclaimed Pride: The Story of Harvey Milk and the Rainbow Flag, comes this powerful and timeless true story that will allow young readers to discover the rich and dynamic history Celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising with the very first picture book to tell of its historic and inspiring role in the gay civil rights movement. From Rob Sanders, author of the acclaimed Pride: The Story of Harvey Milk and the Rainbow Flag, comes this powerful and timeless true story that will allow young readers to discover the rich and dynamic history of the Stonewall Inn and its role in the gay civil rights movement--a movement that continues to this very day. In the early-morning hours of June 28, 1969, the Stonewall Inn was raided by police in New York City. Though the inn had been raided before, that night would be different. It would be the night when empowered members of the LGBTQ+ community--in and around the Stonewall Inn--began to protest and demand their equal rights as citizens of the United States. Movingly narrated by the Stonewall Inn itself, and featuring stirring and dynamic illustrations, Stonewall: A Building. An Uprising. A Revolution is an essential and empowering civil rights story that every child deserves to hear.


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Celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising with the very first picture book to tell of its historic and inspiring role in the gay civil rights movement. From Rob Sanders, author of the acclaimed Pride: The Story of Harvey Milk and the Rainbow Flag, comes this powerful and timeless true story that will allow young readers to discover the rich and dynamic history Celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising with the very first picture book to tell of its historic and inspiring role in the gay civil rights movement. From Rob Sanders, author of the acclaimed Pride: The Story of Harvey Milk and the Rainbow Flag, comes this powerful and timeless true story that will allow young readers to discover the rich and dynamic history of the Stonewall Inn and its role in the gay civil rights movement--a movement that continues to this very day. In the early-morning hours of June 28, 1969, the Stonewall Inn was raided by police in New York City. Though the inn had been raided before, that night would be different. It would be the night when empowered members of the LGBTQ+ community--in and around the Stonewall Inn--began to protest and demand their equal rights as citizens of the United States. Movingly narrated by the Stonewall Inn itself, and featuring stirring and dynamic illustrations, Stonewall: A Building. An Uprising. A Revolution is an essential and empowering civil rights story that every child deserves to hear.

30 review for Stonewall: A Building. An Uprising. A Revolution

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Honeycutt

    I'm leaving this unrated because I honestly don't know how to rate it fairly. While I'm happy that there are kid's books about queer history, I don't know if we're doing kids any favors by offering them a bland, sanitized version of reality. Why write a book about resisting police violence and make it seem like it was just people standing around and shouting? Why not use it as an opportunity to engage kids in real talk about police violence, and how riots are the language of the unheard? Why wai I'm leaving this unrated because I honestly don't know how to rate it fairly. While I'm happy that there are kid's books about queer history, I don't know if we're doing kids any favors by offering them a bland, sanitized version of reality. Why write a book about resisting police violence and make it seem like it was just people standing around and shouting? Why not use it as an opportunity to engage kids in real talk about police violence, and how riots are the language of the unheard? Why wait until the backmatter to mention how trans women of color were instrumental in the Stonewall Uprising? Honestly, this book is FINE as an introduction. I don't want to be that queer person who drags a good-faith effort for not being perfect, because that gets us nowhere. But what I really want a Dottir Press book about Stonewall--less gay rights, more queer liberation.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is nicely illustrated and well-written. However, while it defines gay and lesbian, it doesn't define transgender. In the story, it also only just ever so briefly references the role of transwomen in the riots and aftermath; particularly, the role of transwomen of color, such as Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, are just a very small vague reference (not even by name) in the afterword. I'm leaving at four stars because of the importance of the topic and I'm really happy to see a kids book This is nicely illustrated and well-written. However, while it defines gay and lesbian, it doesn't define transgender. In the story, it also only just ever so briefly references the role of transwomen in the riots and aftermath; particularly, the role of transwomen of color, such as Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, are just a very small vague reference (not even by name) in the afterword. I'm leaving at four stars because of the importance of the topic and I'm really happy to see a kids book about it. However, more intersectionality can and should be demanded when writing about this topic, at all levels. For further reading, see here, here and here.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    A beautiful new children’s picture book just in time for Stonewall 50, the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising which helped launch the LGBTQ 🏳🌈 Civil Rights Movement. Respectful and educational. A celebration of how far we have come and how much more we have to do. Bravo. A beautiful new children’s picture book just in time for Stonewall 50, the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising which helped launch the LGBTQ 🏳️‍🌈 Civil Rights Movement. Respectful and educational. A celebration of how far we have come and how much more we have to do. Bravo.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Marshall

    I received a preview copy of Stonewall at a literacy convention. I loved Pride by Rob Sanders and Stonewall lived up to my expectations. It's a great history story put into a picture book. I will definitely be getting a copy when it is officially out for release.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Stonewall: A Building. An Uprising. A Revolution. is a children's picture book written by Rob Sanders and illustrated by Jamey Christoph, which retells the events of the Stonewall Uprising in New York City. As this book is written to celebrate the anniversary of the uprisings, which happened today (28 June), fifty years ago, I thought it would be apropos to read this book today. June, at least in my part of the world is LGBTQ+ Pride Month, which I plan to read one children's book, which pertains Stonewall: A Building. An Uprising. A Revolution. is a children's picture book written by Rob Sanders and illustrated by Jamey Christoph, which retells the events of the Stonewall Uprising in New York City. As this book is written to celebrate the anniversary of the uprisings, which happened today (28 June), fifty years ago, I thought it would be apropos to read this book today. June, at least in my part of the world is LGBTQ+ Pride Month, which I plan to read one children's book, which pertains to the subject everyday this month. Therefore, I thought that this book would be apropos for today. Thorn's text is rather simplistic, straightforward, and informative. The narrative depicts the narrative of the building history from when it was built in the mid-nineteenth century to becoming a haven for those who told they did not fit in. Additional information and text could be found at the back. Christoph's illustrations were wonderfully done – it captured the mood of solemnity, anger, and fear of the narrative. The premise of the book is rather straightforward. The Stonewall Inn became a home for people who were told that they didn’t fit in during the 1960s. However, others were not as accepting. Scenes of the 1969 face-off between police and protesters capture emotions of anger, fear, and burgeoning energy. Following the riots, crowds appear in the airy daylight of Manhattan, celebrating the first anniversary of the uprising. All in all, Stonewall: A Building. An Uprising. A Revolution. is a wonderful love letter to a building where people who stood for justice and the victories that continue to lead to change.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Marjorie Ingall

    I like the simple, clear text and the clean lines of the art. I like the gimmick of having the story told by the bar itself. But this is the second children's book about the fight for LGBT rights that underplays the role of trans folk and people of color...which is especially egregious in a book about Stonewall. For example, a beautifully illustrated spread showing the crowd at Stonewall, we see 17 people. Twelve or 13 of them are white. C'mon. Five people are in the foreground; four I like the simple, clear text and the clean lines of the art. I like the gimmick of having the story told by the bar itself. But this is the second children's book about the fight for LGBT rights that underplays the role of trans folk and people of color...which is especially egregious in a book about Stonewall. For example, a beautifully illustrated spread showing the crowd at Stonewall, we see 17 people. Twelve or 13 of them are white. C'mon. Five people are in the foreground; four are white men and one is a black drag queen. She is the only drag queen in the entire spread. In the background of the spread are two other black men; three other characters have light brown skin. I realize I may sound petty, but this book draws a misleading visual picture of who frequented the Stonewall Inn and who led the uprising against the cops, and it continues the longstanding trend of putting white men in the foreground of the story. The text does a better job: "In 1967, we swung open our doors and became the Stonewall Inn. Gay men and women from throughout the city and the country came to meet old and new friends, free to be themselves inside our walls. Women and men, young and old, teenagers, transgender people, drag queens, veterans, businesspeople, students, people of different colors, religions, and culture, gathered, chatted, laughed, and danced under our roof." Nonetheless, I am bummed.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I didn't love this book, but I did tear up a bunch reading it. The device of having the Stonewall Inn itself be the narrator is an interesting one -- which didn't quite work for me at the beginning, but by partway through it mostly just felt like a regular third-person narration. It feels a little text-heavy to me for a picturebook, but it's also intentionally kind of reined-in like it's for a young audience, so I'm not sure exactly which age its aimed at. It doe I didn't love this book, but I did tear up a bunch reading it. The device of having the Stonewall Inn itself be the narrator is an interesting one -- which didn't quite work for me at the beginning, but by partway through it mostly just felt like a regular third-person narration. It feels a little text-heavy to me for a picturebook, but it's also intentionally kind of reined-in like it's for a young audience, so I'm not sure exactly which age its aimed at. It does a nice job of taking you through the location's long history of being a place where you could be yourself. And I generally feel okay about the language it uses for queer folks and how it explains terms in-text (though I rolled my eyes at its preference to use the term "LGBTQ+ rights movement" as the present-day name for the movement that at the time was called the "gay rights movement"). Also, I really appreciate the attractive illustrations of lesbians and trans women.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    You know that LGBTQ+ pride marches usually happen in June, but do you know why? If not, this picture book about the Stonewall riots of June 1969 will give you a historical insight. Told from the POV of the Stonewall Inn buildings, the text and illustrations succeed at depicting injustice and resistance in a way that kids can process yet is not sanitized or glossed over. An excellent nonfiction addition to the growing canon of LGBTQ+ picture books.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Linda Quinn

    A picture book, for children, about the Stonewall uprising and the start of the battle for LGBTQ rights. Simply told and beautifully illustrated, this book belongs in every library in our country. There's still a long way to go.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    I looooved this book!! The illustrations are gorgeous and I really like how it shares the history of the building.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Mattmiller

    Amazing! Is it perfect? No. But is it fantastic? Absolutely! And the illustrations- absolute winners! Definitely a needed a book. Love it. So thankful Rob Sanders chose to write about Stonewall, and what a cool perspective (from the building itself!) Also, beyond thankful for Jamey Christoph's gorgeous illustrations!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    This was a well produced book that gives the basics to young readers.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    For many youngsters, it may be hard to imagine a time when police raided bars and arrested clients because of their clothing or sexual orientation. But that was exactly what happened for many years. But that began to change after one tumultuous night. June 28, 1969 was a day like many others. The police raided the Stonewall Inn in New York City and put some of those in the bar in the paddy wagon. For some reason, the onlookers decided that enough was enough, and stood their ground, refusing to l For many youngsters, it may be hard to imagine a time when police raided bars and arrested clients because of their clothing or sexual orientation. But that was exactly what happened for many years. But that began to change after one tumultuous night. June 28, 1969 was a day like many others. The police raided the Stonewall Inn in New York City and put some of those in the bar in the paddy wagon. For some reason, the onlookers decided that enough was enough, and stood their ground, refusing to leave the premises and forcing the police to barricade themselves inside the bar. Their actions were a pivotal point in the LGBTQ+ civil rights movement. The protests went on for several nights, and on the anniversary of the raid and subsequent response, supporters continue to gather and march in support of freedom, love, and equality. Told from the point of view of the Stonewall, originally two stables in Greenwich Village that were later connected, this picture book allows readers to understand why a certain day in June is celebrated while tracing the history of the building itself. Back matter includes additional information about the Stonewall Inn, now designated a National Historic Landmark, and archival photographs. There's also a brief interview with one of the participants in the uprising. The illustrations celebrate the diversity of the community and those who participated in the protests and standing their ground. I'm delighted to see that picture books such as this one are being published since this is an area of civil rights and civil rights history not covered much at all in literature for young readers. Perhaps this story will provide inspiration for others to stand up for their own rights and causes. As far as we've come, it could be just as easy to slide back to these earlier times and practices.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    As the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots quickly approaches this June 2019, this beautiful picture book for children (and adults) is hitting the shelves. It's so wonderful seeing a book like this being published for young children. LGBTQ+ history deserves to be known and taught in this country. Actually, there are many adults who need to know this history as well. As it should be, the Stonewall Inn takes center stage and tells its own story from its humble beginning as a horse s As the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots quickly approaches this June 2019, this beautiful picture book for children (and adults) is hitting the shelves. It's so wonderful seeing a book like this being published for young children. LGBTQ+ history deserves to be known and taught in this country. Actually, there are many adults who need to know this history as well. As it should be, the Stonewall Inn takes center stage and tells its own story from its humble beginning as a horse stable to an iconic, historical monument that was the birthplace of the fight for civil rights for gays and lesbians. With straightforward writing, the history of this important LGBTQ+ building is described. Without going into too much detail that would be hard for young readers to grasp such as the continued and harsh harassment by the police towards gay and lesbian people and the New York mob owning the bar, the author describes the night of the riots. Accompanying the story are gorgeous drawings/paintings by illustrator Jamey Christoph. They are vibrant, colorful, and wonderful pieces of artwork. The book ends on a positive high note which is just perfect. This is a marvelous addition to not only LGBTQ+ books, but children's literature. It right deserves a spot in school libraries and I hope it finds its way there. This is one book that is so worth owning.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Greenwich Village has always been a great place, the creative center of New York City. 2 old buildings, built in the 1840s and joined together in the 1930s became the Stonewall Inn in the 1960s, welcoming all different kinds of people, especially the LGBTQ+ community. When intolerance turned into repeated police raids, the community stepped in, and the Stonewall Uprising began. It lasted for several days and nights, the police had never seen anything like it. Today, June 28th marks the anniversa Greenwich Village has always been a great place, the creative center of New York City. 2 old buildings, built in the 1840s and joined together in the 1930s became the Stonewall Inn in the 1960s, welcoming all different kinds of people, especially the LGBTQ+ community. When intolerance turned into repeated police raids, the community stepped in, and the Stonewall Uprising began. It lasted for several days and nights, the police had never seen anything like it. Today, June 28th marks the anniversary of Stonewall, and people all over the world celebrate the movement for LGBTQ+ rights. The Stonewall Uprising is a complicated topic, but Rob Sanders has condensed and retold the story simply and with respect. Jamey Christoph's illustrations are expressive and compliment the story well. Taking this movement to a picture book audience leaves out a lot, so hopefully it will spark discussions and interest to find out more. For this and more of my reviews, visit https://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2019...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    This illustrated historical account of the Stonewall Inn is narrated by the building itself, which makes it quite unique. Starting with the buildings' origins as horse stables in early America, and up through the recent US National Monument status, the Stonewall tells the reader its story. The main focus, of course, is on the Stonewall Uprisings in June 1969. The art is very nice and clear. I thought the account was pretty well written, though the crucial role of transgender individua This illustrated historical account of the Stonewall Inn is narrated by the building itself, which makes it quite unique. Starting with the buildings' origins as horse stables in early America, and up through the recent US National Monument status, the Stonewall tells the reader its story. The main focus, of course, is on the Stonewall Uprisings in June 1969. The art is very nice and clear. I thought the account was pretty well written, though the crucial role of transgender individuals was left to a note in the back of the book. I was also somewhat disappointed that the word "queer" wasn't used once, not even present on a protest sign in the back of a crowd or anything. There were photographs included in the back of the book, including one featuring Silvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson. Altogether, I really liked this historical account of Stonewall, especially the 'long view of history' lens the authors used.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brooklyn Cribdon (The Wild Library)

    When I first read this picturebook I LOVED it, and it made me teary. Perhaps it was just an emotional day but the story really hit home. Recently though, I saw some reviews of the book speaking to how the story was incredibly sanitized. I've gone back and re-read the book with this new perspective. I get it- there is a total lack of recognition of people of colour, transgender folks, and especially trans people of colour. The language used is also quite binary ("men and women" "gays and lesbians When I first read this picturebook I LOVED it, and it made me teary. Perhaps it was just an emotional day but the story really hit home. Recently though, I saw some reviews of the book speaking to how the story was incredibly sanitized. I've gone back and re-read the book with this new perspective. I get it- there is a total lack of recognition of people of colour, transgender folks, and especially trans people of colour. The language used is also quite binary ("men and women" "gays and lesbians"). With this being said however, I also recognize that in the late 60s, language was binary. There wasn't the same vocabulary and social intelligence around the gender and sexuality spectrums as there is in 2019. Do I think this book could have been even better had it used 2019 vocabulary? You bet. Do I think this book is terrible because it is somewhat sanitized? No. This book is beautiful and emotional, and with an adult's help, the book offers a starting point for discussion.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Devon

    I don't think a star rating would be fair to this book, as it's so important that it exists, and you're not going to get a perfect effort with every telling. The illustrations are great, the language is accessible if there's an adult guiding a child through it... and it is simplified. Something that bothers me is how the extra information at the back talks about trans women of color being seen by many as leaders in the movement, but they aren't given any focus in the text. If they were prominent I don't think a star rating would be fair to this book, as it's so important that it exists, and you're not going to get a perfect effort with every telling. The illustrations are great, the language is accessible if there's an adult guiding a child through it... and it is simplified. Something that bothers me is how the extra information at the back talks about trans women of color being seen by many as leaders in the movement, but they aren't given any focus in the text. If they were prominent leaders, then why leave them out? Even a sentence would have worked. But, if the goal was to give a broad picture of what was happening, and to try and include everyone equally... I don't know. An excellent introduction on the topic, but will need additional information and books to be well-rounded.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cody Lane

    Suitable for grades: 3-5 Stonewall was once a place for rich affluent people to board their horses, then the rich people moved away from the city. Stonewall slowly became a place for artists, and people alike to gather without ridicule. Night after night, the police would raid Stonewall as they didn’t like the LGBTQ+ community. Things changed on June 28th, 1969. During a raid, a riot broke out, the community was tired of being shamed and arrested for being who they were. One year late Suitable for grades: 3-5 Stonewall was once a place for rich affluent people to board their horses, then the rich people moved away from the city. Stonewall slowly became a place for artists, and people alike to gather without ridicule. Night after night, the police would raid Stonewall as they didn’t like the LGBTQ+ community. Things changed on June 28th, 1969. During a raid, a riot broke out, the community was tired of being shamed and arrested for being who they were. One year later, on June 28th, 1970 marked the first anniversary, and the first ever pride celebration. Lessons, questions, or activities for Kids: - Why were the police mean to the people inside Stonewall? - When did gay men and women get the right to marry? - How can you stand up for your rights?

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kerrie Barton

    I'm 42 years old. When I was growing up, even as a teenager and college student, the issues and history of the LGBTQ+ movement and people were never talked about. In my small town, I didn't know anyone (that I knew of) that was gay or "non-conforming." Now that children's books, like Stonewall, are being published, I'm learning about a lot of this for the first time. My hope is that by introducing these books to my young son and my classroom, they will not experience the same "surprise;" that th I'm 42 years old. When I was growing up, even as a teenager and college student, the issues and history of the LGBTQ+ movement and people were never talked about. In my small town, I didn't know anyone (that I knew of) that was gay or "non-conforming." Now that children's books, like Stonewall, are being published, I'm learning about a lot of this for the first time. My hope is that by introducing these books to my young son and my classroom, they will not experience the same "surprise;" that they will grow up knowing, understanding, and accepting all people and their historical struggle for equality, as well as how important it is to stand up for all people and their rights.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    Wonderful picture book featuring two horse stables that are built in the 1840s in Greenwich Village and gradually witness the changes in the neighborhood until they are combined together into a gay bar called the Stonewall Inn. The story of those buildings and the riots which propelled the Gay Rights movement are contained in this beautiful picture book. Very moving and quite clever, I still have to admit while I’d love to read or share this book in a classroom, I’d still look for an ok from adm Wonderful picture book featuring two horse stables that are built in the 1840s in Greenwich Village and gradually witness the changes in the neighborhood until they are combined together into a gay bar called the Stonewall Inn. The story of those buildings and the riots which propelled the Gay Rights movement are contained in this beautiful picture book. Very moving and quite clever, I still have to admit while I’d love to read or share this book in a classroom, I’d still look for an ok from administrators and the school district. So currently I’ll read it myself at home and store it in my mind until I can share it without retribution. The Stonewall Inn Just opened as a National Park too!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Betty White

    I’m reviewing this book as a School Counselor who looks for LGBTQ+ non-fiction to use with students. This book does talk about conflict, but in an effort to make the riot age appropriate all violence has been toned down. So, this might not be the same story you’ve heard before. The protagonist of the story is the Inn itself—which allows the author to explore how the neighborhood has changed over the centuries. I think this book would be a great resource to introduce topics of acceptance, advocac I’m reviewing this book as a School Counselor who looks for LGBTQ+ non-fiction to use with students. This book does talk about conflict, but in an effort to make the riot age appropriate all violence has been toned down. So, this might not be the same story you’ve heard before. The protagonist of the story is the Inn itself—which allows the author to explore how the neighborhood has changed over the centuries. I think this book would be a great resource to introduce topics of acceptance, advocacy, and the history of communities that are often left out of history books.

  23. 4 out of 5

    JC Kato

    Even in the small but gorgeous town of Rosendale, N.Y. at Postmark Books carries this great book. It's historical in being the first Picture Book about a historical event on June 28, 1969 when the LGBTQ+ community demanded equal rights. Rob Sanders uses the perspective of the building where it all happened to inform his young readers that history evolves just like people do. Jamey Christoph's illustrations integrate the words with pictures that makes this a strong, yet beautiful book to last a l Even in the small but gorgeous town of Rosendale, N.Y. at Postmark Books carries this great book. It's historical in being the first Picture Book about a historical event on June 28, 1969 when the LGBTQ+ community demanded equal rights. Rob Sanders uses the perspective of the building where it all happened to inform his young readers that history evolves just like people do. Jamey Christoph's illustrations integrate the words with pictures that makes this a strong, yet beautiful book to last a long, long time.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    I was curious to see how the riots at Stonewall would be depicted in a childrens' book. Rob Sanders took an interesting approach, making the building itself the narrator. He starts off with a brief history of the Stonewall building, which I found to be interesting (history being one of my favorite subjects!) and moves into how the demographic of the Greenwich neighborhood slowly evolved to an LGBTQ+ center. I liked this book, and I think it can be a tool to at least get a conversation started ab I was curious to see how the riots at Stonewall would be depicted in a childrens' book. Rob Sanders took an interesting approach, making the building itself the narrator. He starts off with a brief history of the Stonewall building, which I found to be interesting (history being one of my favorite subjects!) and moves into how the demographic of the Greenwich neighborhood slowly evolved to an LGBTQ+ center. I liked this book, and I think it can be a tool to at least get a conversation started about inclusion.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Penny

    This book was published to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, a turning point in the LGBTQ+ movement. Historical context is provided by making the building itself the narrator. The illustrations are really well done. I read this book with my 9 year old and it was really useful for exploring and discussing of LGBTQ+ rights. The pictures and definitions at the back of the book were helpful. It’s good to be at a point in history where a book like this can be published, but This book was published to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, a turning point in the LGBTQ+ movement. Historical context is provided by making the building itself the narrator. The illustrations are really well done. I read this book with my 9 year old and it was really useful for exploring and discussing of LGBTQ+ rights. The pictures and definitions at the back of the book were helpful. It’s good to be at a point in history where a book like this can be published, but there is still a long way to go.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    This picture book tells the story of the Stonewall Inn and the uprising in 1969 that helped move the LBGTQ+ rights movement forward. It is very informative and explains things in a manner that children can understand. However, it is narrated by the Stonewall Inn itself and I find this doesn't work well. It makes it a little awkward. This is why I only gave it three stars. Otherwise, I liked the information and the illustrations.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Super important topic that I really haven't seen covered for kids before - obviously it doesn't go as detailed (like excluding the first brick thrown, police brutality, etc) but it definitely gets the idea across. This is a really integral part of LGBT history that people should know about, and I also appreciated that it didn't leave trans people out of the story. It gives the origins for Stonewall without getting to intense for younger readers.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    I thought this book was pretty good, although a little clean. Everyone seems to look like a model. Interesting choice to tell it from a building's perspective, although I'm not entirely sure that works. Important reviews to consider: https://booktoss.blog/2019/06/04/eras... http://www.theclassroombookshelf.com/...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cy

    this book is so beautiful!! most books about stonewall only start around the 60s, but this gives an overview of the building itself, long before it was a bar, which i thought was interesting. the illustrations are gorgeous, and probably my favorite part of the whole book. the back matter was great, too. there's a glossary and an interview with someone who participated in the riot, which just.....makes everything feel so much more real.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    I SO wanted to love this book - AND I have purchased a copy for my library because it is such an important topic. Having said that, the books lacks a linear understanding of what the subject is, I was confused about the intended audience and even though it's a book for children I felt that the subject was so "dumby-ed down" that it took away from the importance of the time in history.

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