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Open Season: Legalized Genocide of Colored People

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Genocide—the intent to destroy in whole or in part, a group of people. In Open Season, award-winning attorney Ben Crump exposes a heinous truth: Whether with a bullet or a lengthy prison sentence, America is killing black people and justifying it legally. While some deaths make headlines, most are personal tragedies suffered within families and communities. Worse, these Genocide—the intent to destroy in whole or in part, a group of people. In Open Season, award-winning attorney Ben Crump exposes a heinous truth: Whether with a bullet or a lengthy prison sentence, America is killing black people and justifying it legally. While some deaths make headlines, most are personal tragedies suffered within families and communities. Worse, these killings are done one person at a time, so as not to raise alarm. While it is much more difficult to justify killing many people at once, in dramatic fashion, the result is the same—genocide. Taking on such high-profile cases as Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, and a host of others, Crump witnessed the disparities within the American legal system firsthand and learned it is dangerous to be a black man in America—and that the justice system indeed only protects wealthy white men. In this enlightening and enthralling work, he shows that there is a persistent, prevailing, and destructive mindset regarding colored people that is rooted in our history as a slaveowning nation. This biased attitude has given rise to mass incarceration, voter disenfranchisement, unequal educational opportunities, disparate health care practices, job and housing discrimination, police brutality, and an unequal justice system. And all mask the silent and ongoing systematic killing of people of color. Open Season is more than Crump’s incredible mission to preserve justice, it is a call to action for Americans to begin living up to the promise to protect the rights of its citizens equally and without question.  


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Genocide—the intent to destroy in whole or in part, a group of people. In Open Season, award-winning attorney Ben Crump exposes a heinous truth: Whether with a bullet or a lengthy prison sentence, America is killing black people and justifying it legally. While some deaths make headlines, most are personal tragedies suffered within families and communities. Worse, these Genocide—the intent to destroy in whole or in part, a group of people. In Open Season, award-winning attorney Ben Crump exposes a heinous truth: Whether with a bullet or a lengthy prison sentence, America is killing black people and justifying it legally. While some deaths make headlines, most are personal tragedies suffered within families and communities. Worse, these killings are done one person at a time, so as not to raise alarm. While it is much more difficult to justify killing many people at once, in dramatic fashion, the result is the same—genocide. Taking on such high-profile cases as Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, and a host of others, Crump witnessed the disparities within the American legal system firsthand and learned it is dangerous to be a black man in America—and that the justice system indeed only protects wealthy white men. In this enlightening and enthralling work, he shows that there is a persistent, prevailing, and destructive mindset regarding colored people that is rooted in our history as a slaveowning nation. This biased attitude has given rise to mass incarceration, voter disenfranchisement, unequal educational opportunities, disparate health care practices, job and housing discrimination, police brutality, and an unequal justice system. And all mask the silent and ongoing systematic killing of people of color. Open Season is more than Crump’s incredible mission to preserve justice, it is a call to action for Americans to begin living up to the promise to protect the rights of its citizens equally and without question.  

30 review for Open Season: Legalized Genocide of Colored People

  1. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Jackson

    I recommend Open Season for anyone who really wants to know what the cry "Black Lives Matter" is all about. This book is a detailed narration of, not just past racial injustices in the justice system, but of the current injustices in the headlines today. Open Season is an important chronicle of the state of POC and poor whites in the American Justice system. After listening to this book, I'm convinced more than ever that the word "genocide" is not an overstatement or exaggeration when it comes I recommend Open Season for anyone who really wants to know what the cry "Black Lives Matter" is all about. This book is a detailed narration of, not just past racial injustices in the justice system, but of the current injustices in the headlines today. Open Season is an important chronicle of the state of POC and poor whites in the American Justice system. After listening to this book, I'm convinced more than ever that the word "genocide" is not an overstatement or exaggeration when it comes to the state of black people in America. The author, Benjamin Crump, is probably the most well-known civil rights attorney in America today and, in this book, he makes a riveting and persuasive argument that a silent genocide is being waged on "colored" people in America. Even though Mr. Crump uses the word "colored people" in his title, after listening to this book, I convinced more than ever that the word genocide is not an overstatement or exaggeration when it comes to the state of black people in America. What really makes "Open Season" stand out and apart from many other important books about the conditions of POC in the American justice system is Crump's storytelling ability and the fact that he's been involved, as legal counsel, in most of the high-profile cases that he writes about. From Trayvon Martin to Marissa Alexander to Philando Castille (and many others profiled in this book), Crump is able to humanize the most complex legal cases and make a convincing argument of the role that racial biases played in their outcomes, in such a way, that even a child could understand and see the racial injustices. This book was a fascinating and fast read. I listened to the entire book in one night. While this book should be mandatory reading for law students, lawyers, and judges, I also highly recommend to anyone who has ever questioned if we are living in a post-racial America or why, in 2013 and beyond, we still have to remind some people that BLACK LIVES MATTER!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mat Wuebben

    Definitely had solid content that gave me plenty to think about as a White man. I rated this three stars due to its constant jumping from story to story without transitions or lead-ins. The reading structure in this regard made it difficult to follow the thread of what the main point was.

  3. 4 out of 5

    A.M. Sharpe

    Required reading!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Csimplot Simplot

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Excellent book!!!!

  5. 4 out of 5

    David Baer

    Infuriating. That's my reaction to the book, not the tone of the book. Crump's writing is trenchant and yet not polemical - he consistently takes a high moral tone: "America isn't a story of them, it's a story of us. It's who we are."Well I am certainly comfortable with that. Given the litany of injustice documented in the book, including some directly personal experiences, it's remarkable that Crump is. I am much more personally familiar with white complacency and the softer forms of racism, than Infuriating. That's my reaction to the book, not the tone of the book. Crump's writing is trenchant and yet not polemical - he consistently takes a high moral tone: "America isn't a story of them, it's a story of us. It's who we are."Well I am certainly comfortable with that. Given the litany of injustice documented in the book, including some directly personal experiences, it's remarkable that Crump is. I am much more personally familiar with white complacency and the softer forms of racism, than I am with the lived experience of Blacks and people of color. (Presumably as a way of broadening his message, Crump defines "of color" as a category that includes not only brown people but also LGBTQ and even women generally. However, the issues discussed in the book are the injustices experienced by the black and brown.) When (armed mass-murderer) Dylan Roof was arrested, he complained he was hungry and they took him to Burger King. (my reaction - fu*king Burger King!) When the Chicago PD rolled up on Tamir Rice (apparently armed kid), they shot him on sight. It's not just the shooting. It's the whole justice system: who gets stopped by police, who gets charged, what they get charged with, how long they get sentenced for. None of the disparities described in the book are news, if one has been paying attention (and not discounting the MSM as somehow false), but it is daunting to read through it all in one place. Then there is political intimidation. I was astonished to read of the voter-fraud charges brought against nine Florida women - in 2012! What brought on their charges was their being effective at getting out the vote through the use of absentee ballots. Nothing illegal - everyone who voted, was entitled to vote, and voted for who they wanted to vote for - the state adduced no evidence to the contrary. The underlying problem the state had was that "a lot of people voted, who otherwise would not have voted." Ultimately, after a two-year struggle, during which they lost their jobs and had to face down a plea deal, facing felony conviction, the charges were dismissed. Again - this isn't the early 1960s. This was 2012! And the school-to-prison pipeline. The for-profit system of incarceration whereby America has 25% of the World's prisoners. The disproportionate rate of wrong convictions. Even environmental racism, although this is harder to disentangle from pure economic rapaciousness. This edition of the book contains some editing problems that I assume will be corrected in subsequent editions. "Yolk" used instead of "yoke", for instance. Not important. Crump has a significant public profile: The Benjamin Crump Social Justice Institute; www.BCSJI.com.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Mills

    This book is meticulously researched. Each chapter is filled with lived examples of the legalized genocide of people of color in the United States - and for each topic, he pulls in examples that explore the inequity from every angle, painting the unsettling picture of how speaking out against the ongoing injustices still lands people in terrible situations. This is an incredibly powerful read that's difficult to get through, but critically important. Others noted that there are not considerable This book is meticulously researched. Each chapter is filled with lived examples of the legalized genocide of people of color in the United States - and for each topic, he pulls in examples that explore the inequity from every angle, painting the unsettling picture of how speaking out against the ongoing injustices still lands people in terrible situations. This is an incredibly powerful read that's difficult to get through, but critically important. Others noted that there are not considerable transitions between the examples, but that feels intentional. Each chapter rains down the trauma and sacrifices paid by many for this ongoing injustice - adding transitions may make it easier to read, but it would cost the book its momentum and impact. While it is well researched, it is poorly edited. There are many errors beyond simple typos. One that stood out is pretty early on. In recounting the massacre at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston in 2015, Crump writes "There was nothing out of the ordinary in Charleston, North Carolina..." (p. 34) Of course, Charleston is in South Carolina. The errors are peppered throughout, including errors in direct quotes, like "Voter suppression, not fraud, looks large in US elections." This is the title of a 2016 report from the Brooking Institutes, but Crump paints it as a quote with a typo - as "looks" is actually "looms." (p. 125) This book is so powerful that the inaccuracies do not totally undermine it, but certainly feel unprofessional. The editors really did Crump dirty on this one. Looking at you, Tracy Sherrod.

  7. 4 out of 5

    J Katz

    Ben Crump needed a better editor. Typos like the same sentence twice in a paragraph and saying San Francisco is east of Richmond when it is really southwest. That said the content is really compelling and shocking. Sure I had heard almost all of it before over the years but his thesis that there is a genocide of Black people really pushes the problems forward. No isolated events that are just too bad and could be solved if we trained police better, improved economic status, no, this is about a Ben Crump needed a better editor. Typos like the same sentence twice in a paragraph and saying San Francisco is east of Richmond when it is really southwest. That said the content is really compelling and shocking. Sure I had heard almost all of it before over the years but his thesis that there is a genocide of Black people really pushes the problems forward. No isolated events that are just too bad and could be solved if we trained police better, improved economic status, no, this is about a systemic and institutionalized racism that seeks to destroy. This pan US historical view makes the point. Not good. Worth reading and easy to read maybe because it is not a scholarly work but as noted a rehash that gives a clear perspective of someone who has spent many years advocating for people who seem doomed from the start. He was Trayvon Martin's family lawyer for instance- look what happened there.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joggingt

    This book made me very angry with its truthfulness. Racism is an American institute which has been legitimized by the structure of the government and those in power from slavery to the present time. It is amazing how those in power just accept that it is OK to target a group of people making it difficult to be successful and a real part of the American experience. Of course many of us, myself included, have been able to be successful and not feel the degradation that those in power want us to This book made me very angry with its truthfulness. Racism is an American institute which has been legitimized by the structure of the government and those in power from slavery to the present time. It is amazing how those in power just accept that it is OK to target a group of people making it difficult to be successful and a real part of the American experience. Of course many of us, myself included, have been able to be successful and not feel the degradation that those in power want us to feel. But the majority of my people are incapable of doing this and there is no pulling yourself up by the boot straps when the boot straps are made of paper.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ann Merriweather

    This was a very enlightening book, some of the cases I knew about, and some like, Joseph Mann, Howard Morgan and the many others, I didn't know about. It was eye opening, as to the many different ways we are being discriminated against and not realizing it. Many of us just go through the day to day life, as it may be, not even thinking or questioning the why. I will recommend this book to all my friends. Thank you!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carol Brusegar

    Striking overview of the many ways Black and brown people in the United States have been and are victimized by structural and institutional racism. It includes everything from health to housing to stand your ground to voter suppression to environmental racism. Many sources are provided. Highly recommended for study and action groups in addition to individuals.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Leslie K

    An incredible presentation of facts, court cases/rulings, and real life impact of the racism and oppression. Very difficult to read and digest, but important to understand the challenges we continue to face and the strongholds that keep archaic hate alive.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Doris Raines

    YES AND YES BLACK I BEAUTIFUL YES AND YES BLACK I BEAUTIFUL😎

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hapzydeco

    Ben Crump takes advantage of a hot-button topic. Some readers may see this volume as useless propaganda but If you have an interest in minority rights or social justice this book is a good read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    A must-read if we really care about social justice in the recent history of the United States of America (such an ironic name of a nation).

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sandra VonniessenApplebee

    A heavy but necessary read. If you really want to understand bias and discrimination past and present

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Interesting and informative read

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alcqueline

    This is a good book. I like the delivery of information. A must read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tim McLean

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tina Miller

  20. 4 out of 5

    Eva Ruth

  21. 5 out of 5

    Word Nerd

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jamila Walker

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laura Gillies

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ron Lewis

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nandi

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jon

  27. 5 out of 5

    Riley

  28. 5 out of 5

    John B.

  29. 5 out of 5

    PDBF

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karen

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