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Little Lord Fauntleroy (Illustrated Edition) (Classic Books for Children Book 141)

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Little Lord Fauntleroy is a novel by the English-American writer Frances Hodgson Burnett, her first children's novel. It was published as a serial in St. Nicholas Magazine from November 1885 to October 1886, then as a book by Scribner's (the publisher of St. Nicholas) in 1886. The illustrations by Reginald B. Birch set fashion trends and the novel set a precedent in Little Lord Fauntleroy is a novel by the English-American writer Frances Hodgson Burnett, her first children's novel. It was published as a serial in St. Nicholas Magazine from November 1885 to October 1886, then as a book by Scribner's (the publisher of St. Nicholas) in 1886. The illustrations by Reginald B. Birch set fashion trends and the novel set a precedent in copyright law when Burnett won a lawsuit in 1888 against E. V. Seebohm over the rights to theatrical adaptations of the work. Little Lord Fauntleroy "was the Harry Potter of his time and Frances Hodgson Burnett was as celebrated for creating him as J.K. Rowling is for Potter." During the serialisation in St. Nicholas magazine, readers looked forward to new instalments. The fashions in the book became popular with velvet Lord Fauntleroy suits being sold, as well as other Fauntleroy merchandise such as velvet collars, playing cards, and chocolates. During a period when sentimental fiction was the norm, and in the United States the "rags to riches" story popular, Little Lord Fauntleroy was a hit. This edition of the book contains the 27 original illustrations, rejuvenated. Frances Eliza Hodgson Burnett (24 November 1849 – 29 October 1924) was a British-American novelist and playwright. She is best known for the three children's novels Little Lord Fauntleroy (published in 1885–1886), A Little Princess (1905), and The Secret Garden (1911). Hodgson was born in Cheetham, Manchester, England. After her father died in 1852, the family fell on tough times and in 1865 emigrated to the United States, settling near Knoxville, Tennessee. Frances began writing to help earn money for the family, publishing stories in magazines from the age of 19. In 1870, her mother died, and in 1872 Frances married Swan Burnett, who became a medical doctor. The Burnetts lived for two years in Paris, where their two sons were born, before returning to the United States to live in Washington, D.C., Burnett then began to write novels, the first of which (That Lass o' Lowrie's), was published to good reviews. Little Lord Fauntleroy was published in 1886 and made her a popular writer of children's fiction, although her romantic adult novels written in the 1890s were also popular. She wrote and helped to produce stage versions of Little Lord Fauntleroy and A Little Princess. Burnett enjoyed socializing and lived a lavish lifestyle. Beginning in the 1880s, she began to travel to England frequently and in the 1890s bought a home there, where she wrote The Secret Garden. She divorced Swan Burnett in 1898, married Stephen Townsend in 1900, and divorced him in 1902. A few years later she settled in Nassau County, Long Island, where she died in 1924 and is buried in Roslyn Cemetery. * This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that has been curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted in an attempt to remove imperfections introduced by the digitization process. * If typographic, spelling, or grammatical errors were present in the original, they may have been preserved. * As few changes as possible have been made to either illustrations or text in order to bring you an e-book that is as close to the original as possible.


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Little Lord Fauntleroy is a novel by the English-American writer Frances Hodgson Burnett, her first children's novel. It was published as a serial in St. Nicholas Magazine from November 1885 to October 1886, then as a book by Scribner's (the publisher of St. Nicholas) in 1886. The illustrations by Reginald B. Birch set fashion trends and the novel set a precedent in Little Lord Fauntleroy is a novel by the English-American writer Frances Hodgson Burnett, her first children's novel. It was published as a serial in St. Nicholas Magazine from November 1885 to October 1886, then as a book by Scribner's (the publisher of St. Nicholas) in 1886. The illustrations by Reginald B. Birch set fashion trends and the novel set a precedent in copyright law when Burnett won a lawsuit in 1888 against E. V. Seebohm over the rights to theatrical adaptations of the work. Little Lord Fauntleroy "was the Harry Potter of his time and Frances Hodgson Burnett was as celebrated for creating him as J.K. Rowling is for Potter." During the serialisation in St. Nicholas magazine, readers looked forward to new instalments. The fashions in the book became popular with velvet Lord Fauntleroy suits being sold, as well as other Fauntleroy merchandise such as velvet collars, playing cards, and chocolates. During a period when sentimental fiction was the norm, and in the United States the "rags to riches" story popular, Little Lord Fauntleroy was a hit. This edition of the book contains the 27 original illustrations, rejuvenated. Frances Eliza Hodgson Burnett (24 November 1849 – 29 October 1924) was a British-American novelist and playwright. She is best known for the three children's novels Little Lord Fauntleroy (published in 1885–1886), A Little Princess (1905), and The Secret Garden (1911). Hodgson was born in Cheetham, Manchester, England. After her father died in 1852, the family fell on tough times and in 1865 emigrated to the United States, settling near Knoxville, Tennessee. Frances began writing to help earn money for the family, publishing stories in magazines from the age of 19. In 1870, her mother died, and in 1872 Frances married Swan Burnett, who became a medical doctor. The Burnetts lived for two years in Paris, where their two sons were born, before returning to the United States to live in Washington, D.C., Burnett then began to write novels, the first of which (That Lass o' Lowrie's), was published to good reviews. Little Lord Fauntleroy was published in 1886 and made her a popular writer of children's fiction, although her romantic adult novels written in the 1890s were also popular. She wrote and helped to produce stage versions of Little Lord Fauntleroy and A Little Princess. Burnett enjoyed socializing and lived a lavish lifestyle. Beginning in the 1880s, she began to travel to England frequently and in the 1890s bought a home there, where she wrote The Secret Garden. She divorced Swan Burnett in 1898, married Stephen Townsend in 1900, and divorced him in 1902. A few years later she settled in Nassau County, Long Island, where she died in 1924 and is buried in Roslyn Cemetery. * This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that has been curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted in an attempt to remove imperfections introduced by the digitization process. * If typographic, spelling, or grammatical errors were present in the original, they may have been preserved. * As few changes as possible have been made to either illustrations or text in order to bring you an e-book that is as close to the original as possible.

30 review for Little Lord Fauntleroy (Illustrated Edition) (Classic Books for Children Book 141)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn

    This is a really silly book that caused a generation of little boys to have to suffer through long hair and white lace collars. Cedric, aka Little Lord Fauntleroy, is a goody good good little boy. His mother is perfect too. I bet thousands of little boys in the 1880's wanted this book to disappear.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Casey Costello

    The fact that Frances Hodgson Burnett's "Little Lord Fauntleroy" was such a sensation in the 1880s says as much about the contrast between the late Victorian Era and today as any anthropological study could. The story centers around Cedric Errol, a kind, optimistic young boy who lives with his mother in modest circumstances in New York City, and is friends with just about everyone he meets. One day, he learns that he is actually Lord Fauntleroy, the heir apparent to become Earl of Dorincourt, and The fact that Frances Hodgson Burnett's "Little Lord Fauntleroy" was such a sensation in the 1880s says as much about the contrast between the late Victorian Era and today as any anthropological study could. The story centers around Cedric Errol, a kind, optimistic young boy who lives with his mother in modest circumstances in New York City, and is friends with just about everyone he meets. One day, he learns that he is actually Lord Fauntleroy, the heir apparent to become Earl of Dorincourt, and he then moves to England to live with his hardened, misanthropic grandfather, who has already made up his mind to dislike the child before he even meets him. Moreover, he hates the boy's mother, whom he blames for alienating his now-deceased son's affection, and whom he refuses ever to meet when she comes to England with her son. Cedric's mother, however, is as good and kind as her son, and wishes him to think the best of his grandfather, knowing that he could not comprehend malice in anyone, so she conceals his grandfather's true feelings from him. Cedric, now Lord Fauntleroy, begins to make changes at Dorincourt and for the impoverished tenants who live in the slums of the surrounding village owned by the Earl that improve everyone's lives and earn Fauntleroy great admiration from everyone he meets; however, he attributes every positive change to his grandfather's benevolence, and believes that everyone's admiration is a reflection of how generous an Earl his grandfather is, not knowing that the Earl is, in fact, universally detested by his people as a tyrant. Over time, Cedric's optimism, kindness, and refusal to believe in the slightest aspersion on his grandfather's character actually begins to change his grandfather, the Earl, into the man whom his grandson believes him to be. In Burnett's typical fashion, there is a plot twist which complicates matters, before reaffirming that, indeed, goodness and charity will always overcome deceit, greed, and evil, and that, moreover, being around positivity can actually change one's entire nature from wicked to good. Although often overlooked by contemporary scholars in favor of Burnett's admittedly more complex "The Secret Garden," "Little Lord Fauntleroy" is nevertheless still worthy of reading and study. In fact, the Earl's transformation in "Little Lord Fauntleroy" is in some ways similar to Mary Lennox's or Colin Craven's transformation in "The Secret Garden," only in that book it was the positive energy embodied in the secret garden, and in the character of Dickon, which served as the impetus for Mary's and Colin's personality transformations, and which were able to unlock the goodness and purity of spirit which had always been latent within them. "Little Lord Fauntleroy" is very similar to another later best-selling book, Eleanor H. Porter's "Pollyanna," and its themes and message are in many ways quite similar, so much so that Cedric Errol and Pollyanna Whittier can be seen as essentially the male and female counterpoints of each other. That book, too, while a sensation in its day, is more often than not the source of derision rather than study today, with the term "Pollyanna" becoming synonymous with delusional, if not insufferable, positivity and belief in goodness in the face of despair and misfortune. Perhaps that is a more realistic, if cynical, view of both "Pollyanna" and "Little Lord Fauntleroy," but I happen to have enjoyed both of them thoroughly. And if you've read and enjoyed one, you're likely to enjoy the other. "Little Lord Fauntleroy" may be a relic of a genteel era so far removed from our modern culture that it may be laughable to some, but for others, myself included, it's a pleasant reminder that there exists in the world, without any trace of irony, some texts which reaffirm a belief in the fundamental decency of people and the transformative power of goodness, charity, and optimism.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Calling a child (and of course, this is most usually and generally a young boy) a Little Lord Fauntleroy often tends to be more than a bit derogatory and it can often even insinuate that one thinks, that one believes the youngster in question to be supposedly rather spoiled, precocious and given to sometimes annoyingly prim and proper, rather arrogant airs and graces. But actually and truly, this is an unfortunate labelling which is in fact and indeed pretty well a majorly and strangely ironic Calling a child (and of course, this is most usually and generally a young boy) a Little Lord Fauntleroy often tends to be more than a bit derogatory and it can often even insinuate that one thinks, that one believes the youngster in question to be supposedly rather spoiled, precocious and given to sometimes annoyingly prim and proper, rather arrogant airs and graces. But actually and truly, this is an unfortunate labelling which is in fact and indeed pretty well a majorly and strangely ironic misnomer, as little Cedric Eroll, the main protagonist of Frances Hodgson Burnett's 1886 novel Little Lord Fauntleroy is for all intents and purposes anything BUT spoiled (for far from being the latter, far from from acting and behaving in an arrogantly entitled fashion, young Cedric actually shows a wonderful and much enviable combination of British nobility and American spirit, a sense of justice, an appreciation and support of opportunity for all). And with her novel, with Little Lord Fauntleroy, Frances Hodgson Burnett (who was born in England and then immigrated to the United States of America with her family as a child) draws heavily and most appreciatively on her own personal experiences in both England and the USA, examining in a gentle but nevertheless critical manner the prejudices of both the Americans and the English (not only towards each other, but actually also in a more general and global manner of depiction and description), analysing concepts of class, social structure, nobility, presenting the importances of family, filial love and affection (and how young and American born Cedric, with his exuberance, his gentle determinedness, his willingness to love and be loved, is able to win over his aristocratic English grandfather and his rigid, stodgy and often even nastily uncompromising ideals of class and social structure, always remaining staunchly American to a point, but also easily and joyfully adopting the best and most worthwhile tenets of Britishness, of aristocratic tradition, emerging as a wonderful and in all things grand and good combination of both). Now while at first, young Cedric with his lovable and emotionally overflowing demeanour, his affectionate means and ways (inherited mostly from his beloved American mother, a woman utterly and vehemently despised by the grandfather, by the Earl of Dorincourt, simply for being an American and a co-called commoner) does have a strained and a trifle strange relationship with his grandfather (who had never been in any way close to his own three sons and thus does not really know what to make of Cedric, and how to act in his presence, how to approach him), slowly and sweetly, the two manage to forge a mutual understanding and appreciation of one another, with the Earl of Dorincourt increasingly allowing himself to love Cedric, to show and react with affection and tenderness, and Cedric also begins to understand his own, his British aristocratic background a bit more, becoming a bit more subdued and thoughtful, but still never losing sight of who he is, of his American inheritance and culture (with the Frances Hodgson Burnett presenting in Cedric her wished for ideals of what the British aristocracy should be and should strive for, namely compassionate, understanding and responsible privilege, a caring and yes even a loving attitude towards all, but especially towards tenants, domestic help, those working underneath and for the earls, the barons, the landed gentry, a trifle paternalistic perhaps at times, but still an attitude to be feted and an attitude much more acceptable and in all ways superior to the attitude that Cedric's grandfather, that the Earl of Dorincourt had shown in the beginning, in the opening chapters of Little Lord Fauntleroy. And now finally, while if I were to read Little Lord Fauntleroy simply as a story by itself and in and of itself, I would most probably be ranking the novel with a low to medium four stars, compared to my two favourite Frances Hodgson Burnett classics, compared to both The Secret Garden and A Little Princess, Little Lord Fauntleroy while definitely a lovely and engaging tale, a sweet enough and readable story, is still not quite as yet equally magical and spectacular, and thus, a highly rated (and perhaps even a bit guiltily so) three stars is the maximum ranking I am able and willing to choose, and do indeed stand by having chosen (for sometimes, Cedric really is just a wee bit too good to be true, a bit too perfect, an adorable little boy, no doubt, but also someone of an at times rather too obvious perfection, as even Sara Crewe in A Little Princess has her episodes of despair and silently endured angry frustration, not to mention how increasingly nuanced with both much negativity and positiveness, the majority of the main characters of The Secret Garden are generally presented by Frances Hodgson Burnett as both acting and being).

  4. 5 out of 5

    Karina

    It's funny that I used to read this book about once a month in my childhood. It was a book I went back to time after time. I reread it and I have to laugh at myself bc I don't remember ANY of the story! Weird how the brain works [or memory.] Although I liked it and enjoyed it for being quick and cute and having a sentimental Cinderella theme I seem to find it corny at my old age of 33. Little Lord Fauntleroy was so sweet and kind i wanted to punch his cute, gentle face to make sure he wasn't a It's funny that I used to read this book about once a month in my childhood. It was a book I went back to time after time. I reread it and I have to laugh at myself bc I don't remember ANY of the story! Weird how the brain works [or memory.] Although I liked it and enjoyed it for being quick and cute and having a sentimental Cinderella theme I seem to find it corny at my old age of 33. Little Lord Fauntleroy was so sweet and kind i wanted to punch his cute, gentle face to make sure he wasn't a robot. My kids are good, kind hearted kids but they are just that-- Kids! They have a mean, wild streak. Cedric was just loved and loving every single page. His mom was equally amazing and kind. Maybe I'm just jealous? Lol... No amazing plot but amusing once you get to it. I wish all rich and powerful people thought like the young Earl though. What a beautiful, peaceful step forward life could be. I'll see what my son thinks about it after he reads it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Ideiosepius

    This long standing children's classic story is another from "Mrs Burnett" that has totally stood the test of time. While the rags to riches story is almost a cliche today, in this story it is well enough done to be fresh and interesting, even to the most jaded 21st century palate. It is almost the prototype, so, while there are no unexpected twists in the story and no one truly can doubt the ending, the journey there is as comfortable, pleasant and enjoyable as sinking into a well loved comfy This long standing children's classic story is another from "Mrs Burnett" that has totally stood the test of time. While the rags to riches story is almost a cliche today, in this story it is well enough done to be fresh and interesting, even to the most jaded 21st century palate. It is almost the prototype, so, while there are no unexpected twists in the story and no one truly can doubt the ending, the journey there is as comfortable, pleasant and enjoyable as sinking into a well loved comfy sofa. Most people who like books written historically and who enjoy children's novels should enjoy this one, I think however there may be a few things one has to accept and Little lord Fauntleroy himself, I suspect, is likely to be the sticking point for some modern readers. Cedric Errol is an unbelievably sweet, good and loving seven year old without any vice in a way that I think is unbelievable in the extreme. This level of romanticised childhood is very historically correct for the Victorian era in which it was written and even more so for the Edwardian era which followed. This is the only one of the authors three best known children's books in which part of the story is set in America and which mentions the tensions between the two nations. The American portion was well written, as you would expect from the Author, who herself lived in America. As a historical read it is light but fascinating. The brief mentions of the sailing ship which brought Cedric and his mother to England, the estate his grandfather owned and the power he has over his lands and tenants is interesting to people who like that sort of thing.As I do, I always enjoy re-reading this one.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gayathri

    Read the full review at Elgee Writes This rags to riches children classics revolves around Cedric and his family. His mother and the seven year old Cedric are one of those nice, kind and goody good people who barely make their ends meet in New York City. He is found to the inheritor to earldom in England and his newly found grandfather invites them back home. The grumpy, stubborn Earl already dislikes them even before he meets them. How the charming boy turns the misanthropic grandfather around Read the full review at Elgee Writes This rags to riches children classics revolves around Cedric and his family. His mother and the seven year old Cedric are one of those nice, kind and goody good people who barely make their ends meet in New York City. He is found to the inheritor to earldom in England and his newly found grandfather invites them back home. The grumpy, stubborn Earl already dislikes them even before he meets them. How the charming boy turns the misanthropic grandfather around forms the rest of the story. I read Little Lord Fauntleroy as a part of the children’s classics challenge and surprisingly have never read it before. It is always difficult to review a children’s book given that we are not the target audience. Despite that, I enjoyed this book and it would still be suitable for kids even in the current age. Final thought: Clean and charming children’s tale Recommended to: Children of 4-7 years old. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Amazon |

  7. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    This is pretty terrible. But hey, it does have this passage: Here lyeth ye bodye of Gregorye Arthure Fyrst Earle of Dorincourt allsoe of Alisone Hildegarde hys wyfe. 'May I whisper?' inquired his lordship, devoured by curiosity. 'What is it?' said his grandfather. 'Who are they?' 'Some of your ancestors,' answered the Earl, 'who lived a few hundred years ago.' 'Perhaps,' said Lord Fauntleroy, regarding them with respect, 'perhaps I got my spelling from them.'

  8. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    I read this for a reading challenge. I was alternately feeling charmed and then revolted by this child. A large part of me felt I would instantly dislike such a paragon. But for my sins, I am a Primary School teacher and I must admit, you do occasionally get the most gorgeous and angelic child come through the system, so I cant say it’s impossible!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Edith

    Another gem from one of my all time favorite authors. There’s just something about Burnett’s books... an emanating benevolence that wraps you up like a homemade quilt and makes it impossible not to smile and feel full of renewed hope for humanity. I absolutely love this book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Clare

    One of my most favorite books ever, and I'm not sure why... I just found it to be a very sweet story, and one I would recommend. If anything, it's because Fauntleroy is so much fun to say. Go on, say it!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Luisa Knight

    I'm pretty certain that I can't do justice to this book. My attempt at a review is sure to be blithely. So how about using these words to get my thoughts across: Wonderful. Superb. Exemplary. Entirely lovely. Fond literary moments. Impeccable characters (that you truly adore and really wish you could meet in real life; like warm-hearted little Ceddie ... and his noble, forgiving mother ... the grocery man Mr Hobbs... and even the grumpy old Earl is likable before he has a turn of heart!) Pages I'm pretty certain that I can't do justice to this book. My attempt at a review is sure to be blithely. So how about using these words to get my thoughts across: Wonderful. Superb. Exemplary. Entirely lovely. Fond literary moments. Impeccable characters (that you truly adore and really wish you could meet in real life; like warm-hearted little Ceddie ... and his noble, forgiving mother ... the grocery man Mr Hobbs... and even the grumpy old Earl is likable before he has a turn of heart!) Pages full of ooey gooey kindheartedness and sweetness. A story-line that quickly captures your heart and startles you with it's abrupt plot twist. But now you're thinking, "This isn't blithely. This is over the top." But it's really not. It's just really hard to write a well-deserving, believable review. And what I'm telling you is the whole truth and nothing but. Ages: 6+ Cleanliness: Children's Bad Words Mild Obscenities & Substitutions - 2 Incidents: pooh Scatological Terms - 1 Incident: bl**dy (in reference to Bl**dy Mary) Religious Profanity - 1 Incident: mercy knows Violence - 1 Incident: A sailor mentions a brief story about bloodthirsty cannibals. Conversation Topics - 2 Incidents: A man smokes a pipe. Wine is mentioned. Romance Related - 2 Incidents: The word "breast" is used two times, indicating "chest." A wicked woman leaves her husband and takes the child. Parent Takeaway An incredibly well mannered boy is able to win over his grandfather's heart through his love, kindness and generosity towards others. A great book to show the best of character! **Like my reviews? I also have hundreds of detailed reports that I offer too. These reports give a complete break-down of everything in the book, so you'll know just how clean it is or isn't. I also have Clean Guides (downloadable PDFs) which enable you to clean up your book before reading it! Visit my website: The Book Radar.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    This is most certainly a Burnett book, with its theme of pure, innocent goodness overcoming greed and maliciousness (not to mention the theme of beauty being associated with goodness). For the first couple of chapters, I really thought that I wasn't going to like this one. I still don't think it holds a candle to "The Secret Garden," or even "A Little Princess," but it did grow on me a bit. I have a couple of complaints: 1. Maybe this is my own sexism rearing its ugly head, but I did not enjoy This is most certainly a Burnett book, with its theme of pure, innocent goodness overcoming greed and maliciousness (not to mention the theme of beauty being associated with goodness). For the first couple of chapters, I really thought that I wasn't going to like this one. I still don't think it holds a candle to "The Secret Garden," or even "A Little Princess," but it did grow on me a bit. I have a couple of complaints: 1. Maybe this is my own sexism rearing its ugly head, but I did not enjoy reading about a boy as much as I enjoyed reading the girl stories. I know its the point of the story, but I really felt like he was just TOO good. I put up with the same kind of irritating perfection from Sara Crewe in "A Little Princess," but for some reason it grated on me more here. Something about the way he always calls his mother "Dearest." Maybe it's the modern "Mommy Dearest" reference. 2. I did not care for the way Burnett wrote the American dialect. I don't usually have trouble getting a voice to speak clearly in my head, but I couldn't get my mind wrapped around this one. It kept feeling more British to me than New York. Perhaps those are my own limitations, but for me it was ultimately a distraction from the narrative.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Akemi G.

    A classic story in which the good wins in the end. Ah, how predictable! And I'm usually against predictable plots -- I typically don't even finish the book when the plot becomes so predictable (and this happens quite often, unfortunately). Then why 5 stars? Because I remember I enjoyed it as a child. I think small children enjoy predictability as well as surprises. Or perhaps it's not so predictable for them. I really wanted Cedric to prevail. I really wanted his grandfather, who I could see was A classic story in which the good wins in the end. Ah, how predictable! And I'm usually against predictable plots -- I typically don't even finish the book when the plot becomes so predictable (and this happens quite often, unfortunately). Then why 5 stars? Because I remember I enjoyed it as a child. I think small children enjoy predictability as well as surprises. Or perhaps it's not so predictable for them. I really wanted Cedric to prevail. I really wanted his grandfather, who I could see was a good person despite his stubbornness, to make peace with his mother. The story successfully engaged me and won my support. Rating and reviewing children's books has an innate problem. We are not the targeted audience anymore. And I strongly believe we want to give kids the books that they truly enjoy, rather than books we think are good for them. We can introduce "good" books to them to see how they respond, but ultimately, their preference matters more. So if your child doesn't like this, or any book, don't force them to like it. Like dating, there is an issue of chemistry. On the other hand, don't write this off because it's old. Your kid might enjoy it. . . . I consulted my inner child and she says yes to this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Dixon

    I put this aside for a while and find a month and a half later that I have no interest in returning to it. Just not my thing - I can't blame it on the author's writing style because I love The Secret Garden, but I've never known an angelic child (don't get me wrong, I adore my grandchildren, but they have their naughty moments like every other child I've ever known) and just can't feel any sense of reality in the few pages I read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    miaaa

    I love it. But if you're wondering why I gave it three stars. Merely because I read Little Princess and the Secret Garden first. Somehow, Burnett's works have a pattern of their own and you'd know at the end everything will be alright. A happy ending. Yaaaaaaaaaaaaaay! *** Beruntung sekali menemukannya di gudang buku Pasfes, dengan harga murah dan diterjemahkan dengan apik. Mari berburu buku-buku Frances Hodgson Burnett :D

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kerstin

    Delightful. There is always something endearing when a child with all his innocence penetrates the crusty hearts of the adults around him.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Noriko

    Although this book seems to be lesser known among readers which is quite, in fact, a mystery to me – I loved this book so much, far better than A Little Princess by the same author. Everything about this book is so adorable and heart-warming. Cedric, a 7 year-old boy whose late father is the youngest son of a prestigious Earl in England but disowned because of the “preposterous” marriage, grows up as a normal, innocent boy surrounded by love and kindness. He easily makes friends with anybody Although this book seems to be lesser known among readers which is quite, in fact, a mystery to me – I loved this book so much, far better than A Little Princess by the same author. Everything about this book is so adorable and heart-warming. Cedric, a 7 year-old boy whose late father is the youngest son of a prestigious Earl in England but disowned because of the “preposterous” marriage, grows up as a normal, innocent boy surrounded by love and kindness. He easily makes friends with anybody around him regardless of age and social class, and is loved and cared just as much he does others. I think such Cedric’s character and innocence was what drew me to the story. There’s not a hint of arrogance nor precocity about Cedric which in fact made me less appreciative of Sara from A Little Princess, if anything, I came to appreciate him more and more as the story progresses. It seems like he makes everyone happy and warm at heart. I would even go so far as to say I could see the golden halo shining brightly around him. It’s as though his innocence and genuine benevolence thaw the ice in others’ hearts, and true to form, even the grumpy and imperious Earl Dorincourt – Cedric’s grandfather – becomes fond of him, wanting to be the sole one who receives Cedric’s love and attention. I liked how Cedric’s each word and deed brings changes to his grandfather. His grandfather, Earl Dorincourt has never loved nor cared about anybody but himself and he knows all too well that his people dislike him so much, not a single person would genuinely care about him. That is not the case with Cedric; he believes his father is an admirable figure, the kindest person in the entire world and his belief and trust has a positive effect not only on the Earl, but on the townspeople as well, like a ripple effect of benevolence and kindness washing away all the bad reputation surrounding the Earl. Although I found the story beautiful and sweet overall, I also found it a bit lacking in drama. There’s indeed an alarming twist near the end, but I’m not sure whether the overall amiable undertone of this book which I believe brought by Cedric’s gay character overshines it or the plot itself was a tad weak. Either way, it doesn’t make any difference in the degree I enjoyed this book. Cedric’s friendship with Mr. Hobbs and Dick and their afterstories left me warm and content when I closed the book. Simply put, this book is full of love. There’s literally not a single person who envies nor says bad things about Cedric. Everyone who makes acquaintance with him ends up bewitched, there’s no evil in this book. Love and kindness conquer all. I loved that aspect most of all. As I mentioned earlier, I am not sure why this book is not as popular as the author’s other books. I have never read this book until today and I just don’t know what took me this long to pick up this book. If you are in the mood for indulging yourself in childhood melancholy, go pick up this book. I am sure this book will give you everything you need. This has now officially becomes one of my all-time favorites.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Susan Jo Grassi

    I read this in school when I was 10 or 11. That was, wait for it, half a century ago. Since it was a school project, I doubt that I appreciated it as much as I did this time around. It's the classic example of how good can change bad and innocence and trust can overcome self-indulgence.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Teddy

    Great classic story.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    This was a sweet little story that highlights the power of kindness, generosity and friendship. Cedric Errol, aka Little Lord Fauntleroy, was a perfect, little angel boy. Such a perfect kid, in fact, that any mother who reads this book will be instantly disappointed in their own ogre-like offspring in comparison. lol He's handsome. He's kind. He's caring. He's baby Jesus saintlike. I mean, don't get me wrong, I liked him as a character, but he's kind of setting the bar RIDICULOUSLY HIGH for This was a sweet little story that highlights the power of kindness, generosity and friendship. Cedric Errol, aka Little Lord Fauntleroy, was a perfect, little angel boy. Such a perfect kid, in fact, that any mother who reads this book will be instantly disappointed in their own ogre-like offspring in comparison. lol He's handsome. He's kind. He's caring. He's baby Jesus saintlike. I mean, don't get me wrong, I liked him as a character, but he's kind of setting the bar RIDICULOUSLY HIGH for other little boys to live up to his greatness. For example, when he came into his fortune, he was told he could have anything he wanted. Most little boys would want a race car or a spaceship or something else totally selfish rad. Not Ceddie. He only wanted wealth for the poor. He's like a mini Bernie Sanders! :D His grandpa, the Earl, was your stereotypical stone-faced, heartless ruler who has never loved a soul in his life. That is, until he met his grandson Baby Jesus Cedric, who is impossible not to adore. Cedric's innocent love for his grandpa cracks open his stony old heart and makes an impact, not only for the good of the Earl, but for the good of all the people that he rules. I know this is a fake story for children but I'm seriously jealous that these people get Cedric as their ruler one day, while we're stuck with a dotard for a president. These people definitely lucked out. He's definitely an endearing character. I loved how he was half little kid half 60-year-old man. I loved how he wore little black velvet dresses suits with lace collars. He's got style, he's got class, that's how he became little Lord Fauntleroy!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laureen

    There is a charm to older, classic children's novels that is undeniable. I don't care how many people tell me they are too "goody goody." I love that there are novels that inspire children to goodness, and in so doing, inspire the adults in their lives to the same. Lesser known than her novels, "The Secret Garden" and "A Little Princess," this novel is just as sweet and uplifting. A delight to read. I have treasured images in my mind of my little boy's face alight as I read this book to him when There is a charm to older, classic children's novels that is undeniable. I don't care how many people tell me they are too "goody goody." I love that there are novels that inspire children to goodness, and in so doing, inspire the adults in their lives to the same. Lesser known than her novels, "The Secret Garden" and "A Little Princess," this novel is just as sweet and uplifting. A delight to read. I have treasured images in my mind of my little boy's face alight as I read this book to him when he was about the age of Little Lord Fauntleroy. The careful upbringing of a child is such a wise investment in this planet!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    It's taken me years to get around to reading this (odd considering that I grew up in love with The Secret Garden), and I'm so glad I did because this story is incredible, funny, poignant and unforgettable all at once. Little Lord Fauntleroy offers a strong message of kindness and mutual respect for readers of all ages, and also brings up the futility that comes along with bitterness and greed. Burnett's striking prose is as usual beautiful like classic film, and the characters feel very much It's taken me years to get around to reading this (odd considering that I grew up in love with The Secret Garden), and I'm so glad I did because this story is incredible, funny, poignant and unforgettable all at once. Little Lord Fauntleroy offers a strong message of kindness and mutual respect for readers of all ages, and also brings up the futility that comes along with bitterness and greed. Burnett's striking prose is as usual beautiful like classic film, and the characters feel very much like real people, sometimes flawed or naive but usually good people when it counts and willing to learn from each other in this completely unique and excellent classic.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Inga

    Frances Hodgson Burnett was a British novelist who lived from 1849 to 1924. Her family emegrated to the USA in 1865, she married twice, had two children and is best known for her children's books. One of them is Little Lord Fauntleroy, best known from the all-time favourite family film from 1980 by Jack Gold, starring Alec Guinness as a main actor. The film stays very close to the novel - so if you've known the film first you can see the scenes and hear the characters voices in your head while Frances Hodgson Burnett was a British novelist who lived from 1849 to 1924. Her family emegrated to the USA in 1865, she married twice, had two children and is best known for her children's books. One of them is Little Lord Fauntleroy, best known from the all-time favourite family film from 1980 by Jack Gold, starring Alec Guinness as a main actor. The film stays very close to the novel - so if you've known the film first you can see the scenes and hear the characters voices in your head while reading! The story begins in New York where a British lawyer one day seeks out 7-year-old Cedric Errol and his mother to tell them that Cedric is the remaining heir of the Earl of Dorincourt. The child has to leave his best friends - bootblack Dick and greengrocer Mr- Hobbs - behind and travels to England to meet his grandfather. The grumbly bitter old man is determined to hate this American boy and his mother because he hadn't wanted his son to marry her in the first place. But the Little Lord soon changes his mind... At its time the novel was a huge success and very popular, Cedric was a well-known character and even influenced fashion. Read today, the characters all seem to be exaggerated, overdone. Cedric is to good to be true, sickly-sweet and without flaw. So is his mother. In length the reader gets to know about the dark, unjust and moody old Earl - only to see him overturned in a few pages by the sweet character of the child. Unbelievable and very predictable from the first page on. Of course, it's a fairy tale, a children's story - good has to conquer the bad! And it is done beautifully in Little Lord Fauntleroy, helping poor people, being righteous, being kind. In fact, this message of kindness is one that we can still use today. There are some problematic aspects of the novel: Considering Burnetts background as a female writer at the time and her knowledge of British and American society one would have wished for some more interesting views on aristocracy and the political systems. Instead, the main political critic Mr. Hobbs is transformed into a fan of aristrocratic society and never returns to the USA. But again, it's a children's book and one might still enjoy this positive and kind story today.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    I am always at something of a loss to explain my abiding love for Little Lord Fauntleroy, which must be included, along with The Secret Garden and A Little Princess , among the author's better known works. Extremely sentimental, with a somewhat more moralistic tone than that found in Burnett's other two classics, it features a child protagonist so angelically good that children everywhere might be forgiven for hating him. But despite its Victorian trappings - complete with English aristocrats, I am always at something of a loss to explain my abiding love for Little Lord Fauntleroy, which must be included, along with The Secret Garden and A Little Princess , among the author's better known works. Extremely sentimental, with a somewhat more moralistic tone than that found in Burnett's other two classics, it features a child protagonist so angelically good that children everywhere might be forgiven for hating him. But despite its Victorian trappings - complete with English aristocrats, estranged and disinherited sons, long-lost (not to mention fake) heirs, and the inevitable triumph of the moral and "well-bred" over the deceitful and vulgar - Little Lord Fauntleroy is at heart a satisfying tale of family reconciliation, and the transformative power of love. Cedric Errol, the cheerful, good-hearted young hero of the tale, is able to bridge the differences, not just between the generations, but between the nations. Burnett herself was something of a bridge, born and raised in England, but living most of her adult life in America, and her familiarity with both cultures must have stood her in good stead while writing this tale of a crusty English aristocrat and his American heir. This may also account, in part, for my pleasure in the story, for at a time when few English children's authors had anything good to say about Americans (if they had anything to say at all), Burnett created a lovable character whose virtues - from the ease with which he converses with adults, to his democratic kindness and concern for all - were distinctly alien to British notions of childhood.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Smitha Murthy

    I have become quite the fan of Frances Hodgson Burnett over the last year or so. When you read Children’s Literature as an adult, you do so because despite our cynicism and the jaded ennui that accompanies most of our adult life, there is still something good in us that can relate to the qualities of kindness, compassion, and sheer friendship that encompass so many books written for children. We might have to wash our eyes away from the strains of today. We might have to throw away those I have become quite the fan of Frances Hodgson Burnett over the last year or so. When you read Children’s Literature as an adult, you do so because despite our cynicism and the jaded ennui that accompanies most of our adult life, there is still something good in us that can relate to the qualities of kindness, compassion, and sheer friendship that encompass so many books written for children. We might have to wash our eyes away from the strains of today. We might have to throw away those spectacles of disbelief. We might have to stop ourselves from analyzing. And then, you will find that you are just enjoying the story. ‘Little Lord Fauntleroy’ is just that. A great story. An earnest young lad. A crusty old curmudgeon of a grandfather. A devout mother. And some motley but lovable characters. Much to love in this book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dhanaraj Rajan

    I had read two other works by the same author. They are: The Secret Garden and A Little Princess. The main protagonists in these two works were girls and in the book in review the main character is a boy. I think this was a book intended for the small boys. But then children's literature always comes with its own charm. I was truly amused by the simple story in which a small boy from the poor quarters of New York suddenly finds himself to be an inheritor of earldom in England. He is transferred I had read two other works by the same author. They are: The Secret Garden and A Little Princess. The main protagonists in these two works were girls and in the book in review the main character is a boy. I think this was a book intended for the small boys. But then children's literature always comes with its own charm. I was truly amused by the simple story in which a small boy from the poor quarters of New York suddenly finds himself to be an inheritor of earldom in England. He is transferred to England and is to be trained in nobility by none other than the old Earl, the boy's grandfather. Two contrasting characters meet - the old and young; the selfish and the generous; the grumpy and the charming; the mistrusting and the trusting, The small boy works wonders in transforming the old man. This is the crux of the story. But it is told with lot of drama involving colourful characters that the story becomes sweet and lovely. As usual I found lot of lessons taught in an entertaining manner. The main lesson is that If a person has a kind heart and wills always kindness for the people around him/her, the world would be transformed into lovely place. If you are kind, your kindness affects the other and that affects the next one and thus begins the formation of a chain of influence. The other minor lesson is that always try to look for the good qualities in the others. It would do a lot of good for the relationship. Loved this book. But I found the other two works that I had mentioned in the opening paragraph made an impact that was far greater than the impact made by this work. And that is why I have reduced a star for this work.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    If this weren't so 'syrupy' I'd have enjoyed the story more. (E.g., He calls his mother 'dearest.')

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Another Burnett that touched my childish heart. Of course it is not about a little girl, so it cannot hold the same place as Secret Garden or Little Princess, but it is there nonetheless.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Alvbj... Free download of an abridged version is available at Project Gutenberg.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Charly Troff (ReaderTurnedWriter)

    I have always enjoyed novels revolving around the innocent, loving child making friends with a crochety old person. The first I read and loved was Heidi. I really enjoyed this sweet story, which showcased how kindness and love can have a transformative effect. The story was simple but enjoyable, the themes heart warming.

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