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Wish You Were Here: The Official Biography of Douglas Adams

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It all started when Douglas Adams demolished planet Earth in order to make way for an intergalactic expressway–and then invited everyone to thumb a ride on a comical cosmic road trip with the likes of Arthur Dent, Ford Prefect, and the other daft denizens of deep space immortalized in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Adams made the universe a much funnier place to It all started when Douglas Adams demolished planet Earth in order to make way for an intergalactic expressway–and then invited everyone to thumb a ride on a comical cosmic road trip with the likes of Arthur Dent, Ford Prefect, and the other daft denizens of deep space immortalized in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Adams made the universe a much funnier place to inhabit and forever changed the way we think about towels, extraterrestrial poetry, and especially the number 42. And then, too soon, he was gone. Just who was this impossibly tall Englishman who wedded science fiction and absurdist humor to create the multimillion-selling five-book “trilogy” that became a cult phenomenon read round the world? Even if you’ve dined in the Restaurant at the End of the Universe, you’ve been exposed to only a portion of the offbeat, endearing, and irresistible Adams mystique. Have you met the only official unofficial member of Monty Python’s Flying Circus? The very first person to purchase a Macintosh computer? The first (and thus far only) author to play a guitar solo onstage with Pink Floyd? Adams was also the writer so notorious for missing deadlines that he had to be held captive in a hotel room under the watchful eye of his editor; the creator of the epic computer game Starship Titanic; and a globetrotting wildlife crusader. A longtime friend of the author, Nick Webb reveals many quirks and contradictions: Adams as the high-tech-gadget junkie and lavish gift giver . . .irrepressible ham and painfully timid soul . . . gregarious conversationalist and brooding depressive . . . brilliant intellect and prickly egotist. Into the brief span of forty-nine years, Douglas Adams exuberantly crammed more lives than the most resilient cat–while still finding time and energy to pursue whatever side projects captivated his ever-inquisitive mind. By turns touching, tongue-in-cheek, and not at all timid about telling the warts-and-all truth, Wish You Were Here is summation as celebration– a look back at a life well worth the vicarious reliving, and studded with anecdote, droll comic incident, and heartfelt insight as its subject’s own unforgettable tales of cosmic wanderlust. For the countless fans of Douglas Adams and his unique and winsome world, here is a wonderful postcard: to be read, reread, and treasured for the memories it bears. From the Hardcover edition.


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It all started when Douglas Adams demolished planet Earth in order to make way for an intergalactic expressway–and then invited everyone to thumb a ride on a comical cosmic road trip with the likes of Arthur Dent, Ford Prefect, and the other daft denizens of deep space immortalized in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Adams made the universe a much funnier place to It all started when Douglas Adams demolished planet Earth in order to make way for an intergalactic expressway–and then invited everyone to thumb a ride on a comical cosmic road trip with the likes of Arthur Dent, Ford Prefect, and the other daft denizens of deep space immortalized in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Adams made the universe a much funnier place to inhabit and forever changed the way we think about towels, extraterrestrial poetry, and especially the number 42. And then, too soon, he was gone. Just who was this impossibly tall Englishman who wedded science fiction and absurdist humor to create the multimillion-selling five-book “trilogy” that became a cult phenomenon read round the world? Even if you’ve dined in the Restaurant at the End of the Universe, you’ve been exposed to only a portion of the offbeat, endearing, and irresistible Adams mystique. Have you met the only official unofficial member of Monty Python’s Flying Circus? The very first person to purchase a Macintosh computer? The first (and thus far only) author to play a guitar solo onstage with Pink Floyd? Adams was also the writer so notorious for missing deadlines that he had to be held captive in a hotel room under the watchful eye of his editor; the creator of the epic computer game Starship Titanic; and a globetrotting wildlife crusader. A longtime friend of the author, Nick Webb reveals many quirks and contradictions: Adams as the high-tech-gadget junkie and lavish gift giver . . .irrepressible ham and painfully timid soul . . . gregarious conversationalist and brooding depressive . . . brilliant intellect and prickly egotist. Into the brief span of forty-nine years, Douglas Adams exuberantly crammed more lives than the most resilient cat–while still finding time and energy to pursue whatever side projects captivated his ever-inquisitive mind. By turns touching, tongue-in-cheek, and not at all timid about telling the warts-and-all truth, Wish You Were Here is summation as celebration– a look back at a life well worth the vicarious reliving, and studded with anecdote, droll comic incident, and heartfelt insight as its subject’s own unforgettable tales of cosmic wanderlust. For the countless fans of Douglas Adams and his unique and winsome world, here is a wonderful postcard: to be read, reread, and treasured for the memories it bears. From the Hardcover edition.

30 review for Wish You Were Here: The Official Biography of Douglas Adams

  1. 4 out of 5

    Astrid

    Besides Humphrey Carpenter's Tolkien-biography this is without a doubt one of the best biographies I have ever read - if it isn't actually the best. Nick Webb has caught the mood and mannerism of Douglas Adams to perfection, and anyone who's read Hitchhiker's or any of his other books will recognize the whimsical and charming humor inside this one. Wish You Were Here toes the line between what is personal and what is too personal to tell in a biography, but never once does the author cross it and Besides Humphrey Carpenter's Tolkien-biography this is without a doubt one of the best biographies I have ever read - if it isn't actually the best. Nick Webb has caught the mood and mannerism of Douglas Adams to perfection, and anyone who's read Hitchhiker's or any of his other books will recognize the whimsical and charming humor inside this one. Wish You Were Here toes the line between what is personal and what is too personal to tell in a biography, but never once does the author cross it and there's never an uncomfortable moment when you think he's overshared a bit. All the stories he tells, and the natural criticism any imperfect human will be subjected to when their lives are being retold, are treated with the utmost respect and affection for the people in them. All I can say about this book is: read it. If you are familiar with Douglas Adams it will be like befriending him all over again with all his faults and virtues; if you don't know Douglas Adams read it anyway. This is the perfect example of how to write a biography that is truly in the spirit of its subject. Douglas Adams did not like biographies. But I believe that if Douglas Adams had to write an autobiography, it would be exactly like Wish You Were Here.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Krissa

    This isn't just a must-read for Adams fans, it's also a must-read for writers or any other creative type who enjoys the sweet torture of procrastination - Adams was a master of the genre. I'm not much of a biographies person but this one is almost like hanging out with Adams, he's that well captured.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Douglas Adams is one of my favorite writers, and I've been a fan of his books since I was about 12 or 13. Ironically, I was introduced to his first book (The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy) by my older brother, who has no sense of humor whatsoever. I read this at the same time as reading another Douglas Adams biography, called "Hitchhiker", written by M.J. Simpson. The reason I did this is I wanted to get a more complete sense of the life of my favorite humorist from more than just one Douglas Adams is one of my favorite writers, and I've been a fan of his books since I was about 12 or 13. Ironically, I was introduced to his first book (The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy) by my older brother, who has no sense of humor whatsoever. I read this at the same time as reading another Douglas Adams biography, called "Hitchhiker", written by M.J. Simpson. The reason I did this is I wanted to get a more complete sense of the life of my favorite humorist from more than just one viewpoint. Sure, each book is filled with interviews, but different writers focus on different things, and there was bound to be some stories and events that, while glossed over in one book, would be more fully described in the other. And I indeed found this to be the case. This book did a better job of telling the story of Mr. Adams' life from the viewpoints of his family and close friends. You get a sense of intimacy and closeness that is missing from the other book, largely because author Nick Webb was a close friend of Mr. Adams and family, and he had many personal stories to tell. I recommend this highly to anyone who has enjoyed or been influenced by the works of Douglas Adams. It is a worthy tribute to his life.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Yvette

    Make sure your Biographer is a best friend Read this book both as a biography about Douglas Adams and a series of love letters to him. The author conveys, on behalf of a huge fan base, for all the reasons in the multiverse, how much we wish Douglas Adams were here. A marvelous grounding in the facets of an important man’s life, fore, aft, and under.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    2.5ish. Full confession: I was one of those school kid nerds who discovered Adams' work and completely fell in love with it. I picked this up on impulse at the library and, sadly, struggled to get through it. There were lots of great stories about Adams (the author was a friend of his) but there were. So. Many. Names. I think if I had been familiar with 70s-80s famous media Brits I would have enjoyed it more. As it was, I kept stumbling and pausing, "Should I know who this is?" Still love Adams' 2.5ish. Full confession: I was one of those school kid nerds who discovered Adams' work and completely fell in love with it. I picked this up on impulse at the library and, sadly, struggled to get through it. There were lots of great stories about Adams (the author was a friend of his) but there were. So. Many. Names. I think if I had been familiar with 70s-80s famous media Brits I would have enjoyed it more. As it was, I kept stumbling and pausing, "Should I know who this is?" Still love Adams' work and admire his talents despite his quirks. He sounds like a great chap to have a pint with.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jason ("jcreed")

    A bit rambly but enjoyable. Personally I find it extremely heartening that one of the funniest, most capable writers of the last few decades was beset by crippling self-doubt as to his abilities or chance of success in the world. Add to that the fact that are plenty of people who just as vastly overestimate their talents, and it just goes to show you never know. The biography is quite tolerable until the omg-he's-the-greatest quality of it gets to you. It's not like the level of admiration A bit rambly but enjoyable. Personally I find it extremely heartening that one of the funniest, most capable writers of the last few decades was beset by crippling self-doubt as to his abilities or chance of success in the world. Add to that the fact that are plenty of people who just as vastly overestimate their talents, and it just goes to show you never know. The biography is quite tolerable until the omg-he's-the-greatest quality of it gets to you. It's not like the level of admiration increases over time, or is particularly worth complaining about in the first place (not to mention that it's entirely understandable in the first place since the author was a friend of his) but it's like eating moderately spicy food until it builds up in your mouth and you just can't take any more spiciness.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Giddy Girlie

    Another thrift store find... and a fantastic one at that! Douglas Adams was a difficult genius and Nick Webb did a wonderful job of telling the story in a very even-handed manner. He admits Adams's shortcomings as well as some of his unpublicized triumphs. Webb's writing is also great. A biography has never been so fun! He has a quirky humor, much like Adams, that makes it an enjoyable read. The only bummer is that the book was published before the movie was released - I would have loved to hear Another thrift store find... and a fantastic one at that! Douglas Adams was a difficult genius and Nick Webb did a wonderful job of telling the story in a very even-handed manner. He admits Adams's shortcomings as well as some of his unpublicized triumphs. Webb's writing is also great. A biography has never been so fun! He has a quirky humor, much like Adams, that makes it an enjoyable read. The only bummer is that the book was published before the movie was released - I would have loved to hear his thoughts on the movie, and the thoughts of all the other creative minds behind Hitchhiker's to see how they felt about it. (I personally love the movie)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    This was a very comprehensive book, and very entertaining to read. It made me like Douglas Adams all the more, and really makes me want to go back and reread everything he's written! It took me an unusually long time to read for some reason (not a quick read), but I enjoyed every minute of it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Douglas Adams, and his ideas, were so much more than just Hitchhiker's.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I thoroughly enjoyed this biography, and I may have to go back and reread Adams' books now.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Danny

    I'm not a huge fan of biographies in general. Douglas Adams is one of my favorite authors, and I certainly learned a lot about him while reading this, but I can't say that it added much to my appreciation of his novels, or of him as a person. The author is British and the book was written over 10 years ago, so there was quite a wide cultural gap for me to leap as an American in 2017. References to British celebrities/actors/writers (from the 70s and 80s, mostly) abound that probably would have I'm not a huge fan of biographies in general. Douglas Adams is one of my favorite authors, and I certainly learned a lot about him while reading this, but I can't say that it added much to my appreciation of his novels, or of him as a person. The author is British and the book was written over 10 years ago, so there was quite a wide cultural gap for me to leap as an American in 2017. References to British celebrities/actors/writers (from the 70s and 80s, mostly) abound that probably would have been more interesting if I had more familiarity. Much time is spent going into great detail about the companies and personalities behind Douglas' various projects (the original radio series, each novel, the non-fiction book, the video game and doomed Dot Com company), which was a bit of a slog. The most interesting parts were the insight into his crippling writer's block throughout his career. I know I can agonize over simply editing and rewriting a GoodReads review, so it's comforting to know that even one of my favorite authors struggled too. It was fun enough to read and definitely inspired me to finally go back and explore his catalog for a second time. That said, I'd only recommend this bio for the die-hard fans who want as much minutiae as they can get their hands on.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Fantastic! It takes a little while to get going through some slightly dull plodding about at the start discussing Douglas Adams' family, but it really hits its stride once the great author gets into the picture. Very intelligent and often funny (maybe a bit too much America-bashing from author Webb, ironic as Douglas loved America), this book is straightforward for about half the pages and then goes off the rails in different directions about Adams' life. Appropriate, though, given how full of Fantastic! It takes a little while to get going through some slightly dull plodding about at the start discussing Douglas Adams' family, but it really hits its stride once the great author gets into the picture. Very intelligent and often funny (maybe a bit too much America-bashing from author Webb, ironic as Douglas loved America), this book is straightforward for about half the pages and then goes off the rails in different directions about Adams' life. Appropriate, though, given how full of ideas and enthusiastic Adams was about everything. I really enjoyed it, recommended for Adams fans especially.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    The author was very verbose. The information he gave was wonderful but it was quite a hike to get there. I found myself looking for other things to do rather than sit down with that book and work through it. After 3 weeks, I leafed through the last quarter of the book, reading what caught my attention for a few pages. I read the last couple of pages and considered myself done. It was a relief to slip it into the book depository at the library. That's unusual for me. I love everything about The author was very verbose. The information he gave was wonderful but it was quite a hike to get there. I found myself looking for other things to do rather than sit down with that book and work through it. After 3 weeks, I leafed through the last quarter of the book, reading what caught my attention for a few pages. I read the last couple of pages and considered myself done. It was a relief to slip it into the book depository at the library. That's unusual for me. I love everything about Douglas Adams, but I feel there must be a better biography somewhere else. Sorry Nick Webb.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Well, that was an exhausting, I mean exhaustive, biography. The writing was fine, there was just so much detail, which I'm sure is great for reference books but less for casual purposes. I'm mostly glad I read it just to get a list of what other media I should put on my to-read/to-watch lists (which I probably also could have gotten from a wikipedia list). If you're a mega-fan and want to know, this will sate your appetite. If you picked it up on a whim, like I did, put it back and go read your Well, that was an exhausting, I mean exhaustive, biography. The writing was fine, there was just so much detail, which I'm sure is great for reference books but less for casual purposes. I'm mostly glad I read it just to get a list of what other media I should put on my to-read/to-watch lists (which I probably also could have gotten from a wikipedia list). If you're a mega-fan and want to know, this will sate your appetite. If you picked it up on a whim, like I did, put it back and go read your favorite novels by Adams again.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kerry Annett

    Although I enjoyed this book, I think it was because of Douglas Adams rather than Nick Webb’s writing. Although he does a reasonable job of DNA’s story, he both puts too much detail in parts and not nearly enough in others. Also he keeps quoting Neil Gaiman’s book about Douglas- which I ended up wishing I’d read instead of this one.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Fannin

    I read the Hitchhiker books long ago, but was not aware of this book until it popped up on BookBub and I downloaded for free. I found it to be almost a hagiography of Douglas and all I could think of was that if there wasn't a Douglas Adams, someone would have invented him. I understand what he brought to the world of sci-fi that was not there before, but he was certainly not alone! Yes I think the Hitchiker books were fun, brilliant even, and I enjoyed Dirk Gently. With this book, after a I read the Hitchhiker books long ago, but was not aware of this book until it popped up on BookBub and I downloaded for free. I found it to be almost a hagiography of Douglas and all I could think of was that if there wasn't a Douglas Adams, someone would have invented him. I understand what he brought to the world of sci-fi that was not there before, but he was certainly not alone! Yes I think the Hitchiker books were fun, brilliant even, and I enjoyed Dirk Gently. With this book, after a while, if you were not totally tuned into to all things DNA, well....I was really hoping to get an understanding of how Adams thought, worked, produced..and what I seemed to get was Nick Webb's awe standing in the way. It was so obfuscated with Roget-type words I thought Mr. Webb had taken stock in a word company and had a certain amount to use or his contract would be null and void. A bit to rambling, insufferably British and overwrought for my taste. Just me!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chris Bull

    Rule: Always have a close friend write your biography. Adams wrote, but his opus only rested on a few titles which sold well and paid even better. Adams has issues which are never truly addressed in life or in the biography. Perhaps he was a phenomenon. Nick Webb, the biographer drops names left and right, but we learn little about Adams. Better to read the Wikipedia article.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Snicketts

    This is a warts-and-all biography that gives the overall impression of a brilliant, insecure man. His flaws, his generosity and his ability to drive people nuts while still instilling in them a kind of protectiveness come across very strongly.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    Lots of great stories about and insights into, Douglas Adams. Wasn't a fan of this authors writing however. He got bogged down in many spots with detail that slowed the pace down a bit but still a great read for any fans of Adams.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    An interesting but perhaps overly intellectual book

  21. 4 out of 5

    Luke Cavanagh

    Amazing read and full of very witty moments about Douglas Adams.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Bobbitt

    While not as good, in my opinion, as Gaiman's work on the same subject in Don't Panic, Webb does a good job here of trying to illustrate Adams' life.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kamie

    The writing is a little dry but the content is very interesting.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Janet Phillips

    Excellent biography This biography avoids the usual problem with biographies of having a sad ending by dealing with the death of the subject up front at the beginning. Of course, it helps that the subject sadly died very young so there were no years of decline to write about! Douglas Adams comes over as a nice and intelligent person.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Govinda Parasrampuria

    I picked up this one because I am a big fan of Douglas' books. I've read the H2G2 "trilogy", Last Chance to See and Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency. I thoroughly enjoyed all of them, and I've never laughed the way I laughed while reading H2G2. It's just so damn funny. He was a visionary, way ahead of his time. He was an outspoken atheist too. So, it goes without saying I have a lot of respect for Douglas. But this book, for me, was kind of a let-down. Although it details his life in I picked up this one because I am a big fan of Douglas' books. I've read the H2G2 "trilogy", Last Chance to See and Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency. I thoroughly enjoyed all of them, and I've never laughed the way I laughed while reading H2G2. It's just so damn funny. He was a visionary, way ahead of his time. He was an outspoken atheist too. So, it goes without saying I have a lot of respect for Douglas. But this book, for me, was kind of a let-down. Although it details his life in painstaking detail, but not much attention was paid to make it interesting to read. In the middle I had to summon all my respect for Douglas not to shut the book and move on. Anyway, I got to know about Douglas, his personal life, his exuberant existence. The epic legacy he has left behind shall shine on forever, leaving us in wonder of the world. Douglas, I wish you were here...

  26. 5 out of 5

    J.J. Toner

    A wonderful account of the life of Douglas Adams, a man of boundless energy and imagination who inhabited the wastelands between real science, science fiction and humour, and lived his life with a childlike sense of awe. He will never be forgotten. As for Nick Webb's book, it is stuffed full of detail and amusing anecdotes. He takes us close enough to Douglas to get a strong sense of his drive, his passions and his demons (writer's block, mostly) without intruding too far into his soul. Nick A wonderful account of the life of Douglas Adams, a man of boundless energy and imagination who inhabited the wastelands between real science, science fiction and humour, and lived his life with a childlike sense of awe. He will never be forgotten. As for Nick Webb's book, it is stuffed full of detail and amusing anecdotes. He takes us close enough to Douglas to get a strong sense of his drive, his passions and his demons (writer's block, mostly) without intruding too far into his soul. Nick Webb's affection for his subject is obvious. It was he who first commissioned the books for the publishing company, Pan. I was sad to read that Nick passed away in 2012. Living in Ireland, Radio 4 is beyond our reach, so I never heard the original radio transmissions. The TV programmes were my first experience of the wonderful Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. And I devoured the 5 books of the trilogy, before seeking out the Dirk Gently books. Eoin Colfer's masterly sixth book in the H2G2 trilogy, And Another Thing... is a worthy addition. I have ordered Neil Gaiman's book, Don't Panic, and will probably spend the rest of the year reading or watching related works.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    It's more of a theme-based biography than strictly chronological & very British (I have got to start using the word "kipple"!). Mr. Webb was also an acquaintance of Douglas & as well as being the "official biographer", he was able to bring some of his personal insights to the work. I learned more about his family background that I remember reading in either the Gaiman or Simpson bios - the section of pictures (if a bit too small) was a lovely addition, as was the list of Douglas' It's more of a theme-based biography than strictly chronological & very British (I have got to start using the word "kipple"!). Mr. Webb was also an acquaintance of Douglas & as well as being the "official biographer", he was able to bring some of his personal insights to the work. I learned more about his family background that I remember reading in either the Gaiman or Simpson bios - the section of pictures (if a bit too small) was a lovely addition, as was the list of Douglas' favourite Beatles tunes. The index and List of Works would probably be useful if you were doing research. I'll be adding this book to my Amazon wish list. FWIW - I had the great fortune to meet Adams in the mid 1990's at a book reading/signing... I thanked him for his work and its influence on getting me and my husband together & I got a rather confused "You're welcome" type of reply. It's a tossup as to which creative -mind-gone-too-soon I miss the most: Douglas or Jim Henson.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Painstakingly researched, and affectionate. Webb acknowledges his seriously pro-Douglas bias, but he makes many excuses for Adams' personality challenges which are a bit grating to read after a while. The early parts of the book are the strongest, focusing on things that happened and anecdotes. I consider myself a great admirer of his work, but not a fanatic, so I was happy to learn about the childhood and adolescent circumstances that shaped one of the funniest English modern writers. The Painstakingly researched, and affectionate. Webb acknowledges his seriously pro-Douglas bias, but he makes many excuses for Adams' personality challenges which are a bit grating to read after a while. The early parts of the book are the strongest, focusing on things that happened and anecdotes. I consider myself a great admirer of his work, but not a fanatic, so I was happy to learn about the childhood and adolescent circumstances that shaped one of the funniest English modern writers. The latter chapters - especially the movie-making chapter - get bogged down in too many details. Die-hard fans will enjoy the minutiae (and complain there wasn't enough!) but I found it a bit painful to read and reread accounts of botched Hollywood deals, and the agony Douglas went through with each writing process.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Quiss42

    Having expected something like Monty Python's Tunisian Holiday: My Life with Brian, which was real fun to read, I was more than slightly disappointed by this book. Nick Webb painstakingly lists names of production people, co-authors, family members, you name it, in a neverending trickle of what one or the other has done when. Made it to half of the book, but then decided to no longer endure this verbal Chinese water torture. It seems to be well-researched and may be an interesting read for someone Having expected something like Monty Python's Tunisian Holiday: My Life with Brian, which was real fun to read, I was more than slightly disappointed by this book. Nick Webb painstakingly lists names of production people, co-authors, family members, you name it, in a neverending trickle of what one or the other has done when. Made it to half of the book, but then decided to no longer endure this verbal Chinese water torture. It seems to be well-researched and may be an interesting read for someone else - therefore it should get 2 stars, nevertheless.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Fantastic! It takes a little while to get going through some slightly dull plodding about at the start discussing Douglas Adams' family, but it really hits its stride once the great author gets into the picture. Very intelligent and often funny (maybe a bit too much America-bashing from author Webb, ironic as Douglas loved America), this book is straightforward for about half the pages and then goes off the rails in different directions about Adams' life. Appropriate, though, given how full of Fantastic! It takes a little while to get going through some slightly dull plodding about at the start discussing Douglas Adams' family, but it really hits its stride once the great author gets into the picture. Very intelligent and often funny (maybe a bit too much America-bashing from author Webb, ironic as Douglas loved America), this book is straightforward for about half the pages and then goes off the rails in different directions about Adams' life. Appropriate, though, given how full of ideas and enthusiastic Adams was about everything. I really enjoyed it, recommended for Adams fans especially.

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