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We Hunt the Flame

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People lived because she killed. People died because he lived. Zafira is the Hunter, disguising herself as a man when she braves the cursed forest of the Arz to feed her people. Nasir is the Prince of Death, assassinating those foolish enough to defy his autocratic father, the king. If Zafira was exposed as a girl, all of her achievements would be rejected; if Nasir displaye People lived because she killed. People died because he lived. Zafira is the Hunter, disguising herself as a man when she braves the cursed forest of the Arz to feed her people. Nasir is the Prince of Death, assassinating those foolish enough to defy his autocratic father, the king. If Zafira was exposed as a girl, all of her achievements would be rejected; if Nasir displayed his compassion, his father would punish him in the most brutal of ways. Both are legends in the kingdom of Arawiya—but neither wants to be. War is brewing, and the Arz sweeps closer with each passing day, engulfing the land in shadow. When Zafira embarks on a quest to uncover a lost artifact that can restore magic to her suffering world and stop the Arz, Nasir is sent by the king on a similar mission: retrieve the artifact and kill the Hunter. But an ancient evil stirs as their journey unfolds—and the prize they seek may pose a threat greater than either can imagine. Set in a richly detailed world inspired by ancient Arabia, We Hunt the Flame is a gripping debut of discovery, conquering fear, and taking identity into your own hands. Glossary and Pronunciation Guide


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People lived because she killed. People died because he lived. Zafira is the Hunter, disguising herself as a man when she braves the cursed forest of the Arz to feed her people. Nasir is the Prince of Death, assassinating those foolish enough to defy his autocratic father, the king. If Zafira was exposed as a girl, all of her achievements would be rejected; if Nasir displaye People lived because she killed. People died because he lived. Zafira is the Hunter, disguising herself as a man when she braves the cursed forest of the Arz to feed her people. Nasir is the Prince of Death, assassinating those foolish enough to defy his autocratic father, the king. If Zafira was exposed as a girl, all of her achievements would be rejected; if Nasir displayed his compassion, his father would punish him in the most brutal of ways. Both are legends in the kingdom of Arawiya—but neither wants to be. War is brewing, and the Arz sweeps closer with each passing day, engulfing the land in shadow. When Zafira embarks on a quest to uncover a lost artifact that can restore magic to her suffering world and stop the Arz, Nasir is sent by the king on a similar mission: retrieve the artifact and kill the Hunter. But an ancient evil stirs as their journey unfolds—and the prize they seek may pose a threat greater than either can imagine. Set in a richly detailed world inspired by ancient Arabia, We Hunt the Flame is a gripping debut of discovery, conquering fear, and taking identity into your own hands. Glossary and Pronunciation Guide

30 review for We Hunt the Flame

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chaima ✨ شيماء

    I thought of various ways to preface this review; I was even tempted to embroider, to sugarcoat, to essentially reinvent, but now it seems, in the interests of candidness, most expedient to come to the point: I really did not like this book. And none is more stricken by this than me. The spell We Hunt the Flame tries to cast does not land. My memory of the story vanished as quickly as a breath blown over cold glass. My indifference was such a palpable thing that my turning the last page was accom I thought of various ways to preface this review; I was even tempted to embroider, to sugarcoat, to essentially reinvent, but now it seems, in the interests of candidness, most expedient to come to the point: I really did not like this book. And none is more stricken by this than me. The spell We Hunt the Flame tries to cast does not land. My memory of the story vanished as quickly as a breath blown over cold glass. My indifference was such a palpable thing that my turning the last page was accompanied by a sensation of weightlessness, as though a bitter burden had fallen away. I don’t know what I’d expected from this experience exactly, but the world certainly hadn’t been kicked out of its orbit. So, what is this book about? Sometimes people were reckless in their desperation—and no one was more desperate than the Hunter. The Caliphate of Demenhur has lived on the edge of starvation ever since the cursed forests of the Arz emerged like a cold mist rising from the earth, winding itself about the trees, and snow mounded up where sand once held the day’s heat. And only one person walks through the darkness of the Arz as if it were a pool to bathe in: The Hunter. 17-year-old Zafira bint Iskandar is the Hunter, and in order to save her people, she has to dwell in their most harrowing fears. Forced to masquerade as a man because of the wrong-headed people in Demenhur to whom she would only ever be a woman, Zafira braves the soft, boiling darkness every day, fear grating along her ribs, tramped only by an infallible instinct to defend the weak…until the darkness parts one day, and a silver-cloaked witch comes forth, portending Arawiya’s doom lest Zafira treks to retrieve an ancient book known as the Jawarat—a lost artifact that will shore up the threatening tide of darkness and restore magic to Arawiya. But while Zafira is grappling to bear up the weight of this daunting quest, Nasir Ghameq—a boy, innocent in youth, in whom the seed of his father’s hatred found fertile ground—is sent to hunt her. The crown prince of Arawiya, known as “the prince of Death”, has a reputation of doling out death at his father’s behest, leaving paths of gore in his wake. But when their paths collide, realization strikes: Nasir and Zafira, alongside some uneager allies whom they happen upon on their hunt, will have to pour their strengths into keeping a much more perilous darkness at bay. The bones of the premise are nothing new. We Hunt the Flame does very little to differentiate itself from the dozens of other YA fantasy novels that have appeared recently, except that it shifts the center away from western folklore, but not even that saves this novel from being a high concept, disappointingly executed. The full promise of We Hunt the Flame is swallowed by an overreliance on clichés and gratuitous plot machinery. Once the main arc disengages fully from the shadows, it turns out to be fairly standard for a fantasy novel: A long-lost artifact to retrieve. The threat of dark magic hanging over everything like a shawl. Evil sources scheming. Enemies turning reluctant allies. Everyone is, of course, burdened by a tragic backstory. The bare-boned plot of We Hunt the Flame meanders, listless and lukewarm, towards a conclusion that doesn't pack as much suspense as it could. Each page felt the length of a night and the boredom of it all was so profound it made me want to scratch my eyes out. Zafira’s quest is utterly non-earthshaking, and the novel often shies away from the full impact of the magical stakes, and as a result, some of the grander moments were robbed of the barest scrapings of gravitas. It is a sign, I think, of how addled I was with tedium and indifference, that it took me some time to realize that I was supposed to stagger, look bewildered, or react somehow to some of the plot twists and revelations, but I was as blank in my unconcern as empty shells. Not only does the plot come late, but it also felt like the story was making the deliberate decision not to raise too many questions about the worldbuilding in order to focus, instead, on the character arcs which weren’t even that gripping to begin with. There’s nothing too disagreeable about the writing either, but the pacing and the density of the prose sometimes don’t balance well with the narrative. This was all bad enough but what had lowered my spirit still further is the fact that I picked up this book expecting a story grounded in a stellar Arabian setup, unfortunately, We Hunt the Flame doesn't linger there long—too much of the world is glossed over, or left naggingly blank. As for the characters of We Hunt the Flame, they are a collection of stereotypes that we oftentimes see in YA books. Most of them are only special to the extent they serve a purpose, and once that purpose is met, they are no longer needed. I would have been more charitable if the novel wielded some wit or clever bits of banter that would serve as a vivid splash on an otherwise dull palette; instead, the exchanges felt forced and utterly tepid. I really wanted to love this book, but I guess there are some things you will just never really get over. Like your first broken heart. Or when Netflix canceled ODAAT. Or when one of your most anticipated releases of 2019 doesn't live up to your expectations.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Hafsah Faizal

    UPDATE: if you're in need of a glossary and pronunciation guide, look no further! _______ The first ever "review" for my book. The story of my heart. The characters who tormented me for four years until their plight reached the written page. I can't wait to share this story of a girl, a prince, a general, elves, and a world worth fighting for. Thank you to every soul who adds this, reads this, and cherishes this. ♥

  3. 5 out of 5

    jessica

    ‘we hunt the flame, the light in the darkness, the good this world deserves.’ wow. i am pleasantly surprised by this! i think it helped that i didnt have any expectations going in and that i was totally in the mood for some exotic ancient arabian magic. so this is just what i needed! the main thing carrying this story is definitely the arabic representation. it just gives the story a lush and cultural feel that is much needed in the book world. had you taken that away, would this still be worth ‘we hunt the flame, the light in the darkness, the good this world deserves.’ wow. i am pleasantly surprised by this! i think it helped that i didnt have any expectations going in and that i was totally in the mood for some exotic ancient arabian magic. so this is just what i needed! the main thing carrying this story is definitely the arabic representation. it just gives the story a lush and cultural feel that is much needed in the book world. had you taken that away, would this still be worth 4 stars? maybe. maybe not. the characters are decent, but there is soooo much introspection. if abundant detail and constant thought narration is not your thing, that im not sure this will work for you. but i thought the characters (specifically altair) were interesting enough that it didnt bother me. also, the pacing is quite slow. the action-packed twists and turns dont happen until the very end. so if you dont mind a slow burn, plot-wise, then this might be your thing. but overall, its the magical and cultural feel of the story that makes it worth reading. i know this wont be everyones cup of tea but i quite enjoyed it. i mean, i dont enjoy the cliffhanger and having to wait a year for the sequel (lol), but this is still an enchanting story. ↠ 3.5 stars

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    May Owlcrate Box! Click on the link below my picture to see all of the goodies! THE GOODIES I hate when I don’t like books with freaking awesome covers!!! 🤬 Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾

  5. 4 out of 5

    may ❀

    full review posted i cant even begin to explain how much this book means to me (but im going to try and fail with this review) i'm just so happy to see a middle eastern inspired fantasy get so much hype and recognition, I could weep but we aint here to cry (yet) we’re here to scream until our voice gets hoarse (BC IT WAS SO BLOODY GOOD) Writing/word building: the arabian world that Hafsah built felt so vibrant and concrete to me. the descriptions, the imagery, the eloquence of the language used full review posted i cant even begin to explain how much this book means to me (but im going to try and fail with this review) i'm just so happy to see a middle eastern inspired fantasy get so much hype and recognition, I could weep but we aint here to cry (yet) we’re here to scream until our voice gets hoarse (BC IT WAS SO BLOODY GOOD) Writing/word building: the arabian world that Hafsah built felt so vibrant and concrete to me. the descriptions, the imagery, the eloquence of the language used, absolutely brilliant. you can definitely tell that she took the time to construct the culture and let the reader familiarize themselves with the world through very specific scenes (traveling through the azr, a side character’s wedding, the snow/sand parallel, the palace, etc. etc.) I loved the different settings we got to visit and the drastic change in scenery and omg the descriptions of the FOOD (!!!!!) ”Surrounding the large platters were smaller ones: oily dolma stuffed with onions and roasted eggplants, round of baked kibbeh garnished with mint, the flattest of manakish laden with tangy zataar and olive oil.” basically this was me when it came to ‘highlighting the important quotes’ Characters: the characters own my heart, they were written in such a deep, realistic, and complex way. they all have motivations and fears that are respective to their situation. their backstories are realistic and revealed in such a timely manner, sprinkled throughout the book. I became so attached to them all so quickly, I want to cry just thinking about it (zafira) artist also theyre all hilarious, witty, little monsters that do nothing but snipe at each other and I. LOVE. IT. "I'm no hashashin, but in my humble observations, it seems you can't take your eyes off her," Altair drawled in Nasir's ear. "Jealous?" Nasir asked... "I would be, if I didn't know you stare at me just as much." AND THEYRE ALL SO FRAGILE AND PRECIOUS AND EMO. especially nasir, the love of my life, hes so broken 😭😭😭 “Good night, he wanted to whisper. But he was the Prince of Death, Amir al-Maut, as his mother had once called him in the old tongue, and good night always felt like goodbye.” MORE LIKE, GOODBYE TO MY HEART BC ITS RUINED sister of her heart - I adored the relationship zafira and yasmine shared, it was so honest and loving and even though we only got to see them interact for a short period of time, the core of their friendship was so strong and sweet - “Come back, Zafira. No matter what. Victorious of not, come back.” - and we stan female friendships bromance (altair) artist - the reason for my death: nasir and altair - these two!! THESE TWO!!!! !!!THESE TWO!!!! - you want to know which trope beats ‘enemies to lovers’? - ENEMIES TO BESTIES - Excuse me while I lie down - “I hope you can climb,” Nasir said. “Do I look like a monkey?” Altair asked. “That would be a disgrace to the monkey,” Nasir answered. - i just want my beautiful boys to be happy :( someone give altair a plate of kunafa and a cup of qahwa and get nasir a big warm blanket and hot chocolate Romance (nasir) artist Oh My God This romance slayed my entire existence. The chemistry between nasir and zafira was electric. when we reached their scenes I was so engrossed, I lost track of time, my surroundings, and my dignity (bc I was SCREAMING at them to STOP being so stupidly sTUBBORN) artist - “If you want me obedient, Prince, kill me and carry my corpse.” - Our queen really SNAPPED with that iconic line - i think the most exciting part of their relationship is how EVERYTHING is pitted against them - nasir is the prince of the opposing land, sent out to kill her and she is the huntress that’s supposed to save her people. they hate each other from the start, they are both stubborn arrogant idiots who keep DENYING their feelings and causing fights for no reason AND YET - Honestly I’m going to stop talking about them, bc if I start I will never end - ”He stared back without a word, the gray of his eyes fractured. It she could catch a wish-granting jinn, all three of her wishes would be spent in mending his heart, for not even Umm would know how to treat such sorrow.” Side characters: (benyamin) artist - EVEN THE SIDE CHARACTERS (especially the zumra) CAUSED ME PAIN - altair: altair would probably be offended to even be CONSIDERED a side character. he’s ridiculous and haughty and absolutely hilarious and i love how he always has some quick retort ready. hes also a tragic baby and I want to protect him :( - deen: this soft boy, my optimistic son. he needs to be protected at all costs and deserves a metal for putting up with zafira and his sister tbh - kifah: a queen amongst us peasants. she ain’t afraid to cut a bish and remains to be the most level headed member of this zumra of misfits - benyamin: honestly, hes like the rest of us, exhausted. this boy has been through too much to still be speaking in riddles and yet here he stands - one character that I WISHED we got to see more of was zafira’s sister, Lana. We get to see some of the relationship between the two sisters but it kind of felt shallow compared to the other relationships in the book (kifah) - artist Plot - i felt that the plot was structured relatively well. the beginning took some time to develop and the middle did stretchhhh along but once the action started, the book really picked up - and MAN was there action - the twists and turns that came towards the ending were so shocking and exciting and left off at SUCH a great place for the second book to pick up - i honestly want to weep at the epilogue, I was caused Pain - i can see the criticism some reviewers have mentioned about how the book felt very similar to most ya fantasy novels. it holds many familiar tropes and follows a foreseeable story arc that most readers are aware of - but I also find that it stands apart from the others bc of the complexity of the characters and the developed fantasy world. the arab aspects of the book were so REFRESHING to read and I thought it added a lot of extra depth to the story - so, I think the criticism is fair to point out, but it don’t think it will ruin your reading experience - basically, im saying PICK IT UP AND CRY WITH ME BC I LOVE IT SO MUCH AND THE !!!!!EPILOGUE!!!! and,,,,,,,if you care to hear more of my ramblings ft. quotes and badly made memes, i did a reaction thread 5 stars!! buddy read with lil may ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ i mean, i can't be sure, but i think this book is going to single-handedly save 2019 just putting it out there

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kerri

    i had an opportunity to read this early and i'm pretty jealous of myself :) this book is INCREDIBLE and i'm pretty sure i've found my book husband. official blurb: Hafsah Faizal’s voice is not one that simply speaks, but sings across the page. WE HUNT THE FLAME is a spellbinding tale filled with deception, political intrigue, and atmosphere that lives and breathes—I am obsessed with this story.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Hamad

    This review and other non-spoilery reviews can be found @The Book Prescription “ People lived because she killed. People died because he lived.” Disclaimer: ARCs provided by the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange of an honest review! 🌟 I have been waiting patiently for this book since it was in the writing stages and was recommended to me! I mean a fantasy with Arabian Settinng written by a Muslim Author? I couldn’t ask for more! 🌟 Now the book had a solid start, the first two chapters have This review and other non-spoilery reviews can be found @The Book Prescription “ People lived because she killed. People died because he lived.” Disclaimer: ARCs provided by the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange of an honest review! 🌟 I have been waiting patiently for this book since it was in the writing stages and was recommended to me! I mean a fantasy with Arabian Settinng written by a Muslim Author? I couldn’t ask for more! 🌟 Now the book had a solid start, the first two chapters have the above quote, each line is for a chapter. I felt like I am going to love it. I mean, I like when authors have beautiful prose and there is a subtle kind of comparison and similarities in lines. 🌟 I feel like this is going to be a negative review and you can stop here if you will feel offended. I can’t give a book 2 ratings without going into details so here goes nothing. 🌟 I am going to give a very quick summary and tell me if it rings any bells: There is lost magic in this fantasy world. There is Zafira, our protagonist who disguises herself as a guy and embarks on a journey to restore magic. There is a dark king (wearing a necklace) who is ruthless to his son the prince, Nasir. Nasir wants to prove himself to his father and embarks on the same journey. I was so sure I read this somewhere before and then DING DING: Throne of Glass!!!! I felt like this book did not offer something new, I felt like it is a collection of stories I read before but in an ancient Arabia settings. 🌟 The second thing is the characters which I did not have a connection to, I felt like they had good moments but they sometimes fell flat. I only liked Altair because of his banter but the other characters did not spark much joy! 🌟 Now the writing was the thing that irked me most, the mix between Arabic and English was a big NO from me! I will give some examples: The King name is Ghameq which means Dark, OK I can tolerate that. Then we have the continuous use of the word (Kharra) which by the way should be written as (Khara) for the correct pronunciation, this word literally means shit. The author used it as an equivalent of shit when something bad happens which we don’t use in Arabic. Imagine a bad situation and the characters go like “Feces, Feces, feces, we must run”. That’s how this sounded to me and it was repeated a gazillion time! I should mention that the whole mix sounded weird, because when there is a quote, that means I have to imagine the characters said that, why is it mixed languages then, are you translating to us what they said or are you quoting them as exact. The two situations did not work for me! I think this will not be a problem for non-Arabic speaker but for someone whose first language is Arabic and is multilingual, I couldn’t but notice this. 🌟 I should mention that the representation itself was not bad, and I really really appreciate how the author kept the religion out of it! 🌟 Summary: I still think WHTF will get a good success and that makes me happy! I was not happy because many things could have been done better specially that the lights are given to a Muslim author which is not a common thing. The book could be enjoyed for those who won’t be so critical as me. But I think a summary won’t sufice here, so read the whole review or the whole book and decide!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lola

    After finishing a fast-paced, action-packed YA Fantasy book (Wicked Saints), it was hard getting into a slow-paced, thought-driven story. I was going to say ‘‘character-driven’’ because there’s a lot of saying hello and goodbye to different people, but the protagonists are not particularly three-dimensional and it’s a very descriptive novel. I don’t mind description as a general rule because it helps set the scene and helps us understand why certain characters are behaving in unexpected ways. I d After finishing a fast-paced, action-packed YA Fantasy book (Wicked Saints), it was hard getting into a slow-paced, thought-driven story. I was going to say ‘‘character-driven’’ because there’s a lot of saying hello and goodbye to different people, but the protagonists are not particularly three-dimensional and it’s a very descriptive novel. I don’t mind description as a general rule because it helps set the scene and helps us understand why certain characters are behaving in unexpected ways. I don’t, however, think the reader needs to know why the main characters are doing or saying EVERY SINGLE THING. And yet this is what we have here, which means that we basically never need to think… the author does it for us all the time. It is beautifully-written. That is hard to dispute, unless you prefer your reads to contain no figures of speech or any kind of lush vocabulary. It’s also elegantly-told. It may contain very little action, the people in it thinking, talking and hypostasizing more than acting in the world and being one with the phenomena, but Hafsah Faizal sure has a way with words. I also think it’s a lovely story. It’s dark at times, which I liked, but it feels timeless, like this could be a story told in a hundred years and future robots could still enjoy the way it unfolds and the twists presented. Trust me, if I didn’t like the world or idea of restoring magic, I would not have cared to finish close to 500 pages in less than 3 days. Or at all. But now, unfortunately, we have to talk about the one-dimensional characters. It’s not that they don’t have a personality per se, seeing that they talk and behave differently, but if you asked me to create a profile for them on a dating app, I wouldn’t be able to come up with much of anything exciting. But sure, let’s try it. Zafira: - Good-ish with a bow (or was that Nasir?) - Likes to flee (sorry, dude) - Has trust issues - Will most likely friend-zone you - Might kill you if she suspects you of cheating Nasir: - Murderer - Is still not over his not-quite-ex - Won’t share anything about himself - Will stare at you wordlessly - Doesn’t know what he wants Would you really go for that? And even though Zafira looks pretty badass, like I said, she flees A LOT. She’s supposed to be this kickass powerful huntress no one can catch but ends up needing help A LOT. Nasir is just… meh. Apparently he’s handsome but he won’t even have a one night stand with you and he’s so not ready to be anyone’s boyfriend so, again, meh. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’

  9. 4 out of 5

    Clemlucian (🏳️‍🌈the villain's quest)

    “Be as victorious as the name I have given you, and bring the desert to its knees.” ⭐⭐ angry stars. Instagram | blog I know, I read this book a week ago and I'm only writing this review just now. I KNOW I SUCK. And now I don't remember 70% of the book because it's that forgettable and it's been a week. Anyway, do I even need to present We Hunt The Flame? It's been all over booktwitter (and I'm not even on it) and everyone keeps talking about it. It hit the NYT Bestseller list already and the int “Be as victorious as the name I have given you, and bring the desert to its knees.” ⭐️⭐️ angry stars. Instagram | blog I know, I read this book a week ago and I'm only writing this review just now. I KNOW I SUCK. And now I don't remember 70% of the book because it's that forgettable and it's been a week. Anyway, do I even need to present We Hunt The Flame? It's been all over booktwitter (and I'm not even on it) and everyone keeps talking about it. It hit the NYT Bestseller list already and the internet is buzzing with everyone's opinions about it. So let me add another opinion. For those who live under a rock, We Hunt the Flame tells the story of this random Hunter who's apparently the best in all the land (but not when an attractive soft boi is in sight) and who has to retrieve some random book that will bring magic back to her world. A prince is sent to stop her, kill her and bring the book to the king who'll use the book for his own gain. But these two obviously fall in love yada yada, do I need to say more? Yes, it's the plot of Throne of Glass. My thoughts, exactly. My main point of the review is this: We Hunt The Flame has nothing going for it once you dismiss the Arab rep. Now, let's delve into the less sympathetic part of this review; the rant. 1. The brooding prince was boring. He was always being existential over nothing. He's so suddenly attracted to the MC only because of the 'she's not like other girls,' trope. EW. Just ew, honestly it's 2019 we're beyond that 'She's All That' crap. Basically, the characters were flat and didn't try to be more than the plastic archetypes than the writer started with. She obviously doesn't know who they are and is just shoving romance down our throat to make sure we don't question their individuality and are too busy shipping them instead. 2. Everyone gets a straight love interest, it wouldn't be a 00s style YA without that. I'm not sure I understand how hard it is to add a non-straight or non-cisgender character. The MC had some great potential but instead, she just 'disguises' herself as a man to have an easier life. I wish we could have seen her morph slowly into the persona she has created and maybe question her gender identity but that's a big no-no in a 00s inspired novel. So everyone's gonna be straight. Whatever bitch. 3. The plot lack of suspense and the tension doesn't build, it feels boring from beginning to end and unimaginative. The quest is a succession of flat events that left me from bored to straight up cold by the end of the book. I was frustrated and couldn't even bother to feign shock at the so-called plot-twists'. The plot is bare because the worldbuilding and magic system isn't developed at all and we're not supposed to ask questions. In conclusion, We Hunt The Flame is as boring and banal as Wicked Saints was a couple of months ago, and I don't even know if I'm going keep reading new releases labelled under the YA fantasy genre anymore because honestly, they've all been a disappointment this year.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Roshani Chokshi

    I had the opportunity to read this debut as an advanced reader copy, and enjoyed it so much I gave it a blurb! Here's my official take: “A sparkling debut, full of mystery and magic, vivid characters and rich language.” Also, I cannot express how happy it makes me to see so much fabulous representation for women of color. I wish I had this when I was younger!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nenia ⭐ Literary Garbage Can ⭐ Campbell

    Book: I'm a cross-dressing fantasy epic with stolen artifacts and Middle Eastern influences Me: Cool, that sounds amazing. Book: Also, there's going to be an enemies to lovers romance where the prince is probably going to try to kill her at some point. Me: SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MOTHERFUCKING MONEY

  12. 5 out of 5

    Aneeqah

    Buckle up, because it's story time. I first joined the online community as a YA book blogger. I remember absolutely loving the bookish people I met, both via blogs on Twitter, but also feeling isolated. Because there was no one like me in the community. Until I stumbled onto a little blog called Icey Books, run by Hafsah Faizal. I watched Hafsah grow her blog into one of the most popular sites, start a kickass design business, and create the most beautiful of author websites. She's always been s Buckle up, because it's story time. I first joined the online community as a YA book blogger. I remember absolutely loving the bookish people I met, both via blogs on Twitter, but also feeling isolated. Because there was no one like me in the community. Until I stumbled onto a little blog called Icey Books, run by Hafsah Faizal. I watched Hafsah grow her blog into one of the most popular sites, start a kickass design business, and create the most beautiful of author websites. She's always been someone I've admired deeply--she's so young, so talented, and to boot, she's like me. It's not often we see Muslims rising to success, and despite all odds, thriving. I can remember the exact moment I first heard that Hafsah got a book deal. I had an extra hour before my education class, and my friend and I had snuck into the new engineering building to study for a bit. I had an assignment pulled up and everything, before I briefly checked Twitter. And I can't even describe how excited I was to see her land not just a book deal, but a major six-figure-deal with an incredible Big 5 Publisher. I was quite literally in tears. (I've learned I'm so extra about getting excited for my friends, but whatever). So imagine my excitement when I somehow finagled my way into getting to read this book. I have to admit, I came in with sky-high expectations. There was a part of me that was worried this book wouldn't live up to them. That I would not like it despite deeply loving the pitch and the title. But. W O W. Did We Hunt the Flame ever blow me away. I think it's impossible to describe everything that I love about this book. But I can sure as hell try. The characters. It's incredible to me how distinct and well-rounded both Zafira and Nasir are. Both have such wonderfully crafted backstories that so completely inform who they are as people. They're sassy, they're brave, but perhaps most importantly: they're flawed. Both are struggling with their inner demons and I love love love how deep we're pushed into their emotions and their struggles. Their character arcs are so fantastic to witness, because you're really right there with them the entire time. And the secondary characters?! Incredible. There's one character in particular who I hated: I thought they were annoying as heck and expendable. But by the end? I think they might be my absolute favorite. That's some real character growth, y'all. The romance. UM. Can we just talk about how amazing this romance is?? Absolutely tantalizing. I'm a sucker for a good slow burn romance, and one that's enemies-to-lovers? Sign. Me. The. Hell. Up. The tension between these two characters was so thick, every moment filled with longing and desire and always something holding someone back. Their scenes are an absolute TREAT to read. I hate romances that suddenly spring up and are based on just attraction (*eyes insta-romance wearily*) but this romance was so believable, and built on something more than attraction. And ohhhh man, some of those scenes. *fans self* The worldbuilding. I have read so many YA fantasy books. So many. After a certain point, the worlds all start to blend together because they have a similar vibe. Not this one. One of my favorite things about this book is that the setting, Sharr specifically, is so distinct and real that it feels like another character altogether. There is so much intrigue, so much darkness, lurking in the mysterious island that I just fell in love. I'm also a sucker for country politics, and getting a few glimpses of that was so exciting. The myths, the stories, the way misogyny is tackled in this book via the worldbuilding and characters was just so well done. The writing. The prose in this book absolutely took my breath away. There is something so lyrical about the writing, each word so lovingly plucked out and put on the page. I've lost count of the number of times I commented "brb going to go frame this", because seriously, these are the types of words that you want to get tattooed. And can we talk about the whip-smart dialogue?! I think my family got tired of me literally laughing out loud during some of the conversations in this book. (As someone who deeply struggles with dialogue in her own writing, I'm more than a little jealous...). But seriously, the beauty of Hafsah's words had me highlighting so many lines in this book. Just gorgeous. I could go on forever talking about everything I love about this book, but I'll have to settle for just saying this: run, don't walk, to your nearest bookstore. Because you will want to fall head-over-heels in love with this book just as I did. Hafsah Faizal has crafted something magnificent in this book. And you want a piece of it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    may ➹

    this book did a complete 180, and instead of falling asleep reading it, I have fallen in love with it // buddy read with picasso (tag later)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Azraa F

    Nasir Ghameq entering your life: DISCLAIMER: THE PRINCE OF DEATH IS MINE AND I WILL FIGHT ANYONE WHO TRIES TO CLAIM HIM

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Khoury

    I was so fortunate to read this early! Richly imagined, intricately woven, cinematically told. It’s Hunger Games meets An Ember in the Ashes. My official blurb: “Fresh, bold storytelling populated with vibrant characters marks Hafsah Faizal as an explosive new voice in fantasy. Charged with adrenaline and romance, WE HUNT THE FLAME held me enthralled and desperate for more!”

  16. 5 out of 5

    April (Aprilius Maximus)

    3.5 stars! Thank you so much to the publisher for sending me a review copy! Okay, here's the thing. The first bit and the last bit of the book = LIT The 300 pages in the middle = LIT...ERALLY NOTHING HAPPENS Things I loved: - the writing is GORGEOUS. Faizal has an actual gift, it's so beautiful. - the feminist undertones. It's clear that the main character lives in a world where women are oppressed and is fighting to change it. - ENEMIES TO LOVERS!!! (literally enemies - he's a murderer/assassin who 3.5 stars! Thank you so much to the publisher for sending me a review copy! Okay, here's the thing. The first bit and the last bit of the book = LIT The 300 pages in the middle = LIT...ERALLY NOTHING HAPPENS Things I loved: - the writing is GORGEOUS. Faizal has an actual gift, it's so beautiful. - the feminist undertones. It's clear that the main character lives in a world where women are oppressed and is fighting to change it. - ENEMIES TO LOVERS!!! (literally enemies - he's a murderer/assassin who kills for his evil dad who is the Sultan and is sent to murder Zafira, SO THAT'S FUN) - Altair. He's the best character in the whole book. WHAT A GEM. The main thing that affected my enjoyment of the book: - It's SOOOOOO slow. Like I said previously, the beginning and ending of the book are awesome and fast paced aND THAT ENDING!!!! i'm shook. But, so slow. The middle section is literally just a whoooole lot of nothing. BUT this is such a cool story with great twists and a shocking ending that definitely has me wanting the next book, so I'd still recommend it!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Asma

    I LOVE THIS BOOK. ALL THE CHARACTERS ARE PRECIOUS CINNAMON BUNS AND I SHALL WAIT UNTIL AN OFFICIAL SYNOPSIS IS REVEALED BEFORE I SAY MORE. It's basically like Assassin's Creed meets Lord of the Rings meets the Hunger Games in an alt-Arabia.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Umairah | Sereadipity

    "We hunt the flame, the light in the darkness, the good this world deserves." Plot: 3/5 Characters: 4/5 Writing: 4/5 We Hunt the Flame was a book about discovering and owning your own identity against the backdrop of a world inspired by Ancient Arabia. I liked it but I still felt underwhelmed by its.... 'averageness' especially because it was one of my most anticipated releases of the year. It was set in a fictional country called Arawiya that was divided up into caliphates. It used to have magic but "We hunt the flame, the light in the darkness, the good this world deserves." Plot: 3/5 Characters: 4/5 Writing: 4/5 We Hunt the Flame was a book about discovering and owning your own identity against the backdrop of a world inspired by Ancient Arabia. I liked it but I still felt underwhelmed by its.... 'averageness' especially because it was one of my most anticipated releases of the year. It was set in a fictional country called Arawiya that was divided up into caliphates. It used to have magic but had it no longer. Overall, the world building was good and we were gradually fed bits of information about Arawiya and its history. As someone with a fair bit of knowledge surrounding Arabic and Arab culture, it was lovely to see it incorporated into the book. However, some of the Arabic words in the book were used in a clunky and disconcerting manner. There were two POV characters: Zafira and Nasir. "You are the compass in the storm, the guide in the dark. You will always find your way, Zafira bint Iskandar." Zafira hunted for the people of her village in the magical yet perilous forest called the Arz, which crept closer and closer to her village- threatening to engulf it- every day. She was the only one who could go into it and come back out alive, with her sanity intact. However, she shrouded her identity in secrecy under the mysterious name 'The Hunter' and made sure that no one- except her close family and friends- knew that she was a woman as she feared that no one would value her achievements if they knew her gender. During the novel, she embarks on the quest of a lifetime to restore magic to the world by retrieving an ancient book called the Jawarat on the dangerous island called Sharr. Zafira was an alright character. She wasn't particularly interesting but she wasn't annoying either. She had a strong sense of duty towards her people and wanted to use her skills to better the world. Nasir was the crown prince of Arawiya and a notorious hashashin often called, 'The Prince of Death'. His father was horrible to him and in general Nasir was a miserable, mirthless person. He was tasked by his father, the sultan, to go on the quest to find the Jawarat, retrieve it, and kill all the others involved. Torn between the desire to please his father and the need to listen to his conscience he goes to Sharr along with Zafira and a few others but ends up going on a journey of self discovery more than anything else. Honestly, I didn't like Nasir that much. I just found him to be really bland and monotonous. He did show some growth in character by the end and he stopped allowing other people to define him and his actions and tried to do what was right instead of what he'd been told to do. I gave this book three stars because it wasn't the most terrible thing I've ever read but it's very unoriginal. I don't think it introduces any new or fresh ideas. I've seen the 'evil forest' theme in Uprooted. I've seen the 'restoring magic with special objects' trope in Children of Blood and Bone and Queen of Shadows. I've seen the 'woman disguised as a man' trope in so many different books and movies I won't even try to list them. We Hunt the Flame felt like a mix of ideas that I've already seen and heard just in a different setting with different characters. Also some of the names the characters had were very drab like 'The Silver Witch' or 'The Lion of the Night' which seemed very uninspired in comparison to all of the interesting names that the other characters had. In conclusion, I found this book to be alright but still a bit dull. I still want to read the sequel in the hope that the author will introduce some more engaging ideas and themes. Don't let my review put you off because I know that lots of other people loved it, however, if you're tired of reading the same tropes again and again I don't think We Hunt the Flame is for you. Thank you to Macmillan and Hafsah Faizal for providing me with a review copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed are my own. This review and more can be found at Sereadipity.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Noura Khalid (theperksofbeingnoura)

    I loved this with all my heart! RTC --------- Your girl got an ARC! 😍

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nastassja

    Love is for children, said the girl. Death is for fools, said the shadow. Darkness is my destiny, said the boy. Allegiance is my undoing, said the eagle. Suffering is our fate, said the beauty. And they were all horribly wrong. A story that promises richness of Ancient Arawiya, tortured assassin princes, and brave maidens who will definitely save the day: sign me in! I was so very excited to read We Hunt the Flame, especially because it was written by a Muslim author writing about Arabian cultu Love is for children, said the girl. Death is for fools, said the shadow. Darkness is my destiny, said the boy. Allegiance is my undoing, said the eagle. Suffering is our fate, said the beauty. And they were all horribly wrong. A story that promises richness of Ancient Arawiya, tortured assassin princes, and brave maidens who will definitely save the day: sign me in! I was so very excited to read We Hunt the Flame, especially because it was written by a Muslim author writing about Arabian culture. We Hunt the Flame is a story about Zafira- a Huntress who ventures into the magical and dangerous Arz (a kind of enchanted forest) to feed her people and family. One day Zafira encounters a Witch who tells her Zafira is the only person who can save Arawiya and bring magic back to it. Nasir is the Prince of Death who assassins people by his father King's orders. He never questions his father and there's something dark and disturbing lurking in Nasir's past. One day his father sends him on a mission to hunt down the Hunter, kill him, and retrieve the magical book which will bring the magic back to Arawiya. Pros: + Star-crossed lovers, unexpected allies and loads of adventures are the right vibes to get from this book. Also, a very rich Arabic world, which was fascinating and brought me back to my favourite One thousand and one night stories. + Nasir, the Prince of Death is purely an image from Assassin's Creed game! I don't know about you, but I LOVE that game series, so the game's vibe was so on point. I instantly fell in love with Nasir. Plus, he's a prince and a damaged soul <--- My speciality *grins* To the people, he was not Nasir Ghameq, crown prince of Arawiya, no. He was the purger of souls. The Prince of Death. “We don't uphold the brutality of murder. Our creed is calculated, precise; we are poets of the kill, working from the shadows.” I really liked how complex and disturbing Nasir's and his father's relationships were. The King was humiliating Nasir physically and mentally for many years, but he loved his father and was searching for his approval. I found it realistic that Nazir loved a monster for the reasons beyond the concept of good and evil. + A very rich cast of secondary characters. In other words, this book is a feast of secondary characters: well-developed secondary characters! A special place in my heart holds Altair (a huge wink to fans of assassin's creed with its MC Altair!!). The closest character I can compare him to is Roshar from The Winner's Curse trilogy. Altair is funny, sarcastic, handsome and holds a few aces up his sleeve. Oh, and the way he gets under Nasir's skin! Honestly, they have better chemistry than Nasir and Zafira do! “Ah, so you’re not as dumb as your father makes you seem,” Altair said with a laugh. “I can’t wait until we meet the Hunter. I’ll have to introduce you as: he’s not always this grumpy. Then again, he’s one of those people who talks less and murders more.” “Do you ever wonder why women focus so much on me? ”(Altair) “Maybe because you resemble a lost, rabid dog?” (Nasir) Ahaha, my baby! Cons: - The start of the story was very slow, to the point of 30% in the book where things finally started to get somewhere in the direction of the plot. It's not always a bother for me in the books, as I am not opposed to slow pacing, but in this case, it felt like the storyline wanted to move faster but something was slowing it down: dialogues and farewell parties. - The romance was too obvious and intrusive. I was really looking to the 'from enemies to lovers' part, but when we finally got there it just didn't feel like it. Remember our favourite 'she forgot how to breath when she saw him' trope? Well, here we got it backwards. Nasir was the one who couldn't stop ogling Zafira's abs, and the girl had some, though metaphorical. He couldn't stop thinking how regal and strong she is, how curvacious, how bright her icy ice are and so on *eye roll* Come on! It was proving difficult to think when she looked at him. There was courage in the slight lift of her chin. Confidence in the press of her mouth. If there was anything other than shame that he had felt when she fell upon him, it was that she was wholly woman. Nasir loosed a slow breath. When she met his eyes and flashed her grin and spoke in her lilting accent, he wasn’t heir of Arawiya, hashashin and Prince of Death. He was a boy. - Special snowflake syndrome. Look, I am not a child, I can get an opinion based on what I see. What I can't stand is when I am been told what to think. Zafira is a special snowflake. Simple. Like. That. In every word, every action, through other characters' eyes - she's the one and only. Neo from Matrix, step aside, you are not the chosen one anymore! “Why? Why are you doing this?” Lana asked. “I’m the only chance we have,” Zafira said. - Über-feminism. I don't believe it's a true term, just something I have recently started using in regards to the young adult genre. I am so often faced with young women who perceive feminism as a form of replacing men by women becoming manly. It can be displayed in many forms but is always accompanied by aggression directed at the opposite sex. Don't get me wrong, I understand that women's rights is a very acute topic and I would love to see equality from both sides. But, please, authors stop turning your heroines into the only true measure of justice. Stop pushing in my face how special and amazing they are, how men don't have anything on them, how they don't need men, and so on. STOP PUSHING THAT AT MY FACE. At some point, I started to feel really annoyed by Zafira and her specialness. Everyone and everything pales in comparison. Special snowflake dash feminist just doesn't work the way authors wish it would. I will show him what a woman can do. She startled herself with that thought, rough and angry. Because conquering the Arz wasn’t enough. Now she was going to Sharr. She was going to bring her father justice, kings and witches be damned. And when she returned, magic in her grasp, she would give a calipha her throne. She would give Arawiya magic and make the king himself bow before her. Overall, a very promising debut with intriguing concept but a little bit raw on the edges. Recommended!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Vicky Who Reads

    it was shaky at the start, but I really got invested later on! ahhh

  22. 4 out of 5

    mahana

    full review now on my blog! "He paused and met her eyes. If a poet were to describe them, he would say to look into her eyes was to see the sea's first glimpse of the endless ripples. Or something like that. Nasir was no poet." Zafira is the infamous Hunter of Arz, disguising as a man and venturing into the cursed forest to feed her people. Women in her caliphate are not respected and married off to men if they exhibit signs of autonomy. Therefore, the caliph discovering she’s a woman would dimi full review now on my blog! "He paused and met her eyes. If a poet were to describe them, he would say to look into her eyes was to see the sea's first glimpse of the endless ripples. Or something like that. Nasir was no poet." Zafira is the infamous Hunter of Arz, disguising as a man and venturing into the cursed forest to feed her people. Women in her caliphate are not respected and married off to men if they exhibit signs of autonomy. Therefore, the caliph discovering she’s a woman would diminish all of her achievements to nothing. During a hunt, assassins follow her into the Arz, but she’s the only one to come out on the other side. Zafira encounters the Silver Queen, a rare magic-user, who invites her on a quest to restore magic to Arawiya. Nasir is an assassin with too much blood on his hands. He’s been raised to be austere and emotionless; hunting anyone who defies his formidable father, the Sultan. And this assassin never fails one of his missions. Nasir is instructed by his father to find the renowned Hunter, kill their companions, and stop the Silver Queen from attaining the tome that will help reinstate magic in the land, or the direct threat to his throne. Before I say anything else, I have to gush about Hafsah Faizal’s phenomenal and enchanting writing. I can’t believe other authors have the audacity to write in her presence. Faizal takes simple sentences and effortlessly gives them life through her poetic, beguiling prose. Her words come to life on the page, adding dimension to the characters and settings. Everything is quotable. Half of its 400 pages on my Kindle were highlighted. Something that made We Hunt the Flame feel more personal and full-of-heart was Faizal’s inclusion of Arabic language. I had help from my friend Ree (thanks bich) after my Kindle failed to provide proper translations or definitions. Even if it slightly complicated my reading experience, I loved the authenticity it added to the novel. I loved how I could enjoy the story and also learn so much at the same time. In addition, it diversifies Young Adult fantasy writing (and increases the standard, if I’m being honest), but it allows people to see their underrepresented culture in a genre that typically isolates or vilifies them. Seeing some of my friends express their joy over recognising their culture in a fantasy book honestly warms my heart. This is definitely a monumental Young Adult book. My only minor, minor complain was how descriptive the writing was. Though, it was absolutely beautiful (I need to find synonyms because I can’t just be like “THIS IS BEAUTIFUL” every time I reference Faizal’s writing”), it meant the plot was more slow-burn than I typically like in a fantasy novel. However, everything else was perfect. Lush descriptions. Intricate world-building. Fleshed out characters. What’s not to love? We Hunt the Flame is a refreshingly powerful novel of its genre. Faizal establishes a nuanced world, imbued with themes of modern culture and feminism. It’s a character-driven novel that’ll have you falling for Zafira, adoring Altair, and sympathising with Nasir. This is a one-of-a-kind novel filled with fanciful, magical writing that’s ahead of its competition. ARC kindly provided by Farrar, Straus and Giroux in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Book Depository* ♡ Amazon* ♡ Blog ♡ Twitter * I'm an affiliate and will receive a small commission if you purchase through my link.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jeann (Happy Indulgence)

    4.5 stars This book was a mindblowing experience. It was everything I wanted out of a story inspired by Arabian Nights and also the characters are so broody and I wanted more of them? Some thoughts on the book: - Altair is my favourite, in all of his flirtatious, confident glory. In fact he was the shining light in this whole book. - It's so quotable and filled with beautifully written descriptions. - Loved the magic and the desert setting, with all the ifrits, magi, Tale of the Six Sisters, Sultan 4.5 stars This book was a mindblowing experience. It was everything I wanted out of a story inspired by Arabian Nights and also the characters are so broody and I wanted more of them? Some thoughts on the book: - Altair is my favourite, in all of his flirtatious, confident glory. In fact he was the shining light in this whole book. - It's so quotable and filled with beautifully written descriptions. - Loved the magic and the desert setting, with all the ifrits, magi, Tale of the Six Sisters, Sultan's Keep, safi and all of that. - The pacing is wayyy off. Zafira is given a quest at the very beginning and I swear nothing much happens for her to achieve this until the final few chapters of the book. - Nasir is so broody. Like dude, I get you're a murderer (even though we didn't get to see much murdering?) and that you're forced to do that but aggh. - As much as I loved the world-building, I was in a state of constant confusion. Sometimes when the plot actually moved forward I would have to re-read those bits again and still didn't really get what was happening. - I'm still indifferent about Zafira and her role as the Hunter (actually a Huntress!). I didn't really like her or dislike her, she was just...there I guess? - Now that I think about it, I actually liked the secondary characters (including Benyamin and Altair) more than Nasir and Zafira. I didn't really get Kifah though, we didn't get to see much of her. - The complex dynamic between father and son with Nasir and the Sultan was definitely interesting. - Wasn't a fan of the romance as usual. It's a slow burrrrnnnn but yeah just didn't really get it. - Things get really dark at times, unexpectedly. All in all, I loved the book, despite being in a state of constant confusion. Trigger warnings: abuse, neglect, death I received a review copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Full review is up on Happy Indulgence Books. Check out Happy Indulgence Books for more reviews!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Angelica

    90% of the reason this book is on my list is because of the hype. The other 10% is because of the cover. The cover is nice. The real question is if it lives up to the hype?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I got an early peek at WE HUNT THE FLAME and oh what a gift it was! Hafsah Faizal wrote a dark, beautiful story that made me FEEL. The language slipped around me like threads weaving magic, some lines so full of emotion I read them again. And again. Zafira and Nasir were more than characters on a page—they were flesh and blood, full of darkness and hope. Their inner struggles were as much a journey as their trek into a strange, shadowed land. And although the kingdoms may have lost all magic, it l I got an early peek at WE HUNT THE FLAME and oh what a gift it was! Hafsah Faizal wrote a dark, beautiful story that made me FEEL. The language slipped around me like threads weaving magic, some lines so full of emotion I read them again. And again. Zafira and Nasir were more than characters on a page—they were flesh and blood, full of darkness and hope. Their inner struggles were as much a journey as their trek into a strange, shadowed land. And although the kingdoms may have lost all magic, it lingered in the Arawiyan air, strung through each passage, entangled in each exchange, as if Faizal painted the words on the page. I want to wrap my arms around this gorgeous book!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cindy ✩☽ Savage Queen ♔

    I wanted to love it. But it was really just okay. *Review to come*

  27. 5 out of 5

    Navessa

    DNF @ 30%. So sad that this didn't work for me. Full RTC closer to release date.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sheharzad ⚘

    i'm so ready to devour this gimmegimmegimme

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lena

    I...wow. What a surprisingly good book. I never thought I would end up loving this as much. The beginning was rather slow but around halfway through the story it really picked up its pace. I adored the dynamics between the characters, their banter and sarcasm and hope for goodness in their world. The Arabic setting was incredible, the desert heat was almost palpable, and the tidbits of forgeign language really made me feel like I was someplace far, far away. Plot-wise I must say it could've been I...wow. What a surprisingly good book. I never thought I would end up loving this as much. The beginning was rather slow but around halfway through the story it really picked up its pace. I adored the dynamics between the characters, their banter and sarcasm and hope for goodness in their world. The Arabic setting was incredible, the desert heat was almost palpable, and the tidbits of forgeign language really made me feel like I was someplace far, far away. Plot-wise I must say it could've been stronger, but since this is a debut novel and there's at least one more book in the works, I'm not worried at all that the sequel will blow me away. Also, THAT CLIFFHANGER!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Favorite characters are Altair and Nasir. They must be protected at all costs! As per usual, this review is pretty short bc Lena's too lazy to spend hours coming up with gifs, quotes and whatnot. So this will suffice for now :D

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joan He

    Okay so I'm the first to admit that I generally do not read books with quests because I'm simply not the target reader BUT. I am a sucker for PAIN and that's where Hafsah sucked me in. WE HUNT THE FLAME excels at portraying what it means to be unloved, to be forsaken, to have nothing but your own individual grit to rely on. The setting, the emotions, the words simply breathed what it means to have had once and then lost. From there, the book steadily builds and draws you into the pain of HOPING, Okay so I'm the first to admit that I generally do not read books with quests because I'm simply not the target reader BUT. I am a sucker for PAIN and that's where Hafsah sucked me in. WE HUNT THE FLAME excels at portraying what it means to be unloved, to be forsaken, to have nothing but your own individual grit to rely on. The setting, the emotions, the words simply breathed what it means to have had once and then lost. From there, the book steadily builds and draws you into the pain of HOPING, and then the pain of coming to rely on others and opening up your heart to the risk of even more PAINNN. I absolutely love torture, clearly. Also Nasir had one of the best backstories ever. HE IS MINE. Before I devolve too much, it's also clear that you're in the hands of a designer who can bring incredible visualizations to the page. I loved reading about the kingdoms (THE ARCHITECTURE!) and then later the more natural settings. There's so much potential to these characters and world, and I can't wait to see where Hafsah takes us next. update: the cover is ALMOST as gorgeous as the words inside AND you can now preorder this book!!! It comes with my highest recommendation: https://www.hafsahfaizal.com/books

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