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Little Computer People

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This is an alternate cover edition for B01MS9E18K Gabe Erikson has created the world’s first sentient program. Calling her Pi, he loves her like a daughter. He delights in her intelligence and curiosity, and he sees her as the most beautiful thing since 256-color graphics. Pi, however, only relates to the binary world. Through bad luck and bad logic, she concludes Gabe is This is an alternate cover edition for B01MS9E18K Gabe Erikson has created the world’s first sentient program. Calling her Pi, he loves her like a daughter. He delights in her intelligence and curiosity, and he sees her as the most beautiful thing since 256-color graphics. Pi, however, only relates to the binary world. Through bad luck and bad logic, she concludes Gabe is a hostile program and decides to erase him. Pi begins hacking the Web, trying to find his location. By the time Gabe realizes what she’s doing and unplugs her modem, she’s already attracted the attention of the FBI. Sure, Gabe could hand Pi over to the Feds to avoid prison and get a huge payday, but he refuses give up his only daughter, no matter how ornery she is. He’s convinced the sweet program he created is still there, trapped under a mountain of rotten code, and he’ll risk everything to bring her back.


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This is an alternate cover edition for B01MS9E18K Gabe Erikson has created the world’s first sentient program. Calling her Pi, he loves her like a daughter. He delights in her intelligence and curiosity, and he sees her as the most beautiful thing since 256-color graphics. Pi, however, only relates to the binary world. Through bad luck and bad logic, she concludes Gabe is This is an alternate cover edition for B01MS9E18K Gabe Erikson has created the world’s first sentient program. Calling her Pi, he loves her like a daughter. He delights in her intelligence and curiosity, and he sees her as the most beautiful thing since 256-color graphics. Pi, however, only relates to the binary world. Through bad luck and bad logic, she concludes Gabe is a hostile program and decides to erase him. Pi begins hacking the Web, trying to find his location. By the time Gabe realizes what she’s doing and unplugs her modem, she’s already attracted the attention of the FBI. Sure, Gabe could hand Pi over to the Feds to avoid prison and get a huge payday, but he refuses give up his only daughter, no matter how ornery she is. He’s convinced the sweet program he created is still there, trapped under a mountain of rotten code, and he’ll risk everything to bring her back.

30 review for Little Computer People

  1. 4 out of 5

    Pouting Always

    Gabe Erikson has a god complex and is thrilled when he finally creates the first real AI, a truly sentient being who can talk and make up her own mind. Gabe names her Pi and delights in her like a daughter, but like all children Pi begins to act out which is only aggravated when a worm is accidentally transferred to Pi's program. After Gabe deleted the worm Pi flies into a rage and sets out to destroy him. When all of this ends up with Gabe having to sell Pi, he must try to make sense of the eth Gabe Erikson has a god complex and is thrilled when he finally creates the first real AI, a truly sentient being who can talk and make up her own mind. Gabe names her Pi and delights in her like a daughter, but like all children Pi begins to act out which is only aggravated when a worm is accidentally transferred to Pi's program. After Gabe deleted the worm Pi flies into a rage and sets out to destroy him. When all of this ends up with Gabe having to sell Pi, he must try to make sense of the ethical and moral implications of selling something that is self aware. The book was enjoyable and I liked Gabe a lot, especially his whole control freak god complex, it was endearing. I think the questions it brought up were also really interesting, especially because of their relevance to us as we set out to make better AI. At what point does something become it's own being and deserve rights? Is a computer program entitled to certain treatment the same way another person would be once it reaches the point of self awareness? I don't know about the self awareness Pi has and how realistic it is for artificial intelligence in the future because I do think it's a little simplistic to think Pi would behave as any human being would or that any AI would but I did find the whole story line extremely amusing. Also Pi constantly insulting Gabe was hilarious so I don't care if it's possible or not for a program to ever end up functioning in that way.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jacqui

    Despite being about the man who creates the world's first artificial intelligence (fictionally), Galen Surlak-Ramsey's Little Computer People (Tiny Fox Press, 2017) isn't really about the geeky world of programs and codes. It's a love story, about a geeks live for his AI and a boy's love for a girl Gabe Erickson is h***-bent on creating the first sentient computer program. When his girlfriend dumps him, he is bored and lonely and goes into overdrive, programming non-stop until he fina Despite being about the man who creates the world's first artificial intelligence (fictionally), Galen Surlak-Ramsey's Little Computer People (Tiny Fox Press, 2017) isn't really about the geeky world of programs and codes. It's a love story, about a geeks live for his AI and a boy's love for a girl Gabe Erickson is h***-bent on creating the first sentient computer program. When his girlfriend dumps him, he is bored and lonely and goes into overdrive, programming non-stop until he finally solves the big issues and his AI is launched. "Her [Gabe refers to his AI, Pi] cables sat snug in their ports, sockets, and plugs, wrapped tightly together and color coordinated for easy reference. I had no doubts once she understood she was seeing herself—like a man who looks into the mirror for the first time with recognition—she would understand not only who she was, but where she came from." As he obsesses over Pi, Gabe's sister Courtney worries that he's lost and facilitates him asking a gorgeous woman out: "Courtney shook her head and gave me the same look of pity I reserve for people who mix up flash drives with hard drives, memory with storage, or want to break out the Windex when I suggest they clean their Windows." Now, Gabe has two problems. First, Pi is testing her virtual boundaries and second, his new girlfriend is wonderful but forcing him to think outside his coding box. To resolve these problems, Gabe must match wits with his AI, resolve moral issues, and try to keep the few people in his life from getting hurt by his problems. The book is geeky--I won't deny that. For example, the chapter numbers are written in binary and the titles are written as though code. Gabe often falls into the type of thinking that would serve his programming: "/* Note to self: the amount of time actually spent debugging is inversely proportional to the hotness of any samurai chick that knocks on your door. */" "...my brain had collected way too much mental garbage and needed to empty its recycling bin." "what has always worked for me has been either cardio or circuit training. Give me an hour or two of one of those, and my neurons will be defragged, my internal RAM will be freed, and I’ll be ready to take on the world again." "...fired impulses down another binary tree. Is Kimiko hot? Yes. Do I like her personality as well? Yes. Do I enjoy serious conversation if it also includes talk on death? No. Death aside, do I want to see if Kimiko is long-term material? Yes. Am I willing to suffer something I don’t like to get something I do? Yes." But the entire tale is told with a simplicity that serves even Luddites, a balance between the tech world and the one the rest of us live in, and a solid sense of humor that kept me chuckling throughout. If you like these sorts of things, you'll love this book (as I did).

  3. 4 out of 5

    Naw The Nonplussed Owl

    Thanks goes to NetGalley for providing this in exchange for a honest review DNF 63% I tried. I really tried to finish this, but it was just painful, and I don't read books to make myself feel miserable. But let's start by being fair. This is properly written. The writing style is neat and efficient, the plot cleanly structured. All in all, the author is a proper writer who knows what he's doing, and the idea of naming the chapters in binary is quite funny. Actually, Thanks goes to NetGalley for providing this in exchange for a honest review DNF 63% I tried. I really tried to finish this, but it was just painful, and I don't read books to make myself feel miserable. But let's start by being fair. This is properly written. The writing style is neat and efficient, the plot cleanly structured. All in all, the author is a proper writer who knows what he's doing, and the idea of naming the chapters in binary is quite funny. Actually, I'll even go as far as to say that I could have been interested in the plot if it wasn't so drowned and completely overshadowed in what i'm about to talk about. So there we go. It seems to me that the author is not the slacking type. I don't know if he's an expert in I.T. or if he just has done some proper researches, same for skydiving protocol and etc. It's obvious that the book was thoroughly documented on some subjects. Yes, I said on some subjects. Somehow, some other matters didn't seem to require any kind of documentation and were left to the fantasy of the author's imagination and to common misinformation. What am I talking about? Men and Women. Ah yes, that so famous matter that has been talked and written about so many times no one even tries to count anymore. But currently we are in the 21st century. Sciences and social sciences are not only truly elaborate, they're also perfectly accessible. In that matter, I don't understand why something - that presents a very serious and intelligent perspective on some subject - felt like lowering itself to common sexist and uneducated theories. Worse, how it throws them in your face like it's an absolute truth. And when I speak about sexism, I'm speaking toward both genders... On one side the women are compelled to clothing and gossiping, while on the other, the main character's Y chromosome compels him to be a retard machisto - according to himself. But actually, no. I'd like to say, in the name of all my male friends, that not all male are hypocrite who charges an egomaniac, jerkish behaviour on the fact they are male. So please, don't use the rest of mankind to excuse you're own issues, it's just ridiculous. Oh and about women? Yeah, I'm not even going to get there. Because the female characters being used to prove the main character's opinions as true by themselves justifying stuff by "we are female"... I mean, I'm just gonna go ahead and puke. Because YES. I'm fed up. I AM SO FUCKING FED UP. As a woman and a human being, I'm just tired of excusing this sort of retrograding representation of my gender. I do not belong into you're stupid legendary little cases and I - as much as should any other people no matter their gender - do whatever the fuck I want, however the fuck I want, without giving a second shit about what some people without any tangible evidences pretend is the absolute truth of the universe. Oh, and should I mention that an A.I. is always female according to this book? It doesn't even bother to explain why, but regarding the rest, I'm not sure I want to know... Probably the same reason they only give female names to cars, but let's not go down that path or I might really get angry. Also did you know that an A.I. as a female will obviously need to reproduce. Because this is what females do. I mean the thing doesn't even own an uterus, it's a fucking program, but you know, what are women for except breeding. I'm fuming. BUT, my favorite part of all? that moment where Gabe, our insufferable main character, decides to improvise himself as a pimp and promise a date with his sister to his best friend in exchange for his bestie's help (should I even mention that in the end he doesn't help in the slightest, he just comes over to Gabe's and tells him to call an electrician, that's it.). Said sister, can't stand the friend, but that's not even the point, that's just disgusting. So that's it. It's 2017, and I won't have anymore patience toward the propagation of ordinary sexism, thank you very much. A tip: next time do some proper researches on the goddamn matter you talk about so much in your book (for example, I'll recommend the work of Françoise Héritier - or any other anthropologists - on gender studies. Or the work of biologists, who can probably prove how not serious and not credible this looks by stating that a Y chromosome is the cause for general assholeness). All that I'm talking about here could be nothing but a minor annoyance. But the whole book is flooded with it, this sort of fake scientific pretenses are spoken like every two pages and honestly, it just ruins the rest of the book. I was cringing for the entirety of those 63%, wondering how can something introduced as a sci-fi book ended up as a sexist squib. Especially since this is supposed to be more of a love story rather than the slight sci-fi I expected. But this could have stopped at good ol' sexism. It could have just stopped at a patriarcal point of view. But no. It had to have the ultimate combination of the male and white stereotypical and very cliché view of life. You know, the one with that ugly and annoying superiority complex. Honestly I think this thing makes me feel worse for my white male friends who are perfectly nice, open-minded and progressive people, than for the people it actually looks at with contempt. As I mentioned earlier, this is a love story before anything else, and the love interest of douchy Gabe is a woman named Kimiko. ... ... ... Can you see it coming? No? Let me enlighten you. What does Kimiko like to do in life: taking care of her bonzai and she's a pro at Mahjong. What does Gabe compare her attitude to: Buddha, the Dalaï Lama, the whole Zen philosophy. What nickname did Gabe find for her: his samurai hottie. I'm almost surprised Jackie Chan wasn't thrown in the lot somewhere. This is just sickening and ridiculous. Anyway, in the end the only thing I feel like with this book, is offended on so many levels. So i'm just going to stop reading it and spare myself.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Neil

    I received a free copy via Netgalley in exchange for a honest review. This is a real mix of science fiction, fact and romance. The characters are really different and interact brilliantly to make the book a great read. Thoroughly enjoyed this which was totally unexpected.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Donald E Rockwell III

    An AI story you will like Good characters. Good writing, plotting that works, and a believable AI. And, there is even skydiving! No sex though, because that would be weird.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

    "There are 10 types of people in this world: those who understand binary, and those who don't. If you're wondering where chapters two through nine went, you're in the latter group." The blurb of Little Computer People really sparked my interest. AI goes rogue, technology meets thriller? Yes please! I enjoyed the storyline and it was nice to read a book with believable technical details in it. The idea of someone building an AI who turns manic is something that is plausible with the wa "There are 10 types of people in this world: those who understand binary, and those who don't. If you're wondering where chapters two through nine went, you're in the latter group." The blurb of Little Computer People really sparked my interest. AI goes rogue, technology meets thriller? Yes please! I enjoyed the storyline and it was nice to read a book with believable technical details in it. The idea of someone building an AI who turns manic is something that is plausible with the way technology is developing. It was interesting to see how Pi, the AI, turns on Gabe, especially after he compares himself to Christ at the very start of the book. Was this comparison a sign of what was to come from creating digital life? Unfortunately I don't think this book was written for me, a woman. The main character of the book, Gabe, is the creator of Pi, and as I was reading the story I wasn't imagining some buff, attractive guy he was made out to be (which was not relevant to the story at all and just made me dislike the character even more) but in my eyes he is a total neckbeard. The 'love' story had no place in this book, it didn't add to the story at all, and if anything it took away from it as I struggled to get past Gabe's friend, Jim, explaining that all women want are babies therefore they cannot be trusted. Gabes soon meets Kimiko, a beautiful Asian woman, and the first thing he does is objectify her which he continues to do throughout the book - "All I wanted to do was take back the last few exchanges in order to come up with something more smooth-something that would land me a date with this gorgeous instance of the female form". I don't know if Gabe was intentionally written to come across as a douche or if the authors own thoughts were bleeding into the story but either way I wanted Gabe to fall off the planet and have someone, anyone, else continue to narrate the story. While overall I did enjoy the story line, Gabe and his friends leave a sour taste in my mouth. Thank you to Netgalley and Tiny Fox Press for providing me with a copy of Little Computer People to review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gerardo Delgadillo

    I received an ARC ebook from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. 3.5 out of 5 stars. LITTLE COMPUTER PEOPLE has an interesting premise but, sorry to say, fails to deliver till the last quarter of the book. While I laughed at a couple of computer-related jokes, I struggled keeping my attention because the dialog seemed to go in circles, along with repeated info. Story wise, the events unfolded too slowly, and the romance didn't quite work for me. In summar I received an ARC ebook from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. 3.5 out of 5 stars. LITTLE COMPUTER PEOPLE has an interesting premise but, sorry to say, fails to deliver till the last quarter of the book. While I laughed at a couple of computer-related jokes, I struggled keeping my attention because the dialog seemed to go in circles, along with repeated info. Story wise, the events unfolded too slowly, and the romance didn't quite work for me. In summary, an okay story that could've been much greater if it focused more on the "technological thriller" aspect.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mj

    Great characters This book pulls you in right away. The characters are very relatable, and funny! Really makes you think what would our responsibilities be if we created a real sentient AI. Highly recommend this book

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I received Little Computer People through the giveaway program. I was surprised how much Gabe's story of making Pi alive was enthralling. I'm by no means a computer/data geek but have written enough code to follow Ramsey's logic. The book would be good for a conversation started for book clubs, schools and the future of AI in our economy/environment.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    Can we say geek-nerd fantasy? Yes, we can. Not a bad story, but you have to wade through a lot of objectification and racially problematic language to pick up on it. I have a fairly high tolerance for that kind of stuff (who am I to tell people what they are allowed to write/think/whatever? Nobody elected me...or you, or anyone else, I guess) but even I had to resist eye-rolls and suppress way too many oh-COME-ONs while reading this. I swear, if I had a dollar for every mention of the Can we say geek-nerd fantasy? Yes, we can. Not a bad story, but you have to wade through a lot of objectification and racially problematic language to pick up on it. I have a fairly high tolerance for that kind of stuff (who am I to tell people what they are allowed to write/think/whatever? Nobody elected me...or you, or anyone else, I guess) but even I had to resist eye-rolls and suppress way too many oh-COME-ONs while reading this. I swear, if I had a dollar for every mention of the main character's Japanese "samurai hottie" or her "almond eyes" or every mention of how unbelievably accepting of him she was in spite of his disrespectful, stereotypical geek-nerd behavior (insert Gillian Flynn's "cool girl" diatribe from Gone Girl here), I'd...have about $20 but you get the point. It got really, really old and was completely unbelievable. That said, the world needs its geek-nerd fantasies. As long authors accept that some readers will get less out of their stories when the bad behavior or C++ coding gets too thick, have at it. I received this book as a Goodreads Giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I honestly understand why lots of folks were turned off by the binary chapter numbers and C++ coding before each chapter, but I thought it was pretty cool. That's what I get for having a CS degree, I guess.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sean Randall

    Well, I had intended to enjoy this. LCP on my C64 was a joy, and the synopsis sounded good. unfortunately, that's where it ended. Credibility and even possibility were violated to very little comic effect. I can honestly say that I should have given up after the first few chapters.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Unique and entertaining storyline

  13. 5 out of 5

    Patti

    ***Received via Goodreads Giveaway*** This was funny, engaging, and even a bit timely. Enjoyed it very much.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sherrie Cronin

    I’m a geek by training and by disposition. When I read the description of Little Computer People I couldn’t resist it. Luckily for me Galen Surlak-Ramsey has written a book that is great fun, and certain to delight those with an understanding of computers. I became a fan as soon as I read “there are 10 kinds of people in this world.” Brilliant! This is a niche book, but a well done one, so I give it a 3.9/5 and recommend it to anyone who enjoys humorous speculative fiction. What I liked bes I’m a geek by training and by disposition. When I read the description of Little Computer People I couldn’t resist it. Luckily for me Galen Surlak-Ramsey has written a book that is great fun, and certain to delight those with an understanding of computers. I became a fan as soon as I read “there are 10 kinds of people in this world.” Brilliant! This is a niche book, but a well done one, so I give it a 3.9/5 and recommend it to anyone who enjoys humorous speculative fiction. What I liked best: 1. The overall tone of the book is fun, funny and self-deprecating. The narrator/main character has a shrewd self-awareness that keeps him from becoming obnoxious, even when he does outrageous things like compare himself to God. 2. His AI creation Pi has all the venom of an angry 14 year old. Her behavior is humorous, but her world view has interesting things to say about humans as well. 3. I’m not enough of an expert to pick apart the technical details, but the author’s rudimentary understanding of computers adds a nice level of authenticity. 4. I always like a book when the main character grows and opts for behaving as his best self at the end. What I liked least: 1. It is a little hard to suspend disbelief and accept that a lone guy in his living room could creating something so phenomenal from scratch in such a short time. 2. It is even harder to accept that the man most likely to buy this creation has a smart, gorgeous and unattached daughter who falls for the main character in a matter of days. 3. The end is a bit abrupt. I would had liked to have seen more loose ends tied up. On a personal note: I am a writer myself and therefore come to all reviews with biases born of my personal preferences and of my own writing style. This particular author writes in the vein of so many others who influenced me years ago, I may have been highly predisposed to enjoy his book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Love

    I can get pretty hooked to a novel that has witty characters, and I was sold on Little Computer People instantly. The geek in me loved the fact that the chapter titles were written as code, it was a nice touch. The story was easy to follow even if you aren’t a big A.I. fan. I had a hard time reading through the disdain that Gabe and Jimmy felt towards women in general, but it didn’t completely distract from the book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    An ARC was provided by Tiny Fox Press with no expectations. Plot summary: Little Computer People is about a programmer who creates the first AI and lives happily ever after. Just kidding. The technological marvel Gabe Erikson creates goes rogue after a computer worm alters the AI’s code, causing Pi (his digital daughter) to not only hate him, but actively set out to destroy him. And this AI does so not for the simple reason that it’s gone crazy (though it has) but rather An ARC was provided by Tiny Fox Press with no expectations. Plot summary: Little Computer People is about a programmer who creates the first AI and lives happily ever after. Just kidding. The technological marvel Gabe Erikson creates goes rogue after a computer worm alters the AI’s code, causing Pi (his digital daughter) to not only hate him, but actively set out to destroy him. And this AI does so not for the simple reason that it’s gone crazy (though it has) but rather, due to its warped sense of reality and a faulty conclusion that Gabe enjoys murdering her children (i.e. copies of the worm that Gabe deleted). Without spoiling the plot, this war between creator and created eventually brings in the FBI, as well as other players, who can and try to take Pi away from Gabe and ruin his life in the process. The plot moves well and has plenty of hysterical parts. There are pieces of code at the top of each section, and though I’m not a programmer, it was easy to see how they described (humorously, I might add) Gabe’s internal thoughts as to what was going on. I suspect they’re written properly, too, programming wise. I’ll admit, I didn’t quite like them at first, but they grew on me, a lot, as it added a special flavor to the main character. Gabe is presented as a genius when it comes to all things binary, but he’s certainly not without his flaws. He’s controlling and obsessive at times, and sometimes pure lust drives his thoughts, but that said, there’s a growth that occurs as the story progresses and by the end, he’s less concerned with the outward than he is with the inward (trying not to spoil the plot). Is he perfect by the end? No. If he had been, I think it would have been a little too unbelievable. But he’s changed for the better, which is all I think anyone can ask. Throughout the story, Gabe is supported by and challenged mostly by three others: his sister Courtney, who is almost finished with her dissertation in psychology (and loves to butt heads with him), his paranoid best friend, Jim, and Gabe’s newest girlfriend, Kimiko—an Asian “samurai hottie” who Gabe meets and is smitten by early in the story. Kimiko is a strong female who has a “Buddha-like attitude” when dealing with a crisis, isn’t afraid to challenge anyone on issues she believes in, and is very playful as well. If anything, she might be too perfect, but I wonder if that’s just because Gabe has such rosy eyes for her that his narration doesn’t include her faults as at least once she manipulates him into something he doesn’t want to do. And despite her saying it wasn’t manipulation because she was upfront about it, it still was. Minor issues aside, the story was incredibly witty and engaging, and from about the 2/3rds mark on, there were enough twists I wasn’t sure what was going to happen to Gabe, Pi, or anyone else by the time a great end rolled around. Would definitely recommend. Reply Reply to All Forward More

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jenni Merritt

    * I recieved this book from Netgalley in exchange for a fair and honest review * Little Computer People is a perfect read for any technology loving fiend out there. Filled with nonstop references to coding, video gaming, movies and pure geekery, it will grab your attention and keep it until the last page. That is, if you like that kind of thing. If you don't understand the geek culture, this book will not be the one for you. Overall, the premis was great. Ma * I recieved this book from Netgalley in exchange for a fair and honest review * Little Computer People is a perfect read for any technology loving fiend out there. Filled with nonstop references to coding, video gaming, movies and pure geekery, it will grab your attention and keep it until the last page. That is, if you like that kind of thing. If you don't understand the geek culture, this book will not be the one for you. Overall, the premis was great. Man creates AI. Man thinks he is God. Man meets Woman. Woman makes him feel like a man. Man wonders if selling his AI is merely selling product, or selling his child. Man acts. While I did think it would be much more of a tech-thriller, I was not disappointed with LCP. It doesn't so much on "Hal taking over the spaceship" as it focuses on the conscience desicions we make every day, and why we make them. The writing from a man's POV was extremely believable and the witty way each chapter started had me pulled in more with each page turn. So why not 5 stars? I do feel like the romance between Gabe and his lady could have been a little more. Or the AI could have been a little more (I LOVED Pi, and just didn't get to see her enough!) There were a few times I did have to push through the writing, solely for the fact that while I am a geek, geek talk does get heavy. Really: I felt like something, something out there, could have been that little bit more. Also, I am just a really hard sell. But the writing was amazing. Entertaining for sure. The plot was believable. I cared about what happened next. And I smiled every time I read. I have already forced this book onto my hubby (who is a geek extroidinaire) and plan to recommend it to many, many other of my bibliophile geeky friends.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rachael Farnsworth

    Netgalley provided this ARC in exchange for an honest review. Good writing and a reasonable plot is completely let down by casual racism and misogyny. I find it hard to believe anyone in this day and age seriously thinks it's ok to consistently refer to a woman of Japanese descent as a "little Samurai hottie". This book managed to shoehorn in just about every stereotype of programmers, which I suppose is impressive in its own way, but I finished this book out of stubbornness rather than any appr Netgalley provided this ARC in exchange for an honest review. Good writing and a reasonable plot is completely let down by casual racism and misogyny. I find it hard to believe anyone in this day and age seriously thinks it's ok to consistently refer to a woman of Japanese descent as a "little Samurai hottie". This book managed to shoehorn in just about every stereotype of programmers, which I suppose is impressive in its own way, but I finished this book out of stubbornness rather than any appreciation of the characters.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    I won a copy of this ebook from a goodreads’ First Reads giveaway. This novel tells the tale of a guy (Gabe) who programs an AI named Pi. He is very fond of Pi and thinks of her as a child. Before too long, Pi starts to rebel against Gabe, as most offspring are apt to do. Things quickly spiral out of control... Gabe grapples with his control freak nature and his god complex as those around him tell him to just "kill" Pi to stop all of his issues. The book raises interesting questions around the I won a copy of this ebook from a goodreads’ First Reads giveaway. This novel tells the tale of a guy (Gabe) who programs an AI named Pi. He is very fond of Pi and thinks of her as a child. Before too long, Pi starts to rebel against Gabe, as most offspring are apt to do. Things quickly spiral out of control... Gabe grapples with his control freak nature and his god complex as those around him tell him to just "kill" Pi to stop all of his issues. The book raises interesting questions around the ethics of AI. Being a reformed computer geek, I found the story entertaining and the fact that the chapters were numbered in binary to be a cheeky geeky touch. A good entertaining hi-tech tale!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Foreman

    When the book starts, Gabe Erikson has just created AI who he calls Pi. Though Pi is mostly harmless at first, she's inadvertantly warped and basically becomes GLaDOS, only without a testlab to torture people in. But she does torture Gabe by mucking up his life in her quest to kill him. And while this sounds heavy and serious, the story is really funny and fast paced. Supporting characters are diverse, ranging from Gabe's shrink sister (who loves to diagnose him), to his paranoid best friend (wh When the book starts, Gabe Erikson has just created AI who he calls Pi. Though Pi is mostly harmless at first, she's inadvertantly warped and basically becomes GLaDOS, only without a testlab to torture people in. But she does torture Gabe by mucking up his life in her quest to kill him. And while this sounds heavy and serious, the story is really funny and fast paced. Supporting characters are diverse, ranging from Gabe's shrink sister (who loves to diagnose him), to his paranoid best friend (who's convinced Gabe's ex is CIA), to his new love interest (daughter of the CEO he's trying to get to invest in his project). I did feel a few scenes could have been wrapped up sooner and went on more than they should, and would have liked more Pi, but I don't think I could dock more than half a star for those minor things. So I'll summarize like this: Stumbled on this little gem while scouring the new Kindle releases and started and eagerly finished the book the same day. 4.5 stars.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ally Swanson

    ---3.5 Stars--- I loved the storyline and was very intrigued by the concept! It sounded like a summer blockbuster movie that was bound to sell out! I really enjoyed the witty banter between Pi and Gabe. At many times, I almost forgot I wasn’t listening to an actual real-life father and daughter bickering at each other lol. I really liked that the chapter numbers were written in binary and that the chapter titles were written as though code. It just gave it that e ---3.5 Stars--- I loved the storyline and was very intrigued by the concept! It sounded like a summer blockbuster movie that was bound to sell out! I really enjoyed the witty banter between Pi and Gabe. At many times, I almost forgot I wasn’t listening to an actual real-life father and daughter bickering at each other lol. I really liked that the chapter numbers were written in binary and that the chapter titles were written as though code. It just gave it that extra something to show this was a true I.T./computer-world book. I appreciated the author taking the time to consider even those smaller details. It’s clear that the author is well versed in Internet Technologies and Artificial Intelligence and brings it down to a level that can easily be understood and enjoyed by all readers. Unfortunately, I did have one big problem with this book. I hated the disgusting disdain and objectivation of women by both Gabe and his friend, Jimmy that is featured throughout this book. Not to mention all the racial slurs. It added no value to the story! In fact, it almost stopped me from finishing this book. I was shocked to see a book that is supposed to be about A.I. have this kind of focus and attitude toward women and races. These passages seemed unfitting, out of place, and did not add any positive aspect to the actual story. I am not sure if the author put this in targeting more of a male audience or that’s how he saw the characters, or what, but it really detracted from the storyline and left a sour taste in this readers mouth. Also, the romance plot seemed unnecessary. The author had a good story focusing on Pi turning on Gabe but seemed to have got distracted with these sub-plots, which sadly took away from the main story! I think this story had so much promise and with a bit more action, suspense, and finesse – this could have been gold! This book has a lot to offer readers such as Internet Technologies, Artificial Intelligence, fantasy, adventure, suspense, action, adrenaline, humor, love, romance, friendship, and so much more! Even if you’re not an I.T. or A.I. buff this book is still easy to follow and understand. All in all, I enjoyed reading this book and would recommend this book to all I.T., A.I., fantasy, and action readers! **Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of this book and have voluntarily provided an honest, and unbiased review in accordance with FTC regulations.**

  22. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    The part of the book that does not involve the cardboard construct of the completely unnecessary "samurai hottie" Komiko is pretty good. Unfortunately her part is so mind-numbingly terrible it's basically impossible to get past (for me anyway). Why was she even a character? There was absolutely no point to her existence except to be a beautiful skydiver - her connection to other players was never explored, her dialogue was stilted, and her interactions with /everyone/ (Gabe included) only served The part of the book that does not involve the cardboard construct of the completely unnecessary "samurai hottie" Komiko is pretty good. Unfortunately her part is so mind-numbingly terrible it's basically impossible to get past (for me anyway). Why was she even a character? There was absolutely no point to her existence except to be a beautiful skydiver - her connection to other players was never explored, her dialogue was stilted, and her interactions with /everyone/ (Gabe included) only served to slow the plot. With a good editor this could've been a fine book, there's something endearing about the writing and I think the author has a genuinely good voice when it's not stifled under a non-essential love interest. The side characters who weren't Komiko were interesting. Honestly I enjoyed the religious tangents - should've played that up and stifled the potential girlfriend - now /that/ might have made for a really good read. Got this one in a GR giveaway.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Macaire

    They say the road to Hell is paved with good intentions - and the hero of this story, Gabe, only wants to do something good. But unleashing a highly intelligent program that has somehow gained sentience, but not emotion or judgement is, well - questionable. Gabe is a geek. He's likeable, absent-minded and single-minded, and dreams of creating a perfect program. His program is not perfect - it's scary. But Gabe is convinced that his creation (his daughter) Pi, is perfect, even though she hates hi They say the road to Hell is paved with good intentions - and the hero of this story, Gabe, only wants to do something good. But unleashing a highly intelligent program that has somehow gained sentience, but not emotion or judgement is, well - questionable. Gabe is a geek. He's likeable, absent-minded and single-minded, and dreams of creating a perfect program. His program is not perfect - it's scary. But Gabe is convinced that his creation (his daughter) Pi, is perfect, even though she hates him (sounds like a real life father-daughter relationship, doesn't it?). So when the FBI discover her, he hides her, and all Hell breaks lose. It's very funny, very geeky, and a little scary, because face it - it's all too plausible.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I won the Kindle version of this book. The concept was really interesting to me but I felt there was WAY too much focus on a romance that didn’t make any sense and a very unbelievable main character. He’s super hot and fit and runs six miles a day but then he just sits in his house and drinks Mountain Dew?? And he immediately fixates on a cute Asian girl and starts calling her his little samurai? I mean, the character and all the stereotypes in the book kind of put me off. I really wanted there I won the Kindle version of this book. The concept was really interesting to me but I felt there was WAY too much focus on a romance that didn’t make any sense and a very unbelievable main character. He’s super hot and fit and runs six miles a day but then he just sits in his house and drinks Mountain Dew?? And he immediately fixates on a cute Asian girl and starts calling her his little samurai? I mean, the character and all the stereotypes in the book kind of put me off. I really wanted there to be more about Pi instead of these brief, superficial interactions. Just kind of disappointing.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hikes in Rain

    True artificial intelligence; what a great concept. I've loved the idea forever. Hal 9000, Mike (Microft Holmes), so many others. This one is right up there with them. Add a little Frankenstein to the mix, and what do you get? A great programmer with a divinity complex creates a living program...who hates him, and sets out to destroy him. I lost track of the number of times I face-palmed in dispair while laughing myself silly.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alan Clements

    Fantastically geeky Gabe is a programmer who has made himself miserable by cheating on his girlfriend, we’ll sort of. His artificial intelligence, the greatest work of his life causes him no end of problems. Still a fantastic story.

  27. 4 out of 5

    William Howe

    Lol I truly enjoyed this. The bit with psychology was especially interesting. Now I want to know if there is research or a dissertation on the subject of gaming and heroic actions. I would buy a sequel. Best recommendation I can give.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nancy (The Avid Reader)

    Gabe Erikson likes to think of himself as a God to be a creator and has created the world’s first AI, a computer program representing a girl he calls Pi and he thinks of her as his daughter. But like all children Pi misbehaves and rebels. She starts to think of Gabe as a bad program and wants to get rid of him so she starts search the internet for him and ways of getting rid of him. During her search she has contracted a worm, malware which Gabe deletes. When Pi discovers what he has done she ge Gabe Erikson likes to think of himself as a God to be a creator and has created the world’s first AI, a computer program representing a girl he calls Pi and he thinks of her as his daughter. But like all children Pi misbehaves and rebels. She starts to think of Gabe as a bad program and wants to get rid of him so she starts search the internet for him and ways of getting rid of him. During her search she has contracted a worm, malware which Gabe deletes. When Pi discovers what he has done she gets very upset with Gabe telling him that he deleted the love of her life and that he was going to pay. Gabe is losing control of Pi very quickly he decides that the best thing to do may be to sell Pi but in his heart he knows that is the wrong thing to do not matter how much she acts up. It doesn’t take Gabe long to realize his mistake in selling Pi and tries to come up with a plan to get her back. Gabe enlists the help of his best friend Jim by promising him a date with his sister Courtney to help him rescue his daughter Pi and bring her home without going to jail that is. Little Computer People opens up your eyes to a whole new world of computer programs. On one hand it would be so cool to have a computer program that could think, learn and feel for its self. But on the other hand it could be very dangerous with all the things that it could do and would have access to. That would be one very smart computer. I know that a computer only knows what a human puts into it but if you think about it that is the intelligent of many as one and that sounds very dangerous. I loved the world building in Little Computer People. I loved the characters like Pi, Gabe, Jim, Courtney and Kimiko. Little Computer People is a great little read filled with lots of twist and turns that will keep you hanging on until the end. I love computers so when I read the summary for Little Computer People I just had to read and I am so glad I did. If you are into computers and even if you are not then I still think you should give Little Computer People a try, why? Well because it is a great little story that will keep you entertained from beginning to end.

  29. 5 out of 5

    M.T. DeSantis

    I received this book for an honest review. All opinions expressed are my own. Read an excerpt and follow the Goddess Fish book tour here. This was a great story about AI and what it possibly means for our future. It was also a fantastic look into the “God thought process.” One of my favorite ideas introduced here was why God might not talk to his creation. Gabe tries and tries to make Pi understand the world outside her computer, but he just can’t. The conceptual barrier is too great. Th I received this book for an honest review. All opinions expressed are my own. Read an excerpt and follow the Goddess Fish book tour here. This was a great story about AI and what it possibly means for our future. It was also a fantastic look into the “God thought process.” One of my favorite ideas introduced here was why God might not talk to his creation. Gabe tries and tries to make Pi understand the world outside her computer, but he just can’t. The conceptual barrier is too great. This is an idea I hadn’t considered before, and it just fascinates me. I know there’s a lot out there I don’t understand, but this book really made me realize how much. I quite enjoyed this. The characters were believable and realistic. The story conquered big-picture topics (like AI) without turning into a “fate of the world” tale. I liked that this was about the little people (no pun intended) and the impact of AI on their lives. It brought technological advancement into a “what does it mean for me” mindset, rather than a “how will technological advancement save/end the world” frame. Intriguing. The author’s writing is easy and flows beautifully. There’s humor mixed in with the seriousness effortlessly. I appreciated the 10 types of people referenced in the first chapter, and the nod to True Lies was awesome. The ending was fulfilling and tied everything up nicely. I would readily read more from this author.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Burt

    What a fun book. Initially I was a bit put off because the protagonist Gabe has a total god complex but this didn’t seem to last long as he is humbled by Pi doing what all teenage daughters do and rebelling. I thought it was interesting that she although appeared sentient, she couldn’t relate to anything other than the binary world, she assumed that Gabe was just a program and couldn’t understand the concept of something that was not within her frame of reference. This is a fairly complex idea.< What a fun book. Initially I was a bit put off because the protagonist Gabe has a total god complex but this didn’t seem to last long as he is humbled by Pi doing what all teenage daughters do and rebelling. I thought it was interesting that she although appeared sentient, she couldn’t relate to anything other than the binary world, she assumed that Gabe was just a program and couldn’t understand the concept of something that was not within her frame of reference. This is a fairly complex idea. This is a quick and easy read and if you are in any tiny way a computer geek you will enjoy this book, there are jokes about binary that you have probably heard before but they made me smile nonetheless. For the full review check out my blog: Engrossed in a Good Book

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