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The Right Kind of Crazy: Navy SEAL, Covert Operative, and Boy Scout from Hell

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Clint Emerson, Navy SEAL and author of the bestselling 100 Deadly Skills presents an explosive, darkly funny, and often twisted account of being part of an elite clandestine team of covert operatives whose mission was to keep America safe by whatever means necessary. Just be happy he’s on our side. Retired Navy SEAL Clint Emerson is the only SEAL ever inducted into the Clint Emerson, Navy SEAL and author of the bestselling 100 Deadly Skills presents an explosive, darkly funny, and often twisted account of being part of an elite clandestine team of covert operatives whose mission was to keep America safe by whatever means necessary. Just be happy he’s on our side. Retired Navy SEAL Clint Emerson is the only SEAL ever inducted into the International Spy Museum. Operating from the shadows, with an instinct for running towards trouble, his unique skill set made him the perfect hybrid of elite and modern day counterintelligence agent. Emerson spent his career on the bleeding edge of intelligence and operations, often specializing in solo missions that took advantage of subterfuge, improvisation, the best in recon and surveillance tech, and even elements of Hollywood disguise to combat the changing global battlefield. MacGyvering everyday objects into working spyware was routine, and fellow SEALs referred to his top-secret activities simply as “special shit.” His parameters were: find, fix, and finish—and of course, leave no trace. While Emerson was a real life Jason Bourne as well as a decorated soldier, he operated by only two codes: “if you aren’t cheating, you aren’t trying” and “it’s only illegal if you get caught.” The Right Kind of Crazy is unlike any military memoir you’ve ever read because Emerson is upfront about the fact that what makes you a great soldier and sometimes hero doesn’t always make you the best guy—but it does make for damn good stories.


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Clint Emerson, Navy SEAL and author of the bestselling 100 Deadly Skills presents an explosive, darkly funny, and often twisted account of being part of an elite clandestine team of covert operatives whose mission was to keep America safe by whatever means necessary. Just be happy he’s on our side. Retired Navy SEAL Clint Emerson is the only SEAL ever inducted into the Clint Emerson, Navy SEAL and author of the bestselling 100 Deadly Skills presents an explosive, darkly funny, and often twisted account of being part of an elite clandestine team of covert operatives whose mission was to keep America safe by whatever means necessary. Just be happy he’s on our side. Retired Navy SEAL Clint Emerson is the only SEAL ever inducted into the International Spy Museum. Operating from the shadows, with an instinct for running towards trouble, his unique skill set made him the perfect hybrid of elite and modern day counterintelligence agent. Emerson spent his career on the bleeding edge of intelligence and operations, often specializing in solo missions that took advantage of subterfuge, improvisation, the best in recon and surveillance tech, and even elements of Hollywood disguise to combat the changing global battlefield. MacGyvering everyday objects into working spyware was routine, and fellow SEALs referred to his top-secret activities simply as “special shit.” His parameters were: find, fix, and finish—and of course, leave no trace. While Emerson was a real life Jason Bourne as well as a decorated soldier, he operated by only two codes: “if you aren’t cheating, you aren’t trying” and “it’s only illegal if you get caught.” The Right Kind of Crazy is unlike any military memoir you’ve ever read because Emerson is upfront about the fact that what makes you a great soldier and sometimes hero doesn’t always make you the best guy—but it does make for damn good stories.

30 review for The Right Kind of Crazy: Navy SEAL, Covert Operative, and Boy Scout from Hell

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lorilin

    Oh guys, I hate when I don’t like a book as much as everyone else does—especially when it’s written by a hardcore, badass Navy SEAL. I really thought I was going to love The Right Kind of Crazy. Author Clint Emerson also wrote the wildly popular and highly entertaining 100 Deadly Skills: The SEAL Operative's Guide to Eluding Pursuers, Evading Capture, and Surviving Any Dangerous Situation. It’s amazing, and if you haven’t read it, I encourage you to go out and find it immediately! The Right Kind Oh guys, I hate when I don’t like a book as much as everyone else does—especially when it’s written by a hardcore, badass Navy SEAL. I really thought I was going to love The Right Kind of Crazy. Author Clint Emerson also wrote the wildly popular and highly entertaining 100 Deadly Skills: The SEAL Operative's Guide to Eluding Pursuers, Evading Capture, and Surviving Any Dangerous Situation. It’s amazing, and if you haven’t read it, I encourage you to go out and find it immediately! The Right Kind of Crazy isn’t a manual. It’s a memoir of various battles, operations, and sometimes just pivotal life moments that Emerson has experienced over the years—from the 80s to just a few years ago. Every story in this book is wild. The operations are crazy and scary and impressive. But even the chapters on his family are just as powerful—and give a much better understanding of why Emerson is the way he is. (I had no idea that most SEALs come from broken homes, but I guess that makes sense). So why the low rating? Because the book is simply not written well. It’s chaotic and rambling. Even though it’s technically divided into two neat parts, with each part containing chapters covering one specific time period, it still feels all over the place. There’s a lot of jumping back and forth, almost like stream of consciousness memory vomit. There’s so much going on, I never really knew where to look or focus. It needed major editing and some reorganization. (On that note, it would have also helped if Emerson had just deleted the blacked out redacted portions of the mission descriptions. I get that he’s trying to make a point about the government hiding so many details of his stories, but it got old. And, again, it distracted from the substance of what he was saying.) I’m impressed with and in awe of everything Emerson has done in his life. Seriously, I’m a peace-loving mother, writer, and gardener with pacifist Mennonite roots, and I am fully aware that the only reason people like me can exist is because of people like him. I loved the substance of his stories, but I just wish they had been presented in a clearer and more simple way. Thank you to Touchstone and Net Galley for the ARC!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    After purchasing and reading Clint Emerson's '100 Deadly Skills' books I decided to read this story of his time as a Navy SEAL and covert operative. I have to say that I was not surprised at much of what I read, but some parts of the stories changed my perceptions of special forces soldiers a little. As elite members of the military with the best training on the planet, they still have flaws and human weaknesses. Mr. Emerson brought more than a few of those issues into the light of day in this After purchasing and reading Clint Emerson's '100 Deadly Skills' books I decided to read this story of his time as a Navy SEAL and covert operative. I have to say that I was not surprised at much of what I read, but some parts of the stories changed my perceptions of special forces soldiers a little. As elite members of the military with the best training on the planet, they still have flaws and human weaknesses. Mr. Emerson brought more than a few of those issues into the light of day in this book, which seemed a lot different than other books written by SEALs that I've read. I only gave it 4 stars due to the copious amount of redaction throughout the book - if information was truly redacted, why not re-write those parts? Seeing row upon row of blacked out text was amusing, and made me think it may have been his way of expressing frustration over the government's redaction process. Or maybe it's just a stunt to add some spice to the story? Overall I recommend this book to anyone looking to get inside the head of a 20-year veteran of special forces. Clint Emerson's rough humor and language isn't for everyone, but I found his approach to writing refreshingly real. Give it a go.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Madm007

    I liked it, I did! I had to read in parts, only because I had to process it. Sometimes, look stuff up, just to double check lol, should've known better. My bubble has been burst, SEALs are human, working isn't at all glamorous, and it really does take a special skill/mindset to make/be a SEAL, I am impressed. There's not much room for emotions, it seems, life and death, split seconds, eternal waiting, switches on and off, human machines and all. This is gritty, to the point, as much as can be I liked it, I did! I had to read in parts, only because I had to process it. Sometimes, look stuff up, just to double check lol, should've known better. My bubble has been burst, SEALs are human, working isn't at all glamorous, and it really does take a special skill/mindset to make/be a SEAL, I am impressed. There's not much room for emotions, it seems, life and death, split seconds, eternal waiting, switches on and off, human machines and all. This is gritty, to the point, as much as can be with redactions, and there is even a bit of emotion, tho that's dangerous and unacceptable too, my take only, along with a bit of comedic relief, always appreciated and needed. Relating incidents from when he was a kid to now. Kudos and thank you to our elite and all military. A very good read, thought provoking and bringing to mind more questions that probably cannot and shouldn't be answered.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gustavo Herrera

    The Right Kind of Crazy 5/5 For someone with progressive views of social justice and diversity, I can be surprisingly primitive in a lot of ways: I love fighting (martial arts), I love grueling physical training, and I am not above physically incapacitating (and hurting) another guy if I witness him abusing or bullying a weaker or defenseless person. I know that last part can be dangerous, and even illegal, but as far as character flaws go, I think a lack of self-control against violent bullies The Right Kind of Crazy 5/5 For someone with progressive views of social justice and diversity, I can be surprisingly primitive in a lot of ways: I love fighting (martial arts), I love grueling physical training, and I am not above physically incapacitating (and hurting) another guy if I witness him abusing or bullying a weaker or defenseless person. I know that last part can be dangerous, and even illegal, but as far as character flaws go, I think a lack of self-control against violent bullies is certainly one of the least worse. If I have the opportunity to act to defend someone else (and yes, inflict pain in the attacker is a plus), I have to do it. I honestly believe in that famous JFK quote, from a 1961 speech, which says: "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing". As a former victim of bullying and physical aggressions, I refuse to be the guy who turns a blind eye towards abuse and violence. This book was very meaningful to me for that reason. He uses his personal story from a rebellious teen to a navy seal special operator, as a perfect example of how you can embrace your flaws, be honest about them, and still strive to become the better version you can be of yourself, especially when deep down you have a principle-based belief system of what is right and what is wrong. Sure, those kinds of binary beliefs have been used by religious and political zealots to defend their bigoted views, by saying that [insert sexual orientation, religion, political party] is wrong because it just is. This is exactly why Emerson's book is so compelling, he avoids completely political or religious ideologies in order to avoid the mental gymnastics or complete suspension of reason that those require, he just sticks to a simple idea of defending the victims and being able to act when needed. He now has a business based on helping people prepare for that, ingeniously using his story to state his company's mission, which also represents exactly how I think visionary companies should be built: As Jim Collins or Simon Sinek would put it, by producing a real added value based on real core convictions that justify and inspire its existence.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brian West

    Excellent read Fantastic! If you love 100 Deadly Skills (either edition) or his predecessor book Escape the Wolf, you'll have undoubtedly wondered about the SEAL behind the pages, his bio, his actual name, etc. And you mind find yourself stalking him on Instagram for entertaining content. This is Clint's story. Although several sets of genitals were harmed along the way, and you'll find the liberal use of the F bomb as a verb, adjective, and noun, it's a super great read. It might not make the Excellent read Fantastic! If you love 100 Deadly Skills (either edition) or his predecessor book Escape the Wolf, you'll have undoubtedly wondered about the SEAL behind the pages, his bio, his actual name, etc. And you mind find yourself stalking him on Instagram for entertaining content. This is Clint's story. Although several sets of genitals were harmed along the way, and you'll find the liberal use of the F bomb as a verb, adjective, and noun, it's a super great read. It might not make the Accelerated Reader list at your child's school, but The Right Kind of Crazy will give you a healthy dose of life led by someone with motivation and persistence. I thoroughly enjoyed it and was a bit sad to come to the end. It left me wondering why I too hadn't been an operator instead opting for such ridiculous notions as graduate school! I can't seem to scroll back up and proof read what I've tapped out on my smartphone so BLUF: buy the book and read it cover to cover. Then go make a sugar cookie.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Darren Sapp

    Having read both 100 Deadly Skills books and watched many of Emerson’s videos, I was excited to read this one. His memoir reads just as he talks with no filter for a realistic dive into Navy SEAL life and stands apart from others. As a Navy vet that went to Great Lakes for boot camp about the same time, this one hit home for me. I write about that in my novel, Fire on the Flight Deck (shameless plug), but only mention that if you want another Navy story after reading Emerson. More importantly, I Having read both 100 Deadly Skills books and watched many of Emerson’s videos, I was excited to read this one. His memoir reads just as he talks with no filter for a realistic dive into Navy SEAL life and stands apart from others. As a Navy vet that went to Great Lakes for boot camp about the same time, this one hit home for me. I write about that in my novel, Fire on the Flight Deck (shameless plug), but only mention that if you want another Navy story after reading Emerson. More importantly, I hope you’ll take his message to heart about equipping yourself with the resources Escape the Wolf makes available. Not only am I’m more confident in protecting myself, my family, and my coworkers, I’ve taught these skills along with other skills I’ve acquired to friends and family. I attend a large church in the Dallas area and want our teams going overseas for missions to prepare themselves but also find Emerson’s work helpful for both staff and residents in senior communities. Do yourself a favor. Enjoy the ride of this book and then pick up the first 100 Deadly Skills book. Be a sheepdog.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Audible: First, Clint Emerson is a badass. He has a TRUE determination that fuels his own ego, and benefits others at the same time. Few people are capable of balancing the two. Clint is obviously not a literary guru, so the writing isn’t exactly life changing. But his experiences ARE fascinating, and Navy Seals hold the most interesting stories, although not all good. In my opinion Clint could hold some Sociopathic ideations, but for any successful Navy Seal this is necessary. I’m not sure I Audible: First, Clint Emerson is a badass. He has a TRUE determination that fuels his own ego, and benefits others at the same time. Few people are capable of balancing the two. Clint is obviously not a literary guru, so the writing isn’t exactly life changing. But his experiences ARE fascinating, and Navy Seals hold the most interesting stories, although not all good. In my opinion Clint could hold some Sociopathic ideations, but for any successful Navy Seal this is necessary. I’m not sure I could handle his ego in person for long periods of time, but I most definitely respect him. I hope he continues to encourage future military personnel his survival techniques and determination. There are few people that can walk off battlegrounds, turn their experiences into an optimistic situation, and move on with life. And Clint, you BADASS you... (I mean that!). Don’t narrate your own stories anymore! 😜

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rusty

    I received a free eARC of this novel in exchange for an unbiased review. Fairly run-of-the-mill SpecOps bio. Emerson was in a Navy Seal for 21 years including tours in Iraq and Afghanistan until he moved into a more clandestine field of operations. The book tracks his time through these journeys and his growth as a warrior. There was a bit too much sodomy and masturbation humor in it for my personal tastes, but I wasn't in the service and don't really have any way to comment on the particulars of I received a free eARC of this novel in exchange for an unbiased review. Fairly run-of-the-mill SpecOps bio. Emerson was in a Navy Seal for 21 years including tours in Iraq and Afghanistan until he moved into a more clandestine field of operations. The book tracks his time through these journeys and his growth as a warrior. There was a bit too much sodomy and masturbation humor in it for my personal tastes, but I wasn't in the service and don't really have any way to comment on the particulars of his experiences. I did find the redacted portions silly instead of ironic. I know he has issues with DoD redacting material he knows is unclassified, but just skip the black lines and go back and retell it in a way that skips the redactions. If you are in to military bios, especially SpecOps, you will enjoy it. If you aren't, then there are better ones out there for you to spend your time with.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    I finished this book, and found parts of it interesting. The best chapters are when he "detailed" a particular operation, as it read more like a story. However, those chapters were the exception to the rule. I enjoyed the writer's voice and his no-nonsense (non-PC) opinion about the military and his roles. I did not enjoy the repeated mention of incidences involving certain parts of the male anatomy - if you're a guy, that might have either not bothered you or made you laugh, idk. More detail I finished this book, and found parts of it interesting. The best chapters are when he "detailed" a particular operation, as it read more like a story. However, those chapters were the exception to the rule. I enjoyed the writer's voice and his no-nonsense (non-PC) opinion about the military and his roles. I did not enjoy the repeated mention of incidences involving certain parts of the male anatomy - if you're a guy, that might have either not bothered you or made you laugh, idk. More detail than I needed, though. If I had to compare this book to The Last Rescue by Howard Wasdin, I'd say Wasdin's book comes out on top.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Randal White

    Excellent book by retired Navy Seal Clint Emerson. Not your average, macho, "I'm tougher than you" tale. Emerson comes across as an introspective, intelligent man who probably would have succeeded in any endeavor he attempted. Thankfully, he decided to put his talents to work to serve our country. This is an easy, fast read. Emerson keeps the story moving at a fast pace, not bogging it down with lots of unnecessary acronyms or minute detail. The book is worth reading if just for his insights Excellent book by retired Navy Seal Clint Emerson. Not your average, macho, "I'm tougher than you" tale. Emerson comes across as an introspective, intelligent man who probably would have succeeded in any endeavor he attempted. Thankfully, he decided to put his talents to work to serve our country. This is an easy, fast read. Emerson keeps the story moving at a fast pace, not bogging it down with lots of unnecessary acronyms or minute detail. The book is worth reading if just for his insights into Saudi Arabia (I won't spoil it for you). We are lucky to have men like Emerson, to watch over us and protect us from harm. I wish I could meet him to thank him personally!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I went into this book not expecting anything spectacular, but it fell flat. Not good, not bad just meh. I understand that there are parts that needed to be censored due to confidentiality and preventing ops from being blown, but the amount of blacked out stuff wasn’t needed. Just edit your book and put a disclaimer at the beginning. Overall this could be a good story for kids who have gone astray and how the military can make good use of their personalities and strengths; as well as how I went into this book not expecting anything spectacular, but it fell flat. Not good, not bad just meh. I understand that there are parts that needed to be censored due to confidentiality and preventing ops from being blown, but the amount of blacked out stuff wasn’t needed. Just edit your book and put a disclaimer at the beginning. Overall this could be a good story for kids who have gone astray and how the military can make good use of their personalities and strengths; as well as how perseverance can go a long way in achieving your goals. It was an easy read, but I often found my attention drifting away from the story.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Malmquist

    The hard core life of a navy seal turned covert operative. "The only Seal ever inducted into the International Spy Museum. Stories about how he became a Navy Seal running towards trouble while everyone else runs away from it. To how he then put together a new method of doing things and created a mission training program that took advantage of new technology, subterfuge and improvisation to help fight the war on terrorism. He was the guy that you wanted when something needed to be found, fixed The hard core life of a navy seal turned covert operative. "The only Seal ever inducted into the International Spy Museum. Stories about how he became a Navy Seal running towards trouble while everyone else runs away from it. To how he then put together a new method of doing things and created a mission training program that took advantage of new technology, subterfuge and improvisation to help fight the war on terrorism. He was the guy that you wanted when something needed to be found, fixed and finished. Leaving without a trace. The nitty gritty, rough around the edges, life of soldiers in the toughest fighting areas of the world.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kirk L

    Finally a memoir written by a True Badass This book is a page-turner. The authors entire life, from growing up in the Middle East as a hooligan, to his SEAL training, his overseas adventures as a tier one operator, to his post-military career. It’s all laid out in great detail and it is so interesting and entertaining. The author is a serious operator but also extremely funny. This author was involved in some serious shit, some top secret operations while overseas, as evidenced by the amount Finally a memoir written by a True Badass This book is a page-turner. The authors entire life, from growing up in the Middle East as a hooligan, to his SEAL training, his overseas adventures as a tier one operator, to his post-military career. It’s all laid out in great detail and it is so interesting and entertaining. The author is a serious operator but also extremely funny. This author was involved in some serious shit, some top secret operations while overseas, as evidenced by the amount redacted material that the DOD found too risky to reveal.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marc Pongpamorn

    Excellent read! Really good book about the life of a Navy Seal starting from his childhood to his latest ventures post military career. He shares his personal injuries to bring awareness. Contrary to some reviewers, I thought it was chock full of information and very honest. If you buy books make this one yours because you would be supporting a US veteran. If you cant find this book in your local library be sure to request one.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Heather Bennett

    The Right Kind of Crazy has way to much sodomy jokes in it. I appreciate all of his military service, I come from a military and law enforcement family. This book needs some editing,just because you were in the military does not mean you make a great author. He does have some interesting information in this book, it is just scattered.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Peter Banachowski

    This book did not shed a good like on military personnel. He openly admits to torturing and murdering cats, stealing from friends and family, and the importance of hazing, in the fashion of having your face duct-taped to another man's privates for hours, as an important part of the military.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    I served but I was trained as a REMF to support the war fighters. I enjoy these autobiographies from our pointy end. If nothing else, these guys are working out their PTSD in a healthy form. I think we should support their efforts. Good job Clint.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Zach

    Can’t wait to read this book! Read both of the 100 deadly skills, love the wordplay and the mindset of the author, it’s like he was talking to me. Loved it! I

  19. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Enjoyable! I also like to read things out of my typical! And he has obviously led a very interesting life!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stephan

    Typical "heres what I did, and let me tell you some funny stories" Navy SEAL book. Still super funny, and interesting read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Doris Raines

    NICE BOOK.

  22. 4 out of 5

    PWRL

    E

  23. 4 out of 5

    john koch

  24. 4 out of 5

    Simbre

  25. 4 out of 5

    Charlie Burroughs

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dachokie

  27. 5 out of 5

    Noelle

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Cross

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

  30. 4 out of 5

    James Bright

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