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Where Oblivion Lives

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"Frohock has intricately woven a unique reinterpretation of history. Eloquent prose accompanies a lyrical theme amid prewar tensions, enriching this imaginative historical fantasy." --Publishers Weekly, starred review A lyrical historical fantasy adventure, set in 1932 Spain and Germany, that brings to life the world of the novellas collected in Los Nefilim: Spanish Nephili "Frohock has intricately woven a unique reinterpretation of history. Eloquent prose accompanies a lyrical theme amid prewar tensions, enriching this imaginative historical fantasy." --Publishers Weekly, starred review A lyrical historical fantasy adventure, set in 1932 Spain and Germany, that brings to life the world of the novellas collected in Los Nefilim: Spanish Nephilim battling daimons in a supernatural war to save humankind. Born of daimon and angel, Diago Alvarez is a being unlike all others. The embodiment of dark and light, he has witnessed the good and the horror of this world and those beyond. In the supernatural war between angels and daimons that will determine humankind’s future, Diago has chosen Los Nefilim, the sons and daughters of angels who possess the power to harness music and light. As the forces of evil gather, Diago must locate the Key, the special chord that will unite the nefilim’s voices, giving them the power to avert the coming civil war between the Republicans and Franco’s Nationalists. Finding the Key will save Spain from plunging into darkness. And for Diago, it will resurrect the anguish caused by a tragedy he experienced in a past life. But someone—or something—is determined to stop Diago in his quest and will use his history to destroy him and the nefilim. Hearing his stolen Stradivarius played through the night, Diago is tormented by nightmares about his past life. Each incarnation strengthens the ties shared by the nefilim, whether those bonds are of love or hate . . . or even betrayal. To retrieve the violin, Diago must journey into enemy territory . . . and face an old nemesis and a fallen angel bent on revenge.


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"Frohock has intricately woven a unique reinterpretation of history. Eloquent prose accompanies a lyrical theme amid prewar tensions, enriching this imaginative historical fantasy." --Publishers Weekly, starred review A lyrical historical fantasy adventure, set in 1932 Spain and Germany, that brings to life the world of the novellas collected in Los Nefilim: Spanish Nephili "Frohock has intricately woven a unique reinterpretation of history. Eloquent prose accompanies a lyrical theme amid prewar tensions, enriching this imaginative historical fantasy." --Publishers Weekly, starred review A lyrical historical fantasy adventure, set in 1932 Spain and Germany, that brings to life the world of the novellas collected in Los Nefilim: Spanish Nephilim battling daimons in a supernatural war to save humankind. Born of daimon and angel, Diago Alvarez is a being unlike all others. The embodiment of dark and light, he has witnessed the good and the horror of this world and those beyond. In the supernatural war between angels and daimons that will determine humankind’s future, Diago has chosen Los Nefilim, the sons and daughters of angels who possess the power to harness music and light. As the forces of evil gather, Diago must locate the Key, the special chord that will unite the nefilim’s voices, giving them the power to avert the coming civil war between the Republicans and Franco’s Nationalists. Finding the Key will save Spain from plunging into darkness. And for Diago, it will resurrect the anguish caused by a tragedy he experienced in a past life. But someone—or something—is determined to stop Diago in his quest and will use his history to destroy him and the nefilim. Hearing his stolen Stradivarius played through the night, Diago is tormented by nightmares about his past life. Each incarnation strengthens the ties shared by the nefilim, whether those bonds are of love or hate . . . or even betrayal. To retrieve the violin, Diago must journey into enemy territory . . . and face an old nemesis and a fallen angel bent on revenge.

30 review for Where Oblivion Lives

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mark Lawrence

    This is both a stand alone book and a follow up to the three Los Nefilim novellas. I've only read the first of those novellas, which was excellent: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... So that puts me somewhere between the complete newcomer and the reader who has finishing Los Nefilim. I think Frohock has succeeded in making Where Oblivion Lies accessible to new readers, and that the existence of the trilogy provides a sense of depth and history to the book. Where Oblivion Lies is set in 1932, pr This is both a stand alone book and a follow up to the three Los Nefilim novellas. I've only read the first of those novellas, which was excellent: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... So that puts me somewhere between the complete newcomer and the reader who has finishing Los Nefilim. I think Frohock has succeeded in making Where Oblivion Lies accessible to new readers, and that the existence of the trilogy provides a sense of depth and history to the book. Where Oblivion Lies is set in 1932, primarily in pre-Franco Spain and wandering into pre-Hitler Germany (via France). The sense of period is well conveyed and it all feels convincing to me. The story concerns the machinations of angels, demons and their offspring, mostly their offspring, the nefilim who are essentially reincarnating, long lived humans, with a magic based around song (not what you're imagining but more to do with powering sigils with the right note or sealing portals with the right music - we're talking classical violin here, not rap battles!). It's beautifully written. You can rely on Frohock for clear writing and, when the situation demands it, beautiful prose. Frohock also builds strong relationships between characters that you believe in and care about. The story itself is a slow burn leading to an exciting crescendo with some genuinely creepy vibes. As a tone deaf musical ignoramus I was still able to enjoy the music based magic and the hunt for a musical key to achieve an important goal. In that respect it was similar to the musical interludes in The Name of the Wind where the quality of the writing carried me through despite my lack of understanding of the fine points of ... notes ... and ... stuff. I enjoyed reading this and if it sounds interesting to you then it very likely will be! Join my 3-emails-a-year newsletter #prizes ...

  2. 5 out of 5

    T. Frohock

    I'm taking advantage of the Kindle notes to add annotations to the text in case anyone is interested. You can find the Kindle Notes here. There are currently five, but I'll be adding more over the next few days. If you enjoyed the Los Nefilim novellas--In Midnight's Silence, Without Light or Guide, and The Second Death--check out Where Oblivion Dwells. Diago and all of the nefilim are back for a brand new adventure. Bonus points for getting to do a novel, so I'm able to share more of Los Nefilim's I'm taking advantage of the Kindle notes to add annotations to the text in case anyone is interested. You can find the Kindle Notes here. There are currently five, but I'll be adding more over the next few days. If you enjoyed the Los Nefilim novellas--In Midnight's Silence, Without Light or Guide, and The Second Death--check out Where Oblivion Dwells. Diago and all of the nefilim are back for a brand new adventure. Bonus points for getting to do a novel, so I'm able to share more of Los Nefilim's mythology with you.

  3. 4 out of 5

    wanderer (Para)

    4.5/5 RTC This was even better than the novellas, since the story got some breathing space. And the novellas were already excellent. Can't wait for the next one.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael Fletcher

    This is one of those where I need some time to put my thoughts into order. Gorgeously lyrical, T. Frohock weaves a lush tapestry. At times beautiful and brutal, I am in awe of this unbelievably talented story-teller. Highly recommended! This takes everything I loved about Los Nefilim and improves on it, which is quite a feat! I want more!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer (bunnyreads)

    Some books just click and this was one of those times. It wasn’t even that there is much in the way of my bullet-proof likes either- Angels are not an auto-buy for me, and historical fantasy is probably closer to an auto-skip. But there was something about this story that resonated (a little pun intended) and part way through I knew I was going to have to go back and read the rest of the series, as soon as my schedule allowed. Now a member of the Los Nefilim, Diago’s work on the key is being hamp Some books just click and this was one of those times. It wasn’t even that there is much in the way of my bullet-proof likes either- Angels are not an auto-buy for me, and historical fantasy is probably closer to an auto-skip. But there was something about this story that resonated (a little pun intended) and part way through I knew I was going to have to go back and read the rest of the series, as soon as my schedule allowed. Now a member of the Los Nefilim, Diago’s work on the key is being hampered to the point he can no longer ignore it. His instrument, a Stradivarius (violin) is being used against him like a weapon in a type of psychic attack. Suffering from crippling hallucinations and what is essentially the equivalent of PTSD he sets out to locate the source and retrieve his Violin. *** The magic is music based, shaping tones and sound to create sigils/glyphs. It’s accessible and you don’t need to be a music prodigy to understand it. I loved the use and how music, combined with the setting, with Hitler on the rise and Spain on the verge of civil war, gave the story a very unsettled, haunting quality that heightened the sense of danger. The characters- I’m a of a sucker for those outsider type characters- the ones that feel like they are walking a tight rope in their head trying to do the right thing. That only really need someone to believe in them for them to believe in themselves. Diago, feels a bit like that kind of character to me. He’s found redemption and a family and will do anything to protect it. To back Diago up- there are people who love, trust and support of him but who also occasionally have real fears and doubts that he wont trust himself enough to be the person they know he is. Villains- IMO, some of the best villains are the ones that have a past with the main character. A little history goes a long way and, in this case, Diago’s shared history in his past incarnation, adds a deeper layer making not only the relationships between all the characters more complicated but also making this more than just a grasp for power story. The reincarnations/memories- I tended to think of these as something like the reincarnated version of the Highlander tv show where McLeod would have a history with a person and we’d get glimpses of characters past together to set up the back story/relationship. Watch for Me – I don’t usually even comment much on the writing in a review unless it stands out. But nothing says better what kind of writing to expect than that phrase-which honestly gave me a little thrill every time it came up. Used like goodbye, it’s double meaning with the reincarnations, also serves as a reminder of how dangerous their lives are. That the next time they may see one another is in a future incarnation. I really liked the punch that it added and I think it’s a perfect example to use here to show the thought that was given to the writing in every part of this story- from the word choices, to the setting, the music, the characters, and the past lives. The writing alone could have felt almost stark but the combined elements assist in bringing the world alive through all of our senses. For me this was the distinction that made this an outstanding read. I would have given this book six stars if GoodReads would have let me. Well worth checking out and quite easy to jump in at this point. But, I can guarantee if you’re like me, you’ll want to go back and catch this series from the start.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Bryant

    Teresa Frohock is a true hidden treasure whose work deserves a much wider audience. Her current work, of which I received and ARC, is a novel continuing the tales in the Los Nefilim novellas, set during the time of the Spanish Civil War and continues the story of Diago, born of daemon and angel, his husband Miquel and their son as Diago continues to gain the trust of the Nefilim in their quest to maintain the peace between the immortals, whose conflicts parallel events in our world. Teresa’s pro Teresa Frohock is a true hidden treasure whose work deserves a much wider audience. Her current work, of which I received and ARC, is a novel continuing the tales in the Los Nefilim novellas, set during the time of the Spanish Civil War and continues the story of Diago, born of daemon and angel, his husband Miquel and their son as Diago continues to gain the trust of the Nefilim in their quest to maintain the peace between the immortals, whose conflicts parallel events in our world. Teresa’s prose is nothing short of brilliant, she has done a yeoman’s share of historical research to flesh out the setting and make the reader part of the scene. A brilliant scene in the Black Forest of Germany brings back haunting memories of Bram Stoker’s initial castle scene in Dracula. Well paced and heart pounding, this is a must read, as is all of her work. Do. Not. Miss. This

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elena C.

    When one of your favorite authors drops the news of a sequel for one of your favorite reads of 2017 you didn't even know was in the making: And it's going to be a full-lenght novel, too! Hurrah!!!

  8. 4 out of 5

    David

    It was great to see a novel-length Los Nefilim story, as well as seeing some real flashbacks to past incarnations and just more in-depth exploration of the greater politics around and above Barcelona. My only knock against this book is that I wanted more Diago/Miquel/Rafael time compared to the novellas. But wow, are some of these characters quite damaged inside--and with the Spanish Civil War about to start in 4 years, I don't see this getting any better for them. Watch for me.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mia

    WHERE OBLIVION LIVES is a well-written, historically grounded, evocative dark urban fantasy. While designated Los Nefilim #4, there being 3 previous novellas, reading the novellas is unnecessary for the full appreciation of this book, though it is likely to spur you to obtain the novellas post-haste. It is a tale WHERE FAMILY LIVES and thrives—family forged by blood, and family that is hand-picked and formed by voluntary bonds. The central family consists of Diago (half-angel, half-demon), Miquel WHERE OBLIVION LIVES is a well-written, historically grounded, evocative dark urban fantasy. While designated Los Nefilim #4, there being 3 previous novellas, reading the novellas is unnecessary for the full appreciation of this book, though it is likely to spur you to obtain the novellas post-haste. It is a tale WHERE FAMILY LIVES and thrives—family forged by blood, and family that is hand-picked and formed by voluntary bonds. The central family consists of Diago (half-angel, half-demon), Miquel (a Nefil), and Rafael, Diago's recently discovered son with a prior tryst with an angel. The central family is embraced by another family, that of Guillermo, leader of the Nefilim. Beyond that lies all the Nefilim who have collectively accepted the central family, though not without suspicion, particularly of Diago and his split origin. This book is WHERE MAGIC LIVES. First, there is the magic employed in the story in the form of music powering special sigils—magic heard, seen and felt. Voice, instruments, anything that produces musical tones can lend strength and force to magical symbols. Second, there is the magic of T. Frohock's lyrical prose, painting a canvas of emotions. There is a palpable sense of underlying danger. The language, tone and turn of phrase Frohock adopts lend themselves to instinctively feeling fear for Diago, Miquel, Guillermo—in the manner one fears for loved ones. Almost from the outset—especially if you've read the novellas—the reader feels connected, relates to, and sympathizes with, the characters, fears for them, hopes against hope for their survival. The backdrop is WHERE HISTORY LIVES. We revisit history in this tale grounded in 1932 Spain and Germany during the rise of nationalism, where the seeds of World War II were sown. To this increasing political turmoil, Frohock adds a supernatural battle between nefilim—marshals of angels, near immortal, with the power of reincarnation—and daimons. The historical aspect is obviously well-researched, the fantasy addition is highly imaginative, and they are seamlessly interwoven. The quest for The Key that unlocks the secret to unifying and harmonizing the Nefilim's collective voice is WHERE THE FUTURE LIVES. The world is in jeopardy and powerful as a nefil may be, no single voice alone is powerful enough to avert disaster. Diago has caught snippets of The Key but must unravel his past to unlock it in its entirety. T. Frohock reminds us WHERE HOPE LIVES--ensconced in the unwavering resolve to do the ought. Attempts may fail; attempts will fail. But re-orienting all attempts to this most righteous and noble of intents is the rudder without which only failure is guaranteed. Loved ones are the constant-- always celebratory in success, reassuring in failure, comforting in despair, and forgiving before offense is even committed. Failure remains a possibility but a risk worth taking. Where mistakes and failure may be found is also WHERE REDEMPTION LIVES. With the power of reincarnation comes past lives and the regrets that attend them. Diago, Guillermo, and the others are haunted by ghosts of their pasts and the reverberating consequences of prior choices and decisions throughout time. Old enemies join forces with new ones to create greater peril. To maneuver through all this, Diago & Co. must work through the imperfections of memory, the disconnect between actual events and one's hazy, tenuous, incomplete recall of them. In order to prevail, they must come to terms with their past and exorcise old demons. The most dangerous enemy each of the characters must face may just be themselves. A world where people of seemingly disparate origins and backgrounds are able to get past differences and overcome bias and suspicion is WHERE LOVE LIVES. Some may talk of purity of race, define family in the most narrow of ways, appoint themselves protector of virtue but, ultimately, the only pure thing is love that is persistent, gratuitous, unconditional, enduring. WHERE T. FROHOCK WALKS, this reader shall follow.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joel

    An absolute gem - wonderfully written, genuinely intriguing through the entire novel, and containing the same superb characters, relationships, and drama I've come to expect from the Los Nefilim series. It's felt like an incredibly long wait to get back to these characters, but Frohock thankfully hits it out of the park.

  11. 5 out of 5

    keikii Eats Books

    To read more reviews in this series and others, check out keikii eats books! Short Review: Historical UF with angels, exactly the balm my soul needed with this genre. Perfect sequel to the first three novellas. I love the characters, and I loved the story. I can't wait to see more in this series. Longer Review: 96 points, 5 STARS! LGBT Themes Once again, Where Oblivion Lives is everything I needed in an urban fantasy novel. I didn't just want everything to do with this novel, I needed it to soothe a To read more reviews in this series and others, check out keikii eats books! Short Review: Historical UF with angels, exactly the balm my soul needed with this genre. Perfect sequel to the first three novellas. I love the characters, and I loved the story. I can't wait to see more in this series. Longer Review: 96 points, 5 STARS! LGBT Themes Once again, Where Oblivion Lives is everything I needed in an urban fantasy novel. I didn't just want everything to do with this novel, I needed it to soothe a part of my soul that has been struggling against the world. I was drawn into this story with Los Nefilim and I continued to be enchanted through Where Oblivion Lives. From the moment I started, I didn't want the ride to stop. The lore surrounding the Angels and Demons is just outstanding. There is nothing worse than a weak, humanic, angel and demon race set, but these are good, strong, proper races in Where Oblivion Lives. The plays these two races make are anything but weak. There wasn't as much demonic action during Where Oblivion Lives, but the actions of everyone else more than make up for it. The way music and sound are interwoven into magic...well, it is pure magic itself. Frohock understands that everything is based on vibrations, and if you can change that, you can change the world. It is perfect and exactly what I love in my magic. In a departure from the majority of the novellas, Diago shares his time with Guillermo and others. The shift from focused novellas to focused novel was handled very well, and I cannot wait to read more full sized stories like this in the future. Where Oblivion Lives has many facets and players, each thinking they are in the right. But, everyone can't be remembering true. The idea of multiple incarnations is explored a lot more in this story. Remembering something in a past life isn't easy, though, and can be used for good or ill. I don't like memory loss, but this isn't memory loss. This is something fundamental to the beings that are nephilim, and I wouldn't have it any other way. It is perfect. I also love how the mortal world and the supernatural world are interwoven together. Spain is gearing up for civil war, and the characters are aware of the trouble that is ahead of them. The world is a decade away from another world war, which they have seen the signs of as well. It is great how Frohock weaves the two worlds together, with mortals not having any knowledge of their world, and the Nefilim belonging to the mortal world and not. It can be a difficult task for an author to show how the characters belong to the mortal world while also not, and it is often overlooked entirely when there is a masquerade in effect. The fact that it isn't overlooked and it is well handled just raises this series in my eye even more, and I didn't think it could get much higher! Where Oblivion Lives was everything I wanted and needed right now. This series has already jumped up onto my favourites and I cannot wait for the next installment of this series. I love Diago and his family and I need to see them grow together more. I received a copy of this book from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to T. Frohock, HarperCollins, and Edelweiss for providing this copy for review!

  12. 5 out of 5

    T.O. Munro

    A delightful standalone excursion into the world of Los Nefilim, part spy thriller, part gothic horror, part magical warfare, as the husband and husband team of Diago and Miquel navigate dangers across Europe on the eve of the Spanish Civil War. I posted a full review at the Fantasy Hive, here http://fantasy-hive.co.uk/2019/01/whe... The author also kindly answered some interview questions about the book and the process of writing it, here http://fantasy-hive.co.uk/2019/02/int...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maša

    Soundtrack:Happy Days are Here Again! It's a happy day indeed, so many things I like in one place! Midway through the book I realized it's fourth in a series, so now I have some catching-up to do. An interesting magic system. Music-imbued sigils? Yes please! If you follow the text, you can listen to a pretty interesting soundtrack. It was great to hear ol' Brahms and Berlioz as a soundtrack to angel-killing and soul-eating! A new(ish) take on an old trope. Children of angels and humans - now with Soundtrack:Happy Days are Here Again! It's a happy day indeed, so many things I like in one place! Midway through the book I realized it's fourth in a series, so now I have some catching-up to do. An interesting magic system. Music-imbued sigils? Yes please! If you follow the text, you can listen to a pretty interesting soundtrack. It was great to hear ol' Brahms and Berlioz as a soundtrack to angel-killing and soul-eating! A new(ish) take on an old trope. Children of angels and humans - now with more warfare, memories from past incarnations, and angst. The realistic portrayal of some facets of human nature. There is talk about trauma, PTSD, addiction, obsession, and nightmares. The author doesn't shy away from the violence, but manages to convey a sense of camaraderie and hope in her characters, which I came to appreciate (I blame too much of Abercombie in a short time period for my disdain of grimdark, really). The music. I repeat myself, but of, what joy! It makes me overlook a somewhat odd pacing and over-dramatics.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Erika Kraus

    I won this book in the first reads giveaway! T. Frohock is a wonderful writer. You don't need to read the first three books in the series but after reading the fourth I will look for the other three!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jon Adams

    I love beautiful books.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    For those who are new to the series, Los Nefilim presents an early 1930's Europe in which nefilim, the children of angels and daimons, live hidden amidst mortal kind and serve the angels as earthly soldiers in the angel-daimon war. We follow the activity of the Spanish nephilim branch, Los Nefilim, particularly one Diago Alvarez--a half-angel, half-daimon being who's recently been inducted into the organization. While I'd enjoyed the novellas (the characters in particular), I did feel like I was For those who are new to the series, Los Nefilim presents an early 1930's Europe in which nefilim, the children of angels and daimons, live hidden amidst mortal kind and serve the angels as earthly soldiers in the angel-daimon war. We follow the activity of the Spanish nephilim branch, Los Nefilim, particularly one Diago Alvarez--a half-angel, half-daimon being who's recently been inducted into the organization. While I'd enjoyed the novellas (the characters in particular), I did feel like I was getting held back on the worldbuilding and nefilim lore. This full-length novel firmly addresses those problems. So now we get the heart-tugging family dynamic of the novellas plus a deeper exploration into the nefilim's magic and their history. The story also widens its field of view to include Germany, introducing a new kind of tension relating to growing Aryan supremacy and too-curious Nazi officers. While we don't see a lot of interaction between Diago and his companions (and thus not a lot of development), what we do see of the characters individually I really liked. Diago's existence continues to spit in the face of toxic masculinity. Besides being a badass half-angel, half-daimon being who can harness musical energy, he's also a loving husband, doting father, and a battler of PTSD, full of insecurities and fears but also a willingness (however reluctant) to voice them, which frankly makes him all the more badass. Rafael continues to be the best kid character I've encountered in adult fantasy in the past year. So sweet. So adorable. So authentically child-like--not an adult's skewed vision of what a child should be. And so incredibly bad for my heart because it melts every time he shows up on page. "Don't come home beat up. Every time you go away without us, you come home beat up." Disappointingly, Diago's husband Miquel takes a backseat in this story, but on the upside, we do see a lot of Guillermo, the leader of Los Nefilim, and through his eyes we get more deeply entrenched into the political side of the war which I wholly enjoyed. The espionage section of the story is the really interesting bit. The blurb dresses it up in this flashy action-adventure garb, but the reality is something more intimate and ordinary and creepy: One house, two brothers, strange happenings, and suspense threatening to spill through the edges. When you lay out such a seemingly mundane setting and plop down a character who's as powerful as Diago is and still manage to make the readers fearful for him, you'll hear me applauding in the background because that's such a hard thing to pull off. While reading the novellas beforehand would be helpful, I don't think it's necessary for the enjoyment of the story. I heartily recommend this to anyone who likes angel/demon stories, music magic, fantasy mixing with pre-WW2 history, and male protagonists who embrace vulnerability.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ashleigh | Wild Heart Reads

    Diago is haunted by a long-forgotten song, an old enemy returns and war looms for both humans and the nephilim.  Where Oblivion Lives opens with Diago supposed to be trying to compose the Key, a song that only he has heard and, one that could be used to devastating effect in the wrong hands. But his dreams are haunted by a song played on his stolen Stradivarius, drawing him to Germany. Meanwhile, in Santuari, Miquel and Guilliermo deal with traitors in the ranks. Someone is intent on taking Guill Diago is haunted by a long-forgotten song, an old enemy returns and war looms for both humans and the nephilim.  Where Oblivion Lives opens with Diago supposed to be trying to compose the Key, a song that only he has heard and, one that could be used to devastating effect in the wrong hands. But his dreams are haunted by a song played on his stolen Stradivarius, drawing him to Germany. Meanwhile, in Santuari, Miquel and Guilliermo deal with traitors in the ranks. Someone is intent on taking Guilliermo's place as leader of Los Nefilim even if it means unleashing a monster.  Where Oblivion Lives picks up roughly a year after Los Nefilim ended, however it can be read as a standalone. I do recommend reading Los Nefilim first, not only for the back story it provides but also because these characters will own your heart and you won't want to miss a moment.  What really makes this book are the characters. Where Oblivion Lives is a character driven story and Frohock sings them to life so well even in the slower moments the pacing never feels off. You are drawn in by these characters and caught in the song. Diago, Miquel, Rafael, Guilliermo, Ysabel and Juanita - I love these characters and the found family vibe, as well as their loyalty to each other and the love they have.  One of the overarching elements here is Diago's struggle and desire to prove himself to Los Nefilim as a whole. As a half-angel-half-daimon, many in Los Nefilim don't trust him, expecting Diago to betray them and sell them out to the daimons. So he has to balance his desire for action and rushing in head long with trusting Guilliermo to have his back. Frohock puts your emotions through the wringer, she gets you so emotionally invested in these characters and it's intense and heartbreaking at times, joyful at others. And then you have characters that aren't wholly good or wholly evil - they just are, doing there best to survive. Like Rudi, oh Rudi. One of the aforementioned heartbreaking moments.  Where Oblivion Lives is such a great book. I cannot recommend this and Los Nefilim enough. They are evocative and rich, with such a unique and wonderful take on angels and daimons - where music is magic and past incarnations are as vital as the current ones. Also queer angels anyone?! "Watch for me...it was the nefilim's prayer and served as a goodbye, or a blessing, or a curse. To watch for another meant they would search the eyes of every soul until they found each other again, either in this incarnation or the next." This review at more can be found at https://wildheartreads.wordpress.com/

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sumayyah

    This is such a beautiful read. Miss Frohock is a master word smith, and it is no wonder her work enjoys such appreciation from fellow authors. Very few authors can weave emotions in their story so compellingly. Frohock is a master at it. Where Oblivion Lives although starts slowly, it doesn't give you a breather towards the end of the book (in a good way). While I have really enjoyed the previous Los Nifilim books, this one was a feat as it conveyed so much in such less number of words. Frohock ta This is such a beautiful read. Miss Frohock is a master word smith, and it is no wonder her work enjoys such appreciation from fellow authors. Very few authors can weave emotions in their story so compellingly. Frohock is a master at it. Where Oblivion Lives although starts slowly, it doesn't give you a breather towards the end of the book (in a good way). While I have really enjoyed the previous Los Nifilim books, this one was a feat as it conveyed so much in such less number of words. Frohock talks about war with a responsibility that is remarkable. It is a very well explored theme in the book: how big a disaster a war can be, and how the it impacts people years later. (view spoiler)[ Another underlying theme is of owning your past, and accepting it to move ahead in present. (hide spoiler)] The book explores the relationships beautifully; Diago's relationship with his son, his husband, his friends specially Guillermo, and overall Los Nefilim (Damn its tough to remember the write spelling for each group of Nefil). But what shines through for me is each and every interaction between Diago and Rafael. The father son duo are a treat and I wanted to spend days in their household. The book ends beautifully. (view spoiler)[ The subtle shift in behaviours of Carme and other Los Nefilim towards Diago is awesome. The story is about coming back home. The title of the last part "Free at Last", could not have been more apt. (hide spoiler)] Although continuation of the story is implied, the ending left me really satisfied. The Magic system of the books is amazing. Although it can be read as a standalone, I would recommend new readers to start from In Midnight's Silence. P.S. I love the names of the books in this series. Highly recommended.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Drema Deoraich

    Diago, a nefil born of an angel-daimon pairing, has been tasked by the leader of Los Nefilim with finding The Key, a musical sequence that can unlock the barrier between realms and unite the nefilim’s voices, empowering them to save Spain from the coming darkness. But Diago finds it hard to focus when nightmares plague his sleep, dreams in which his stolen Stradivarius plays the same jarring notes over and over, prompting snatches of memories from prior incarnations that torment Diago with his p Diago, a nefil born of an angel-daimon pairing, has been tasked by the leader of Los Nefilim with finding The Key, a musical sequence that can unlock the barrier between realms and unite the nefilim’s voices, empowering them to save Spain from the coming darkness. But Diago finds it hard to focus when nightmares plague his sleep, dreams in which his stolen Stradivarius plays the same jarring notes over and over, prompting snatches of memories from prior incarnations that torment Diago with his past mistakes. Now Diago has the chance to prove himself, to heal past wounds in himself and others. To do so, he must leave his husband and their seven-year-old son, venture into a rival stronghold to retrieve the violin, and confront powerful enemies who still hold a grudge and are out for revenge. His success or failure will carry consequences not just for Diago and his family, but for all of Spain. I’m not usually a fan of historical fiction, but a story in which things happen the way we know them, but for different reasons than we thought? Bring it! In Where Oblivion Lives, T. Frohock has penned a unique, captivating historical fantasy that takes place behind the scenes in 1932 Spain, France, and Germany. Tension in pre-war Europe flavors the backdrop of the story, casting shade across the already shadowy nefilim who live unnoticed among mortals. It is the business of the Inner Guard, those nefilim enclaves empowered by the Angelic Thrones to monitor daimonic activity, to track and counter dark magic. Between fallen angels, the rise of Nazis, and looming civil war, there is plenty to keep Los Nefilim busy. Nefil are magical beings at heart and Oblivion’s main characters all have especially powerful skills. The nefilim require constant magical protection, as their work is often fraught with danger. Frohock weaves an accurate and esoteric tapestry of wards, glyphs, and magical energy throughout the book, including one element I’ve not seen used often: music. Sound. Vibrations of various frequencies, whether sung with voice or played on instruments like the Stradivarius, serve to empower the glyphs drawn by angel, daimon, or nefil. I took piano lessons for years (long ago), and was pleased to recognize familiar musical terminology in the text. But beyond that detail, this unusual element added a layer of texture to the narrative that fleshed it out beyond just reading the words and visualizing the scenes. I could almost hear the nefilim’s songs, or the screeching attack of notes from the Stradivarius, or Diago pounding the piano’s ivories in search of The Key. Other senses come into play as well in his memory flashbacks from the prior war—the squelch of mud, the stench of smoke, the pressure of earth-shattering bombs. There is plenty of action in Oblivion, but I found it to be more of a quiet burn rather than a fast-paced thriller, at least until near the end when things heat up quite a bit. Anxiety builds in scenes akin to those in movies where the hero is sneaking around in a place where they aren’t supposed to be, and you find yourself on the edge of your seat, biting your nails and shouting, “Get out of there! Someone’s coming!” Tension between characters carries over from past incarnations into their present lives, coloring every word, every smile, every twitch of one’s brow, and interpreting their meaning—for reader and for character—added yet another layer of pressure to the scenes. Getting to know the characters was part of the fun of this book. Watching Diago develop was a joy, especially given where he started and all he had to contend with since. The other characters each contribute to flesh out Diago’s world, worrying with and about him, striving to help him, making him feel like a part of something bigger, a member of an extended family rather than the rogue he’s always been. Watching him address those changes on his own terms felt authentic, believable. I loved his strength, his tenderness, his vulnerability. Reading the story gave me a thrill, but seeing Diago grow into his new role was the icing on the cake for me. Oblivion is a standalone novel, though there are three prequel novellas, gathered together in one volume called Los Nefilim. While I’ve not read those, they are definitely going on my to-be-read list. In addition, two sequels will follow Where Oblivion Lives. The first, Carved from Stone and Dream, is now available for preorder. Watch for the third one on the author’s website. I thoroughly enjoyed this story, and have even begun reading it through a second time; the layers are so intricate, so interwoven, I am already finding meanings I missed the first time. Deep, mystical, and inspiring, Where Oblivion Lives is one historical fantasy you won’t want to miss.

  20. 5 out of 5

    THE BIBLIOPHILE (Rituranjan)

    Brilliant and engaging. The novel has the element of mystery and the narrative delicately balances the suspension of disbelief that lingers throughout the story. There is alluring darkness to the tale that keeps on giving a gothic vibe, a delicate kind of Udolpho ambiance to it. The ending surmises a sort of greater conflict to come, which I believe will be a fooder for later books in the series. The writing, as usual, is elegant and perfectly captures the pensive mood of the story. I loved the Brilliant and engaging. The novel has the element of mystery and the narrative delicately balances the suspension of disbelief that lingers throughout the story. There is alluring darkness to the tale that keeps on giving a gothic vibe, a delicate kind of Udolpho ambiance to it. The ending surmises a sort of greater conflict to come, which I believe will be a fooder for later books in the series. The writing, as usual, is elegant and perfectly captures the pensive mood of the story. I loved the way Frohock balances the historical and the supernatural. This novel adds depth and nuance to the Nefilim mythos. The readers are taken on a journey from pre-Franco Spain to Germany before the rise of Nazism. We get to know a lot about the character's past, and how it affects their present with altering consequences. As usual, music remains a primary presence, and it gives an eerie and otherworldly feel to the story and is also a central motif for the quest that the characters undertake. The characterization is top-notch. The ending was freaking surreal and scary at the same time. What I love about Frohock's books is that she imbues them with love, warmth, and hope despite writing about the incomprehensible world of angels, demons, and Nephilim. She makes them feel real, as flawed and dubious as the human world. This easily is one of the best supernatural fantasy books I have read in a long time. I can't wait to read the next book in the series.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mary Soon Lee

    I have been eagerly awaiting this book since I first read "Los Nefilim," three (excellent) novellas centered on the same characters. Often when I most anticipate something, it disappoints. Not so in this case. I devoured this book within 24 hours of receiving it. The story belongs to a subgenre that I rarely enjoy, dealing as it does in angels and daimons, and falling in the borderlands between horror and fantasy. Yet there is a skill to Frohock's writing that allows me to suspend disbelief, and I have been eagerly awaiting this book since I first read "Los Nefilim," three (excellent) novellas centered on the same characters. Often when I most anticipate something, it disappoints. Not so in this case. I devoured this book within 24 hours of receiving it. The story belongs to a subgenre that I rarely enjoy, dealing as it does in angels and daimons, and falling in the borderlands between horror and fantasy. Yet there is a skill to Frohock's writing that allows me to suspend disbelief, and fall into the story. Her prose is fluid, sometimes poetic. The suspense ratchets up as the plot progresses. The 1932 setting in Spain, France, and Germany is darkly atmospheric. But it is Frohock's characters that pleased me most. They are brave, vulnerable, damaged, not quite human, and they care about each other. They help each other, which, it turns out, I much prefer to solitary heroes. In this respect, though the setting and tone are quite different, "Where Oblivion Lives" reminds me of Sharon Lee and Steve Miller's wonderful Liaden Universe. It is the characters who give Frohock's work a great sweetness against a dark backdrop. It is because of those characters that I am impatiently awaiting the next book. Highly recommended, though I would advise starting at "Los Nefilim" and then going on to "Where Oblivion Lives."

  22. 5 out of 5

    Fraser Sherman

    4.5 stars. A familiar urban fantasy premise (supernatural entities walk among us!) but done very well. The setting is 1930s Europe (Spain mostly). The Nephilim are the children of angels or demons, possessed of song based magic powers and working as heaven's (or hell's, I gather) agents on Earth. Protagonist Diego is gay (and married) and tormented by some lingering business from his past life being turned to music and wielded against him. When he sets off to deal with it, he doesn't know he's w 4.5 stars. A familiar urban fantasy premise (supernatural entities walk among us!) but done very well. The setting is 1930s Europe (Spain mostly). The Nephilim are the children of angels or demons, possessed of song based magic powers and working as heaven's (or hell's, I gather) agents on Earth. Protagonist Diego is gay (and married) and tormented by some lingering business from his past life being turned to music and wielded against him. When he sets off to deal with it, he doesn't know he's walking into a trap. This is very low key compared to say the pyrotechnics of a Harry Dresden novel (I like those too, that's just for comparison). But it worked just the same, and the setting and historical detail gives it a novel backdrop (we see Franco and Hitler rising to power in the background). I would have liked a little more exposition up front about how the magic works (particularly the magical Key) but I didn't get lost without it. And it's preferable to historical adventures that squeeze in too much exposition.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joe Crowe

    (Review from an advance copy.) The descendants of angels use magic based on music, in this cool adventure story based in 1930s Spain. The author says the hero of the story is inspired by The Shadow -- a cool detail on its own -- but that is a touchstone of the depth of influences and creativity that is apparent here. Books about angels fighting demons have been done before, but this one sets a high bar. This book is an action-adventure worthy of any pulp story, but the author adds a sense of tim (Review from an advance copy.) The descendants of angels use magic based on music, in this cool adventure story based in 1930s Spain. The author says the hero of the story is inspired by The Shadow -- a cool detail on its own -- but that is a touchstone of the depth of influences and creativity that is apparent here. Books about angels fighting demons have been done before, but this one sets a high bar. This book is an action-adventure worthy of any pulp story, but the author adds a sense of time and place that was not always there in the pulp era. 1930s Spain is just as important a setting as Gotham City is to Batman. This whole thing is just fun, and worth a reread. I'm going to need more in this series, post-haste. Is more ready yet? What about now?

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    I won this ARC in a Goodreads giveaway. This is the first book by the author and the first book in this series I have read. I haven't had the best luck with books about Nephilim and the like in the past so I was prepared to be disappointed or at least underwhelmed (this may have worked in the books favor). Honestly the flow of the story is way better than similar series that I've read and the characters felt more genuine and likeable than those of the Shadowhunter series. The books pacing never r I won this ARC in a Goodreads giveaway. This is the first book by the author and the first book in this series I have read. I haven't had the best luck with books about Nephilim and the like in the past so I was prepared to be disappointed or at least underwhelmed (this may have worked in the books favor). Honestly the flow of the story is way better than similar series that I've read and the characters felt more genuine and likeable than those of the Shadowhunter series. The books pacing never really slows which makes it hard to put down and easy to read. When I get a chance I will definately be going back to read the previous books in the series.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Having not read any of the other books in the series, this book can be read as a stand alone. It did a good job at explaining the angel and demon background stories and left me at an ending that will make me want to read the next novel in the series. It is written very well, the story moved along at a good pace, and it kept me interested. It is in the LGBT genre, but no sexual context. I'm not interested in the genre, but glad I didn't let it stop me from entering the giveaway for this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sheri Konschak

    I won this book in a GoodReads giveaway. It is not of the genre I would read. Don't go for the science fiction make believe colonies of make believe people. I am donating it to my local library for those who do like this genre to enjoy. Thank you for picking me to receive this book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    April

    Wow. Loved this! The story continues with Diego and his family and I fell in love even more! Flawed but perfect the characters in T’s novels just come alive in your imagination. A very engaging read with fascinating concepts for magic/being music/ being color. I highly recommend it!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Pulignani

    Great story.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Faith 09

    An enjoyable and unique read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Wright

    5/5 stars — grounded in history, brought to life by magic and emotion Where Oblivion Lives is the novel-length sequel to T. Frohock's three Los Nefilim novellas. I loved the novellas and this book builds upon everything I originally enjoyed about Diago, the world of nefilim, and musical magic. The story is a genre-blending cross between historical fiction, mystery, and supernatural horror. Diago Alvarez, now a member of Los Nefilim, a group of angelic descendants with united under the leadership 5/5 stars — grounded in history, brought to life by magic and emotion Where Oblivion Lives is the novel-length sequel to T. Frohock's three Los Nefilim novellas. I loved the novellas and this book builds upon everything I originally enjoyed about Diago, the world of nefilim, and musical magic. The story is a genre-blending cross between historical fiction, mystery, and supernatural horror. Diago Alvarez, now a member of Los Nefilim, a group of angelic descendants with united under the leadership of Diago's enemy-turned-friend Guillermo, is tormented by dreams woven with music from his lost Stradivarius violin. When he's tasked with retrieving it, his search leads to Germany, the domain of an adversarial nefil queen and the burgeoning Nazi movement. (view spoiler)[Once there, Diago is trapped in a house haunted by a corrupted angel who eats the souls of nefilim. (hide spoiler)] One of my favorite aspects of Where Oblivion Lives is Diago's character arc. Frohock uses her concept of nefilim reincarnation to brilliant effect, sending Diago up against not only old enemies but old traumas as well. Unable to recall more than a few vague visions from his second incarnation, Diago fears he may have betrayed or harmed his loved ones. This worry meshes with his present determination to complete his mission and prove he belongs in Los Nefilim despite his half-daimon heritage and those who doubt his loyalty. Finally, Diago is driven by the need to protect his husband and son from falling prey to those seeking to punish or harm Diago himself. Diago's solo mission gives him time for introspection—dangerous when self-doubt can be his own worst enemy. Worldbuilding and setting were again gems of Frohock's work. The narrative takes place within the lengthening shadow of the Nazi threat; racist pseudoscience and period-typical homophobia proved as menacing in the antagonists' hands as their historically accurate firearms. On a personal level, it was extremely satisfying to read Diago's metaphorical eye-rolls at the suggestion that a person was less intelligent because of their skin color rather than because of their belief in such stupidly self-aggrandizing ideas. The fictional world of angels, daimons, and nefilim is complex enough that I spent the novella trilogy wanting to learn more. In Where Oblivion Lives, Frohock further explains the system of magical glyphs that are brought to life with music. From details like protective glyphs embedded in the railings in Guillermo's house to "Red Zones," or areas across Europe where wards were damaged by natural and supernatural upheaval during WWI, magic is a fact of life in Diago's world. A couple of other aspects of the story really stood out to me. First was Frohock's prose, which I remember caught my attention in the novellas too. Here, the writing was precise yet dramatic, serving to emphasize the age and refinement of many nefilim and also delivering terrifying punch in some of the more horror-heavy scenes. An example is the phrase "I will watch for you," which is either promise or threat among nefilim depending on context. Second was the theme of familial love, also carried over from the previous books. It's evident in Diago's devotion to Miguel and Rafael and in Guillermo's protection of Los Nefilim as a whole, but particularly his wife and daughter. The children read like actual kids, and Diago's experience of parenthood as a joy but also a drain on his energy feels very real. In case it wasn't obvious, I highly recommend Where Oblivion Lives and the whole Los Nefilim series. The nail-biting suspense and tightly plotted mysteries will appeal to fans of historical fantasy and horror alike. content warnings: racism, homophobia, abuse by a family member, drug use, rape mention

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