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Betty Crocker's Picture Cookbook, Facsimile Edition

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It's the book that started it all, the well-loved edition that first bought Betty Crocker cookbooks into American homes and hearts. Published in 1950, this ground-breaking title made cooking easy, it made cooking appealing, and best of all, it made cooking fun. Packed full of practical tips, useful hints, and lavish color photography, this was the book that shaped cooking It's the book that started it all, the well-loved edition that first bought Betty Crocker cookbooks into American homes and hearts. Published in 1950, this ground-breaking title made cooking easy, it made cooking appealing, and best of all, it made cooking fun. Packed full of practical tips, useful hints, and lavish color photography, this was the book that shaped cooking for generations, the book that people remember. Every recipe you -- or your mother -- ever wanted is here, from pigs in blankets, to Emergency Steak to Chicken Tomato Aspic. Enjoy the clever ideas throughout -- twelve months of birthday cake ideas, showing how to decorate a cake to match each month's gem stone, pointers to make setting up a kitchen easy, or hints to make housework more pleasant. Feel a part of history when making Home Front Macaroni, developed during WW II rationing to stretch meat. Get into the spirit of fun with a Betty Crocker "Cookie Shine" or cookie baking party. People who grew up with this book will want it for the memories; those who are new to the book will want it for its charm and its intelligent approach to cooking. It's a perfect keepsake and a great gift.


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It's the book that started it all, the well-loved edition that first bought Betty Crocker cookbooks into American homes and hearts. Published in 1950, this ground-breaking title made cooking easy, it made cooking appealing, and best of all, it made cooking fun. Packed full of practical tips, useful hints, and lavish color photography, this was the book that shaped cooking It's the book that started it all, the well-loved edition that first bought Betty Crocker cookbooks into American homes and hearts. Published in 1950, this ground-breaking title made cooking easy, it made cooking appealing, and best of all, it made cooking fun. Packed full of practical tips, useful hints, and lavish color photography, this was the book that shaped cooking for generations, the book that people remember. Every recipe you -- or your mother -- ever wanted is here, from pigs in blankets, to Emergency Steak to Chicken Tomato Aspic. Enjoy the clever ideas throughout -- twelve months of birthday cake ideas, showing how to decorate a cake to match each month's gem stone, pointers to make setting up a kitchen easy, or hints to make housework more pleasant. Feel a part of history when making Home Front Macaroni, developed during WW II rationing to stretch meat. Get into the spirit of fun with a Betty Crocker "Cookie Shine" or cookie baking party. People who grew up with this book will want it for the memories; those who are new to the book will want it for its charm and its intelligent approach to cooking. It's a perfect keepsake and a great gift.

30 review for Betty Crocker's Picture Cookbook, Facsimile Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Edgar

    I've been trying to make gluten free cakes and have had little success until recently when we came across these really old recipes online that seemed to work well with rice flour. The recipes were from the old Betty Crocker's 1950 edition cookbook before they changed all of the recipes to make them "healthy." I would suggest to anyone that likes to really cook to get this reproduction of the 1950 edition of the Betty Crocker's cookbook. Have you ever wondered why the current recipes in the I've been trying to make gluten free cakes and have had little success until recently when we came across these really old recipes online that seemed to work well with rice flour. The recipes were from the old Betty Crocker's 1950 edition cookbook before they changed all of the recipes to make them "healthy." I would suggest to anyone that likes to really cook to get this reproduction of the 1950 edition of the Betty Crocker's cookbook. Have you ever wondered why the current recipes in the newest edition don't taste anywhere near as good as the ones in the boxes at the store? It is likely a marketing ploy. Betty Crocker and other companies likely make more money off people buying their boxed cakes than off their recipe books. I would suggest going back to making the original cakes and recipes they taste like cake. Also if you like cooking from scratch instead of from canned food and are tired of using the microwave, then this cookbook is for you.

  2. 4 out of 5

    etherealfire

    I wanted a copy of this cookbook my entire adult life - ever since I left home and had to leave mom's treasured old book behind I've coveted it. One Christmas (a few years ago now - I don't remember when this came out) I was finally gifted this facsimile edition and as far as I can tell, this is the very same book. With the delicious Caramel (Burnt Sugar) Cake and Caramel Icing (on page 130). The only birthday cake I ever really want to have! This cookbook is one of my prized possessions, not I wanted a copy of this cookbook my entire adult life - ever since I left home and had to leave mom's treasured old book behind I've coveted it. One Christmas (a few years ago now - I don't remember when this came out) I was finally gifted this facsimile edition and as far as I can tell, this is the very same book. With the delicious Caramel (Burnt Sugar) Cake and Caramel Icing (on page 130). The only birthday cake I ever really want to have! This cookbook is one of my prized possessions, not only for the delicious old recipes but because of the priceless sentimental value it holds.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Meltha

    If you own no other cook book, get this one. My grandmother used it. Every single thing I have ever tried in it has turned out perfectly, and there's a thousand variations on the basic recipes. The cottage pudding, scones, and black midnight cake in particular are wonderful. Granted, there's some fun to be had with the section at the back on how housewives can combat fatigue and doldrums by fantasizing about going out on the town waltzing or lying prone for a while on the kitchen floor, but it's If you own no other cook book, get this one. My grandmother used it. Every single thing I have ever tried in it has turned out perfectly, and there's a thousand variations on the basic recipes. The cottage pudding, scones, and black midnight cake in particular are wonderful. Granted, there's some fun to be had with the section at the back on how housewives can combat fatigue and doldrums by fantasizing about going out on the town waltzing or lying prone for a while on the kitchen floor, but it's still and excellent book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    Loving the classic recipes. The appetizer suggestions alone make me want to throw a 1950's cocktail party. On a different note, I was struck by the section at the end, about how a housewife ought to take care of herself, BECAUSE "If you're tired from overwork /Household chores you're bound to shirk." (!!!) Don't wear yourself out, ladies, because then who will clean and cook? And this helpful hint: "If you feel tired, lie down on the floor on your back, put your hands over your head, close your Loving the classic recipes. The appetizer suggestions alone make me want to throw a 1950's cocktail party. On a different note, I was struck by the section at the end, about how a housewife ought to take care of herself, BECAUSE "If you're tired from overwork /Household chores you're bound to shirk." (!!!) Don't wear yourself out, ladies, because then who will clean and cook? And this helpful hint: "If you feel tired, lie down on the floor on your back, put your hands over your head, close your eyes, and relax for 3-5 minutes." Did you catch that? Lie ON THE FLOOR, and this is accompanied by a little drawing with an aproned woman in a dress stretched out on some tile or linoleum kitchen. I guess the couch might lead to disastrous napping. Still, it's an interesting piece of history. And several recipes call for 1/8tsp pepper. Careful there, Betty, you or you might end up tasting that!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Raquel

    A wonderful little time capsule into the kitchens of the 1950s. Granted some recipes are weird. Like salad in jello, rice rings, cream cheese & anchovy appetizers, sandwich cheese loafs, etc. However, a lot of them are basic American classics. The structuring of the recipes takes some getting used to if you are not familiar with cookbooks like these. The book is very charming with it's trivia, history, cartoons, rhymes, songs, tips and reminders. It's fun to flip through quickly or to just A wonderful little time capsule into the kitchens of the 1950s. Granted some recipes are weird. Like salad in jello, rice rings, cream cheese & anchovy appetizers, sandwich cheese loafs, etc. However, a lot of them are basic American classics. The structuring of the recipes takes some getting used to if you are not familiar with cookbooks like these. The book is very charming with it's trivia, history, cartoons, rhymes, songs, tips and reminders. It's fun to flip through quickly or to just linger on some of the pages. I made two recipes with this: Cinnamon Rolls and Devil's Food Cake. Cinnamon Rolls came out wonderful (just not as puffy as I'd like) and the Devil's Food Cake was a disaster. If you are interested in getting this cookbook, make sure it's more for the nostalgia or the history of it than for the actual recipes.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Every kitchen needs this book, it is a classic. My grandmother gave me a copy as a Christmas gift one year...she said she loved this book and wanted me to have a copy also. Oh grandmother you were so right - some of the best biscuits I have ever made came courtesy of this book! I love the fact that it is so retro too, the pictures crack me up along with some of the content (oh the 50's you were so funny with your woman in the house & no where else attitude). The retro feel of it also will Every kitchen needs this book, it is a classic. My grandmother gave me a copy as a Christmas gift one year...she said she loved this book and wanted me to have a copy also. Oh grandmother you were so right - some of the best biscuits I have ever made came courtesy of this book! I love the fact that it is so retro too, the pictures crack me up along with some of the content (oh the 50's you were so funny with your woman in the house & no where else attitude). The retro feel of it also will make you think "WHOA!!" when reading some of the recipes - because of the ingredients. I won't lie, I have used some of the recipes as a base and modified them to be a little healthier. All in all I think it is a great reference for "old school" cooking and a go to for classic basic recipes.

  7. 4 out of 5

    T Hill

    This is my favorite cookbook and the one that I learned to cook from. I've got my mom's 1956 copy now and still use it. I love the little comments about who provided the recipe and serving suggestions and have been known to treat this cookbook like a collection of short stories reading it cover to cover. It is a great cookbook and the recipes are simple and easy to follow. If you think that scratch cooking is too much work using this book may change your mind.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Denae

    A re-publication of the original Betty Crocker cookbook. When I was growing up, this was one of two Betty Crocker cookbooks to which we always turned. Most of our recipes for pies and cakes are from here. I love the concept of key recipes followed by all of the variations. I definitely should pull this out more often to try new things.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary

    I so enjoyed giving Holly a new copy of this classic - totally '50s with very few vegetable recipes and lots of CAKE! I taught myself to bake with this book as a teenager and still have my mother's original copy.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Okay, I have not actually READ this entire cookbook. I have the original from 1950. But I have looked through it. I love it! I love these old cookbooks. I received my copy from a friend of my mom's who presumably bought it new.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Henry

    One of my favorite cookbooks. Come for the pre-microwave recipes, stay for the hilariously sexist anecdotes sprinkled throughout the text. The illustrations are charming 1950's style two tone affairs, showing exactly what to do with innocent clarity. Every once in awhile a wonderful pastel photo of delicious confections will pop up as you look for something. I love the Swedish Tea Ring recipe, the "key recipe" potato salad (still my standard whenever I make it.) and the golden cake. I firmly One of my favorite cookbooks. Come for the pre-microwave recipes, stay for the hilariously sexist anecdotes sprinkled throughout the text. The illustrations are charming 1950's style two tone affairs, showing exactly what to do with innocent clarity. Every once in awhile a wonderful pastel photo of delicious confections will pop up as you look for something. I love the Swedish Tea Ring recipe, the "key recipe" potato salad (still my standard whenever I make it.) and the golden cake. I firmly believe that cooking and baking are important skills to learn, and reading from the past can help you see how easy it can be today. Bonus: Look at the meal planning. It's like making thanksgiving dinner every day of the week!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Claire Spencer

    My Grandma gave me this cookbook so I loved it even before I looked at the recipes. That being said, I love this cookbook even more now that I have looked through the whole thing. All the recipes I've made so far have been delicious. There's a huge variety to choose from and there are a lot of family style/home cooked kind of recipes. Great traditional cookbook to have around, I definitely recommend it!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jean MacLeod

    I owned a copy of this book in the '60s and gave it away when we moved across the country. When I came across a pristine copy at the Library sale, it was like contacting an old friend. Naturally, I had to buy it. It's now taken up residence with my other treasured cookbooks.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Daylee

    I love this book. A lot of the recipes are still good, while others are a great glimpse at the time period. I also love a lot of the none recipe information about being a good house wife and hostess. Despite the obvious sexism I believe a lot of the advice is still pretty solid.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Penney

    Very good love the recipes

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    Another classic cookbook your mother or grandmother had. A must for your collection.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    My favorite go-to cookbook. I grew up with my mom's 1970's version and found it the best cookbook. I went online and my choices were the 1950's throwback cookbook (this one), or a new "updated" one published only a year or two ago. After reading reviews, I opted for the classic version. The popover recipe is the best I've tried. I love the tips and hints throughout the book. And of course, the old-fashioned photos and drawings are awesome. The only disappointment about the 1950's version is the My favorite go-to cookbook. I grew up with my mom's 1970's version and found it the best cookbook. I went online and my choices were the 1950's throwback cookbook (this one), or a new "updated" one published only a year or two ago. After reading reviews, I opted for the classic version. The popover recipe is the best I've tried. I love the tips and hints throughout the book. And of course, the old-fashioned photos and drawings are awesome. The only disappointment about the 1950's version is the index. Everything is categorized and then alphabetized so it's not easy looking up something specific. For instance, potato recipes are under vegetables, but a random potato recipe might be under another section. And the pages want to rip out of the ringbound cover quite often. It would have been sturdier as a hardback cookbook, not ringbound. For these reasons, I rated this cookbook with 4 instead of 5 stars.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mell

    This reproduction is the same version of the Betty Crocker Cookbook that my grandmother had, so my mom and I are happy to have access to many of the recipes that she used. I especially like the baking section- there are complex, fancy cakes that most modern cookbooks don't include anymore. (Ex: The Lord Baltimore, which I have not yet tried.) Charlotte desserts and meat (or vegetable) aspics, which seem to have fallen out of fashion, are also included. Because this cookbook is older, don't expect This reproduction is the same version of the Betty Crocker Cookbook that my grandmother had, so my mom and I are happy to have access to many of the recipes that she used. I especially like the baking section- there are complex, fancy cakes that most modern cookbooks don't include anymore. (Ex: The Lord Baltimore, which I have not yet tried.) Charlotte desserts and meat (or vegetable) aspics, which seem to have fallen out of fashion, are also included. Because this cookbook is older, don't expect a flashy, full page photo for every single recipe. Many of the "how to" photos are small, black and white images. And the recipes all call for butter, sugar, frying in oil, etc. There are no "skinny" versions of recipes in the margins. You can make your own substitutions, but the ingredient lists reflect the 1950's, when the book was first published.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Eliza Noel

    This cook book is full of wonderful cooking, baking, and hospitality tips. Some of the things you learn from it may be a little bit old fashioned, because it was originally published in 1950, but there are still a lot of great things to learn from it. One of things you need to know as you read this book is that some of the recipes include uncooked eggs, which in that case you just need to figure out a way to cook the eggs first. My mom used the recipe Texas Hash from this cook book and it was This cook book is full of wonderful cooking, baking, and hospitality tips. Some of the things you learn from it may be a little bit old fashioned, because it was originally published in 1950, but there are still a lot of great things to learn from it. One of things you need to know as you read this book is that some of the recipes include uncooked eggs, which in that case you just need to figure out a way to cook the eggs first. My mom used the recipe Texas Hash from this cook book and it was really yummy! After reading parts of this book I put together a menu from it that I plan to make for dinner some time. One thing that I think is cool is that the pictures are the original pictures from the 1950's edition. I love this book and I really want to encourage you to read it!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ram

    Awesome cookbook. That amalgam of hundreds of "typical" American women really knows its stuff around the kitchen, tell you what! And here my wife and I are not even as good at cooking as some goddamn amalgam!! Get the 1950 version of this, then try to figure out what a "hot oven" is, as opposed to a "medium" or "very hot" oven. Burn yourself with a flat iron -- was it "hot," "very hot," or "OhjesusmaryandjosephwhydidyouDOthat?!?!" Hmm? Also, who uses cakes of yeast nowadays? Germans? Overall, two Awesome cookbook. That amalgam of hundreds of "typical" American women really knows its stuff around the kitchen, tell you what! And here my wife and I are not even as good at cooking as some goddamn amalgam!! Get the 1950 version of this, then try to figure out what a "hot oven" is, as opposed to a "medium" or "very hot" oven. Burn yourself with a flat iron -- was it "hot," "very hot," or "OhjesusmaryandjosephwhydidyouDOthat?!?!" Hmm? Also, who uses cakes of yeast nowadays? Germans? Overall, two thumbs in my pie.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    This is more than a great retro cookbook. The 1950 edition is a treasure chest of recipes that even those of us who grew up in the 1970s will recognize from our mothers' kitchens. The desserts and breads are especially tasty. Some main dishes may need an extra bit of seasoning for today's tastes--but an equal number are classic comfort foods that will remind most of us of Mom.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    This is a wonderful basic cookbook. I love the time capsule that it is. All of that aside, I haven't tried a single recipe from it that didn't work out. My buttermilk pancakes are straight from here. I also learned some good kitchen techniques like using towels in the oven to help keep food warm for serving. There are some interesting novelties...like I learned what deviled ham was.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Annette

    I grew up with this cookbook in my mother's kitchen and always poured over the illustrations and tidbits on creating a lovely home. I was lucky enough to stumble upon an old edition years ago and snatched it up. The recipes are still good ( most of them.) I don't think I will ever make Kix chicken, but you never know.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Susan Howson

    I mean, don't get this book because you want a bunch of useful recipes, get it to laugh at the Fifties and to feel relief that you no longer have to make a man a ham in order to assure your financial future. (I have used a bunch of pie recipes from here, actually, and they've all turned out great.) Just get it. Get it!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rose Ann

    The best cookbook ever published anywhere. Love it love it love it! My mother had this cookbook and it was a tattered stained mess but I learned how to cook from it. The pictures, the little editorial notes -- like a trip back to childhood's happy hours. And I still use it! Every week! (Thankfully my sister gave me, as a gift, a brand-new facsimile copy of the original.)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

    This is a reprint of the original 1950's cookbook. My mom wore her original copy out. I purchased a copy of the reprint version for everyone in the family a few years ago. It is a piece of history with information that is valid today.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Book

    I have the 1950's edition and it's fantastic, with vintage photos and cute line drawings as well. This cookbook has very easy to follow recipes for making all sorts of dishes. My favorite section is the "Cookies" one: it's loaded with recipes (some quite unique) and tips on baking.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    The cookbook I love more than any other!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    This is a fun read, and the recipes are actually good, too. This has the waffle recipe I usually use.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Creolecat

    My copy is a first edition (ninth printing), copyright 1950 with a color photograph of fruit and miniature pies on the cover.

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