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His Hideous Heart

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Thirteen of YA’s most celebrated names reimagine Edgar Allan Poe’s most surprising, unsettling, and popular tales for a new generation. Edgar Allan Poe may be a hundred and fifty years beyond this world, but the themes of his beloved works have much in common with modern young adult fiction. Whether the stories are familiar to readers or discovered for the first time, readers will revel/>Edgar/>


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Thirteen of YA’s most celebrated names reimagine Edgar Allan Poe’s most surprising, unsettling, and popular tales for a new generation. Edgar Allan Poe may be a hundred and fifty years beyond this world, but the themes of his beloved works have much in common with modern young adult fiction. Whether the stories are familiar to readers or discovered for the first time, readers will revel/>Edgar/>

30 review for His Hideous Heart

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amy Imogene Reads

    Dark, delicious, diverse, feminist, eerie, memorable, and twisted—welcome to the new generation of Edgar Allan Poe. It’s a lot of fun in here. In His Hideous Heart, editor Dahlia Adler has compiled a truly impressive shortlist of some of Poe’s most famous tales, reimagined for a 2019 audience. I couldn’t believe how nuanced and imaginative these retellings were, and how eerily similar they felt to their original inspirations. Having the original Poe tales in the back of the collection was such Dark, delicious, diverse, feminist, eerie, memorable, and twisted—welcome to the new generation of Edgar Allan Poe. It’s a lot of fun in here. In His Hideous Heart, editor Dahlia Adler has compiled a truly impressive shortlist of some of Poe’s most famous tales, reimagined for a 2019 audience. I couldn’t believe how nuanced and imaginative these retellings were, and how eerily similar they felt to their original inspirations. Having the original Poe tales in the back of the collection was such a good call—I actually read each tale in tandem, from new reimagining to old inspiration to compare and contrast each entry. To keep this review shorter than its original anthology, here are my quick thoughts and ratings on each of the 13 tales: She Rode a Horse of Fire (Metzengerstein) by Kendare Blake Rating: ★★★★★ The perfect opener to this anthology, this historically-minded tale about a manor house experiencing the entrancement and death of its lord was the PERFECT amount of spooky. It’s Carnival! (The Cask of Amontillado) by Tiffany D. Jackson Rating: ★★★★ A tale twisted to a diverse feminist revenge story, this entry watches the narrator as she exacts a clinical end to the man who mocked her and her family for not being Jamacian enough with deadly results in modern-day New Orleans. Night-Tide (Annabelle Lee) by Tessa Gratton Rating ★★★★★ Tied as my favorite, this prose retelling of the poem follows the summer seaside hypnotic reality of the narrator as she questions whether her illicit love for Annabelle Lee was the cause of Annabelle’s death in this historic New England tale perfect for fans of f/f star-crossed lovers. The Glittering Death (The Pit and the Pendulum) by Caleb Roehrig Rating: ★★★★ A modern tale of a serial killer who targets women, and the girl who finds herself a live captive in need of escape—extremely gritty, and another parable on modern-day feminism. A Drop of Stolen Ink (The Purloined Letter) by Emily Lloyd-Jones Rating: ★★★★ 1/2 Edgar Allan Poe meets the future in a world where information is coded in biometric tattoos and one girl is sent to uncover a CEO’s treachery in the high-stakes world of the tattoo-data black market. Happy Days, Sweetheart (The Tell-Tale Heart) by Stephanie Kuehn Rating: ★★★★★ A high-achieving diverse female student always comes in second to the mediocrity of her white male competitor at their private school—so she decides to balance the scales of justice and eliminate him in this gruesome tale of cold revenge. The Raven (Remix) by Amanda Lovelace Rating: ★★★ The poem The Raven, blacked out to create a new narrative, remained cool in concept by struggled to shine in between such impressive prose entries. Changeling (Hop-Frog) by Marieke Nijkamp Rating: ★★★★ Set in 1832, this tale of the Fae is reimagined as a vigilante group of former disabled and neglected abused children who receive a glorious second chance at a happy life or a vengeful one in a dark tale of one girl questing to retrieve those who deserve more than what the mortal world can give them by transporting them to the kingdom of the Fae and punishing their perpetrators. The Oval Filter (The Oval Portrait) by Lamar Giles Rating: ★★★★★ A college football star’s dead girlfriend shows up in his Instagram feed trapped in an oval filter that appears to be suffocating her behind the screen—can Tariq solve the mystery behind her appearance before it drives him mad? Red (The Masque of the Red Death) by Hillary Monahan Rating: ★★ My least favorite in the collection, this tale should be read for the aesthetic and not for the narrative as it is essentially a color-coded picture show with a dark conclusion. Lygia (Ligeia) by Dahlia Adler Rating: ★★★ 1/2 A f/f tale of loss and mourning gone too far, the narrator mourns her dead girlfriend, Lygia, and tries to remake her presence in her new girlfriend with dark results. The Fall of the Bank of Usher (The Fall of the House of Usher) by Fran Wilde Rating: ★★★★★ Tied as my favorite, this masterful blend of futuristic nanotech with old-school English manor joins the heist trope in this tale of (potentially) gender-fluid twins who take the job of hacking the unhackable Bank of Usher in an old manor house guarded by semi-sentient computerized mold. (I hear you saying “wtf”—just read it. It’s amazing.) The Murders in Rue Apartelle, Boracay (The Murders in the Rue Morgue) by Rin Chupeco Rating: ★★★ Confusing and at times overly complicated given its length, this tale was a modern blend of magical realism in the Philippines told by the female narrator as she recounts the tale of her mysterious rich boyfriend who may or may not be too knowledgeable about a murder case. ***** Original notes: Ahhhh! So thrilled to be a part of the blog tour for His Hideous Heart. Stay tuned for my review on September 5! This is one of my most anticipated releases for 2019 so I am HYPED. Thank you so much to Flatiron Books for an ARC of this title in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    Oh... my god... EAP retellings?! Do you guys even know how much I love Edgar Allan Poe?! *screaming intensifies*

  3. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    You had me at Rin Chupeco and Kendare Blake reimagining Edgar Allan Poe, but then I read the rest of the contributors and almost fainted. This is going to be the best anthology ever. What a blessing. Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Youtube | Twitch

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elise (TheBookishActress)

    hope someone retells the Cask of Amontillado and brings back the meme

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dahlia

    I'm so excited at how soon this book will be out in the world, and thank you to everyone who's looking forward to it! It is, of course, on the horror side, so, CWs below in the spoiler tags, but, uh, assume a lot of death/murder/revenge; I'm not gonna put those tags in because it's basically every story. (Please note that these are intentional facets of the stories in which they appear. YMMV on how you receive that, but you aren't going to find these things "checked" on the page, only...dealt wi I'm so excited at how soon this book will be out in the world, and thank you to everyone who's looking forward to it! It is, of course, on the horror side, so, CWs below in the spoiler tags, but, uh, assume a lot of death/murder/revenge; I'm not gonna put those tags in because it's basically every story. (Please note that these are intentional facets of the stories in which they appear. YMMV on how you receive that, but you aren't going to find these things "checked" on the page, only...dealt with, shall we say.) Animal death: (view spoiler)["She Rode in on a Horse of Fire" by Kendare Blake (hide spoiler)] Homophobia: (view spoiler)["Night-Tide" by Tessa Gratton (hide spoiler)] Suicide: (view spoiler)["She Rode in on a Horse of Fire" by Kendare Blake, "Night-Tide" by Tessa Gratton" (hide spoiler)] Implied transphobia: (view spoiler)["The Murders in the Rue Apartelle, Boracay" by Rin Chupeco (hide spoiler)] Ableism and related abuse: (view spoiler)["Changeling" by Marieke Nijkamp (hide spoiler)] Torture: (view spoiler)["The Glittering Death" by Caleb Roehrig (hide spoiler)] Misogyny: (view spoiler)["The Glittering Death" by Caleb Roehrig, "The Oval Filter" by Lamar Giles (hide spoiler)] Implied partner death: (view spoiler)["Night-Tide" by Tessa Gratton, "Lygia" by Dahlia Adler (hide spoiler)] Substance abuse (mild): (view spoiler)["Lygia" by Dahlia Adler (hide spoiler)]

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tucker

    [Image TK] Many thanks to Macmillan Audio for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review DNF. well, that got old fast ------------ reasons why i will definitely love this book: 1. horror 2. edgar allen poe 3. a fully casted audiobook (WHAT) | Goodreads | Blog | Twitch | Pinterest | Reddit | LinkedIn |

  7. 5 out of 5

    Caidyn (SEMI-HIATUS; BW Reviews; he/him/his)

    I received this ARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review! I also won this in a Goodreads giveaway, so thanks to Flatiron for this! 3.8/5 I heard about this book ages ago and immediately needed it. I just didn't expect to 1) get approved through Netgalley and 2) win a Goodreads giveaway! I haven't won a giveaway on there since 2017. Been ages. Overall, I was very impressed by this collection. I'm not a huge short story person, but I love Poe. He's a very goo/>

  8. 5 out of 5

    Emily Lloyd-Jones

    I am so excited to be part of this anthology! (And hopefully I will resist the urge to make Poe-themed puns.)

  9. 5 out of 5

    TL

    No rating for now.. wasn't in the mood to read Poe's stories so will put up a full review when I get to them:). See my status updates for my ratings (DNFed the last story). I enjoyed the stories for the most part but only a handful stuck out for me, with only one that annoyed me and had me wondering how it made it in the collection. Would recommend, there's a nice variety of stories in here.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    Edgar Allan Poe being one of my favorite authors, I couldn't not get this book. Although I'm always wary when it comes to retellings of one of my favorite book or of stories of one of my favorites authors, I still really wanted to read that one. While I haven't been absolutely enchanted by it, it's still a good book, with a nice idea behind it, and I'm pretty sure many people (including others Poe fans) will love it more than I did. Edgar Allan Poe was an amazing writer who influenced so many pe Edgar Allan Poe being one of my favorite authors, I couldn't not get this book. Although I'm always wary when it comes to retellings of one of my favorite book or of stories of one of my favorites authors, I still really wanted to read that one. While I haven't been absolutely enchanted by it, it's still a good book, with a nice idea behind it, and I'm pretty sure many people (including others Poe fans) will love it more than I did. Edgar Allan Poe was an amazing writer who influenced so many people, and it does warm my heart to see those authors coming together to celebrate his work. Just for that, this anthology does have merit. The format is very nice, because it's in two parts: The Tales Retold first and then The Original Tales. You can read it as you want: the retelling and then the original tale, or like I did all the retellings and then enjoy once more the original tales. For those who haven't read Poe before, it's also a great opportunity for them to discover his writing without buying one of his books if they were never interested before. For those who love Poe, it's a great opportunity to read those new authors and to read once more the tales they already love. Basically, it's a win-win for everyone. Among those 13 tales, I had a hard time with some of them, but that's to be expected in general with an anthology. You have the stories you love, the ones you don't like, the ones that are just all right, which makes for me an overall rating of three stars. Night-Tide by Tessa Gratton, a retelling inspired by Annabelle Lee, is my favorite. The Glittering Death by Caleb Roehrig (inspired by The Pit and the Pendulum), Happy Days, Sweetheart by Stephanie Kuehn (inspired by The Tell-Tale Heart), Changeling by Marieke Nijkamp (inspired by Hop-Frog) were also really good. That makes 4 stories out of 13 that I really liked. On the other hand, I wasn't convinced at all by the The Raven (Remix) by Amanda Lovelace, where the original tale has parts covered in black to create a new tale. I found it more annoying than anything, but it's a matter of personal taste. A Drop of Stolen Ink by Emily Lloyd-Jones (inspired by The Purloined Letter) and The Fall of the Bank of Usher by Fran Wilde (inspired by The Fall of the House of Usher) are futuristic stories, which unfortunately isn't for me ; once again, it's really a matter of personal taste. The Oval Filter by Lamar Giles (inspired by The Oval Portrait) wasn't for me either (I get the use of technology like Instagram is now popular in horror movies and books, but it just doesn't work for me). So also 4 stories out of 13 that I didn't like. The 5 stories left, She Rode a Horse of Fire by Kendare Blake (inspired by Metzengerstein), It’s Carnival! by Tiffany D. Jackson (inspired by The Cask of Amontillado), Red by Hillary Monahan (inspired by The Masque of the Red Death), Lygia by Dahlia Adler (inspired by Ligeia), and The Murders in Rue Apartelle, Boracay by Rin Chupeco (inspired by The Murders in the Rue Morgue) were okay. All in all, this anthology is a very good October read if you're looking for one, with some tales definitely worth reading.

  11. 5 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) I couldn't imagine a book that was more on brand for me. Edgar Allen Poe re-tellings, edited by a fantastic human, full of some of my favorite and most anticipated authors? His Hideous Heart is made for me. I was unbelievably lucky to get an early copy and I devoured it whole. His Hideous Heart retains the magic of anthology, while bringing new life to Edgar Allen Poe. Part of why (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) I couldn't imagine a book that was more on brand for me. Edgar Allen Poe re-tellings, edited by a fantastic human, full of some of my favorite and most anticipated authors? His Hideous Heart is made for me. I was unbelievably lucky to get an early copy and I devoured it whole. His Hideous Heart retains the magic of anthology, while bringing new life to Edgar Allen Poe. Part of why I love anthologies, is that not only do they offer you experiences to become closer to your favorite authors, but also to discover new loves. And what a subject. I can remember my first experiences with Edgar Allen Poe in middle school. Being absolutely transfixed by his writing, his characters, the atmosphere. Obsessed with the Gothic imagery and haunting desires. These stories retain the eeriness, the creepiness, the same feeling of curiosity, and breathes new settings, characters, and technology. Nothing is as it seems and it only makes me want to go re-read the originals. Re-tellings will consistently captivate me - how much you retain from the original, what themes you bring forth, and which elements you eliminate. This anthology was like watching my wildest fantasies come true. full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Julia Ember

    Really great spooky collection. Of all the stories, Emily Lloyd-Jones's A Drop of Stolen Ink was probably my favorite -- a futuristic crime queer take on The Purloined Letter.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nursebookie

    "His Hideous Heart" Edited by Dahlia Adler is a collection of 13 short stories that are retold and inspired by Edgar Allan Poe. The overall themes include Love and Loss, Grief and Death, Rivalry and Revenge. Edgar Allan Poe's works continue to inspire Young Adults and every reader to this day, even after more than 150 years later. I remember reading Poe in high school and remembering how I felt reading his works. I enjoyed this collection and it is very well curated by Adler. Some of my favorite "His Hideous Heart" Edited by Dahlia Adler is a collection of 13 short stories that are retold and inspired by Edgar Allan Poe. The overall themes include Love and Loss, Grief and Death, Rivalry and Revenge. Edgar Allan Poe's works continue to inspire Young Adults and every reader to this day, even after more than 150 years later. I remember reading Poe in high school and remembering how I felt reading his works. I enjoyed this collection and it is very well curated by Adler. Some of my favorites are the following: THE NIGHT-TIDE By Tessa Gratton which was inspired by "Annabel Lee" and THE GLITTERING DEATH by Caleb Roehrig inspired by "The Pit and The Pendulum". I recommend this very much for a wonderful collection of short stories with amazing inspiration. Thank you NetGalley, Flatiron Books and authors for sending me a free copy in exchange for my objective and honest review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ariana

    Originally posted on: The Quirky Book Nerd *I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review* “Once upon a midnight dreary, I received a review query, About this very quaint and curious volume of Poe’s retold lore…” First off, I have to start by saying I was incredibly tempted to write this entire review as a poem in the style of “The Raven” but, unfortunately (…or perhaps fortunately), I think that far exceeds my creative writing talents. “Once Originally posted on: The Quirky Book Nerd *I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review* “Once upon a midnight dreary, I received a review query, About this very quaint and curious volume of Poe’s retold lore…” First off, I have to start by saying I was incredibly tempted to write this entire review as a poem in the style of “The Raven” but, unfortunately (…or perhaps fortunately), I think that far exceeds my creative writing talents. I know I am pointing out the obvious at this point, but this is a collection of thirteen YA authors’ contemporary retellings of some of Edgar Allan Poe’s most famous works. The authors have taken these chilling stories and reimagined them for a new generation of readers. These modernized versions are hauntingly unique yet still retain much of Poe’s signature tone and style while paying homage to the beloved originals. Thrills and chills, love, heartbreak, and revenge can all be found within these pages, forming a collection that further immortalizes these classic tales. As a lover of all things dark and creepy, I immediately fell in love with Edgar Allan Poe’s work when we first studied him back in middle school. So when I heard about this collection, I absolutely had to give it a read—and I was not disappointed. As with any anthology with multiple authors, you’re going to have some hits and some misses. However, I found that the focus here on Poe retellings helped to unify the stories quite a lot more than other short story collections I have read. Each story possesses the vividly eerie, peculiar, longing, and vengeful qualities found in the originals and stays very faithful to Poe’s visions for them. My favorite stories from the collection were: Night-Tide by Tessa Gratton Lygia by Dahlia Adler The Oval Filter by Lamar Giles A Drop of Stolen Ink by Emily Lloyd-Jones The Glittering Death by Caleb Roehrig The Fall of the Bank of Usher by Fran Wilde Now, I’ll go into some specifics about each of the individual stories and my thoughts on them. She Rode a Horse of Fire by Kendare Blake (3.5/5) Inspired by “Metzengerstein” In this story, we follow a girl who works in a mansion. The young master of the estate, Friedrich Baron, loses his most recent girlfriend in a fire on his property. It turns out that she was the daughter of another wealthy family who has a centuries-long feud with Friedrich’s. Then, out of nowhere one day, a young woman appears and Friedrich begins to spend all his time with her. And, somehow, this young woman has a striking resemblance to a figure in a mysterious tapestry found in the Baron estate. Though it was an interesting story, it just felt like it needed something more. I would have liked a little more clarity about who the characters are—particularly the main character—and what their relationships to each other were. The way the story is told, it makes it seem necessary to have a few more of those details. Other than that, it is a splendid update of the original story—very faithful to all the elements of the plot with a more modern twist to them! It’s Carnival! by Tiffany D. Jackson (3/5) Inspired by “The Cask of Amontillado” In this story, a girl named Cindy plans to get her revenge on a man named Darrell using Brooklyn’s West Indian Day Carnival to cover her tracks. It is clear that Darrel has been harassing her and her family relentlessly for years, though not much detail is given. The Cask of Amontillado is one of my favorite Poe tales and I felt that this was a pretty accurate depiction of the general idea of the story. It unfolds in much the same way as the original and that holding back of details is similar to how Poe tells his version. I think my only real issue was that I couldn’t quite get into Jackson’s writing style. It just didn’t click with me and I felt like there was a little something missing, but overall, it is an accurate retelling. Night-Tide by Tessa Gratton (5/5) Inspired by “Annabel Lee” Gratton transforms this classic poem into a short story about lost lovers. A young lady tells of a girl she loves who has tragically fallen ill and passed away. The narrator mourns her Annabel Lee, reminisces of better times, and feels anger at the intolerant whispers of the locals in this beach town. This was my favorite story in the whole collection—I absolutely adored it. It is both beautiful and utterly heartbreaking and is such a brilliant take on the original poem. Gratton did an amazing job of capturing those feelings of loss and longing that emanate from Poe’s writing. A wholly unique and imaginative retelling! The Glittering Death by Caleb Roehrig (4.25/5) Inspired by “The Pit and the Pendulum” In this story, a young girl is captured by an infamous serial killer named “The Judge”. He is going to kill her because he believes she has committed many sins and he wants her to confess them before her time comes. While trapped in a cage in his basement, she realizes she will have to determine how to beat him at his own game if she wants to get out alive. This is just begging to be turned into a full-length psychological thriller novel! The one thing I felt it was lacking was a bit more backstory for the main character. There were a number of plot points, specifically about her relationships with a couple other characters, that were only vaguely touched on. The fact that these plot points were brought up in the first place made some more detail necessary in order to fully develop the story. A Drop of Stolen Ink by Emily Lloyd-Jones (4.5/5) Inspired by “The Purloined Letter” In this story, society has reached a point where our entire identities are written in a tattoo on our bodies that can be scanned whenever our details are needed. This makes it nearly impossible for a person’s identity to be stolen. However, that very thing has happened, and it is up to our main character to find the missing tattoo. Classic mystery/thriller style plot meets futuristic tech? Sign me up! I absolutely loved this story—it was definitely my kind of thing. Once again, this is another story that I would absolutely love seeing turned into a full novel! Happy Days, Sweetheart by Stephanie Kuehn (2/5) Inspired by “The Tell-Tale Heart” In this story, we follow a girl who is dealing with a lot of pressure from herself to be the best but is struggling with being a minority in her school. She continuously loses out to a rich, white boy who does not put the same effort into things as she does. As the end of senior year approaches, she will do anything to become valedictorian. The Tell-Tale Heart is another one of my favorite Poe stories. However, I ended up not really liking this retelling. I do think it was very accurate and featured many of the important plot elements from the original. And, while I definitely understand the message Kuehn is trying to convey, I feel that this particular story is just not the right one to use in order to do that. I wasn’t entirely sure how to feel about this one. The Raven (Remix) by Amanda Lovelace (N/A) Inspired by “The Raven” This is a blackout poetry version of “The Raven” (one of my favorite poems of all time). Essentially, Lovelace takes the original poem and blacks out portions of the text in order to reveal a new poem that she has created from Poe’s words. Unfortunately, there was an error here with the digital ARC and nothing was blacked out, so I cannot give a rating or review on this one. However, I absolutely love Amanda Lovelace and her poetry is always so beautiful and creative. I am certain I will enjoy reading this when the collection officially releases. Changeling by Marieke Nijkamp (4/5) Inspired by “Hop-Frog” In this story, the children in society who are deemed “crippled” are either being treated unfairly or just left to fend for themselves. There is a tale of the fae coming to gather these children and bring them to a better life that many of them are hopeful is true. We follow a character who was once found and taken in by the fae and who now does the same for others—while also aiding them if they wish to take revenge on those who have wronged them. This one felt like a dark fairytale and I loved that. It was definitely an interesting and unique take on the original story. The Oval Filter by Lamar Giles (5/5) Inspired by “The Oval Portrait” This is the story of a guy named Tariq whose girlfriend has recently been murdered. Suddenly, she is haunting his Instagram feed, her constantly changing image in the oval profile picture helping lead Tariq to discover who has killed her. I had not read The Oval Portrait prior to this but I ended up absolutely loving both versions. Giles definitely captures the highly unsettling nature of the original work using our modern-day portraits—profile pictures. The changing image in the oval filter is described so vividly and the way it is used is truly creepy. Giles did a fantastic job of setting a clear and intense tone and atmosphere in a short amount of time. Red by Hillary Monahan (2/5) Inspired by “The Masque of the Red Death” Despite being familiar with and having studied The Masque of the Red Death, I was honestly quite confused by this story. I couldn’t really figure out what was happening. We follow this mysterious girl with red hair and it is clear that she is some sort of otherworldly being out for revenge. But that’s about all I figured out. There are many references to names used within the original story, such as the bar the girl ends up at having the same name and distinct internal color scheme as the home where the guests are hiding from the plague in Poe’s version. The ending produces the same result as the original text. However, I could not figure out why anything was happening or anything about the girl and what exactly she is. I do have to give Monahan credit for making such a fascinatingly atmosphere setting, though. Lygia by Dahlia Adler (5/5) Inspired by “Ligeia” In this story, our main character loses the girl she is deeply in love with to cancer. Then one day at school, she passes Lygia’s locker only to see a new girl who is somewhat reminiscent of Lygia—reminiscent enough that the narrator begins to do everything she can to make her the spitting image of Lygia. This is exactly the type of story that I love and I desperately wish this was a full-length novel. And that ending! I totally want to hear more of this story. I read the original “Ligeia” alongside this one as I had not read it before and felt that it was a very unique yet accurate retelling. The Fall of the Bank of Usher by Fran Wilde (4/5) Inspired by “The Fall of the House of Usher” Here, we follow twins who, together, are the hacker phenom “Madrik”. They receive an email inviting them to a bank in need of their skills to test their new security system. Once the twins arrive, however, it is clear that something much more sinister is at play. The sci-fi/hacker story nerd in me was very pleased with this one. The only “complaint” I had was that I wish this had been longer. There were so many fascinating pieces of technology I wanted more details on, and I would have loved to hear more of the twins’ backstory. Nevertheless, I thought this was an absolutely brilliant modernization of the original tale. Taking the creepy and inexplicable things that ensnare the house in the original story and transforming them into things like biotech and robotics was so great! The Murders in the Rue Apartelle, Boracay by Rin Chupeco (3/5) Inspired by “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” In this story, we follow a transgender girl as she falls in love with a man who takes her on a wild journey. She marvels at his attention to detail and remarkable powers of deduction. After spending days together exploring the area, they find out that a double murder has taken place and they are swept up into the investigation. This kind of had some Sherlock Holmes vibes, which I liked. It was an interesting story, but I never felt like I was all that invested in it or the characters. I think part of it was the writing style. I have read and enjoyed Rin Chupeco’s work in the past, but have also found her writing style a bit difficult to get in to. It was a very faithful retelling of the original, however, with a neat, fantastical twist! Overall, I had a really great time reading this. I definitely very highly recommend giving this collection a go if you are a fan of Edgar Allan Poe or any of these wonderful YA authors!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Stoolfire

    I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. His Hideous Heart edited by Dahlia Adler is an anthology of thirteen classic Edgar Allan Poe tales as reimagined by top YA authors. Needless to say, Edgar Allan Poe is one of my all time favorites so I had incredibly high expectations for this collection with an all new audience in mind. I loved that these talented authors have created such unique takes on these classics, some of which are quite unexpected. It was so much fun to be surprised byreview.His I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. His Hideous Heart edited by Dahlia Adler is an anthology of thirteen classic Edgar Allan Poe tales as reimagined by top YA authors. Needless to say, Edgar Allan Poe is one of my all time favorites so I had incredibly high expectations for this collection with an all new audience in mind. I loved that these talented authors have created such unique takes on these classics, some of which are quite unexpected. It was so much fun to be surprised by where some of the stories were so cleverly taken while still being able to recognize them at their core. My favorites included The Fall of the Bank of Usher by Fran Wilde (The Fall of the House of Usher), The Glittering Death by Caleb Roehrig (The Pit and the Pendulum), It’s Carnival! by Tiffany D. Jackson (The Cask of Amontillado), A Drop of Stolen Ink by Emily Lloyd-Jones (The Purloined Letter), Changeling by Marieke Nijkamp (Hop-Frog), and The Oval Filter by Lamar Giles (The Oval Portrait). Of all of these retellings, I was the most excited to see what Fran Wilde made of The Fall of the House of Usher as it's been a long time favorite and luckily her short tops my list of all thirteen retellings. I can't say I was expecting a sci-fi hacker heist, but it totally worked for me. Also, out of all of the self-contained stories in this anthology, this is the one where I wouldn't mind a longer novella or even a full-length novel of Mad and Rik's exploits. Overall, if you enjoy Edgar Allan Poe as much as I do, this collection of some of his most well known tales retold is well worth picking up. Don't worry if you aren't familiar with the original stories featured here because they are actually included at the back of the book for your enjoyment. Now I feel like watching some of Roger Corman's Edgar Allan Poe adaptations featuring Vincent Price!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Harker

    Rating: 4.5 Stars Content Warnings: Animal death, fire, ableist comments, blood, death (cancer), abuse of a child/teenager Representation: Rep: F/F (Night-Tide), disabled MC (Changeling), MOC/WOC MCs (The Oval Portrait), Portuguese LI (Lygia), trans girl MC & French-Filipino LI (The Murders in the Rue Apartelle, Boracay) This list may not be 100% complete, but is compiled to the best of my knowledge. ----- If you're looking for the perfect collection of stories to cu/>:/>Content Rating: 4.5 Stars Content Warnings: Animal death, fire, ableist comments, blood, death (cancer), abuse of a child/teenager Representation: Rep: F/F (Night-Tide), disabled MC (Changeling), MOC/WOC MCs (The Oval Portrait), Portuguese LI (Lygia), trans girl MC & French-Filipino LI (The Murders in the Rue Apartelle, Boracay) This list may not be 100% complete, but is compiled to the best of my knowledge. ----- If you're looking for the perfect collection of stories to curl up with, to haunt you into the wee hours of the morning and beyond, look no further than this: His Hideous Heart, edited by Dahlia Adler and contributed to by many more names from across the literary world. Taking inspiration from some of Edgar Allan Poe's most well known works, and from some possibly not so well known, each story or poem collected and reimagined therein is one sure to inspire chilling thoughts as you wonder about where the story will go, what will have changed, and just who you might be cheering for in the end. Thank you to Cat from Flatiron Books for having me on the His Hideous Hearts blog tour. It's been a blast. :) What I Enjoyed The authors within His Hideous Heart took inspiration from a classic source and brought that into modern places. There were elements of desperation and terror and anger and the need for justice that many feel and need. Whether it's someone getting a privilege or an absolution they don't deserve, or another person tearing a character down because of their accent, their heritage...a fragment of a Poe story waits for them within. The eeriness, the elements of the supernatural, the depths of depravity that humans themselves are capable of, all of these facets combine to weave an intense tapestry of stories.  I loved how I was able to find satisfaction in the crafting of these stories. I won't say that they're 100% faithful to the originals, as I haven't read all of the Poe versions, but let's say that the contributors to His Hideous Heart were able to find endings that twisted the themes of the stories, embodied the soul of them, and found wicked beauteous finales. The diversity of the tales was also terrific, much improved over the originals. From the Philippines to Barbadian immigrants to trans girls and more, there was so much to find within these pages. An exceptionally helpful facet of the book, if you've never read the original Poe tales before or if you need a refresher, if that His Hideous Heart includes the corresponding works at the back of this anthology. They're well worth a look because what would this collection be without Poe's classics? What I Didn't Enjoy While normally of fan of amanda lovelace, I wasn't entirely taken with her rendition of The Raven, here entitled The Raven (Remix). It didn't flow smoothly for me and made it difficult to take in amongst all the other stories. To Sum It Up This was one of my favorite anthologies in memory. How often can you say that you enjoyed almost every entry and cannot wait to go back for a reread? I look forward to the publication date of this book and the opportunity to secure the audiobook and experience these tales from a whole new perspective. I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Quotes included are from an advanced reader copy and may not reflect the finalized copy.

  17. 4 out of 5

    amanda

    I’m part of this book’s blog tour. Check out my blog for full review. Anthologies are fun. Oftentimes they are a miss, some stories lacking the power of the others. Rarely do I find myself completely obsessed with a book of short stories. And retellings? They’re hard to do. This book managed to hold my interest from start to finish and by the end I discovered authors I had never known about before, but now would hopelessly and utterly read more of their work. That is the true sign of a good ant I’m part of this book’s blog tour. Check out my blog for full review. Anthologies are fun. Oftentimes they are a miss, some stories lacking the power of the others. Rarely do I find myself completely obsessed with a book of short stories. And retellings? They’re hard to do. This book managed to hold my interest from start to finish and by the end I discovered authors I had never known about before, but now would hopelessly and utterly read more of their work. That is the true sign of a good anthology. ‘The marquee behind me proclaims Prospero’s dominion across the night sky.
I do not bother proclaiming mine. ‘ We all are familiar with Edgar Allan Poe’s work but of course there are stories more well known than others. In His Hideous Heart we get a mix of the known and the unknown and the combination is delicious. It’s stark and so well written. The authors and the characters are diverse in all factions. They tell you their story through their stories. There are a handful of narratives that are modernized as they mention Hayley Kiyoko, Iphones, and new slang. They work so very well because each author is fantastic in their own right and while you may think you know the ending, you never do. Some of my favorites are: • The Oval Filter by Lamar Giles • It’s Carnival! by Tiffany D. Jackson • The Glittering Death by Caleb Roehrig • Happy Days, Sweetheart by Stephanie Kuehn All of the stories are great however. You won’t be disappointed in any of the work. Whether its modernized, set in the past, or includes mythical creatures such as fae, eldritches, and monsters, they are all well written and leave you hungry for more. And there is more. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for this copy of my ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Owens

    The publisher of this book reached out to me and asked if I would provide an honest review in exchange for an electronic copy. All thoughts & opinions are my own. His Hideous Heart is a short story collection of re-imaginings of Edgar Allen Poe (hereafter referred to as EAP) short stories (and one poem) written by various Young Adult authors. Instead of going story-by-story and giving you a review and synopsis of each, I’m going to talk to you about the highs & lows of the col The publisher of this book reached out to me and asked if I would provide an honest review in exchange for an electronic copy. All thoughts & opinions are my own. His Hideous Heart is a short story collection of re-imaginings of Edgar Allen Poe (hereafter referred to as EAP) short stories (and one poem) written by various Young Adult authors. Instead of going story-by-story and giving you a review and synopsis of each, I’m going to talk to you about the highs & lows of the collection. The first story in this collection that was actually interesting to me was “Night-Tide” by Tessa Gratton, which is based on EAP’s “Annabel Lee.” This story had some mysterious substance to it, and wasn’t just a surface plot-based retelling. The emotion behind this story was made clear through the gorgeous, careful language. It struck a good balance between being original but also referencing its source material. Also yay it’s gay! My only issue with this one was that I was (and still am) unsure about what time period it’s supposed to be set in, which doesn’t really make a difference in terms of how good the story & writing are. I definitely think that Tessa Gratton was the perfect author for this one, and I ended up giving it a 4/5 stars. One of the most disappointing ones to me was “The Glittering Death,” which is the story based on EAP’s “The Pit & the Pendulum.” I am more familiar with “Pit & Pendulum” than I am with any other EAP stories, so I went into this one with high expectations. Unfortunately I just didn’t find this one very chilling, especially in comparison with the original. I didn’t like that the main character, Laura, was part of a “mean girls” type clique at school. It created a gap between me as a reader and her and I couldn’t connect. It all felt superficial and I couldn’t quite buy into the creepiness or dread of her situation & captivity. I ended up rating this story 2/5 stars. Though I didn’t rate it particularly high, I feel the need to talk a little bit about the story “The Oval Filter” – based on EAP’s story “The Oval Portrait.” I had some very overwhelming feelings about it – some positive and some negative – that I’d like to just touch on & point out. My initial reaction to it was that it was gross; the writing style had some very bro-y language in it that was unnecessary. For example, the main character describes his past girlfriend as “Rihanna-esque” and a “bad chick.” It was so very focused on how pleasant her body and features were to him and it was gross to read. And not very professional writing, in my opinion. Just very surface and disappointing. The plot itself though was actually super cool! The way she like, hacked into his phone and controlled it, it was cool and creepy and fun. And the ending was badass! I just wish this story had focused more on the fun mystery plot and the supernatural elements to it than on the flimsy, bad “character development.” I ended up giving it a 2/5 stars. My favorite story of the collection was actually “Changeling,” based on “Hop-Frog.” I didn’t quite know that it was my favorite until I had finished the whole collection and went back through all of my thoughts I had written down to write this review. This story, while not necessarily the “scariest” of the bunch, was the most original, intentional, and well-written of the bunch for me. Despite it being short in length it still managed to be intricate in every way. There was a fleshed-out history & context for the characters and the fantasy world it’s set in. Like I said before, the story was intentional in every way; the word choice seemed thought out and the characters relationships & choices seemed like they served a deliberative purpose. It was confusing in the best way – an authentically mysterious way. Overall it just was a sweet story, which is surprising to say considering the themes and ideas were fairly dark. I gave it 4/5 stars. And all of the others stories were either not memorable or too confusing and should have been longer. Overall I was a bit disappointed in this book as a whole. It wasn’t as spooky as I would have liked, and it seemed all over the place – likely due to the fact that the stories were all written by different authors. At the very least with EAP’s original stories, the voice and vibe of the stories & poems were consistent because the same author was writing them. And I think that’s why I had trouble with this. It was very disorienting and I felt jerked around and like I couldn’t get into anything. And once I did get into it and start to understand it, it was over. I think this was a personal reading experience – I 100% still think that if you like gothic-type books, want something to read for Halloween times, or like EAP, you should definitely give this a try yourself.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sara Jovanovic

    When I heard this anthology was announced, it's simple to say I was beyond excited. I love Poe and his works so I was eagerly awaiting for this to be released. It features 13 pieces of writing, all of them reimaginings of Poe's famous short stories and poems by beloved YA authors. I was already familiar with all of the original Poe's works used for inspiration, but I think it was such a good idea to involve them into anthology along with the reimaginings. It made it easy to get familiar with the When I heard this anthology was announced, it's simple to say I was beyond excited. I love Poe and his works so I was eagerly awaiting for this to be released. It features 13 pieces of writing, all of them reimaginings of Poe's famous short stories and poems by beloved YA authors. I was already familiar with all of the original Poe's works used for inspiration, but I think it was such a good idea to involve them into anthology along with the reimaginings. It made it easy to get familiar with the ones you don't know (or revisit some of the favourites in my case). Unfortunately, I'm displeased to say this was rather bad overall. There was one story that completely blew me away with it's magical writing, thoughtful construction and amazing portrayal of grief and loss and that is Night-Tide by Tessa Gratton, which is undoubtedly my favourite out of this collection, and I even read it several times. She took inspiration from Annabelle Lee, setting her historical fiction in a quiet New England resort, in a story about star-crossed lovers and memories that haunt forever. Along with Tessa's story, there were few of them I liked as well, but all of the others were either really bad or plain mediocre. And I'm really sorry to say that, because I expected so much out of this anthology. In the meantime, I'll just continue to re-read Night-Tide and quietly hope that Dahlia's next anthology inspired by Shakespeare will be better that this one. Ratings: 1. She rode a Horse of Fire by Kendare Blake: 3.5 stars 2. It's Carnival! by Tiffany D. Jackson: 2.5 stars 3. Night-Tide by Tessa Gratton: 5 stars 4. The Glittering Death by Caleb Roehrig: 2 stars 5. A Drop of Stolen Ink by Emily Lloyd-Jones: 3.5 stars 6. Happy Days, Sweetheart by Stephanie Kuehn: 1 star 7. The Raven (Remix) by Amanda Lovelace: 2 stars 8. Changeling by Marieke Nijkamp: 4 stars 9. The Oval Filter by Lamar Giles: 3 stars 10. Red by Hillary Monahan: 1 star 11. Lygia by Dahlia Adler: 4 stars 12. The Fall of the Bank of Usher by Fran Wilde: 1 star 13. The Murders in the Rue Apartelle, Boracay by Rin Chupeco: 2 stars Average rating: 2.65

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jess ✩

    Some stories I liked. Most I didn't. I gave about half these stories two stars and I just... so disappointing.

  21. 4 out of 5

    ♠️ TABI ♠️

    Uhm, a collection of retellings all based on Poe's writing by a lot of my favorite authors???? And now, of course, I must wait to read this . . . Uhm, a collection of retellings all based on Poe's writing by a lot of my favorite authors???? And now, of course, I must wait to read this . . .

  22. 4 out of 5

    Fran

    * I have a story in this collection * And I love it so. Each retelling transforms the way I look at the original, and makes me think.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn

    When an idea you came up with becomes an actual novel!!!!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Emily (moonlight&moths)

    ITS OCTOBER AND I'M HERE TO READ SOME POE RETELLINGS!! I LOVED reading this anthology because it was so diverse. I kept freaking out everytime a f/f pairing happened because I didn't know that this book was going to feed me so well. I also loved that this book featured marginalized characters who were able to take power for themselves and kill, steal from, or fight back against their oppressors. Seeing people become empowered in situations where they might have been vilified previously was an in ITS OCTOBER AND I'M HERE TO READ SOME POE RETELLINGS!! I LOVED reading this anthology because it was so diverse. I kept freaking out everytime a f/f pairing happened because I didn't know that this book was going to feed me so well. I also loved that this book featured marginalized characters who were able to take power for themselves and kill, steal from, or fight back against their oppressors. Seeing people become empowered in situations where they might have been vilified previously was an interesting perspective and I'm so glad someone wrote it. ♠,.:*:.,♠.,:*:,.♠,.:*:.,♠,.:*:.,♠,.:*:.,♠,.:*:.,♠.,:*:,.♠,.:*:.,♠ She Rode a Horse of Fire (Kendare Blake) ★★★★☆ Haunted homes are my FAVORITE gothic trope. The way the characters talked and their mannerisms all felt so Poe-esque. Blake really captures the spirit of Poe in the story, hands down a spooky read. It's Carnival! (Tiffany D. Jackson) ★★★☆☆ Rep: WOC mc Honestly this story was a little underwhelming. It really didn't do anything new with the story but it did empower a girl to kill someone who harasses her. Night-Tide (Tessa Gratton) ★★★★★ REP: wlw pairing ITS THE POEM OF ANNABEL LEE BUT SAPPHIC. No words can describe how much I LOVED reading this short story. The Glittering Death (Caleb Roehrig) ★★★☆☆ TW: Torture sequences I really really REALLY dislike serial killers. This story chilled me to the bone, especially since I was working a closing shift at my job that night. It was a creative way to tell the story, but the vivid torture really made the story less enjoyable for me. 10/10 for managing to terrify me though... A Drop of Stolen Ink (Emily Lloyd-Jones) ★★★★★ Rep: wlw pairing This was an incredibly clever retelling of the Purloined Letter and I thoroughly enjoyed the ending. Happy Days, Sweetheart (Stephanie Kuehn) ★★★★★ Rep: Black-Hispanic mc Without spoiling it, let me just say... THAT ENDING THOUGH The Raven (Remix) (amanda lovelace) ★★★★★ I got chills reading this. Changeling (Marieke Nijkamp) ★★★★☆ Rep: wlw pairing briefly mentioned, disabled mc What's better then a fae found family? A GOTHIC fae found family. The Oval Filter (Lamar Giles) ★★★★☆ Rep: MOC mc, WOC love interest An unique retelling of the original story. Think modern day Poe but if he was a goth, jock. Red (Hillary Monahan) ★★★☆☆ Again this was one of the stories where I felt like nothing revolutionary was done to the retelling. Instead it was just the same story but in a modern day setting. Lygia (Dahlia Adler) ★★★☆☆ Rep: Lesbian mc, Portuguese love interest, lesbian love interest This was an interesting retelling of the story it just also made me feel really cringy the whole time I read it so.... :-/ The Fall of the Bank of Usher (Fran Wilde) ★★★★☆ This is my favorite Poe story so I was a little skeptical while reading this retelling. However I enjoyed Fran's heist spin on the story and I'm really glad that the mold still played a vital part in the decay of the house. This was an excellent sci-fi twist on a classic I love. The Murders in the Rue Apartelle, Boracay (Rin Chupeco) ★★★★☆ Rep: trans girl MC, French-Filipino love interest It's like Sherlock Holmes but the only white guys present are the bad ones. The world in this story is so lush and unique. I really want Rin Chupeco to write a full story in this world because those eldritch beasts were super interesting.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Leah Hall

    1.5 (FULL DISCLAIMER: I AM an edgar allen poe stan) Oof! i hated it! There are exactly two good things in this book, Kendare Blake and Edgar Allen Poe. Thank god this shitty book includes all his original works, because I need to cleanse my pallet after gargling this shit storm for days straight. Breakdown: She Rode a Horse of Fire: 4.5⭐ It’s Carnival: 3.5⭐ Night-Tide: 3⭐ The Glittering Death: 3.5⭐ A Drop of Stolen Ink: 2⭐ Happy Days, Sweetheart: DNF 0/5 The Raven (Remix): 1⭐ Changelin 1.5 (FULL DISCLAIMER: I AM an edgar allen poe stan) Oof! i hated it! There are exactly two good things in this book, Kendare Blake and Edgar Allen Poe. Thank god this shitty book includes all his original works, because I need to cleanse my pallet after gargling this shit storm for days straight. Breakdown: She Rode a Horse of Fire: 4.5⭐️ It’s Carnival: 3.5⭐️ Night-Tide: 3⭐️ The Glittering Death: 3.5⭐️ A Drop of Stolen Ink: 2⭐️ Happy Days, Sweetheart: DNF 0/5 The Raven (Remix): 1⭐️ Changeling: 1.5⭐️ The Oval Filter: 1.5⭐️ Red: 2⭐️ Lygia: 3⭐️ The Fall of the Bank of Usher: DNF The Murders in the Rus Apartelle, Boracay: 2⭐️ the DNFs: Okay, let me just say that i was going through this whole book most excited for The Telltale Heart and The Raven. Happy Days, Sweetheart was the reimagining of The Telltale Heart, so I was pretty excited when I got to it. Boy, was i disappointed. If there’s one thing that turns me off more then anything it’s inserting your shitty political opinion into a book. When the story started out with the narrator discussing how Hillary lost to Trump I knew I couldn’t do it. It’s so unnecessary to bring politics into an anthology for Edgar Allen Poe. I hate everyone who approved this decision and I hate the author (whoever they are) for briefly ruining The Telltale Heart for me (like i said, thank god for the original tales in the back). Okay and my second DNF was The Fall of the Bank is Usher because it was boring... NEXT! My 1-2 Star ratings: None of these were good. They were all boring and not the least bit scary. Shoutout to The Raven remix for being particularly pretentious and bad! The Oval Filter? you also sucked don’t think your getting out of this without an honorable mention! Not scary, not even a HINT of the brilliance Poe displayed in his writings The 3 Stars: They weren’t great but they weren’t bad, okay. Lygia was kinda unsettling and The Glittering Death was creative enough (though incredibly unrealistic (needles need to be inserted into VEINS for them to work YA authors!! you can’t just shove them in anywhere and have the character pass out for ages!!)) But honestly, I can’t complain- compared to the other dumpster fires these were good The Lone 4 Star: Shoutout to my girl Kendare Blake!! You’re cool, you’re amazing, you’re the best writer out of all these authors combined... we been knew. Thank you for blessing me with your story first, you rocked it. Killed the game with an actually creepy story that didn’t completely abandon Poe’s classic work. I love you, never stop writing All together, Kendare Blake and the 3 stars earned this book an extra .5 on my rating. If I could burn the other stories out of my brain forever, I would!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chasia Lloyd

    Perfect Halloween read Just in time for the season of frights, His Hideous Heart takes familiar Edgar Allan Poe stories and reimagines them across a wide spectrum of genres, sexualities, genders, and ethnicities. My personal faves include Emily Lloyd-Jones's exciting retelling of "The Purloined Letter" and Dahlia Adler's creepy spin on "Ligeia." Link to the editor's list of content warnings: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Raegan

    *CALLING ALL EDGAR ALLAN POE FANS* Disclaimer, I had never read any of EAP's works before reading this book. Which if I am being honest made it even more appealing since it had both the original tales and the re-imagined versions. Horror, dark, or creepy stories are not my favorite but since it was SpOoKy season I thought i'd give it a shot. They stories were so very diverse in so many ways and it was so cool to read but it also made it hard for me to get into the book because as soon as I *CALLING ALL EDGAR ALLAN POE FANS* Disclaimer, I had never read any of EAP's works before reading this book. Which if I am being honest made it even more appealing since it had both the original tales and the re-imagined versions. Horror, dark, or creepy stories are not my favorite but since it was SpOoKy season I thought i'd give it a shot. They stories were so very diverse in so many ways and it was so cool to read but it also made it hard for me to get into the book because as soon as I was finally getting into the story it would be over. That being said, they were SO well written. When our library first got this book I had put it into our YA section and after reading it I most definitely be moving it to our Teen collection. All in all it was a good October read!

  28. 4 out of 5

    James

    Edgar Allen Poe retellings? The concept alone had me hooked. I already wanted to revisit some of his work this season, and this was a great twist on reading the stories alone. In each case I read the original first, and then went back to the first half of the book and read its corresponding retelling. Some definitely worked better than others - My favorites were the reimagining of Annabel Lee and The Pit and the Pendulum, but all were worth a visit.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cassie-la

    The 13 young adult shorts in this collection -- inspired by specific works of Edgar Allan Poe -- run the gamut from straight horror to science fiction to fantasy. Bonus: the anthology even includes the original works so you can compare and contrast Poe's source material with the retellings. While the overall anthology is weighed down by a few clunkers (because what collection isn't?), His Hideous Heart features some really well written, diverse stories for a modern age that pay homage to the master o The 13 young adult shorts in this collection -- inspired by specific works of Edgar Allan Poe -- run the gamut from straight horror to science fiction to fantasy. Bonus: the anthology even includes the original works so you can compare and contrast Poe's source material with the retellings. While the overall anthology is weighed down by a few clunkers (because what collection isn't?), His Hideous Heart features some really well written, diverse stories for a modern age that pay homage to the master of the macabre.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Liza Wiemer

    This anthology is ADDICTIVE, incredible stories-dark, creepy, powerful, chilling in the best way! High praise from someone who never, NEVER reads horror or scary stories. An absolute MUST READ! Brilliant. Perfect companion book for HS teachers teaching Edgar Allen Poe!

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