Hot Best Seller

All For One

Availability: Ready to download

In this dazzling finale to the trilogy that began with the New York Times bestselling Alex & Eliza: A Love Story, the curtain closes on the epic romance of Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler 1785. New York, New York. As a young nation begins to take shape, Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler are on top of the world. They’re the toast of the town, keep In this dazzling finale to the trilogy that began with the New York Times bestselling Alex & Eliza: A Love Story, the curtain closes on the epic romance of Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler 1785. New York, New York. As a young nation begins to take shape, Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler are on top of the world. They’re the toast of the town, keeping New York City buzzing with tales of their lavish parties, of Eliza’s legendary wit, and of Alex’s brilliant legal mind. But new additions to Alex & Eliza’s little family mean change is afoot in the Hamilton household. When they agree to take in an orphaned teenage girl along with Eliza’s oldest brother, John Schuyler, Eliza can’t help but attempt a match. It’s not long before sparks start to fly…if only Eliza can keep herself from interfering too much in the course of true love. After all, she and Alex have an arrival of their own to plan for, though Alex’s latest case brings a perilous threat that may destroy everything. The sweeping love story of Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler comes to a close in All for One, the riveting final installment of the New York Times bestselling Alex & Eliza trilogy.


Compare

In this dazzling finale to the trilogy that began with the New York Times bestselling Alex & Eliza: A Love Story, the curtain closes on the epic romance of Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler 1785. New York, New York. As a young nation begins to take shape, Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler are on top of the world. They’re the toast of the town, keep In this dazzling finale to the trilogy that began with the New York Times bestselling Alex & Eliza: A Love Story, the curtain closes on the epic romance of Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler 1785. New York, New York. As a young nation begins to take shape, Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler are on top of the world. They’re the toast of the town, keeping New York City buzzing with tales of their lavish parties, of Eliza’s legendary wit, and of Alex’s brilliant legal mind. But new additions to Alex & Eliza’s little family mean change is afoot in the Hamilton household. When they agree to take in an orphaned teenage girl along with Eliza’s oldest brother, John Schuyler, Eliza can’t help but attempt a match. It’s not long before sparks start to fly…if only Eliza can keep herself from interfering too much in the course of true love. After all, she and Alex have an arrival of their own to plan for, though Alex’s latest case brings a perilous threat that may destroy everything. The sweeping love story of Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler comes to a close in All for One, the riveting final installment of the New York Times bestselling Alex & Eliza trilogy.

30 review for All For One

  1. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie ((Strazzybooks))

    3.5/5, rounded up for the trilogy as a whole. “Nation-building can be a rather callous endeavor..” This was the final book in the Alex & Eliza trilogy and I read it around the 4th of July, which was the perfect mood read. This wasn’t my favorite of the three, but it wrapped up the story nicely. I was impressed with the writing and details - from Eliza cutting the pages of her new book in bed, to the pressure on Hamilton, you really get the feel of a new and growing country along wi/> 3.5/5, rounded up for the trilogy as a whole. “Nation-building can be a rather callous endeavor..” This was the final book in the Alex & Eliza trilogy and I read it around the 4th of July, which was the perfect mood read. This wasn’t my favorite of the three, but it wrapped up the story nicely. I was impressed with the writing and details - from Eliza cutting the pages of her new book in bed, to the pressure on Hamilton, you really get the feel of a new and growing country along with a growing marriage/family. The characters’ personalities also shine, and even when you don’t much like them, you can understand them. I definitely recommend this trilogy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mary-Faith

    3.5 / 5 stars I enjoyed this, just as I've enjoyed the other books in the series. The historical details were meticulously researched. But...this was very repetitive. Very little actually happened. So I didn't absolutely love it, and I'm wondering if maybe the first book should have just been a standalone since it was the best of the three. Regardless, I enjoyed reading this (mostly fictional) take on the Hamiltons' story.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    When I finished the first book in this trilogy I swore I’d not read the second, and when I finished the second I promised myself I’d poke my eyes out before I read the third, but here we are. The writing is rubbish, and it swings between weird moments of frivolous characterisation (why is Alexander Hamilton tap dancing?) and stupid info dumps of historic information, I’m assuming to prove how well researched she is. And she might be, but you wouldn’t know, because she chang When I finished the first book in this trilogy I swore I’d not read the second, and when I finished the second I promised myself I’d poke my eyes out before I read the third, but here we are. The writing is rubbish, and it swings between weird moments of frivolous characterisation (why is Alexander Hamilton tap dancing?) and stupid info dumps of historic information, I’m assuming to prove how well researched she is. And she might be, but you wouldn’t know, because she changed so much of the history in this. People are born in the wrong year, characters are invented, she deliberately moved one of the pivotal moments in Hamilton’s life forward 10 years and changed how the world found out about the Reynolds affair for what? Eliza to look a bit more “sassy”? And then to top it off she writes an authors note that basically says I DIDN’T CHANGE TOO MUCH I SWEAR followed by a list of EVERYTHING SHE CHANGED. Oh, and her Eliza is a snobbish, annoying, selfish woman, to go with her Alexander’s boorish ways. AWFUL. WHY. THANK GOD THERE ISN’T A 4TH ONE I’LL TRY AND READ.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Zoe

    2.5 Stars This review is a mess of me yelling about everything, also ***Spoilers for HISTORY*** Okay. So their marriage is going all good. And then... [Maria Reynolds, enter stage left] Let's just have a conversation about feminism. The usual. But first. Me yelling about a-spec erasure in this line. Extended period without romantic intimacy Romantic intimacy being sex. But sex isn't the only kind of romantic intimacy?? Like it's obviously a/> 2.5 Stars This review is a mess of me yelling about everything, also ***Spoilers for HISTORY*** Okay. So their marriage is going all good. And then... [Maria Reynolds, enter stage left] Let's just have a conversation about feminism. The usual. But first. Me yelling about a-spec erasure in this line. Extended period without romantic intimacy Romantic intimacy being sex. But sex isn't the only kind of romantic intimacy?? Like it's obviously a part?? But cuddling?? Holding hands? And they're era appropriate?? Dude. Go hug your pregnant wife rigHT NOW. It's really sad. Yeah, so feminism. Eliza obviously forgives Hamilton for cheating on her while she's with child, and I'm like. Good for you?? But?? Why?? Contributing to this point is a line from 'Burn' that says You'll sleep in your office instead Like no divorce. No cutting all ties. This is 1785. She still has to rely on him and raise his child and pay for their lives. And she knows he'll do it cause he screwed up. But she can't rely on herself. This has been a piece on feminism and a-spec erasure, News at 6. Trigger and Content Warnings: previous loss of loved ones, alcoholism, talk of gambling, talk of prostitution, physical abuse, domestic abuse, toxic masculinity, talk of privilege, sexism, classism, cheating 1). Alex & Eliza ⭐⭐⭐☆☆ 2). Love & War ⭐⭐☆☆☆ ---------- I swear I've gone into a reading slump... this is the first book I've read and it's basically been a week... this does not bode well

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sara (A Gingerly Review)

    Glad to be done with this series. It wasn't that it was boring (remember - this story is set in the 1700s and the first-world issues are not being invited to the right parties or having the proper China to display during tea) it was that too much time was given to describing things that had no value to the story. I don't care what type of cookies were served at tea or that these people talked as if they were better than everyone else. It was a peaceful story and nothing more.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Scarlett

    (Probably more of a 3.5) I did enjoy this instalment more than its predecessors- but some significant artistic licence was taken with the historical accuracy. I can understand this, of course, as this series is a fictional take on the lives of the figures: but some jumbled events on the timeline are quite noticeable if you are interested in the history behind the book's cast of characters. [Full review coming soon]

  7. 5 out of 5

    Fiona

    I think Ms. de la Cruz could have a real talent for historical fiction if she would be more mindful of her word choices and refrain from having 19th century persons say things like, "I didn't want them to be all matchy-matchy," (as Eliza Hamilton does).

  8. 5 out of 5

    Maja

    (Realistic rating: look, I had to be rounding down from two stars on this series eventually, and this is it, we are here. It's more for the series as a whole than this book in particular, but I DO think the second book in the series is the best [if for a very, VERY loose definition of the word], so I suppose that means it's fair to give the other two one star. [I don't have a review for Alex & Eliza on this account, but rest assured it would be one star, too. Realistically, it's closer to 1.5? Li (Realistic rating: look, I had to be rounding down from two stars on this series eventually, and this is it, we are here. It's more for the series as a whole than this book in particular, but I DO think the second book in the series is the best [if for a very, VERY loose definition of the word], so I suppose that means it's fair to give the other two one star. [I don't have a review for Alex & Eliza on this account, but rest assured it would be one star, too. Realistically, it's closer to 1.5? Like, it's not TOTALLY unreadable dreck. But you should definitely not make the effort to consume it. Like, ever.) I mean... these books are bad, y'all. They're bad! It's hard to say which of them is the worst -- the first is outright offensive, the second is boring as fuck, and this one COMPLETELY destroys a character we're supposed to like and root for (which, I mean, I never did, ha, but it was clear that was the intent in prior books!), turning her into a complete snob who manipulates everyone around her and becomes wildly defensive when called out on it and/or reminded that other people have lives and desires other than those she might choose for them (not to mention the classism truly jumping out!!). And, of course, I can't overstate how fucking absurd it is to write about the Reynolds affair in a YA book!! Yes, let's teach teenagers that staying with your cheating significant other is the only way to truly prove you're adults who can make a relationship work!! GREAT IDEA, MELISSA. BEST IDEA EVER. I really don't even know where to start on a lot of the issues of this book; obviously, I'm really furious about the cheating and about Eliza's wild dive into classism and selfishness (which BARELY gets fixed at the end, and honestly way too late!!), but I'm also really mad about a relatively minor plot point, which is the pregnancy -- Eliza not realizing she's pregnant when she misses all the signs despite desperately wanting a baby, and the weirdly praise-filled descriptions of being pregnant in a book aimed at teenagers?? ??? Come on, Melissa, what agenda are we promoting here?? And let's not even start on the further constant references to her pale skin (in a book inspired by the almost-all-POC musical!!), which has been constant throughout the entire series. Just... it's a nightmare, folks. Start to finish, it's a big steaming pile of garbage. Please do yourselves a favor and never, ever read this series.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    3.5 stars -- this felt like a lackluster ending to the trilogy that I really loved at the start! I loved reading about Alex and Eliza, but this one just felt like a whole book revolving around Eliza trying to play matchmaker.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Fierymermaidbooks

    I love Alex and Eliza’s story! It is a slower read because of all the history and law cases.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Luna

    Nothing really happened. This could've easily be done in the second book or just in a 100 pages. It was enjoyable but that's about it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susie

    I liked this final book more than I thought I would, knowing what I know about the actual events of the lives of the Hamiltons. I suppose I thought there wouldn’t really be any way to “handle” those unpleasantries. But, it worked surprisingly well. I will always be glad to have learned more about the beginnings of our nation and it’s first citizens.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Danae Mckain

    Overall I enjoyed the series, but this last book the plot just didn't hold my attention. There were good story lines scattered throughout but the main story of Alex and Eliza just made me feel meh.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    DNF on chapter 75. Can't do it, everything seemed to be pointless. I love the cutesy moments but it wasn't enough to get through the whole book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Heather McC

    The trilogy of Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler concludes, mixing historic fact with fictional liberties to finish their love story. While the Schuyler sister trio are not overly present (very little mention of Angelica and Peggy), readers are offered a glimpse of Elizabeth's younger brother John Bradstreet Schuyler. De La Cruz blends fiction and history neatly to finish a complex tale filled with heroes, heroines, and the occasional villain(ness). What seems missing from De La Cruz's t The trilogy of Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler concludes, mixing historic fact with fictional liberties to finish their love story. While the Schuyler sister trio are not overly present (very little mention of Angelica and Peggy), readers are offered a glimpse of Elizabeth's younger brother John Bradstreet Schuyler. De La Cruz blends fiction and history neatly to finish a complex tale filled with heroes, heroines, and the occasional villain(ness). What seems missing from De La Cruz's third installments are a bibliography of sources that the more curious reader (or historian) can utilize to uncover more on the topic.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Taryn

    My least favorite of the series

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gaby Hernandez

    I love historical fictions and this was no exception. I love the way Melissa de la Cruz wrote this trilogy it was beautiful and flowed together easily. The characters were my favorite especially Emma and Drayton. I was just really disappointed that Alex cheated on Eliza it really ruined their relationship for me.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    I received this book as an advanced reader's copy due to our young reader's love for Melissa De La Cruz rendition of the love story of Alex and Eliza. The huge Hamilton craze keeps on growing with the third installment of the Alex & Eliza series. We start to see a more intimate and playful side to Alex and Eliza's relationship despite all the political action going through Alex's head with General Washington and Aaron Burr. I also found it interesting when Eliza wanted to set up an Orphaned I received this book as an advanced reader's copy due to our young reader's love for Melissa De La Cruz rendition of the love story of Alex and Eliza. The huge Hamilton craze keeps on growing with the third installment of the Alex & Eliza series. We start to see a more intimate and playful side to Alex and Eliza's relationship despite all the political action going through Alex's head with General Washington and Aaron Burr. I also found it interesting when Eliza wanted to set up an Orphaned Girl with her brother since her family had such high standards in social status but it was nice to see a human side to Eliza and how caring she was for the public. We enjoyed this book a lot and that is why we are giving it 5 stars!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Payne

    Least fav of the trilogy. Strayed too far from the facts. I did not like the voice she gave to Maria Reynolds.

  20. 4 out of 5

    reenie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Yay, we've reached the conclusion of the Alex & Eliza Series. I started reading this series two years ago, and we have reached the end. It was a satisfying conclusion to an epic love story and has a beautiful yet tragic end to the love story of Alexander and Eliza Hamilton. Even though All For One takes some historical liberties and lacks the accuracy as well, All For One is still a pretty good book. The language, clothing style, and social standards are very accurate to the 1780s, even thou Yay, we've reached the conclusion of the Alex & Eliza Series. I started reading this series two years ago, and we have reached the end. It was a satisfying conclusion to an epic love story and has a beautiful yet tragic end to the love story of Alexander and Eliza Hamilton. Even though All For One takes some historical liberties and lacks the accuracy as well, All For One is still a pretty good book. The language, clothing style, and social standards are very accurate to the 1780s, even though the end of the love stories of John Schuyler, Betty, Drayton, and Emma are very predictable. Eliza and Alex both irritated me many times in this book more than Alex and Eliza AND Love & War. ALEX HITTING HIS PREGNANT WIFE ELIZA IS NOT OKAY. The fact that this action was not addressed later and condemned pissed me off because DOMESTIC ABUSE is NEVER okay. Also, Alex being so weak that he couldn't resist having an affair with Maria Reynolds disgusts me, even after he finds out about Maria's intentions. If you don't mind historical inaccuracies but like the love story of Alexander and Eliza Hamilton, I recommend Alex & Eliza. Happy Thursday! Hope your day is going well. And if it isn't, I hope that tomorrow or sometime in the near future, it gets better. Because I promise that it will. Maybe not today or tomorrow, but soon. Do things that make you happy, and above else, amor omnia vincent. with love forever, Reenie 💋

  21. 5 out of 5

    ~Sophia~

    Let’s be honest: this series was cute, but nothing more.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ashlee

    Since the time I've read the first two installments in the series, I have become a lot more educated in who Alexander Hamilton and Eliza Hamilton were. As a result, the history nerd part of me was a little upset in the way the facts were twisted around. With that being said, the book nerd part of me loves how the author captured the essence of the characters and time period. I gave 4 stars because of this. I enjoyed reading about Alex and Eliza's playful and intimate side of their relationship. They w/>I Since the time I've read the first two installments in the series, I have become a lot more educated in who Alexander Hamilton and Eliza Hamilton were. As a result, the history nerd part of me was a little upset in the way the facts were twisted around. With that being said, the book nerd part of me loves how the author captured the essence of the characters and time period. I gave 4 stars because of this. I enjoyed reading about Alex and Eliza's playful and intimate side of their relationship. They were still the adorable couple I read about in the first and second book, but they also grew more as a couple. I thought it was interesting the way Maria Reynolds was presented. I didn't particularly like it, but I think the author believed it was important to humanize her. Otherwise, what would Hamilton have seen in her? To be honest, I didn't like the epilogue (or at least the last couple of pages of it). I found it odd that the timeline would go from Hamilton's death all the way back to when Alex and Eliza first met. I guess it was to show the full circle of events and come back to where it all began. But still. Overall, reading this installment and series was a great experience. But, I don't agree with the chronological change in events. It strayed a little far from the facts for my tastes. Still, it's a nice additon to the historical fiction genre and I liked reading about what could have been the epic love story of Alexander and Eliza Hamilton. Btw, I noticed the colors of each installment's background on the cover represents a Schuyler sister. Pink for Angelica, blue for Eliza, and yellow for Peggy. Yes, that's how much of a Hamilton fan I am.⭐😂

  23. 5 out of 5

    booksbywhit

    I was happy to have read this series and learn a little bit about the Revolutionary War :)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah (Presto agitato)

    How much history belongs in historical fiction is in the eye of the beholder. Some readers will have no problem with liberties taken in the name of an entertaining book while others insist on accuracy. When a novel is about prominent historical figures, there will be even more tension between story and history. I read a book (view spoiler)[ I, Eliza Hamilton (hide spoiler)] about the same characters featured here that seemed as if the author had such reverence for the char How much history belongs in historical fiction is in the eye of the beholder. Some readers will have no problem with liberties taken in the name of an entertaining book while others insist on accuracy. When a novel is about prominent historical figures, there will be even more tension between story and history. I read a book (view spoiler)[ I, Eliza Hamilton (hide spoiler)] about the same characters featured here that seemed as if the author had such reverence for the characters and their place in history that she was afraid to speculate about anything they might have thought. It made for dry reading. I read another book recently on a different topic I know well where there were significant deviations from fact, but the author made a clear argument for her decisions in the Author's Note. I didn't agree with all of them, but I appreciated the explanation. In this book, I was willing to let a lot go until the Author's Note stated that aside from changing the date when the couple's first child was born, "the story is very much rooted in history," glossing over a long list of other fictional alterations. She then went on with further inaccuracies in the note itself. Even novelists should cite sources if they are going to make assertions that are not consistent with generally established history. I got the feeling that the author read something sort of like the claims made about the Burr-Hamilton duel and wrote about it without bothering to make sure she was remembering it correctly. This book is the third in a young adult trilogy about Alexander Hamilton and his wife, Eliza, published over the course of two years. Maybe they were rushed out to capitalize on the Hamilton craze. The first, Alex and Eliza, was reasonably well-written and entertaining, with good characterization. The second, Love & War, was long on filler and short on plot. (There was way too much of Eliza's internal monologue about china patterns.) This final book had potential, but the muddled history prevents it from fully realizing it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sara Dalla Palma

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 2/5 🌟 (I skipped the epilogue because I was too angry) As well as many people, I started to understand better the life of Ham and Eliza with the musical Hamilton. I also discovered this trilogy because I began to love so much their love story and I did love the first two books in the series, even tho I’m not a romance lover. Let’s start with the positives: I love the writing style. I think the author is capable of writing in a historic manner however I also found it too det 2/5 🌟 (I skipped the epilogue because I was too angry) As well as many people, I started to understand better the life of Ham and Eliza with the musical Hamilton. I also discovered this trilogy because I began to love so much their love story and I did love the first two books in the series, even tho I’m not a romance lover. Let’s start with the positives: I love the writing style. I think the author is capable of writing in a historic manner however I also found it too detailed on things I don’t personally care about. At the same time, however, I know those things are important for the setting. I also loved the new characters such as Emma, Drayton, John and Betty but at some points they felt too present for me to care. Let’s go with the negatives. Since book 2 I though the timeline was handled badly: I personally would have finished the second book with Philip’s born. But no, the dear author had to mess up so bad the dates to the point that the finale doesn’t make any sense! She mixed up so many things (best of wife’s and best of women but Alex doesn’t die? really) and I found it so annoying! Also, a lot of the incredible things Alex and Eliza do are not mentioned in the book (apart the epilogue!): I would basically have planned the trilogy very differently. The worst of this book are the main characters. Eliza Hamilton, my favorite character in the musical, in here became a snobbish rich woman. She has a huge heart towards the poor but not for the other people in her life? It’s so out-of-character if we think about her in the previous books. Alexander Hamilton, on the other hand, it’s just so flat. Even someone who doesn’t know about the Reynolds scandal would have guessed that Alex would have betrayed Eliza but there was no real meaning. There was no reason. Burr was so disappointing. We barely see him and his character is destroyed by the plot and the timeline changes. I would recommend the trilogy? Maybe just the first two books?

  26. 5 out of 5

    Renae Roehl

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Perhaps I just know the real story too well, but the author took far too many liberties for my taste. Of course I understand that historical fiction will stray from the facts in order to support the author’s vision. However, I think that shifting the order of significant events in the main characters’ lives (especially people as significant as Alexander & Eliza Hamilton) serves no purpose. For instance, Philip Hamilton was not in utero when the Reynolds affair occurred, he was 10. That’s a p Perhaps I just know the real story too well, but the author took far too many liberties for my taste. Of course I understand that historical fiction will stray from the facts in order to support the author’s vision. However, I think that shifting the order of significant events in the main characters’ lives (especially people as significant as Alexander & Eliza Hamilton) serves no purpose. For instance, Philip Hamilton was not in utero when the Reynolds affair occurred, he was 10. That’s a pretty significant change in the story, because Alex cheating when his pregnant wife of more than a decade was at home with multiple children, is quite different than him straying so soon in their marriage. It’s no more acceptable, but different, and serves no real purpose. Furthermore, Eliza (whom I consider one of the purest characters in American history) was snobbish and a little annoying in this story, contrary to the other Alex & Eliza books, and all the other Hamilton stories. This just wasn’t my favorite read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    The concluding novel to the Alex & Eliza trilogy was just what I needed. I flew through this novel. It’s easy to read and quite light on historical detail, so if you enjoy historical settings without too much detail, you’d likely enjoy this series. I enjoyed this book much more than the second installment, maybe not as much as the first. My biggest issue is the historical inaccuracy and the artistic license the author took with the characters and timeline. Obviously, if that’s not something The concluding novel to the Alex & Eliza trilogy was just what I needed. I flew through this novel. It’s easy to read and quite light on historical detail, so if you enjoy historical settings without too much detail, you’d likely enjoy this series. I enjoyed this book much more than the second installment, maybe not as much as the first. My biggest issue is the historical inaccuracy and the artistic license the author took with the characters and timeline. Obviously, if that’s not something that bothers you, than great. It’s not that I expect it to be a history text book, but when so many of the people reading this story are Hamilton fans and surely know a lot of the basics, is it really worth playing around with history so much? Also, so much of the language was modern. There’s just some words that are so obviously anachronistic that it’s a bit cringe-worthy. Overall though, I enjoyed the story and would recommend the trilogy if your looking for an easy-to-read historical fiction series.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Coffin

    "Life is more than its plot points." So the end of the trilogy. I was wondering how much into the Reynolds Pamphlet we were going to get - turns out a good amount. It definitely interesting to see a portrayal more from Hamilton's POV and see his thought process. More than ("Tell me how to say no to this, Lord, I really have to say no to this." - lik "Life is more than its plot points." So the end of the trilogy. I was wondering how much into the Reynolds Pamphlet we were going to get - turns out a good amount. It definitely interesting to see a portrayal more from Hamilton's POV and see his thought process. More than ("Tell me how to say no to this, Lord, I really have to say no to this." - like bro, she didn't ask you anything?) I would have liked to see more of Peggy ("And Peggy!") since her character just vanishes in Act II of Hamilton. And though I wish we could have seen more of Philip Hamilton when he was older ("God you're a fox!"), I'm also glad we didn't have to see his duel to the death. I particularly liked the epilogue, with more information. I also liked the case with Trinity Church, which explains a lot of the reason why Alexander is buried there. So that was cool to learn.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Diane Adams

    I probably wouldn't have been interested in this trilogy without the musical Hamilton, but my memory of Hamilton made this book the hardest to get through. The author admittedly takes liberties with the timeline, and this book is considered historical fiction. I believe Lin-Manuel Miranda took fewer liberties with his version. The greatest lack of agreement came with this book, which addressed the Maria Reynolds affair and a duel with Burr that ended up not taking place. It is fortunate that de I probably wouldn't have been interested in this trilogy without the musical Hamilton, but my memory of Hamilton made this book the hardest to get through. The author admittedly takes liberties with the timeline, and this book is considered historical fiction. I believe Lin-Manuel Miranda took fewer liberties with his version. The greatest lack of agreement came with this book, which addressed the Maria Reynolds affair and a duel with Burr that ended up not taking place. It is fortunate that de la Cruz does include an afterword which explains a lot of what happened after her story ended, but there was still plenty of room for confusion with dates, duels, and sons named Phillip! Overall, I enjoyed the trilogy, but now I think I should read a non fiction account, so I can get my facts straight!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Meyer

    After the slightly disappointing middle book, this one made me smile again. It brought back the magic of the first book, even if it still wasn't as good as book one. My biggest problem continues to be her twisting around of the timeline. She should know that all Hamilton fans are uber nerds about these things. I know it shouldn't matter as much to me but it does. Also, she uses words that are not historically correct a lot. Other than that, I thought it was a great book and After the slightly disappointing middle book, this one made me smile again. It brought back the magic of the first book, even if it still wasn't as good as book one. My biggest problem continues to be her twisting around of the timeline. She should know that all Hamilton fans are uber nerds about these things. I know it shouldn't matter as much to me but it does. Also, she uses words that are not historically correct a lot. Other than that, I thought it was a great book and enjoyed the storyline as we finally got to the Maria Reynolds part of the story. I would have liked more time after the event happened, because it felt like Eliza went from angry and hurt too quickly, even though it's months later. I wanted to see those months, thank you. I do enjoy this series and need to get books two and three for my collection. A great one for Hamilton fans.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.