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By Any Means Necessary

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An honest reflection on cultural identify, class, and gentrification. Fans of Nic Stone and Elizabeth Acevedo will eagerly anticipate Torrey. On the day Torrey officially becomes a college freshman, he gets a call that might force him to drop out before he’s even made it through orientation: the bee farm his beloved uncle Miles left him after his tragic death is being An honest reflection on cultural identify, class, and gentrification. Fans of Nic Stone and Elizabeth Acevedo will eagerly anticipate Torrey. On the day Torrey officially becomes a college freshman, he gets a call that might force him to drop out before he’s even made it through orientation: the bee farm his beloved uncle Miles left him after his tragic death is being foreclosed on. Torrey would love nothing more than to leave behind the family and neighborhood that’s bleeding him dry. But he still feels compelled to care for the project of his uncle’s heart. As the farm heads for auction, Torrey precariously balances choosing a major and texting Gabriel—the first boy he ever kissed—with the fight to stop his uncle’s legacy from being demolished. But as notice letters pile up and lawyers appear at his dorm, dividing himself between family and future becomes impossible unless he sacrifices a part of himself.


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An honest reflection on cultural identify, class, and gentrification. Fans of Nic Stone and Elizabeth Acevedo will eagerly anticipate Torrey. On the day Torrey officially becomes a college freshman, he gets a call that might force him to drop out before he’s even made it through orientation: the bee farm his beloved uncle Miles left him after his tragic death is being An honest reflection on cultural identify, class, and gentrification. Fans of Nic Stone and Elizabeth Acevedo will eagerly anticipate Torrey. On the day Torrey officially becomes a college freshman, he gets a call that might force him to drop out before he’s even made it through orientation: the bee farm his beloved uncle Miles left him after his tragic death is being foreclosed on. Torrey would love nothing more than to leave behind the family and neighborhood that’s bleeding him dry. But he still feels compelled to care for the project of his uncle’s heart. As the farm heads for auction, Torrey precariously balances choosing a major and texting Gabriel—the first boy he ever kissed—with the fight to stop his uncle’s legacy from being demolished. But as notice letters pile up and lawyers appear at his dorm, dividing himself between family and future becomes impossible unless he sacrifices a part of himself.

30 review for By Any Means Necessary

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nenia ⚡ Aspiring Evil Overlord ⚡ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY is a breezy, college-age YA about a Afro-Latino boy named Torrey. It explores his struggle to keep his apiary (bee farm) from being foreclosed on, the negative aspects of gentrification, and also his coming of age romance with the bisexual love interest, Gabriel, a hot Portuguese guy who was the first boy Torrey ever kissed. There were some things I really liked about BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY. I think it has an Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY is a breezy, college-age YA about a Afro-Latino boy named Torrey. It explores his struggle to keep his apiary (bee farm) from being foreclosed on, the negative aspects of gentrification, and also his coming of age romance with the bisexual love interest, Gabriel, a hot Portuguese guy who was the first boy Torrey ever kissed. There were some things I really liked about BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY. I think it has an authentic YA voice. The romance was great. It does an excellent job focusing on some of the elements that make California such a unique and diverse place to live, while also showing how racially-charged class disparities can be harmful to cities and the people who live and work in them, especially people of color. I loved all of that. The downside was that this book took me a long time to get into, and sometimes I almost felt like it was trying too hard to get me to think that the main character was cool. Maybe I'm just too old to appreciate some of the teen ridiculousness, but at times it felt like Torrey's "humor" was too forced and over the top, which often had me rolling my eyes. There isn't really a "solid" plot. This is largely a character-driven story and while it works here, that isn't really my favorite method of story-telling, which did impact how much I liked this book. If you're looking for diverse YA with a great romance and some real world issues, though, I think you would do well to pick up BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY, especially if you don't mind a meandering and character-driven storyline. Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!   3 to 3.5 stars

  2. 5 out of 5

    anna (readingpeaches)

    rep: Black gay mc, Afro-Latino bi li, almost all Black side characters Review also on my blog. ARC provided by the publisher. I have so much love for this book, I’m not even sure where to start. Let’s just make a list and get through it step by step. 1) The writing style is really cool. It’s first person pov, which I know isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, but it works perfectly here. It’s clear that Montgomery knows how teenagers think, so it’s never awkward in that particular way only some YA books can rep: Black gay mc, Afro-Latino bi li, almost all Black side characters Review also on my blog. ARC provided by the publisher. I have so much love for this book, I’m not even sure where to start. Let’s just make a list and get through it step by step. 1) The writing style is really cool. It’s first person pov, which I know isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, but it works perfectly here. It’s clear that Montgomery knows how teenagers think, so it’s never awkward in that particular way only some YA books can be. Instead, it’s fresh & funny & casual. It’s like hanging out with a friend, basically. And then you get treated with a beautiful sentence here and there & it becomes magical. 2) From the first word to the very last, this book is just unapologetically Black. You can feel that pride in the culture seeping out of every paragraph, but it also doesn’t shy away from dealing with some uncomfortable parts of belonging to the community. It’s actually a whole arc, with Torrey trying to save the apiary and not always getting the support he’s looking for from members of that community. 3) At the same time, there are still a lot of people who are willing to help him. And the majority of them are women, which Torrey is very much aware of in his narration. It basically feels like a love letter to Black women & it doesn’t just stop with that one arc or just one generation of women – Torrey appreciates the friends he made at college just as much as the women he grew up around. It’s woven into the whole book, into the very essence of Torrey even – this deep appreciation of all the work that Black women do. 4) This social awareness he displays doesn’t stop there, either. The book full-on calls out white people on all the little (and big) ways we exhibit racism in our day to day lives. Personally, I appreciated that a lot. It always worked perfectly well the topic at hand, too. Actually, one of the main topics of the book is pretty much a call-out of white, western culture: gentrification. The book shows how this “trend” destroys whole communities, while also saying “hey, you can fight back”. 5) The romance is kind of central to the plot, only by central I don’t mean that it’s the tired “will they, won’t they” dance. The opposite, really. Torrey and Gabriel get together pretty soon in the book and it’s their love that helps Torrey to push forward. The romance is central in a way that it acts as an anchor for Torrey. It’s central in a way that it’s a big part of Torrey’s life and focuses him. It’s never the magical cure for all his problems & actually causes some of its own, but it’s important. It’s shown as the complex thing that it should be. I’m not trying very hard, but I just can’t find any faults in this book. If you’re Black, I’m pretty sure reading it would feel like a warm hug, like someone is looking out for you, but also like a push to action. If you’re not, like me, you might just learn something. In any case, it’s a really well written book about a Black gay freshman in college trying to balance all the things in his life & you don’t wanna miss out on that.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Candice Montgomery

    SOMEBODY GIVE THIS AUTHOR A GD PULITZER! (idk, entirely objectively, I think the book’s pretty ok, ijs) SOMEBODY GIVE THIS AUTHOR A GD PULITZER! 🍯🐝💫 (idk, entirely objectively, I think the book’s pretty ok, ijs)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dahlia

    I do not remember the last time I fell so hard, so fast for a voice. (Honestly, might've been the author's last book. Voice is a clear common-thread skill here.) There's so much happening here and I'm too tired to write something coherent, so, the important bullet points: 1) This is set in college! YAY COLLEGE YA 2) The MC is a QPoC! Gay Black MC, bi Afro-Latinx (Brazilian) LI, to be exact 3) I loooove when MCs have awesome hobbies/occupations that they're really passionate about, and running an I do not remember the last time I fell so hard, so fast for a voice. (Honestly, might've been the author's last book. Voice is a clear common-thread skill here.) There's so much happening here and I'm too tired to write something coherent, so, the important bullet points: 1) This is set in college! YAY COLLEGE YA 2) The MC is a QPoC! Gay Black MC, bi Afro-Latinx (Brazilian) LI, to be exact 3) I loooove when MCs have awesome hobbies/occupations that they're really passionate about, and running an apiary was definitely a new one of me 4) The things discussed in this book are so powerful on both micro and macro levels - gentrification and self-care and family and that horribly delicate balance of saving and advancing yourself when the people you were born into caring about are the ones who threaten to keep you back, for better or for worse. And, of course, the intersection of queerness and Blackness and how all of these things are interconnected. It's just...brilliant. Also, there is a reference to me in this book that is just one of the best things I have ever read in my entire life. 69 points to anyone who gets it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kate (GirlReading)

    When a book features an adorable second chance m/m romance, has a college setting, honestly discusses gentrification, race, poverty, sexuality and the undeniable intersections between them, explores family dynamics, including found family and the need for self care, you know you’re in for something great but when there are also BEES , there’s no escaping that greatness. TW: homophobia, police violence

  6. 5 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) By Any Means Necessary is a story of family, friendship, and our past. It is a emotional book that examines racism, homophobia, and our difficulty in leaving behind the past. I am struggling to put words to my feelings about By Any Means Necessary. Featuring a black gay main character, Torrey is always conscious of the way the world and his family sees him. Montgomery examines the (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) By Any Means Necessary is a story of family, friendship, and our past. It is a emotional book that examines racism, homophobia, and our difficulty in leaving behind the past. I am struggling to put words to my feelings about By Any Means Necessary. Featuring a black gay main character, Torrey is always conscious of the way the world and his family sees him. Montgomery examines the experience of being the first generation in his family to go to college and his race with both humor and weight. But even more than who Torrey is, By Any Means Necessary is a story with complex layers: toxic relationships versus friendship, the struggle of gentrification versus the economic inequality of people of color, and more. By Any Means Necessary is also a story based in friendship and found family. There's such a fantastic core of side characters that you find yourself reading not only for Torrey but his friends. There are about a billion ways you can get lost in By Any Means Necessary. You might have heard about this book because of its college setting, or its bisexual Afro-Latinx love interest or black gay MC representation. By Any Means Necessary examines Torrey's identity and the way his blackness and sexuality intersect and effect his relationships. But there's even discussion of self-care, when we have to move on from what we think, toxic family members, the balance between moving forwards and walking away. Or you might just love bees. full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...

  7. 5 out of 5

    bookishly_sweety

    Firstly I would like to say that this book was not at all what I expected it to be. At first, I found it hard to get into the book, because its told only in first person and from Torrey's POV. So I was beginning to get bored thinking it's going to be the voice of a person who is only going to keep grumbling about the situation he is in. But the story evolved and with it, Torrey too. To say life's been tough for Torrey wouldn't be an exaggeration. The kid is Black and poor and gay in a homophobic Firstly I would like to say that this book was not at all what I expected it to be. At first, I found it hard to get into the book, because its told only in first person and from Torrey's POV. So I was beginning to get bored thinking it's going to be the voice of a person who is only going to keep grumbling about the situation he is in. But the story evolved and with it, Torrey too. To say life's been tough for Torrey wouldn't be an exaggeration. The kid is Black and poor and gay in a homophobic society that still treats persons of colour differently. I liked the cutesy way Gabriel and Torrey become a couple. No beating around the bush, or pushing and pulling each other till the end of the book. And totally loved how Gabe calls Torrey his Principe (Spanish for Prince) *insert heart-eyes* Gabriel is all risk and wild decisions. But me? I am hesitation. I am Gabriel's antonym. The Taurus to his Pisces. And when I was beginning to get antsy about the lack of strong females, Candice blesses us with Emery. I loved her so much. Together with the CAKE ( Clarke, Auburn, Kennedy, Emery) or alone with Torrey, she just rocks and I loved her so much. Even Torrey is amazed by her. I loved the below quote from the book because its so beautifully written about a girl, from a guy's point of view. A guy who is not a boyfriend !! Girl's a poem in the boxing ring. She's breathless. She's gorgeous. she's moving -- dancing. She's a fire blazing in a rainstorm, a strike of lightning across a cornfield. She's everything. And ooh who wouldn't love the scene where Torrey takes her to the apiary and they harvest honey together!! The imagery in itself was so much pleasing and I loved it. And Torrey leaves you surprised by the random bee facts he throws in and I did not know most of them. Most people don't know that there are more than twenty thousand species of bees, only four of which are honey bees. And why should they? I mean, did you know that? Not only bees, Torrey also lets you know what is really happening in the Black 'hoods. How gentrification is affecting their livelihood and displacing them. I love how through him, the author is trying to bring attention to how silently the society is replacing the Hoods and white-washing them. Also loved how so MUCH importance is given to their community, the women and their ways, the dialect, the habits, standing for each other, being your own support system. From the college professor who makes Torrey learn punctuality to Emery who provides him all the support he can get, I say Torrey is blessed with all these women in his life. <3 I had very few problems with a book - like Torrey digressing a lot from his point and jumping randomly from one thought to another and Torrey's spiral into vandalism. But they teeny tiny minor things that I'm willing to overlook because overall, this is such a powerful book. Having read books by Ibi Zoboi, Elizabeth Acevedo, Angie Thomas, I know where all this anger comes from and I get it - I get how every single oppressed soul feels like, through these wonderful authors. I'm so glad I got this chance to read Candace's second book and I very much recommend it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Flora ❀

    m/m love story and a bEE FARM?! my bee loving ass is thriving!!!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Aditi

    Thanks to FFBC and the publisher for the beautiful ARC! All thoughts and opinions are my own. Ok, first of all- this book should be a must read because it provided such a unique point of view on white privilege, truths of the ‘hood’, and gentrification. My Likes: When I say unique, I mean UNIQUE. Terry’s voice is so present and it catches your attention immediately. And of course, you either love it or hate it. He breaks the fourth wall so many times that it’s actually funny! But this book discussed Thanks to FFBC and the publisher for the beautiful ARC! All thoughts and opinions are my own. Ok, first of all- this book should be a must read because it provided such a unique point of view on white privilege, truths of the ‘hood’, and gentrification. My Likes: When I say unique, I mean UNIQUE. Terry’s voice is so present and it catches your attention immediately. And of course, you either love it or hate it. He breaks the fourth wall so many times that it’s actually funny! But this book discussed so many important points. Terry kinda vehemently dislikes white people in general, but before you get all worked up, listen: he hates those who don’t acknowledge privilege and knowingly hurt POC with their actions. Besides all the tough-tough-tough, I loved Emery (and the rest of CAKE)! Emery is definitely not a love interest, but she’s probably Terry’s closest friend depicted in the book. She’s so refreshing and honest and boss and honestly, I’m copying a bunch of Goodreads’ reviewers now, but this whole book was basically a tribute to black women. And I loved it! Most of the characters were Black and Terry’s love interest is Afro-Latino, and I really found it interesting the way this book explored poverty and privilege. My Dislikes: When I read this book, sometimes I felt… genuinely uncomfortable, and hear me out. I felt like I was intruding on something. There were so many amazing references to blackness and subtle digs on whites, and it made me feel… surprisingly content yet uncomfortable?? It felt like I did something wrong, or that I was intruding on something I shouldn’t be hearing or shouldn’t be part of the conversation for. Or maybe that’s just because I’m not a huge fan of all the cursing haha. I’m not -squeaky- clean, but I don’t curse. So for my innocent mind, that’s a li’l bit oof. Terry’s voice (like he was speaking to me) felt like he was almost accusing me of gentrification. I’m a POC, but I’m lucky enough to live with privilege, and at one point, when he literally said that he hated Black and brown people that didn’t care or sympathize with their brothers and sisters in the hood. Ok, I was shook. I felt so bad and this is the epitome of privilege- I’m not white, yet I feel it too. We all have it, if we’re able to write on a laptop and send our writing out to the world. Also, it made me uncomfortable because there was… a lot of cursing. A lot. Terry’s bf, Gabriel, was also interesting, but I felt like something was missing?? I didn’t connect with the romance like I usually do, and I think it needed more angst and chemistry. Recommend or No? YES YES YES, I RECOMMEND IT. It’s a delightful read, and it’s so important. Just… read it. I think it would be a huge eye-opener even if you already know your privilege, and even more if you’re skeptical. cropped-blog-feather.pngcropped-blog-feather.pngcropped-blog-feather.pngcropped-blog-feather.png 4 BEAUTIFUL FEATHER-STARS ❤

  10. 4 out of 5

    M

    Oh, this book. If you know me you probably know how much I loved this author's previous work. Montgomery's writing is fantastic, I could get lost in their clear and sharp prose forever. This is their second novel and while it is very different in style and tone from their first one, HOME AND AWAY, it is just as much a love letter to Black women and if anything it got even more enjoyable for me. If this were a play, Torr as a character would break the 4th wall constantly. I know some people will Oh, this book. If you know me you probably know how much I loved this author's previous work. Montgomery's writing is fantastic, I could get lost in their clear and sharp prose forever. This is their second novel and while it is very different in style and tone from their first one, HOME AND AWAY, it is just as much a love letter to Black women and if anything it got even more enjoyable for me. If this were a play, Torr as a character would break the 4th wall constantly. I know some people will love it, others will struggle with being addressed by the MC a lot. I belong to the first group, I absolutely adored Torr and him talking to me as a reader was not only fun and *funny*, but also deeply moving and made this novel personal on a level I have a hard time describing. The plot is not a huge, interwoven structure of story arcs, it's rather quiet and character driven, the end never really clear and yet almost always tangible in its significance. Torr goes through a lot in the relatively short time we spend with him, and the decisions he has to make are important and not easy. Read my full review on Small Queer, Big Opinions.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

    BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY is an engaging contemporary YA that presents some issues very well. The writing is in a stream-of-conscientiousness style through which we follow the main character, Torrey, very closely. Torrey is about to begin his freshman year of college at SFSU. He had been mainly raised by his aunt, after his mother entered into a coma due to brain injuries of a fall compounded by drug abuse and his uncle was killed by police. His uncle left him an apiary in a gentrifying area of BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY is an engaging contemporary YA that presents some issues very well. The writing is in a stream-of-conscientiousness style through which we follow the main character, Torrey, very closely. Torrey is about to begin his freshman year of college at SFSU. He had been mainly raised by his aunt, after his mother entered into a coma due to brain injuries of a fall compounded by drug abuse and his uncle was killed by police. His uncle left him an apiary in a gentrifying area of town, which has kept making money, and which he loves. However, as he is beginning college, he learns that due to unpaid property taxes (a job a relative had taken on as he was not of age), the apiary is going to be auctioned off. Considering the area, it is desirable for businesses to acquire it in this gentrifying part of town- part of what made the property taxes get so high after they owned it. Torrey must also balance his personal life into the mix- college and navigating classes as a first generation student, homophobia from others (even relatives), a crush that he had an intense relationship with when he was younger, and new friendships. The best part of this book is the presentation of social issues that give the reader something to think about, and there are a lot that a black, LGBT teen would have to deal with. They are all presented in a way that really makes the reader think and consider, and this was really strong. However, I had a hard time getting into the style of the writing as a lot of the past/facts are glossed over. I actually would have liked a more in-depth introduction to Torrey's world and the characters in it. There's a lot to unpack, and it was pretty fast-paced, which also holds its own appeal. Overall, this is a strong YA contemporary fiction with some great romance and important issues raised. I would recommend for fans of Angie Thomas and Nicola Yoon. Please note that I received an ARC. All opinions are my own.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    What a lovely surprise. I loved the main character's voice and the writing, witty and unique and the strong friendships in this. I also adored the complex feelings between letting go of the past and just letting to and do what's best for you, too. Overall such a strong read, I had a lot of fun with this and can't wait to read more from the author :) Full review coming soon! Thank you to the publisher & NetGalleyfor the e-ARC of this book. This did not, in any way, influenced my thoughts and What a lovely surprise. I loved the main character's voice and the writing, witty and unique and the strong friendships in this. I also adored the complex feelings between letting go of the past and just letting to and do what's best for you, too. Overall such a strong read, I had a lot of fun with this and can't wait to read more from the author :) Full review coming soon! Thank you to the publisher & NetGalleyfor the e-ARC of this book. This did not, in any way, influenced my thoughts and rating. My Blog - Drizzle & Hurricane Books - Twitter - Bloglovin'

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paige Green

    Disclaimer: I reiceved this book from the publisher. Thanks! All opinions are my own. Author: Candice Montgomery Book Series: Standalone Rating: 5/5 Publication Date: October 8, 2019 Diversity: Gay MC and a M/M relationship Genre: YA Contemporary Recommended Age: 15+ (romance, bees, and idenity) Publisher: Page Street Synopsis: An honest reflection on cultural identify, class, and gentrification. Fans of Nic Stone and Elizabeth Acevedo will eagerly anticipate Torrey. On the day Torrey officially becomes Disclaimer: I reiceved this book from the publisher. Thanks! All opinions are my own. Author: Candice Montgomery Book Series: Standalone Rating: 5/5 Publication Date: October 8, 2019 Diversity: Gay MC and a M/M relationship Genre: YA Contemporary Recommended Age: 15+ (romance, bees, and idenity) Publisher: Page Street Synopsis: An honest reflection on cultural identify, class, and gentrification. Fans of Nic Stone and Elizabeth Acevedo will eagerly anticipate Torrey. On the day Torrey officially becomes a college freshman, he gets a call that might force him to drop out before he’s even made it through orientation: the bee farm his beloved uncle Miles left him after his tragic death is being foreclosed on. Torrey would love nothing more than to leave behind the family and neighborhood that’s bleeding him dry. But he still feels compelled to care for the project of his uncle’s heart. As the farm heads for auction, Torrey precariously balances choosing a major and texting Gabriel—the first boy he ever kissed—with the fight to stop his uncle’s legacy from being demolished. But as notice letters pile up and lawyers appear at his dorm, dividing himself between family and future becomes impossible unless he sacrifices a part of himself. Review:I absolutely loved this book! It was damn cute and so unapologetic. I loved the writing, I loved the character development, I loved how the main character had mostly female help. Also I loved how the romance was helpful and not hindering to the main character and how it helped the main character grow instead of delay it. My only complaint is that sometimes the pacing is a bit slow and I think I could have used a bit more world building but that's just for my personal taste. Verdict: This was a truly magnificent book and I can't recommend it enough!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mari Johnston

    This review and many others can also be found at Musings of a (Book) Girl. Content Warnings: addiction, underage drinking, gentrification, racism, police brutality, death of family Candice Montgomery has given us an astounding and culturally important novel with By Any Means Necessary. the writing and voice These were both so authentic. I loved the writing style and how it felt as if the main character was talking to the reader. It actually isn’t often that I enjoy this because it can feel really This review and many others can also be found at Musings of a (Book) Girl. Content Warnings: addiction, underage drinking, gentrification, racism, police brutality, death of family Candice Montgomery has given us an astounding and culturally important novel with By Any Means Necessary. the writing and voice These were both so authentic. I loved the writing style and how it felt as if the main character was talking to the reader. It actually isn’t often that I enjoy this because it can feel really distracting and completely take me out of the story but Montgomery did it so flawlessly. The humor was also spot on. So many funny things were sprinkled throughout and I appreciated a ton of the references. the story I’ll be the first to admit my privilege and say that I didn’t 100% understand gentrification. Until now. By Any Means necessary was a complete eye-opener. This story held nothing back and plainly showed how harmful gentrification really is. This book has the ability to open so many eyes. What is even more important is how many teens will see themselves in this story. Countless lives are negatively affected by gentrification. Like we see in the story, so many adults are giving up and letting it happen – leaving young people to stand up and fight. Their stories need to be told so they can see they aren’t alone. the characters Did I love them all? I really think I did. Sweet sweet Gabriel. He was just so soft and perfect. I love how unabashedly he would just start doing dance spins no matter where he was at. Emery! All her sass and loving friendship gave me life. I really enjoyed every single interaction between her and Torrey. Honestly, I think I need a book that focuses mainly on her. Desh! Can you find a more perfect roommate? He had the most fun personality traits. It was really great to see how he helped take care of Torrey sometimes in his own way. the feels This book had them all. So many sweet lines between Torry and Gabriel. Their relationship gave me the warm fuzzies. Seeing them learn each other and become more attached throughout the book was the best thing. Y’all seriously just need to read the damn book. I don’t care who you are – just read it. A physical ARC was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Belle Ellrich

    *I WAS PROVIDED A PHYSICAL ARC FOR THE PURPOSES OF A BLOG TOUR. THIS HASN’T AFFECTED MY OPINION* This book really stunned me. When I opened this book and started reading the first page, I knew I was going to be obsessed with it. Candice Montgomery has a way of writing to entrance their readers, and it stayed that way throughout the majority of the book. Torrey really opened our eyes to issues we aren’t always exposed to but can still see a lot of; those being harassment, racism, low incomes, *I WAS PROVIDED A PHYSICAL ARC FOR THE PURPOSES OF A BLOG TOUR. THIS HASN’T AFFECTED MY OPINION* This book really stunned me. When I opened this book and started reading the first page, I knew I was going to be obsessed with it. Candice Montgomery has a way of writing to entrance their readers, and it stayed that way throughout the majority of the book. Torrey really opened our eyes to issues we aren’t always exposed to but can still see a lot of; those being harassment, racism, low incomes, homophobia within the home and outside it, familial problems, and so many more. "There are a lot of things I need to worry about in life, like, as a Black male teen. A lot of things I have to worry about seperately—as a teen and again as a male and then, further still, as a Black person. Confusing, right? Well, try being me. When you combine those seperate parts, apparently, I’m lethal. I am a problem." (This is quoted from the unedited text.) Montgomery made sure to address every single issue without a stumble, and they projected them well throughout the characters. Though, I did have just a few problems that I picked up during reading. For one, I feel like Torrey’s relationship with Gabe happened way too quickly. Sure, I know that can happen sometimes in real life, but it felt almost unrealistic in this book. I feel like they spent a few outings together before deciding to get together, and it really kind of threw me off with that sudden pacing. Don’t get me wrong, I loved that they were together and happy with each other, but it just felt like them “dating” happened way faster than we could’ve processed and that there was little to no building to it. Another Torrey’s vandalism decision toward the end of the book. I completely get where Mongomery was trying to go with this, but again, I felt like there was barely any building up to that point. I feel like Torrey almost made a “why not?” decision about it, and I didn’t really understand why it happened all of a sudden. Other than those few things, I loved this book. I feel like this book, if taught in school, would change a lot of people’s perspectives, views, and feelings. I feel this book would be a great addition to schools’ curriculums and could ultimately shape our future generations. For that, I rate By Any Means Necessary 3.5 stars. I definitely suggest y’all to read it, and I hope you enjoy it and learn from it like I did.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Hanson

    OH MY GOODNESS. I love so much about this book. The voice. The characters. The rep. I love everything. All the heart eyes in the world!!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Trisha

    Just posted a review at my blog, Trish Talks Texts. I liked the MC A lot. He deserves all the good things.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brooke Banks

    I received this book for free from Fantastic Flying Book Club in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.Happy Friday Eve ya'll! Today I get to share my review of tear-jerking, heart-soaring life changing novel, By Any Means Necessary by Candice Montgomery. It's queer. Black. Queer and black AF. It's a love letter to so many communities and those among their intersections. It's beautiful. And necessary. About By Any Means Necessary: I received this book for free from Fantastic Flying Book Club in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.Happy Friday Eve ya'll! Today I get to share my review of tear-jerking, heart-soaring life changing novel, By Any Means Necessary by Candice Montgomery. It's queer. Black. Queer and black AF. It's a love letter to so many communities and those among their intersections. It's beautiful. And necessary. About By Any Means Necessary: IMHO: By Any Means Necessary Trigger Warning: Homophobic uncle & community, police encounter, talk of murder by police, Here's the thing. I loved every single part of this in a way I'm finding hard to express. I'm literally tearing up right now just thinking about this again. I don't want to sell it short or turn anyone off. I really truly think all ya'll need to read this NOW. It's just...beautiful. So. Here's a non-exhaustive list of all the things I loved about it: Quickly swept up & away Didn’t want to put it down. Genuinely sweet & funny moments Didn’t have any issues keeping up with the narrative, flash backs, transitions. (This has been an issue in other books lately) Torrey’s VOICE. Holy Forking Shirtballs! Love the straight roommate that doesn’t make it weird having a gay roommate, it just is! Just a big ol’ teddy bear. Love CAKE, collectively and individually, with or without Torrey All the bee facts sprinkled throughout Aunt Lisa Fuck you Theo. Good for you Torrey! Torrey drinks for the first time Protesting the Collective I sees you literary references!! re: Lilly Anderson and Amal Unbound London! Gabriel! That glorious mane gets a whole line to itself And so does all the dancing And all the little things Torrey loves about him & describes so wonderfully. The breaking the fourth wall like moments re: white readers & privilege. That cop interaction left me cold and sweating when reading, and every time I think about it afterwards *shudder* Afro-latinx characters rep! BLACK AF Black woman love and recognition!! I love how there’s no sympathizing with the slimy fuckers, never, not once. Not after Torrey retaliates. There’s no moralizing or hand wringing about what he did. Just caring about Torrey and how the consequences will affect him. Really handles so many intersections and issues so well, in an organic everyday way. It’s fucking hard to live it, and to write it. There’s no one way or right way to juggle things personally and it doesn’t fall into the trap of presenting itself as the only correct way Tender and careful about the delicate way these factors all weave together, without pulling how hard those punches land. Totally want more of this crew, maybe a bit of that queer CAKE next?   Stop making me cry and just go read it already, damn.   FYI: Here's a helpful tip I found on the internet long ago to remember how to spell necessary: one collar, two sleeves.    Some Favorite Quotes: Up yours sign. You’re written in Comic Sans, nobody likes you anyway.   Which isn’t a sentiment I’m opposed to, so much as the train it arrives on. He presses into me and his lips meet mine, and I become a whisper of a boy.   “Your lies only hurt me because they are so poorly crafted.”   Obligations isn’t so bad when you choose it for yourself.   Two masc dudes kiss to express feelings that homophobia tried to rob them of. Write that tell-all.   The city hasn’t taught them that Black and brown people get fined for expressing emotions at a volume white people find to be too much.   “Nothing beats a failure but a try.”   He would be the most beautiful Icarus, I think. Dancing a little too closely to the sun all his life. About the Author: Giveaway: Prize: Win a copy of By Any Means Necessary by Candice Montgomery (US/CAN Only) Starts: October 8th 2019 Ends: October 22nd 2019 a Rafflecopter giveaway Tour Schedule: This review was originally posted on The Layaway Dragon

  19. 4 out of 5

    Miss Susan

    honestly this already sounded great and then i noticed the author's muslim? WE R READING TO SUPPORT THE UMMAH honestly this already sounded great and then i noticed the author's muslim? WE R READING TO SUPPORT THE UMMAH 😤

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lauriane

    By Any Means Necessary is a young adult contemporary novel (LGBT) written by Candice Montgomery. Published by Page Street, the book was released on October 8, 2019. I received a free copy in exchange for an honest review. Torrey McKenzie is a young, black, and gay college freshman. As he settles into his San Francisco State University (SFSU) dorm, he receives troubling news about the beloved apiary he inherited. Taxes were not paid while the business was handled by his grandfather, and he has two By Any Means Necessary is a young adult contemporary novel (LGBT) written by Candice Montgomery. Published by Page Street, the book was released on October 8, 2019. I received a free copy in exchange for an honest review. Torrey McKenzie is a young, black, and gay college freshman. As he settles into his San Francisco State University (SFSU) dorm, he receives troubling news about the beloved apiary he inherited. Taxes were not paid while the business was handled by his grandfather, and he has two months before the business, which is in his hometown of Los Angeles, is seized. He can’t lose this apiary. It is the only good thing he has in his life, and he uses its profits to pay for the facility his mother resides in. As Torrey is now eighteen, he can legally act without permission. His struggle is how to address the problem at the apiary while attending SFSU. He can’t return to Los Angeles because he must attend his classes. In the midst of the chaos, Torrey reconnects with a former love interest. Armed with an eccentric roommate and good friends, he attempts to save the apiary and succeed at school without having to sacrifice a part of himself. This book immediately grabbed my attention because the narrator, the main character, has a unique voice filled with humor. I found myself rooting for him early in the story. While Torrey faces many challenges to the point where he feels overwhelmed, he doesn’t give up. His passion is commendable. The secondary characters in this story all play important roles in Torrey’s development. His roommate, Desh, and his other four friends, a group anagrammed CAKE, are individuals who challenge him as much as they support him. The chemistry between Torrey and Gabe is off the chart. They have an interesting relationship, as they are very different. The attraction is undeniably present, which makes this book a real page turner. Throughout the story, humor is used to point out some harsh truths about our society. This book reflects on cultural identity, class, and gentrification. Homophobia is depicted in a way that is utterly heartbreaking. As a warning, the story contains some triggers with verbal abuse, racism, and homophobia. This story hits all the right spots: social issues, love, friendship, and family. The writing is engaging, witty, casual, and on-point. I believe this book deserves a five-star rating. I highly recommend it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rachel (Life of a Female Bibliophile)

    Read even more book reviews at: https://www.lifeofafemalebibliophile.... This novel follows the story of Torrey a black teenager who is a first generation college student in his family. His excitement for this new journey is dampened when he finds out the bee apiary back home is being sold. He took over it after Miles, his uncle, passed away and wants to keep the legacy while his grandfather, Theo, wants to get rid of it. Torrey grapples with what to do while trying to adjust to college life, Read even more book reviews at: https://www.lifeofafemalebibliophile.... This novel follows the story of Torrey a black teenager who is a first generation college student in his family. His excitement for this new journey is dampened when he finds out the bee apiary back home is being sold. He took over it after Miles, his uncle, passed away and wants to keep the legacy while his grandfather, Theo, wants to get rid of it. Torrey grapples with what to do while trying to adjust to college life, make new friends, and reconnect with a boy from the past. Torrey is torn between school and saving the apiary from being sold. Being in college is an opportunity for him to widen his horizons, but at the same time he doesn’t want to destroy his uncle’s legacy and hard work. Though he feels somewhat out of place as colleges freshman, he has a strong support system of friends and also a blossoming relationship with a former flame. He misses home but at the same time is glad be in a new place due the negative treatment he received from his grandfather. The book’s main theme focuses on gentrification as Torrey’s neighborhood is slowly being replaced little by little and low income people being pushed out of their homes and businesses. Torrey’s fight fiercely to save the apiary, and makes a stand against the bigger corporations buying up businesses: I think he (Miles) understood, better than I ever will, that sometimes the fight is necessary. It always gets you to the other side and at the end of it, you’ll always have picked up something new, regardless of the fight’s outcome: a couple new bruises or some bragging rights. Both of which can be valuable in the hands of a Black boy. I felt that Torrey’s character is not only complex but is relatable to a wide audience as well. He’s got a lot of growing up to do and he’s trying to process a lot of stuff. He’s vulnerable, feels conflicted, but also stands up for what he believes in. This was an engrossing read from start to finish and I enjoyed how it discussed multiple topics including sexuality, gentrification, college, and discovering yourself. Trigger Warnings: Homophobic/Racial Slurs FTC Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    H. Taylor

    I have mixed feelings about this one. I thought the writing was okay, though there were some formatting and grammatical issues, which I don’t know whether they are limited to ARC copies. For instance, the first letter of the start of each chapter was missing. The plot itself was relatively interesting and I was really interested by the romance. However, it felt at times as though we were missing some information. For instance the introduction of the side characters and love interest didn’t really I have mixed feelings about this one. I thought the writing was okay, though there were some formatting and grammatical issues, which I don’t know whether they are limited to ARC copies. For instance, the first letter of the start of each chapter was missing. The plot itself was relatively interesting and I was really interested by the romance. However, it felt at times as though we were missing some information. For instance the introduction of the side characters and love interest didn’t really feel like an ‘introduction’, more like a second book introduction to them. And along with that the depiction of university life just didn’t seem real or accurate, like maybe there wasn’t enough research done? Now I didn’t attend an American uni but I did 4 years at university and I know for certain that no lecturer would A) know students at the beginning of term by name and B) call students out for being late and forcing them to arrive to lectures earlier. It just doesn’t happen. Lecturers and even tutors have too much on their plate to care about individual students like that. At a university level it becomes up to the student to do the work. If they’re not there, they aren’t there. Simple. So that was really quite annoying to read, a small thing but for me, an important setting aspect. Overall, I would recommend this to anyone looking for more queer, new adult romances. I was given an ARC copy of By any means necessary via Netgalley for an honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Love the representation and the ideas this book explores. Nevertheless, I thought the relationships (friendships & romantic) seemed a bit too instant and convenient. (And none of the CAKE members ever felt fully actualized except Emery.) The writing took a while to draw me in, and in the end I was left somewhat confused about the overall message. Spoilers: At the end, Torrey talks about battling gentrification by “any means necessary” and helps to orchestrate a protest, using others’ fear as Love the representation and the ideas this book explores. Nevertheless, I thought the relationships (friendships & romantic) seemed a bit too instant and convenient. (And none of the CAKE members ever felt fully actualized except Emery.) The writing took a while to draw me in, and in the end I was left somewhat confused about the overall message. Spoilers: At the end, Torrey talks about battling gentrification by “any means necessary” and helps to orchestrate a protest, using others’ fear as a weapon in the fight. Then in the epilogue, he envisions a world in which he only has to focus on today, and love, and the world isn’t “pressuring me to fight a thing I am helpless to win.” I don’t think this was meant to sound defeatist or lessening of his previous actions, but sounded strange after emphasizing (at least as I interpreted it) that fighting for the cause is not, in fact, hopeless or “helpless to win.” And the move to, in the epilogue, solely focus on how his world is so much brighter because of Gabe seemed too much like love as a cure all. IDK, the dynamic between their romantic relationship and the book’s message of battling gentrification just felt disjointed and unbalanced at times. The parts were all there (I loved their love story for the most part), but the parts just didn’t come together in the right way for me.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Cobb Sabatini

    I won an Uncorrected Proof of By Any Means Necessary by Candice Montgomery from Goodreads. The reader may believe he has an understanding of how gentrification of neighborhoods impacts the people who live there, but he will gain a more intimate understanding through Candice Montgomery's novel, By Any Means Necessary. The author quickly draws in readers by placing them immediately inside the mind of protagonist Torrey McKenzie. Readers are introduced to the way Torrey views the world as his I won an Uncorrected Proof of By Any Means Necessary by Candice Montgomery from Goodreads. The reader may believe he has an understanding of how gentrification of neighborhoods impacts the people who live there, but he will gain a more intimate understanding through Candice Montgomery's novel, By Any Means Necessary. The author quickly draws in readers by placing them immediately inside the mind of protagonist Torrey McKenzie. Readers are introduced to the way Torrey views the world as his thoughts flow naturally through his language and observations. This novel is more than a book about a single issue. Our narrator, Torrey, waxes poetic about all the emotions felt by a young man on the verge of adulthood: falling in love, true friendships, responsibility, honor, growing up gay, and what constitutes a family. As Torrey philosophizes about life, race, society, identity, and about being a young black male in a world controlled by whites, readers are offered a clearer understanding of the real world that is represented in this work of fiction. Fans of Coming of Age stories will appreciate this novel. Every reader will gain insight into the needs and requirements for dignity of persons facing displacement.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Torrey has been through some rough times. His mother is in a coma due to a drug overdose. Torrey was living with his Uncle, Aunt and grandfather and then his Uncle died. His grandfather has never been loving, but he is downright ugly to Torrey when he learns he is gay. His Uncle left Torrey his bee farm/business and his Aunt has agreed to harvest the honey and care for the bees and farm while Torrey is in college. He has just arrived at college when he learns that his grandfather, who is the Torrey has been through some rough times. His mother is in a coma due to a drug overdose. Torrey was living with his Uncle, Aunt and grandfather and then his Uncle died. His grandfather has never been loving, but he is downright ugly to Torrey when he learns he is gay. His Uncle left Torrey his bee farm/business and his Aunt has agreed to harvest the honey and care for the bees and farm while Torrey is in college. He has just arrived at college when he learns that his grandfather, who is the trustee for the property failed to pay the property taxes and his farm is being foreclosed on. Torrey is torn--should he stay in college and create a better future for himself or should he return to the farm he loves and attempt to save it? Can you really focus on one thing when you are being torn in two?

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

    teen fiction (gay boy flirts with bisexual former crush in his first months at SFSU and also tries to save his dead uncle's foreclosing bee farm at the same time) I liked Torrey's voice a lot (though sometimes the slang went over my head) and think this is probably a cute romance that also probably deals with some grief and acceptance. I probably would have continued reading (I got to p. 54) but have other stuff I need to read now--would still recommend.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    3.75 This took to me a little while to get in to as it is written as the characters would speak in real life. It shows the journey of Torrey, a black college guy who has to battle between choosing college (as the first person in his family to go) and running his late uncle’s bee farm that is in foreclosure. Torrey struggles to follow his heart as he doesn’t want to let anyone down.

  28. 4 out of 5

    elizabeth

    dnf 45% Thought I would like this more then I did. Then I thought this might pick up and I would feel engaged with the writing, the story—something, anything. Nearly at the halfway mark and I still feel disconnected with the writing style and what’s going on, the result of disinterest and not clicking with what’s going on.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shreya

    I've been rattling around between a 3 and 4 star rating for By Any Means Necessary. For now it's a 3, but check my Blog Tour post on October 12 to find out for sure! Bookstagram post up on the same day with this beautiful cover featured! Thank you to Page Street Kids for sending me a copy in exchange for my honest review!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Beth Cohen

    I am so glad this book exists. I loved reading about a response to gentrification from the inside. I also loved reading about two boys falling in love. The voice was incredible and will be hard to forget.

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