Hot Best Seller

Elevator Pitch

Availability: Ready to download

It all begins on a Monday, when four people board an elevator in a Manhattan office tower. Each presses a button for their floor, but the elevator proceeds, non-stop, to the top. Once there, it stops for a few seconds, and then plummets. Right to the bottom of the shaft. It appears to be a horrific, random tragedy. But then, on Tuesday, it happens aga It all begins on a Monday, when four people board an elevator in a Manhattan office tower. Each presses a button for their floor, but the elevator proceeds, non-stop, to the top. Once there, it stops for a few seconds, and then plummets. Right to the bottom of the shaft. It appears to be a horrific, random tragedy. But then, on Tuesday, it happens again, in a different Manhattan skyscraper. And when Wednesday brings yet another high-rise catastrophe, one of the most vertical cities in the world—and the nation’s capital of media, finance, and entertainment—is plunged into chaos. Clearly, this is anything but random. This is a cold, calculated bid to terrorize the city. And it’s working. Fearing for their lives, thousands of men in women working in offices across the city refuse leave their homes. Commerce has slowed to a trickle. Emergency calls to the top floors of apartment buildings go unanswered. Who is behind this? Why are they doing it? What do these deadly acts of sabotage have to do with the fingerless body found on the High Line? Two seasoned New York detectives and a straight-shooting journalist must race against time to find the answers before the city’s newest, and tallest, residential tower has its Friday night ribbon-cutting.


Compare

It all begins on a Monday, when four people board an elevator in a Manhattan office tower. Each presses a button for their floor, but the elevator proceeds, non-stop, to the top. Once there, it stops for a few seconds, and then plummets. Right to the bottom of the shaft. It appears to be a horrific, random tragedy. But then, on Tuesday, it happens aga It all begins on a Monday, when four people board an elevator in a Manhattan office tower. Each presses a button for their floor, but the elevator proceeds, non-stop, to the top. Once there, it stops for a few seconds, and then plummets. Right to the bottom of the shaft. It appears to be a horrific, random tragedy. But then, on Tuesday, it happens again, in a different Manhattan skyscraper. And when Wednesday brings yet another high-rise catastrophe, one of the most vertical cities in the world—and the nation’s capital of media, finance, and entertainment—is plunged into chaos. Clearly, this is anything but random. This is a cold, calculated bid to terrorize the city. And it’s working. Fearing for their lives, thousands of men in women working in offices across the city refuse leave their homes. Commerce has slowed to a trickle. Emergency calls to the top floors of apartment buildings go unanswered. Who is behind this? Why are they doing it? What do these deadly acts of sabotage have to do with the fingerless body found on the High Line? Two seasoned New York detectives and a straight-shooting journalist must race against time to find the answers before the city’s newest, and tallest, residential tower has its Friday night ribbon-cutting.

30 review for Elevator Pitch

  1. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    In Elevator Pitch, Linwood Barclay writes brilliantly about the fear and mayhem experienced by New Yorkers when elevators appear to take on a life of their own, killing all those on board. It begins when four people board an elevator in a Manhattan office tower. Each of them have pressed a button for their particular floor, but the elevator ascends right to the top, stops for a few seconds and then plummets right to the bottom of the shaft. On Tuesday it happens again in another build In Elevator Pitch, Linwood Barclay writes brilliantly about the fear and mayhem experienced by New Yorkers when elevators appear to take on a life of their own, killing all those on board. It begins when four people board an elevator in a Manhattan office tower. Each of them have pressed a button for their particular floor, but the elevator ascends right to the top, stops for a few seconds and then plummets right to the bottom of the shaft. On Tuesday it happens again in another building . Wednesday yet another high rise tragedy occurs, plunging the city into complete chaos. Elevators are closed throughout the city - people are unable to work - medical emergencies on top floor apartments go unanswered, but just who is responsible? Is it a terrorist organisation, or the Russians, or an individual with some ulterior motive. One thing’s for sure, the perpetrators need to be caught, and fast, or the whole of New York and its economy will be brought to it’s knees. I think what makes this a compelling read is, that given the high tech world in which we now live, I can imagine that this scenario could be entirely plausible, and one can only imagine the adverse effects on the financial markets and of society as a whole. This was a gripping read, and it’s literally no smooth ride, as the story picks up ever more speed, bowls along, broadens out and takes the reader on a journey to hell. With expert use of smoke and mirrors, I never did guess who was behind these horrific events, and as expected, Barclay carries the plot forward to a thrilling climax. * Thank you to Netgalley and HQ for my ARC. I have given an honest unbiased review in exchange *

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Humphrey

    2.5 STARS rounded to 3 I'm keeping this brief, because it's obvious from my rating that this one just wasn't for me, and I think it's because I was expecting something a bit more fast paced with more elevator scenes. I will say that I appreciate so much that the author put a lot of time and effort into proper research of local NYC haunts that my friends who live in the city said meant so much to them. I'll always be a huge fan of Barclay's, and not every book by an author will appeal to e 2.5 STARS rounded to 3 I'm keeping this brief, because it's obvious from my rating that this one just wasn't for me, and I think it's because I was expecting something a bit more fast paced with more elevator scenes. I will say that I appreciate so much that the author put a lot of time and effort into proper research of local NYC haunts that my friends who live in the city said meant so much to them. I'll always be a huge fan of Barclay's, and not every book by an author will appeal to every reader. I say pick this one up for yourself and see what you think! *Arc provided by the publisher via NetGalley.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Paromjit

    Linwood Barclay writes an intense, dark and fast paced thriller set in the most vertical city in the world, New York has more skyscrapers than anywhere else, with elevators a critical requirement for almost everyone in their daily lives. In a terrifying premise that has all the hallmarks of realistic possibility, it begins on a Monday in Morris Lansing's building, an elevator goes crazy, leaving four people dead. Elevator accidents happen, they are rare, it is at first assumed that this is just Linwood Barclay writes an intense, dark and fast paced thriller set in the most vertical city in the world, New York has more skyscrapers than anywhere else, with elevators a critical requirement for almost everyone in their daily lives. In a terrifying premise that has all the hallmarks of realistic possibility, it begins on a Monday in Morris Lansing's building, an elevator goes crazy, leaving four people dead. Elevator accidents happen, they are rare, it is at first assumed that this is just such a tragedy. However, on Tuesday, there is another elevator accident that results in a gruesome death. The ambitious mayor, Richard Wilson Headley and his team are to find themselves under extreme stress and pressure as evidence emerges that these may not be unfortunate tragedies, it seems someone has embarked on the path of creating terror, fear and mayhem. Headley finds himself in the midst of a crisis as he orders all elevators to be shut until essential checks are made, bringing the city to a standstill, whilst more die who rely on elevators. Barbara Matheson is a journalist who has made life difficult for the mayor, she loses a friend in the first elevator disaster. She wants to know who is behind the attacks, surely there are easier ways to cause death and mayhem? She is shocked when her daughter, Arla, finds herself a job in the mayoral office, and concerned by comments left on her articles by someone calling themselves Going Down. An alt-right group calling themselves, The Flyovers, headed by Eugene Clement, is suspected of explosions in coastal cities like Boston. Clement and his wife have arrived in New York, ostensibly for their wedding anniversary, but clearly there is another agenda. NYPD Detectives Jerry Bourque and his partner, Lois Delgado, find themselves on the scene of a murdered man, near the railtracks. The man's face has been destroyed and his fingertips have been cut off, someone has gone to a great deal of trouble to prevent him being identified. Why? Barclay ratchets up the tension with skill with his short chapters, providing the reader with a myriad of colourful and interesting characters, and the best possible location to illustrate just how much peoples' reliance on elevators can be exploited to deadly effect, and fan the fears of all who live in one of the most important cities in the US. This is a high octane intense read, full of suspense and tension, and effortlessly gripping. This is for all those who love their crime thrillers, written by an experienced author who can be relied on to provide the necessary thrills and chills. Many thanks to HQ for an ARC.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kylie D

    Whoa, what a ride. After reading this book I'll guarantee you wont want to get into an elevator for a long, long time. New York is in a state of chaos. Someone has sabotaged an elevator in Manhattan. Then there's another incident...and another. Before long the city is in a panic and the mayor has put an embargo on the use of all elevators, effectively bringing the city to a halt. Who is behind the sabotage? And why? Does it have something to do with a taxi that was blown up? Well, you'll have to Whoa, what a ride. After reading this book I'll guarantee you wont want to get into an elevator for a long, long time. New York is in a state of chaos. Someone has sabotaged an elevator in Manhattan. Then there's another incident...and another. Before long the city is in a panic and the mayor has put an embargo on the use of all elevators, effectively bringing the city to a halt. Who is behind the sabotage? And why? Does it have something to do with a taxi that was blown up? Well, you'll have to read this book to find out! Like the elevators in this book in freefall, you'll find yourself devouring the pages with great speed. It's quite fast paced, but it's not all action, as we get to know the stories of those involved, from the detective on the case, the reporter covering it, even the mayor himself. So strap yourselves in and hold on tight. Meanwhile, I'll be taking the stairs... My thanks to Harper Collins Australia for an uncorrected proof to read and review. The opinions are entirely my own.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Holly B

    I might be opting for the stairs for awhile. Someone is messing with the elevators in NYC, which gave me a sudden sense of horror . I know I'm going to think about this book the next time I step into one. There are quite a few characters in this book and it is longer than most, but I was wrapped up in the mysteries and it was certainly a page-turner. Turns out that Barclay is the master of chapter cliff-hangers too!  Let the mayhem begin.... There are two police partners investigating the crimes and they addetoo!  I might be opting for the stairs for awhile. Someone is messing with the elevators in NYC, which gave me a sudden sense of horror . I know I'm going to think about this book the next time I step into one. There are quite a few characters in this book and it is longer than most, but I was wrapped up in the mysteries and it was certainly a page-turner. Turns out that Barclay is the master of chapter cliff-hangers too!  Let the mayhem begin.... There are two police partners investigating the crimes and they added intrigue and I was rooting for them along the way. Loved these two! The tension and suspense increased as the pages turned. Feel like some intense suspense mixed with some intriguing characters? Pick this one up for a thrill ride! Thanks to EW for my review copy. OUT 9/17/19    

  6. 4 out of 5

    Debra

    It's one thing to get stuck in an elevator, it’s another thing to, well, have it plummet-picking up speed-going faster and faster-until .... Manhattan, a city of skyscrapers, so many elevators, so many people, so many ways for things to go wrong. It all begins when four people are in an elevator that plummets to the bottom of the shaft. It's not going to be the only one. There will be others. What first looks like a tragedy, soon begins to look like an act of terror. Someone is behind It's one thing to get stuck in an elevator, it’s another thing to, well, have it plummet-picking up speed-going faster and faster-until .... Manhattan, a city of skyscrapers, so many elevators, so many people, so many ways for things to go wrong. It all begins when four people are in an elevator that plummets to the bottom of the shaft. It's not going to be the only one. There will be others. What first looks like a tragedy, soon begins to look like an act of terror. Someone is behind all these elevator mishaps. Who and why? There is a fair amount of characters in this book with the main plot and subplots going on, which of course had me guessing how they were all related. There was one subplot that, although interesting, upon finishing the book, I didn't feel was even necessary. A plus, for me, were the characters relevant to the story. I enjoyed Barbara and Detective Bourque the most. I loved flawed characters. Let’s face it, they are more interesting, and I always want to root for them. The writing was solid and apart from feeling that one subplot wasn't necessary, I enjoyed the book. I will probably remember this book the next time I step in an elevator. Plus, this book did teach me to never step forward when an elevator door opens until I am sure the elevator is actually there- nuff said. This is a solid book with underlying tension by Barclay. Not my favorite by this author but still enjoyable with mounting tension as the book reaches its conclusion. 3.5 stars Thank you to the publisher and Edelweiss who provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The thoughts and opinions expressed in this review are my own.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kaceey

    Do you have a fear of elevators? No? You will after reading this book! Someone is sabotaging the elevators in the high rise buildings of New York City. The casualties are piling up! What elevator is next? Do you trust the one you’re about to step on with? Nope, not me!! This is a fast paced thriller that kept me guessing throughout! Is it personal? Random? Or is this the work of a homegrown terrorist group?? I’ve been reading Linwood Barclay books for years and he never disappoints Do you have a fear of elevators? No? You will after reading this book! Someone is sabotaging the elevators in the high rise buildings of New York City. The casualties are piling up! What elevator is next? Do you trust the one you’re about to step on with? Nope, not me!! This is a fast paced thriller that kept me guessing throughout! Is it personal? Random? Or is this the work of a homegrown terrorist group?? I’ve been reading Linwood Barclay books for years and he never disappoints! They are always intricate thrillers that captivate me from start to end! I’m already looking forward to his next! Thank you to Edelweiss Harper Collins - William Morrow and Linwood Barclay for an ARC to read and review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    I was pleased to get my hands on the latest Linwood Barclay novel, as I find the author never fails to keep me thinking throughout a reading experience. Barclay turns the relatively mundane elevator into a masterful inanimate antagonist in this piece that may leave readers debating whether to ‘take the stairs’ next time. It was a Monday like any other in New York City, until it wasn’t. When an elevator plummets in a Manhattan office tower, four are dead and Mayor Richard ‘Dick’ Headley is forced I was pleased to get my hands on the latest Linwood Barclay novel, as I find the author never fails to keep me thinking throughout a reading experience. Barclay turns the relatively mundane elevator into a masterful inanimate antagonist in this piece that may leave readers debating whether to ‘take the stairs’ next time. It was a Monday like any other in New York City, until it wasn’t. When an elevator plummets in a Manhattan office tower, four are dead and Mayor Richard ‘Dick’ Headley is forced to do some damage control. In the Office of the Mayor, anyone who can seeks to spin this and turn it on poor inspector records, though there is barely any time to breathe before new fires emerge. A gritty journalist, Barbara Matheson, wants answers and Headley’s head on a platter. She rushes to the scene and discovers a personal tie to the accident, one she was not expecting. Meanwhile, NYPD Detectives Bourque and Delgado are called to the scene of a body found by a jogger. They run the few leads they have and identify the victim as an elevator repairman, but there is still no clear motive for his murder. When another elevator plummets on Tuesday, all eyes turn to Mayor Headley, who is scrambling to keep his city at ease while wondering what is going on. Further acts of violence, including a bombing and yet another elevator mishap lead some to wonder if this is the work of a domestic terror organization seeking to push their message out however they can. When it is discovered that someone has planted cameras in all the elevators that crashed, new theories about how one might be able to ‘remotely control’ the elevators emerges, only fuelling the idea that this might be a form of terrorism. Barbara Matheson works her magic and finds a parallel between all three locations of the elevator malfunctions, which could cause havoc if it’s released too soon. While the world watches, New Yorkers are left paralyzed as all elevators are shut down by decree of the mayor. Political suicide, perhaps, but there has to be an answer somewhere in all of this. Barclay offers a thrilling ride that will leave all readers a little less certain about what they would do when arriving in a lobby of a multi-storey building. Recommended to those who love a good thriller, as well as readers who are longtime fans of Linwood Barclay. I can usually count on Linwood Barclay to serve up a wonderful novel that will send chills up my spine and cause many of my brain synapses to spark. His ideas are well plotted, though there is usually a twist or two that could not have been predicted. With a wide cast of characters, it is hard to choose a single as the protagonist. The reader can learn a little more about Detective Jerry Bourque and the personal struggles he has on the job, while trying to solve this murder, or they might want to focus their attention on Mayor Headley, who is always keen on spinning things to go in his direction. The character development of Barbara Matheson is intriguing, both from a personal and professional angle. She has a gritty nature to her, but it is surely one the reader will enjoy, given the opportunity to envelop themselves in her backstory. There are many other characters from which the reader can choose when focussing their attention. Some may say this multi-layer story can distract the reader, but I find that it all connects together on some level and serves to permit a variety of views on a single, large event. The entertainment factor is high yet again, as Barclay uses this multi-character approach, pulling the reader in deeper. The story itself was quite ingenious, taking something as simple as an elevator and turning it into a weapon. The plot moves along well,, not rushing but also not dragging, as Barclay seeks to give the reader something to ponder while the story advances. With a mix of chapter lengths and just the right amount of suspense built in, the reader can follow as the narrative gathers momentum. There is certainly a great pace here and I can only hope readers find themselves as enthralled as I was in this piece. I may stay away from elevators for a while... or take the risk! Kudos, Mr. Barclay, for another great novel. I can always count on a wonderful story when you are at the helm. Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/ A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sandy *The world could end while I was reading and I would never notice*

    EXCERPT: The elevator car maintained its slow descent. It did not stop at the lobby level. It continued, slowly, on its inexorable downward path. The injured man, no longer visible, could be heard shouting, 'Make it stop! Stop the f***ing thing!' Frantically, the security guard, unable to think of anything else to do, kept jabbing at the button. 'Come on! Stop, you son of a bitch!' The top of the elevator car now dropped below the level of the lobby fl EXCERPT: The elevator car maintained its slow descent. It did not stop at the lobby level. It continued, slowly, on its inexorable downward path. The injured man, no longer visible, could be heard shouting, 'Make it stop! Stop the f***ing thing!' Frantically, the security guard, unable to think of anything else to do, kept jabbing at the button. 'Come on! Stop, you son of a bitch!' The top of the elevator car now dropped below the level of the lobby florr. The screams from the man in the pit grew more intense, and were joined by the woman. A bone-chilling, two-person chorus of death. The elevator car, like some cunning animal moving in on its prey, maintained its slow descent until it finally came to a stop. The screaming ceased. ABOUT THIS BOOK: It all begins on a Monday, when four people board an elevator in a Manhattan office tower. Each presses a button for their floor, but the elevator proceeds, non-stop, to the top. Once there, it stops for a few seconds, and then plummets. Right to the bottom of the shaft. It appears to be a horrific, random tragedy. But then, on Tuesday, it happens again, in a different Manhattan skyscraper. And when Wednesday brings yet another high-rise catastrophe, one of the most vertical cities in the world—and the nation’s capital of media, finance, and entertainment—is plunged into chaos. Clearly, this is anything but random. This is a cold, calculated bid to terrorize the city. And it’s working. Fearing for their lives, thousands of men in women working in offices across the city refuse leave their homes. Commerce has slowed to a trickle. Emergency calls to the top floors of apartment buildings go unanswered. Who is behind this? Why are they doing it? What do these deadly acts of sabotage have to do with the fingerless body found on the High Line? Two seasoned New York detectives and a straight-shooting journalist must race against time to find the answers before the city’s newest, and tallest, residential tower has its Friday night ribbon-cutting. MY THOUGHTS: Not the most chilling novel I have read about elevators - I will still ride them, but pretty damned good! The chapters are short, tension-filled, and to the point. Linwood Barclay doesn't muck around...no detours, no side roads, no sight-seeing. Its wham, bam, thank you ma'am, get your teeth into this, do up your seat beat, and hold on tight! Barclay keeps us guessing as to who is behind the elevator attacks; there are plenty of possibilities. ISIS? The Flyovers?.... or is it someone closer to home? Is the car bombing related? And where will they strike next? Will it be your building? Questions buzzed around my brain the whole time I was reading, but Mr Barclay kindly answered them all by the end. As I have said occasionally in the past, the scariest thing is....this could happen. Probably will happen at some point. Maybe I won't ride elevators after all. **** THE AUTHOR: Linwood Barclay is the #1 internationally bestselling author of seventeen novels for adults, including No Time for Goodbye, Trust Your Eyes and, most recently, A Noise Downstairs. He has also written two novels for children and screenplays. DISCLOSURE: Thank you to Harlequin Australia & MIRA via NetGalley for providing a digital ARC of Elevator Pitch by Linwood Barclay for review. All opinions expressed in this review are my own personal opinions. For an explanation of my rating system please visit my profile page on Goodreads.com, or the about page on Sandysbookaday.wordpress.com. This review is also published on Twitter, Amazon and my webpage https://sandysbookaday.wordpress.com/...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mandy White

    Confession time - Elevator Pitch was my first Linwood Barclay book! I know, I know I am a shocker. Once I started this book I did not want to put it down, it was all I could think about. I am absolutely a fan of this writer now and I will be looking for more books by him. This book completely sucked me and it scared me! Getting into an elevator was something that I started to dread, and honestly contemplated taking the stairs. What happens in this book is scary because it could happen! You will Confession time - Elevator Pitch was my first Linwood Barclay book! I know, I know I am a shocker. Once I started this book I did not want to put it down, it was all I could think about. I am absolutely a fan of this writer now and I will be looking for more books by him. This book completely sucked me and it scared me! Getting into an elevator was something that I started to dread, and honestly contemplated taking the stairs. What happens in this book is scary because it could happen! You will never look at an elevator the same way again after reading this book. New York City - the most vertical city in the world. Home of the tallest skyscrapers and buildings that are inhabited by millions of people. So when the elevators in these buildings start to malfunction all hell breaks loose. It starts with one on a Monday morning. 4 people get in and press their floors. But the elevator races to the very top, before plummeting to the very bottom at a very fast pace - kind of like the Guardians of the Galaxy ride at California Adventure at Disneyland. Only this is not a ride you want to be on. This is just the start of the terror. The next day and the day after that more elevator incidents happen in Manhattan and the city is frightened. People are afraid to go to work or leave their apartments. The mayors office is under pressure to shut all the elevators down which will basically shut the city down. All the while 2 NYPD detectives are looking into the murder of a man whose fingers have been cut off and left on the high line. Are the 2 things connected? Who is doing this and why? Journalist Barbara Matheson is like a dog with a bone with this story and nothing will get in her way to get the headline. Can they make the city safe again before Friday when the tallest tower in New York is set to open? Thanks to Harlequin HQ Book Club for my advanced copy of this book to read. All opinions are my own and are in no way biased.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine from How Useful It Is

    This book is an excellent read though it has a bit of a slow start. After reading this book, the elevator now gives me the creeps. I almost feel excited that I don't have to use the elevator anytime soon until I went to my doctor appointment and then I had to get on one. I immediately thought about this book and felt nervous the entire ride. I like following Barbara's view. She's a strong independent woman who doesn't feel afraid to speak her mind. Normally I don't like books with a lot of views This book is an excellent read though it has a bit of a slow start. After reading this book, the elevator now gives me the creeps. I almost feel excited that I don't have to use the elevator anytime soon until I went to my doctor appointment and then I had to get on one. I immediately thought about this book and felt nervous the entire ride. I like following Barbara's view. She's a strong independent woman who doesn't feel afraid to speak her mind. Normally I don't like books with a lot of views but in this case it helps to understand what each person is thinking before they die if their character is short lived. Definitely interesting to learn more about New York reading this book. I like that it's considered as the vertical city since there are many tall buildings. 
This book begins with a prologue, told in the third person point of view following Stuart, 38 as he waits around by the elevator under a disguise for Sherry, Producer, to pitch her into giving him a chance to be the newest screenwriter. After he, Sherry and two other people got on the elevator, it begins to have problems. The book then started with Barbara Matheson, journalist who brought to light a new allegation against Mayor Headley of NYC. The second view is Detective Jerry Bourque, 40 who came out to look at the new murder scene. The third view is Garnet aka Bucky who is a member of the Flyover group. The fourth view is the anonymous boy who hangs around his ill mom written in italicized. The fifth view is Fanya, a visiting scientist from Russia who lives on the 28th floor. She's waiting for the elevator to go down and feeling mad at the children and their parents for keeping the elevator. This book is organized from Monday to Friday. The sixth view is Headley, NYC Mayor. The seventh view is Alexander, Russia Ambassador. The eight view is Glover, advisor and son of the mayor. The ninth view is Eugene, an older figure that Bucky looks up to and is the leader of The Flyover group. The tenth view is Chris who works for the mayor. The eleventh view is Arla, Barbara's daughter. The twelfth view is Anjelica who invited Eugene for an interview on TV. The thirteenth view is Elliot as he and his partner from Canada wait for the elevator to arrive at their 15th floor. There are more other small characters I won't list them all. 
Elevator Pitch is very well written and most definitely an interesting read. I love the reminder about how our eyes are always glued to the phone and how it could harm us if we don't watch where we are going. The simple thing about elevator being made into a scary ride is excellent. The author is sure creative. I enjoyed all of the different scenarios of how an elevator can cause an accident. "Eyebrows like mutant caterpillars," haha Love that description! Love the unexpected twists, Jerry not ducking, and Barbara's touchdown. I like how the ending tie to the prologue, pitching an idea in an elevator. I recommend everyone to read this book! Pro: elevator, terrorist acts, mobile phones, page turner, New York City, some humor, lesson learned at the end
 Con: bit of a slow start 
I rate it 5 stars! ***Disclaimer: Many thanks to William Morrows for the opportunity to read and review. Please be assured that my opinions are honest.
xoxo,
Jasmine at www.howusefulitis.wordpress.com for more details

  12. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    This was an interesting one and, having read it, I may never look at an elevator in the same way again. Especially one in a high rise building. There were some very inventive details and a few very gory deaths. The author used his imagination fully to create original and amazing ways to die in an elevator incident. I was completely fooled by the ending. There was one huge red herring which made me think I was very clever - until I was not. Very well done and definitely worth a read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jayme

    You've heard the saying.. Once is chance Twice is Coincidence Third Time is a pattern.. It all begins on Monday, when four people board an elevator in a Manhattan office tower, and the elevator proceeds, non-stop to the top, pausing briefly, before plummeting right to the bottom of the shaft. It seemed like another horrific, but random, tragedy for the World's most vertical city. Till, it happens again in a different skyscraper on Tuesday. And, then the You've heard the saying.. Once is chance Twice is Coincidence Third Time is a pattern.. It all begins on Monday, when four people board an elevator in a Manhattan office tower, and the elevator proceeds, non-stop to the top, pausing briefly, before plummeting right to the bottom of the shaft. It seemed like another horrific, but random, tragedy for the World's most vertical city. Till, it happens again in a different skyscraper on Tuesday. And, then there is yet another catastrophe involving a high rise and an elevator on Wednesday. Well developed characters Barbara Matheson, a straight shooting reporter and no fan of the current Mayor, Richard Headley, AND Detectives Jerry Bourque and Lois Delgado, are determined to figure out WHO is behind these attacks and WHY. Is a terrorist group using the elevators of NY to paralyze the city? The book synopsis promises that this thriller will do for elevators what Psycho did for showers and Jaws did for the beach...and as the elevators plunged, my heart was racing! This was another top notch thriller that would make a great blockbuster movie, and with all of the sequels and remakes produced this year, it's clear to me that Hollywood could use an original idea like this! 🍿 Although last year's "A Noise Downstairs" remains my favorite Linwood Barclay book, so far (I have lots of his earlier work yet to read!) -I have no hesitation in recommending this to readers who enjoy suspense and thrillers! Thank You to Edelweiss, William Morrow Publishing and the author for allowing me to read a digital ARC in exchange for a candid review! This book will be released on Sept 17th, 2019!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    After reading this, you'll never look at an elevator the same way, and if you're smart you'll certainly never step into one without looking first. It all began on a Monday in Manhattan, when an elevator accident caused four people to plummet to their deaths. At least it was thought to be an accident until another elevator accident happened on Tuesday followed by a third on Wednesday. The Mayor's office is in a spin - who is targeting elevators and will there be any more incidents? Do After reading this, you'll never look at an elevator the same way, and if you're smart you'll certainly never step into one without looking first. It all began on a Monday in Manhattan, when an elevator accident caused four people to plummet to their deaths. At least it was thought to be an accident until another elevator accident happened on Tuesday followed by a third on Wednesday. The Mayor's office is in a spin - who is targeting elevators and will there be any more incidents? Do they keep quiet and hope there won't be or do they close down all 70,000 elevators in the city bringing the whole city to a standstill, and causing hardship for all those living in high rise apartments? The NYPD have few leads to follow to find the culprit and have others matters to investigate such as a faceless, fingertip-less corpse and a terrorist bomber loose in the city, who might or might not be connected to the elevator incidents. Linwood Barclay has taken something very familiar to the everyday lives of city dwellers (elevators) and made it into something very scary indeed. It would probably have to be the most effective way of crippling a city with the least number of deaths. The plot moves along well, centred on the Mayor and his closest staff, a hard hitting journalist (and long time thorn in the Mayor's side) Barbara Matheson and the two very likeable detectives on the case, Jerry Borque and Lois Delgardo. The final chapters are very thrilling indeed as Barclay ramps ups the tension as the culprit manipulating the elevators steps out of the shadows and their motives are revealed. With thanks to Netgalley and the publisher Harlequin Australia for a digital ARC to read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    As one elevator after another malfunctioned and people were killed, the mayor of New York, Richard Headley was trying to calm the people of his city. But Headley’s decision to shut down all elevators – in a city that was mainly vertical – meant chaos ensued. Who was causing this? And why? NYPD Detectives Delgado and Bourque were investigating the brutal death of an elevator mechanic when suddenly the links to the two connected. And reporter Barbara Matheson, for Manhattan Today, was asking quest As one elevator after another malfunctioned and people were killed, the mayor of New York, Richard Headley was trying to calm the people of his city. But Headley’s decision to shut down all elevators – in a city that was mainly vertical – meant chaos ensued. Who was causing this? And why? NYPD Detectives Delgado and Bourque were investigating the brutal death of an elevator mechanic when suddenly the links to the two connected. And reporter Barbara Matheson, for Manhattan Today, was asking questions – about Headley, and once again, the why. The depth of the investigations; the crisis that New York was facing – people were terrified. Those who lived in high rises couldn’t leave their apartments because of the climb back to the top. Minor needs like groceries and prescriptions had to be forgone. But people were dying and whoever was behind it all needed to be stopped. With the latest high rise, Top of the Park, due to open, the rush to make sure the elevators passed inspection was on. Almost one hundred floors with the party on the top level – the elite of New York attending – would it be safe? Would it go ahead? The race was on… Elevator Pitch by Linwood Barclay is a standalone psychological thriller with an electric pace and plenty of twists. I thought I knew who the perpetrator was – I was wrong. A chilling read with a good dose of suspense; Elevator Pitch is one I highly recommend. With thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for my digital ARC to read in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    This stand alone novel by one of my favourite authors Linwood Barclay was good but not great. It started well and the end was dramatic and very good but a lot of what came between did not do it for me. The book start with four people getting into an elevator in a Manhattan office tower. They all press the buttons to indicate their destination but the elevator proceeds to the top of the building before pausing and then plummeting to the bottom. This appears to be an horrific accident until t This stand alone novel by one of my favourite authors Linwood Barclay was good but not great. It started well and the end was dramatic and very good but a lot of what came between did not do it for me. The book start with four people getting into an elevator in a Manhattan office tower. They all press the buttons to indicate their destination but the elevator proceeds to the top of the building before pausing and then plummeting to the bottom. This appears to be an horrific accident until the following day when the very same happens again in another high rise building. Further incidents occur and the city is reduced to fear and resulting chaos. The question is who is behind it and why. There were plenty of high spots in this book so I don't want to be too negative about it, I did enjoy it and love the writing of Linwood Barclay so I fully understand why other reviewers will give more favourable ratings. I would like to thank both Net Galley and HQ for supplying a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Esil

    How is it possible to read two thrillers based on malfunctioning elevators in one month? I don’t know. I definitely don’t have a thing for elevator thrillers and I certainly would prefer not to develop a fear of elevators. But there it is. I read The Escape Room a few weeks ago, and now I just read Elevator Pitch, and I might just have to start taking the stairs... Joking aside, I quite enjoyed Elevator Pitch. It starts with one nasty elevator incident in New York, and then another... The How is it possible to read two thrillers based on malfunctioning elevators in one month? I don’t know. I definitely don’t have a thing for elevator thrillers and I certainly would prefer not to develop a fear of elevators. But there it is. I read The Escape Room a few weeks ago, and now I just read Elevator Pitch, and I might just have to start taking the stairs... Joking aside, I quite enjoyed Elevator Pitch. It starts with one nasty elevator incident in New York, and then another... The story focuses on a number of characters who are affected by the incidents, including a journalist and her daughter, the mayor and his son, and a couple of police officers. It’s a smooth narration, in short chapters, telling the story from different perspectives. The political issues are contemporary. The focus on what would happen to New York if all elevators were taken out of service is really interesting. I have a bit of a complaint about the improbability of one of the connections between the characters, but otherwise this one was a fun and clever read. But now the real question is whether I should take the elevator or the stairs when I go back to work on Tuesday? Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for an opportunity to read an advance copy.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    There is something very disturbing about this thriller novel, which sets it apart from many others in its genre. It's definitely got a unique premise - you know, sometimes pipe bombs and arson sprees and drive-by shootings just don't catch the public eye so well... so, you've gotta start cutting elevator cables in Manhattan skyscrapers! This sick and twisted act seems random at first, but quickly reveals itself to be organized, in what appears to be some sort of terrorism. This quickly sends the There is something very disturbing about this thriller novel, which sets it apart from many others in its genre. It's definitely got a unique premise - you know, sometimes pipe bombs and arson sprees and drive-by shootings just don't catch the public eye so well... so, you've gotta start cutting elevator cables in Manhattan skyscrapers! This sick and twisted act seems random at first, but quickly reveals itself to be organized, in what appears to be some sort of terrorism. This quickly sends the city into a state of panic, leading two detectives to... well, you know the drill. See, the thing about this book is that it's really not bad. I enjoyed it well enough I guess, although there were some pacing issues, but apart from the original plot device of the elevator mystery, this plays out like a very typical and formulaic urban thriller with every usual trope in the book. Hardened detective duo, random unrelated drama, city rushing to solve things more to keep up appearances than for public safety, and so-on. The thing that made me enjoy it a bit more than the usual thrillers in this style though was that it's a bit bigger in terms of its mystery. It's not just some random thug with a gun, but an orchestrated series of murders in office towers. In our post-9/11 era, terrorism is still on the minds of many, and Elevator Pitch looks at what a string of bizarre, organized murders can do to a city not just physically, but psychologically, as well. The elevator scenes were written very effectively, and made it easy to sympathize with the victims, which made the mystery even more gripping. The weird thing is, I don't think I would have enjoyed it without its originality, because it makes the book stand out as more memorable.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    There is something deliciously safe yet still scary reading about one of your fears isn’t there? I cant stand lifts/elevators and so absolutely couldn’t wait to read about something I could MORE than imagine Even if your not wary of lifts everyone knows that somersault tummy moment when the door of the lift doesn’t open quite quickly enough and you wonder...... In Elevator Pitch you meet ‘normal’ people who are in lifts whilst New York is suffering a spate of tragic accidents relating There is something deliciously safe yet still scary reading about one of your fears isn’t there? I cant stand lifts/elevators and so absolutely couldn’t wait to read about something I could MORE than imagine Even if your not wary of lifts everyone knows that somersault tummy moment when the door of the lift doesn’t open quite quickly enough and you wonder...... In Elevator Pitch you meet ‘normal’ people who are in lifts whilst New York is suffering a spate of tragic accidents relating to lifts, like any good disaster film, you get to know them quickly and then they are embroiled in the disaster, same as in this book I felt every panic, every ‘false bit of humour’ and every manic hope as these people became involved in a ‘lift event’, some survive and some don’t, it felt very realistic to me The book then through various characters comes to solve what and why this is happening and ends on a scene to make ‘Towering Inferno’ proud! Now, its very American, thats not a criticism just an observation, the actual descriptions of New York are wonderful, the author obviously loves it and it built a great picture of the City in my mind The characters, from the typecast Mayor ( with secrets ) to the embittered journo trying to cause the Mayor as much hassle as she can are not immediately or in some cases ever likeable but they play their parts well although it did take me a while to ‘get to know them’ All in all a satisfyingly chilling read with breathing space for everything to be told and come together in a thrilling ending

  20. 5 out of 5

    Pauline

    Someone in New York City is targeting elevators in high rise buildings and people are being killed when the elevator gets out of control. Also terrorists are setting off bombs in public places. Detectives Bourque and Delgado have been assigned to help with these incidents and to see if they are connected. Mayor Headley is desperately trying to sort out this mess and Journalist Barbara Matheson is determined to make things difficult for him. A fast paced thriller that I enjoyed with som Someone in New York City is targeting elevators in high rise buildings and people are being killed when the elevator gets out of control. Also terrorists are setting off bombs in public places. Detectives Bourque and Delgado have been assigned to help with these incidents and to see if they are connected. Mayor Headley is desperately trying to sort out this mess and Journalist Barbara Matheson is determined to make things difficult for him. A fast paced thriller that I enjoyed with some really good characters. Thank you to NetGalley and HQ for my e-copy in exchange for an honest review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Whispering Stories

    On Monday morning four people enter an elevator in an office building. They each press the button for their designated floors but the elevator sails passed them right to the top. Once there it sits idle for a few minutes before plummeting to the ground killing three immediately and one a few hours later from her injuries. On Tuesday an elevator malfunctions in an apartment block and stops dead. Inside is a young boy on his way to school and a Russian scientist. They manage to prise op On Monday morning four people enter an elevator in an office building. They each press the button for their designated floors but the elevator sails passed them right to the top. Once there it sits idle for a few minutes before plummeting to the ground killing three immediately and one a few hours later from her injuries. On Tuesday an elevator malfunctions in an apartment block and stops dead. Inside is a young boy on his way to school and a Russian scientist. They manage to prise open the doors and the scientist climbs out but upon reaching for her purse the elevator drops, killing her instantly. On Wednesday an elevator door opens and two people step on, but there is no elevator and they fall, luckily not too far. Injured but alive people come to their rescue, that is until the elevator moves down crushing the pair. New York is in terror as the residents and workers refuse to use the elevators leaving some people stranded in their high-rise buildings. The Mayor is catapulted into the limelight as people want answers and what does a fingerless man found dead on the Highline have to do with the issue? It’s up to detectives Jerry Bourque and Lois Delgado to work quickly and put the pieces together. If you have a fear of elevators (lifts) then you might want to give this book a miss, for those that don’t have a fear of them this might make you think twice before stepping onto one! Elevator Pitch is an intense thriller that weaves a lot of plotlines together. In the beginning, I was a little confused as the book moved from the initial accident onto a journalist and her dealings with the New York Mayor. We then meet two detectives who are dealing with a crime scene on the Highline where a man has been found brutally murdered and his fingers cut off. I struggled a little to try to work out how all these characters and scenes would come together but once we find out who the murdered man is and the events that occurred on Tuesday everything starts to come clear and the book began to make sense again. It’s at this point the book truly came alive and I raced through it. Not only do we have elevators malfunctioning there is also a terrorist on the loose blowing up things. Are the two connected? This is the first book by Linwood Barclay that I have read and from how much enjoyment I had reading it, it won’t be my last. Elevator Pitch is chilling and exciting, yes, it begins slowly but keep going as it certainly will take you for a ride. The ending is perfect and I like how it incorporated the prologue too.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    You board the elevator, just like you do every morning. Your eyes are glued to your smartphone as you tap from news site, to weather app, to social media feeds and back again. You take little notice of the others surrounding you and they are all immersed inside their own virtual morning routines. But something sparks you out of it. The elevator is not moving. You jab impatiently at the ground floor button but the elevator does not move. When it finally does it rises, away from your conjoined des You board the elevator, just like you do every morning. Your eyes are glued to your smartphone as you tap from news site, to weather app, to social media feeds and back again. You take little notice of the others surrounding you and they are all immersed inside their own virtual morning routines. But something sparks you out of it. The elevator is not moving. You jab impatiently at the ground floor button but the elevator does not move. When it finally does it rises, away from your conjoined destination. A group sigh is released. The elevator stops again. This time it falls down to your destination. It continues to fall. It does not stop. It hits the ground shattering its metal frame and every bone contained inside of it. This is the nightmare reality that is plaguing New York, when a slew of consecutive elevator murders take place, leaving every modern high-rise to feel like the creation of a haunted horror film. Despite the modern setting, this is exactly the type of thrilling reading it also provided for the reader, as gory murder was delivered with inevitable conclusion but with the most drawn-out and suspenseful of narrative styles. Surrounding this was a politically-heightened focus that provided perspectives from the fields of the police force, the media, and the mayor's office. Who to trust and who to believe inside of them was often tricky and it required my intrigue and investment in every one of their stories. Two major plot twists had me reeling early on and I maintained my excitement in this story until a final third grand reveal and the high-stakes conclusion. This intrigue had me pressure-reading throughout, despite a small early resistance when the political focus felt not to my current tastes. However Barclay soon had me bypassing this and also ensured himself as a writer to trust and one I will definitely read from again. I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to the author, Linwood Barclay, and the publisher, William Morrow, for this opportunity.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chandra Claypool (wherethereadergrows)

    As someone who has been stuck in an elevator twice in NYC, this book really has me side eyeing all the elevators I may be going on (you canNOT avoid them in this city)... and let's be real - I'm too lazy for stairs so I guess I'll just be taking my chances! ;) I loved Barclay's A Noise Downstairs and was so excited for this copy of Elevator Pitch and once again, the author gives us a binge worthy dive into a thrilling world where one of the characters has my exact birthday AND he refe As someone who has been stuck in an elevator twice in NYC, this book really has me side eyeing all the elevators I may be going on (you canNOT avoid them in this city)... and let's be real - I'm too lazy for stairs so I guess I'll just be taking my chances! ;) I loved Barclay's A Noise Downstairs and was so excited for this copy of Elevator Pitch and once again, the author gives us a binge worthy dive into a thrilling world where one of the characters has my exact birthday AND he references places in MY NEIGHBORHOOD - there's something so giddy about that. There are TONS of thrillers set in NYC as we know, but when they come to Astoria for even a blip and mention places I've been - well, YES! Now, I'll let you in on a little secret - this DOES get a little convoluted - there's a background to relationships that I think didn't *need* to be added - it, at the end of the day, didn't really lend itself to the story. And the reasoning behind these attacks seemed a bit lackluster after the buildup over these few days as things, ahem, escalated. BUT, take away from some of this, and once again it's a binge worthy read where you have to suspend reality and just enjoy the crazy that happens. I think some long time thriller readers will have issues with this book and I think had I been a different mood, I might've felt the same because I SEE IT, but at the end of the day.... I was entertained, loved the characters honestly and applaud the effort.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Laura Rash

    Well I won’t be riding in any elevators any time soon without thinking of this book. What struck me is how delicate of a society we are if one convenience would be shut down as in elevators, cell phones, water or electricity. And also what a terrorist act that could be. All in all a unique story that had me guessing at “the bad guy” til the end.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    So, I have a small confession to make. This is my first introduction into this authors work. Shocking I know. I have heard so many great things and even have one of his books sat on my bookshelf waiting to be read. What a book to start with though. Brilliant is the first word that comes to mind to describe it. If you’re lucky enough to not have a phobia about elevators, well you more than likely will have one by the time you finish this book. There’s something about a small confined s So, I have a small confession to make. This is my first introduction into this authors work. Shocking I know. I have heard so many great things and even have one of his books sat on my bookshelf waiting to be read. What a book to start with though. Brilliant is the first word that comes to mind to describe it. If you’re lucky enough to not have a phobia about elevators, well you more than likely will have one by the time you finish this book. There’s something about a small confined space and relying totally on technology that gives you a sense of trepidation. The fact that in the space of a couple of days there are fatalities that involve elevators, it literally sent me running for the stairs. The story centres around the Mayor of the city and Barbara who works for a newspaper, of which there is no love lost between these two characters. We get to see the busy lifestyle of someone in power and the behind the scenes of when things go wrong and a city desperate to lay the blame at someones feet. It sure does make for some compelling reading. The sense of fear in people really stands out in the story. The suspense and tension was just electrifying and I couldn’t turn those pages quick enough to see who was responsible. There was more than a few jaw dropping moments where I had to go back and re read to fully comprehend what I had just read. Those moments are THE best! Woah I really need people to read this book as boy do I have to talk about it. Even thinking about them now, I can feel the build up of excitement it brought me. Elevator Pitch is brilliant. Pure and simple. I absolutely loved it. This is a hands down must read and what a fantastic film it would make too. An exhilarating and intense read with plenty of thrills along the way. Be prepared to hold on tight! My thanks to HQ Stories for an advanced readers copy of this book. All opinions are my own and not biased in anyway.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Louise Wilson

    This story takes place in Manhattan. An elevator from a high height to the basement kill all but one of its passengers. That happened on the Monday. On the Tuesday, another high-rise elevator crashes. The city is in chaos. It's thought to be an act of terrorism. A body has also been found with his fingertips removed. The mayor calls for elevators to be shut down until the reason behind the elevator crashes can be found. I like Linwood Barclay for several reasons. I like his style in w This story takes place in Manhattan. An elevator from a high height to the basement kill all but one of its passengers. That happened on the Monday. On the Tuesday, another high-rise elevator crashes. The city is in chaos. It's thought to be an act of terrorism. A body has also been found with his fingertips removed. The mayor calls for elevators to be shut down until the reason behind the elevator crashes can be found. I like Linwood Barclay for several reasons. I like his style in writing, how he builds up the tension and he always has a mixed bunch of characters. This is a thrilling read that I did not want to put down. I also like the way he connects one event to the other and all the loose ends tie up. The pace is fast and the plot thrilling. I loved it from beginning to end. I do recommend this book. I would like to thank NetGalley, HQ and the author Linwood Barclay for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Monnie

    I admit to being more than a tiny bit claustrophobic (go down in a submarine, even when it's docked? Fuhgettaboutit). But oddly, elevators really don't bother me too much. No, I'm not fond of them - especially those that are old, rickety and not much bigger than a bread box. But overall, I'm good. This book changed - albeit not as much as I'd expected based on the description. Most of the ups and downs happen near the beginning and end, with the middle more focused on the hows, whys a I admit to being more than a tiny bit claustrophobic (go down in a submarine, even when it's docked? Fuhgettaboutit). But oddly, elevators really don't bother me too much. No, I'm not fond of them - especially those that are old, rickety and not much bigger than a bread box. But overall, I'm good. This book changed - albeit not as much as I'd expected based on the description. Most of the ups and downs happen near the beginning and end, with the middle more focused on the hows, whys and whodunits. And that's okay with me; it's still a fast-paced and thrilling book that "forced" me to stay up late to finish. As the title suggests, elevators take center stage here, starting with an horrific and unexplained freefall in a midtown New York City highrise that leaves the occupants quite dead. Meanwhile, Detective Jerry Bourque and his partner Lois Delgado are called to the scene of a murder; the badly beaten victim is unidentifiable because whoever did him in chopped off all his fingers. Early on, readers also learn that Bourque is carrying around emotional baggage, some of which, at least, may be responsible for the bouts of severe shortness of breath that require him to carry an inhaler (making me wonder how that might be worked into the story as it progressed). Throw into the mix journalist Barbara Matheson, who's got baggage of her own but has carved a successful career for herself at the expense of alienating the affections of a now-grown daughter. Most recently, she's been dogging the for-the-most-part unpopular New York mayor, a Trump-like guy whose nastiness is tempered only once in a while by a hint of compassion for other people (none of which is bestowed on his son Glover, who works for him). There are questions of whether the murder and elevator plunge are related (acts of terrorism, perhaps?), but for the most part, city officials are trying to play down both incidents. Then the unthinkable happens: Another elevator misbehaves, this time mutilating one of the occupants whose identity triggers even more suspicions as to who's running the show. At this point, there's no choice but for the powers-that-be to come clean publicly, putting fear in the hearts of city residents who can't help but wonder if their building's elevator will be next and prompting city leaders - including the mayor - to fear that their actions (or inactions) could lead to even worse consequences. Matters get even more complicated when Barbara's mom-defying daughter lands a job in the mayor's office and gets friendly with the mayor's son. Needless to say, mom's not a happy camper, but she seems up about far more than the potential for conflict of interest. As the investigation progresses, readers learn more about the characters and their backstories and read on in anticipation that one or more of them just might bite the dust on the elevator floor before the police get the drop on whoever's pushing the wrong buttons. A very entertaining book on its own, but I must add - should no one else think of such a thing - it would make an excellent disaster movie as well.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Maranda

    FEAR OF ELEVATORS? CLAUSTROPHOBIC? Skip Barclay's Elevator Pitch. BUT....If you want a fantastic read with disjointed characters that lead to an array of suspects and events DON'T MISS OUT ON THIS NOVEL. Barclay must have an amazing story board for this novel that brings panic to NYC. Pages are full of what happens when a vertical city is suddenly unable to safely use this transporting room. A copy of this book was provided by Harper Collins Publishers via NetGalley with no requirements for a re FEAR OF ELEVATORS? CLAUSTROPHOBIC? Skip Barclay's Elevator Pitch. BUT....If you want a fantastic read with disjointed characters that lead to an array of suspects and events DON'T MISS OUT ON THIS NOVEL. Barclay must have an amazing story board for this novel that brings panic to NYC. Pages are full of what happens when a vertical city is suddenly unable to safely use this transporting room. A copy of this book was provided by Harper Collins Publishers via NetGalley with no requirements for a review. Comments here are my honest opinion." MUST READ!!!

  29. 4 out of 5

    L.A. Starks

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Elevator Pitch is an interesting regional mystery/thriller by professional author Linwood Barclay. My copy came with blurbs from Stephen King, his son Joe Hill (a pseudonym), and others. What I really, really liked about this book was its basic plot around elevators, elevator malfunctions, New York as a vertical city (Chicago, too), the claustrophobia of being in elevators, (vs. the difficulty of climbing dozens of flights of stairs) with people one may or may not know, and the result Elevator Pitch is an interesting regional mystery/thriller by professional author Linwood Barclay. My copy came with blurbs from Stephen King, his son Joe Hill (a pseudonym), and others. What I really, really liked about this book was its basic plot around elevators, elevator malfunctions, New York as a vertical city (Chicago, too), the claustrophobia of being in elevators, (vs. the difficulty of climbing dozens of flights of stairs) with people one may or may not know, and the resulting required brief cultural anthropology/pecking order of being in such a confined space with others. This is all nicely original and vertical-city-specific (NYC, Chicago, Tokyo, Hong Kong, other major cities). Barclay's novel points out how we take such important conveniences for granted, until they're not there. I found some of the characters to be tiresome clichés however. A mayor with a nickname d---h--d who'd been a real estate developer. Sounds like yet another TDS projection. (Is the president taking up that much space in the head of every author?) A woman with a child who'd picked work over her child--sure it allows for a character arc, but it's a false dichotomy in these days when mothers (and fathers) manage demanding jobs and parenting. A thug from Tulsa, Oklahoma--we don't know if he was First Nations/Native American as many Tulsans are, or maybe it's a Liz Warren projection? NYC under attack by deplorables. Or Russians. Give me a break. At the same time, I credit Barclay for his cop-with-a-memory-and-architectural-interest-character which of course fits the plot, his willingness to be direct and graphic enough about elevator accidents/sabotage consequences, the readability of the book, the climactic scene, and again, his bottom-line point about the technology we take for granted that makes our lives work, until it doesn't. For regional mysteries and thrillers, I prefer and recommend Bird Boys by Lisa Sandlin and Under a Dark Sky by Lori Rader-Day.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    "Actions have consequences. Maybe not overnight. Maybe not in a week, or a month or even a decade...Eventually, things have a way of balancing out." Things become anything but normal in New York when there are 3 separate incidents involving elevators located inside Manhattan skyscrapers that result in deaths. The city's residents are mildly interested and guess there's some sort of connection between these events but total panic really ensues when Mayor Richard Wilson Headley orders t "Actions have consequences. Maybe not overnight. Maybe not in a week, or a month or even a decade...Eventually, things have a way of balancing out." Things become anything but normal in New York when there are 3 separate incidents involving elevators located inside Manhattan skyscrapers that result in deaths. The city's residents are mildly interested and guess there's some sort of connection between these events but total panic really ensues when Mayor Richard Wilson Headley orders that all of them be put out of service until they can be checked. In a vertical city, this can lead to disaster. But that's not the only concern of Detectives Jerry Bourque and Lois Delgado -- they're wondering if these engineered elevator episodes are targeted murders or if they're related to a domestic extremist group known as the "Flyovers." Homeland security is investigating as a possible act of terrorism. But no one claims responsibility. And might the elevator tampering be related to the death of a man found bludgeoned and without fingertips on the High Line? Or how about that taxi bombing? It's a very complicated scenario affecting many jurisdictions and the situational response is being followed very closely by journalist and reporter, Barbara Matheson. She has her own personal reasons for examining all the players and especially those in the Mayor's office. Who is doing this, and why? NO SPOILERS. What a wild ride of suspense! I could barely stop reading once I opened the book. The narrative is told in alternating points of view, but the motives are only slowly revealed with red herrings that caused my guessing talent to flounder several times. The characters are well-developed and engaging with enough historical detail to make them relatable -- even the ones you won't like so much. The writing is excellent and I've long been a Barclay fan. There are plenty of grisly descriptions and enough deaths to make this a thriller while also serving as a bit of a morals directive. There are twists and surprises. I enjoyed it immensely and fans will be clamoring to get their hands on this one. Thank you to HarperCollins Publishers for the e-book ARC to read and review. This jumped to the top of my extensive TBR list as soon as I received it. PS - if you have any phobia about elevators, reading this book will definitely make it worse!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.