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The Alamo Bride

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A Series for Lovers of History, Adventure, Romance, and Ancestry Will Ellis Lose All at the Alamo? Ellis Dumont finds a man in New Orleans Grey unconscious on Dumont property in 1836. As his fevers rage, the man mutters strange things about treasures and war. Either Claiborne Gentry has lost his mind or he’s a spy for the American president—or worse, for the Mexican enemy t A Series for Lovers of History, Adventure, Romance, and Ancestry Will Ellis Lose All at the Alamo? Ellis Dumont finds a man in New Orleans Grey unconscious on Dumont property in 1836. As his fevers rage, the man mutters strange things about treasures and war. Either Claiborne Gentry has lost his mind or he’s a spy for the American president—or worse, for the Mexican enemy that threatens their very lives. With the men of her family away, Ellis must stand courageous and decide who she can trust. Will she put her selfish wants ahead of the future of the republic or travel with Clay to Mission San Jose to help end the war? Join the adventure as the Daughters of the Mayflower series continues with The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo. More in the Daughters of the Mayflower series: The Mayflower Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse – set 1620 Atlantic Ocean (February 2018) The Pirate Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo – set 1725 New Orleans (April 2018) The Captured Bride by Michelle Griep – set 1760 during the French and Indian War (June 2018) The Patriot Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse – set 1774 Philadelphia (August 2018)​ The Cumberland Bride by Shannon McNear – set 1794 on the Wilderness Road (October 2018) The Liberty Bride by MaryLu Tyndall – set 1814 Baltimore (December 2018) The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo – set 1836 Texas (February 2019)  


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A Series for Lovers of History, Adventure, Romance, and Ancestry Will Ellis Lose All at the Alamo? Ellis Dumont finds a man in New Orleans Grey unconscious on Dumont property in 1836. As his fevers rage, the man mutters strange things about treasures and war. Either Claiborne Gentry has lost his mind or he’s a spy for the American president—or worse, for the Mexican enemy t A Series for Lovers of History, Adventure, Romance, and Ancestry Will Ellis Lose All at the Alamo? Ellis Dumont finds a man in New Orleans Grey unconscious on Dumont property in 1836. As his fevers rage, the man mutters strange things about treasures and war. Either Claiborne Gentry has lost his mind or he’s a spy for the American president—or worse, for the Mexican enemy that threatens their very lives. With the men of her family away, Ellis must stand courageous and decide who she can trust. Will she put her selfish wants ahead of the future of the republic or travel with Clay to Mission San Jose to help end the war? Join the adventure as the Daughters of the Mayflower series continues with The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo. More in the Daughters of the Mayflower series: The Mayflower Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse – set 1620 Atlantic Ocean (February 2018) The Pirate Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo – set 1725 New Orleans (April 2018) The Captured Bride by Michelle Griep – set 1760 during the French and Indian War (June 2018) The Patriot Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse – set 1774 Philadelphia (August 2018)​ The Cumberland Bride by Shannon McNear – set 1794 on the Wilderness Road (October 2018) The Liberty Bride by MaryLu Tyndall – set 1814 Baltimore (December 2018) The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo – set 1836 Texas (February 2019)  

30 review for The Alamo Bride

  1. 4 out of 5

    Deanne Patterson

    I have read every book so far published in the Daughters of The Mayflower series, this is number 7. While they are a series they can also be read as standalones. All of the books feature a woman main character who is a strong,encouraging role model/heroine. I enjoyed this story it takes us back to 1835 in New Orleans,Louisiana then we find ourselves in Quintana,Texas . The book is filled with tension,is intriguing and will love appear? I love Ellis's strong character. Upon finding a stranger on I have read every book so far published in the Daughters of The Mayflower series, this is number 7. While they are a series they can also be read as standalones. All of the books feature a woman main character who is a strong,encouraging role model/heroine. I enjoyed this story it takes us back to 1835 in New Orleans,Louisiana then we find ourselves in Quintana,Texas . The book is filled with tension,is intriguing and will love appear? I love Ellis's strong character. Upon finding a stranger on her land she cares for him as she has been taught to do by her mother, also a healer but due to his injury he has memory loss . Is he dangerous, can he be trusted? This was well researched and I feel like I have learned a lot about Texas and Mexico. Published February 1st 2019 I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Book through NetGalley. Thank you. All opinions expressed are my own.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Staci

    While The Alamo Bride didn't steal my heart like the author's prior book in the series The Pirate Bride, it was a well written story. I especially enjoyed the way the author painted a picture of the geography. I could easily visualize in my mind the setting. Ellis is a lovely name and a compelling leading character. She has spunk and stubbornness like her grandmother along with a love for family and Texas. This series continues to be such a wonderful journey through history. My gratitude to Barbou While The Alamo Bride didn't steal my heart like the author's prior book in the series The Pirate Bride, it was a well written story. I especially enjoyed the way the author painted a picture of the geography. I could easily visualize in my mind the setting. Ellis is a lovely name and a compelling leading character. She has spunk and stubbornness like her grandmother along with a love for family and Texas. This series continues to be such a wonderful journey through history. My gratitude to Barbour Books for a complimentary NetGalley copy of the novel. I was not required to post a review and all opinions expressed are my own.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarita

    Having read The Pirate Bride where I adored Maribel, it was fun to read about her great-granddaughter, Ellis, who had a lot of the fun qualities I enjoyed in Maribel. Some of my favourite parts were interactions between her and her grandfather where her strong will came across in a humorousness way. Clay, with his memory issues, was also an interesting male lead and I enjoyed the interaction between the two. The author did a great job with describing the setting and there was a lot of action which Having read The Pirate Bride where I adored Maribel, it was fun to read about her great-granddaughter, Ellis, who had a lot of the fun qualities I enjoyed in Maribel. Some of my favourite parts were interactions between her and her grandfather where her strong will came across in a humorousness way. Clay, with his memory issues, was also an interesting male lead and I enjoyed the interaction between the two. The author did a great job with describing the setting and there was a lot of action which kept me turning the pages and not knowing what to expect. Even though I enjoyed the story, I'm only rating it 3.5 stars. Thinking back on this story now, there was a lot of things that felt either rushed or unfinished for me. I never really new what Clay did in the past which he wanted to correct, the treasure hunt which sounded promising in the beginning did not meet my expectations. I still enjoyed this story and loving the series. *I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Books through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.*

  4. 5 out of 5

    Paula Shreckhise

    The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo is book seven in The Daughters of the Mayflower series from Barbour Publishing. I have enjoyed these peeks into history. Each one of these stories is unique and I gleaned new information into these periods of history. I eagerly await the next books! The Alamo Bride is very well written. Ms. Y’Barbo weaves a very believable story. There is the quandary of Clay Gentry, a New Orleans Grey soldier, who gets injured and loses his memory. He only knows he has a miss The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo is book seven in The Daughters of the Mayflower series from Barbour Publishing. I have enjoyed these peeks into history. Each one of these stories is unique and I gleaned new information into these periods of history. I eagerly await the next books! The Alamo Bride is very well written. Ms. Y’Barbo weaves a very believable story. There is the quandary of Clay Gentry, a New Orleans Grey soldier, who gets injured and loses his memory. He only knows he has a mission to perform. He is nursed back to health by Ellis Valmont. Together they travel to The Alamo to rescue her brother, Thomas. As memory gradually returns, Clay’s mission is revealed as having something to do with helping Texas win freedom from Mexico. There is excitement as they face danger. The overarching theme is taken from Psalm 91. Ellis has chosen to memorize this Psalm and Clay is very familiar with it. The Valmont family takes God and His Word very seriously, attributing all to God, never to luck. This story was a fascinating depiction of circumstances surrounding the incident at the Alamo, with just a brief mention of the actual battle there. Ms. Y’Barbo has done an impressive job researching the area and time period. If you like good historical fiction, give this book and series a try. *I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing. I was not required to give a favorable review. All opinions are my own.*

  5. 5 out of 5

    Julie Carpenter

    3.5* I've enjoyed this Daughters of the Mayflower series a lot. I have two that I need to catch up on and am looking forward to them. Kathleen Y'Barbo wrote a previous book in this series, The Pirate Bride. I thoroughly enjoyed it and her writing style. That was my first time reading a full length novel by this author. I did enjoy reading, The Alamo Bride, but it didn't capture my attention as much as, The Pirate Bride, did. It was fun though that the main character, Ellis, in this book was talked 3.5* I've enjoyed this Daughters of the Mayflower series a lot. I have two that I need to catch up on and am looking forward to them. Kathleen Y'Barbo wrote a previous book in this series, The Pirate Bride. I thoroughly enjoyed it and her writing style. That was my first time reading a full length novel by this author. I did enjoy reading, The Alamo Bride, but it didn't capture my attention as much as, The Pirate Bride, did. It was fun though that the main character, Ellis, in this book was talked about being similar to her great grandmother, the main character from, The Pirate Bride. That was fun to have that connection again. For me the story really picked up once Ellis and Clay had their first meeting. It was a good amount into the story. But there was some different setting up that the author had to achieve before they could meet and interact. I loved Ellis as she was trying to help and heal Clay, especially with trying to interpret his delirious ramblings when he was unconscious. I did skim a little bit here and there. Not necessarily because of the story or the writing but with my busy schedule and wanting to see what happened with these characters' story. The ending was great. It came full circle and I loved the sweet family reunion. There is a strong sense of family throughout this book and I really liked that aspect a lot. If you haven't picked up any of these books yet, you can definitely read any of them as stand alone novels. If you read them in order you will understand the family history that is written about throughout the different novels. The authors do a good job at making sure you can understand the family history and allow these to be stand alone novels. So if you're worried that you won't be able to make sense of who is who, no worries, you can. Content: Clean. These can be labeled as Historical Christian fiction. The characters think and look to God for guidance yet I didn't feel like it was over the top or preachy. It was a good balance, especially thinking about how people would have thought and been at this time period. There are some moments of peril. Some blood and battles but not overly graphic at all. I would recommend this book for older YA readers and up. I received a copy from the publisher, Barbour Books, via NetGalley. I also won a kindle copy in a Goodreads giveaway. Yay! All thoughts and opinions in the review are my own. Happy Reading!!!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    “Whatever else you know or do not know about yourself, you have the heart and mind of a hero.” --Jean Paul Valmont to Clay Gentry A tale of espionage, war, intrigue, hidden memories, and a feisty red head! This tale brings together beautiful, lively Ellis Valmont, a young woman from Texas, and Claiborne “Clay” Gentry, a member of the New Orleans Greys, a volunteer militia formed during the Texas War of Independence. As these two young people from disparate backgrounds work to piece Clay’s memory “Whatever else you know or do not know about yourself, you have the heart and mind of a hero.” --Jean Paul Valmont to Clay Gentry A tale of espionage, war, intrigue, hidden memories, and a feisty red head! This tale brings together beautiful, lively Ellis Valmont, a young woman from Texas, and Claiborne “Clay” Gentry, a member of the New Orleans Greys, a volunteer militia formed during the Texas War of Independence. As these two young people from disparate backgrounds work to piece Clay’s memory back together, their conflicting distrust and attraction creates a continuous thread of tension in this story. It is fall of 1835 when Ellis finds Clay lying in a boat along the Brazos River with multiple serious wounds. As she works to nurse him amid family drama, she stealthily works to make sense of his unconscious ramblings about the war, treasure, and an important meeting. Ellis tries to put together the bits of information she gathers as Clay struggles to regain his memory in bits and pieces. Mistrust and suspicion keep the two from sharing their information initially. Rich in historical detail, this story offers intrigue and romance as well. In addition, subtle reminders of faith are woven through the story. Lively characters, historical settings, and a captivating plot ensure that this book will capture the interest of historical and inspirational fiction fans. Enjoy Book Seven in this series! Coming next is The Golden Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse, set in 1849 in San Francisco. This ARC copy was received from Barbour Books and Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review. The above thoughts and opinions are wholly my own. 4/5

  7. 5 out of 5

    Debby "Piene Raven"

    The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y'Barbo is a historical romance that takes place during the time of the Alamo and is wonderfully Christian-based. It has a powerful message that deals with trusting and believing in God and trusting God when one is unsure of what the future holds. I found the book hard to put down once I started. It is a well-written novel by this author and was filled with an abundance of history, action, drama with a tremendously lovely ending. Highly recommend the read. I received a The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y'Barbo is a historical romance that takes place during the time of the Alamo and is wonderfully Christian-based. It has a powerful message that deals with trusting and believing in God and trusting God when one is unsure of what the future holds. I found the book hard to put down once I started. It is a well-written novel by this author and was filled with an abundance of history, action, drama with a tremendously lovely ending. Highly recommend the read. I received a copy of this book by Barbour Publishing through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. All opinions contained herein are my own.😊 4.5-Stars

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Kathleen Y'Barbo's love for her home state shines through this wonderful addition to the Daughters of the Mayflower series. The books in this series can be read as a stand alone and penned by several authors. Most of the story of the Alamo Bride is set away from the historic site, in the days leading up to the famous battle of Texas' fight for independence from Mexico. While the historic details are definitely a part of the story, most of the story centers primarily around Ellis and her care for Kathleen Y'Barbo's love for her home state shines through this wonderful addition to the Daughters of the Mayflower series. The books in this series can be read as a stand alone and penned by several authors. Most of the story of the Alamo Bride is set away from the historic site, in the days leading up to the famous battle of Texas' fight for independence from Mexico. While the historic details are definitely a part of the story, most of the story centers primarily around Ellis and her care for an injured stranger. His injuries cause a memory loss, and his incoherent ramblings while healing make it difficult for Ellis to determine his loyalties. I loved how both relied on their faith in God to strengthen them. Kathleen Y'Barbo's ability to pen a great story with well-researched historical detail make this book a must read. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review. All opinions expressed are my own.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Loraine

    As an adopted Texan (I lived there for 32 years) and having taken a college class in Texas history, I appreciated the author's wonderful historical research on Texas' battle for independence. She brought the life and times of the Texians into a vivid picture that set the reader right there as it was all happening. She also pulled in some lesser known facts such as the New Orleans Greys role in the fight for independence. My favorite character was Ellis. She was a strong, independent, feisty woma As an adopted Texan (I lived there for 32 years) and having taken a college class in Texas history, I appreciated the author's wonderful historical research on Texas' battle for independence. She brought the life and times of the Texians into a vivid picture that set the reader right there as it was all happening. She also pulled in some lesser known facts such as the New Orleans Greys role in the fight for independence. My favorite character was Ellis. She was a strong, independent, feisty woman just like her grandmother, Maribel, who starred in Y'Barbo's Pirate Bride. The slowly developing relationship between Ellis and Clay didn't overshadow the main focus of the war for independence which I really appreciated. I wish there had been a little more action throughout the story as the first half seemed to focus predominantly on Ellis caring for Clay. There wasn't much depicted of the actual fighting itself to give the reader a picture of what the battle for independence was really like especially the Battle at the Alamo and the capturing of Santa Ana at the Battle of San Jacinto. **I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing through NetGalley. Opinions are mine alone. I was not compensated for this review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Karen R

    The newest addition to the Daughters of the Mayflower series has plenty of action, interesting history and courageous characters. The author does a thorough job of reminding readers of the family's history, connecting back to characters from her previous book in the series, The Pirate Bride. The introduction and historical notes at the end fill in the blanks about the real people and events mentioned in the text, showing her careful research. This made me curious and had me looking up names like The newest addition to the Daughters of the Mayflower series has plenty of action, interesting history and courageous characters. The author does a thorough job of reminding readers of the family's history, connecting back to characters from her previous book in the series, The Pirate Bride. The introduction and historical notes at the end fill in the blanks about the real people and events mentioned in the text, showing her careful research. This made me curious and had me looking up names like Jean LaFitte, Sam Houston, and William Claiborne, and their connections to Andrew Jackson. “He shall cover thee with his feathers, and under his wings shalt thou trust.” Both Ellis and Clay take great comfort in reading the Book of Psalms, focusing on Psalm 91. Trusting in the Lord for help and comfort, and doing what they believe to be right was an important theme throughout. In a time of war that can be tricky, especially when helping wounded soldiers who appear to be spies or possible enemies. Ellis is brave, and willingly serves others with her knowledge of 'doctoring' using herbs. She seems to carry the burden for her family a lot. It was unclear what Clay was hiding from his past, and didn't seem to matter in the end. The idea of a possible treasure hunt was intriguing. Readers who enjoy stories based on real historical events, with a clean romance, may like this latest addition to the series. They all easily read as stand alones. The Pirate Bride will fill in more of the backstory alluded to here about Maribel Cordoba. (An e-book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley. All opinions are my own.)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y'Barbo is book 7 in the Daughters of the Mayflower series. I've really enjoyed going on this journey through history with this series. All the books can be read as a stand alone but starting with The Mayflower Bride and working my way through history has been an adventure I have loved. The Alamo Bride is not one of my favorites in the series but it was interesting to learn about different aspects of that time frame. I do wish there had been more of the actual Alamo a The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y'Barbo is book 7 in the Daughters of the Mayflower series. I've really enjoyed going on this journey through history with this series. All the books can be read as a stand alone but starting with The Mayflower Bride and working my way through history has been an adventure I have loved. The Alamo Bride is not one of my favorites in the series but it was interesting to learn about different aspects of that time frame. I do wish there had been more of the actual Alamo adventures included. Being a Texan, I'm always ready for a trip through Texas history. I can't wait to see what's in store in The Golden Bride, set during the Gold Rush. I received this book from the publishers via NetGalley. This is my honest opinion of The Alamo Bride.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Hodgkins

    To be honest, The Alamo is the first historical event in this amazing series, The Daughters of the Mayflower, of which I had preconceived ideas and, as such, I cracked The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo open with hesitation. If I could read with my eyes closed that would have been how I tackled this one. At the same time, I don’t like skipping a book in a series, and thank goodness I don’t, this one is a gem! Sit back and enjoy it with the knowledge that, despite it’s historic setting, the auth To be honest, The Alamo is the first historical event in this amazing series, The Daughters of the Mayflower, of which I had preconceived ideas and, as such, I cracked The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo open with hesitation. If I could read with my eyes closed that would have been how I tackled this one. At the same time, I don’t like skipping a book in a series, and thank goodness I don’t, this one is a gem! Sit back and enjoy it with the knowledge that, despite it’s historic setting, the author creates a beautiful story and the ending is a good one! My knowledge of the Alamo was limited to the disaster and massive loss of life but this book expanded my horizon to the context, the people and complexity of the conflicts. Ellis is headstrong, independent and empathetic. Claiborne is, through his own behaviours, trying to work out who he is and where he stands in the war raging around them. For the most part, the discoveries are made from Ellis’ home through storytelling and reflection. I thoroughly enjoyed it, five out of five on the en-JOY-ment scale and can’t wait to tuck into the next in the series! If you haven’t started reading this collection, don’t hold back, it’s fabulous!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bess

    This is the 7th book in the multi-author series. I liked this one (a strong 3 stars). It's the greatest battle for Texas ever, the Alamo. As a Texan who has also sent several years in Louisiana, I'm a sucker for Southern history! First, you meet Clay, a soldier looking to help the President when his memories fly out of his head after an attack. Enter Ellis, our lovely leading lady (alliteration!). She coaxes Clay back to help and together they single-handedly save the Alamo...no, wait...that's no This is the 7th book in the multi-author series. I liked this one (a strong 3 stars). It's the greatest battle for Texas ever, the Alamo. As a Texan who has also sent several years in Louisiana, I'm a sucker for Southern history! First, you meet Clay, a soldier looking to help the President when his memories fly out of his head after an attack. Enter Ellis, our lovely leading lady (alliteration!). She coaxes Clay back to help and together they single-handedly save the Alamo...no, wait...that's not right. I guess you just have to read it for yourself to see what happens! There are some edge of the seat moments and a bit of misdirection. Of course, that makes for a nice read. I mean you know it's a HEA (happily ever after) story but getting to the end was worth it. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Find this and other reviews at: https://historicalfictionreader.blogs... As background, I want to note that while I read Christian fiction fairly regularly, I do not consider myself a genre fan. I am first and foremost a reader of historical fiction and my interest colors my assessment of this story. This is not to say that I discount the novel’s incorporation of faith, just that I might not weight it as heavily as someone who is more invested in the religious aspects of Y’Barbo’s work. The Alamo Find this and other reviews at: https://historicalfictionreader.blogs... As background, I want to note that while I read Christian fiction fairly regularly, I do not consider myself a genre fan. I am first and foremost a reader of historical fiction and my interest colors my assessment of this story. This is not to say that I discount the novel’s incorporation of faith, just that I might not weight it as heavily as someone who is more invested in the religious aspects of Y’Barbo’s work. The Alamo Bride marks my first experience with the Daughters of the Mayflower series so I’m not entirely sure how it fits in the grander scheme of things, but I enjoyed the novel well-enough as a standalone and thought the scope of its historic content creatively presented in the experiences of Ellis Valmont and Claiborne "Clay" Gentry. Historically speaking the book covers the Texas Revolution and includes a wealth of research on the time period. Y’Barbo offers many introductions to key players in the conflict and I love what she did in highlighting the New Orleans Greys. That said, I think the story offers a far wider view than the title suggests and encourage readers to understand these pages chronicle more than a single siege. As far as the religious elements of the story are concerned, I’d classify the content as moderate to heavy. I did not find Y’Barbo’s themes abrasive by any means, but I’d definitely mention this material as significant when recommending The Alamo Bride to secular readers.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Missy

    I love this series and love each additional book in the series (I secretly hope they keep it going, I would love to see what an author does with the Civil War, WW I, and WW II, which are my favorite times). This was a solid 4.5 star read. But this one kept me wanting to read, even though I HAD to keep putting it down. This day job thing is just getting in the way. This is a book about Ellis Valmont (the great-granddaughter to Maribel Cordoba and Jean Luc Valmont from Book 2) and Claiborne "Clay" I love this series and love each additional book in the series (I secretly hope they keep it going, I would love to see what an author does with the Civil War, WW I, and WW II, which are my favorite times). This was a solid 4.5 star read. But this one kept me wanting to read, even though I HAD to keep putting it down. This day job thing is just getting in the way. This is a book about Ellis Valmont (the great-granddaughter to Maribel Cordoba and Jean Luc Valmont from Book 2) and Claiborne "Clay" Gentry. Clay works with Sam Houston, is friends with Andrew Jackson, and enlists in the Grays from New Orleans to get to Texas for a mission. Little does he know is mission does not go as planned once he gets to Quintana, Texas, where Ellis and her family now live. Ellis and her mother are both healers and find Clay in a dire situation, and no memory of who he is or why he is in Texas. With skirmishes with Mexican soldiers and fighting at the Alamo, Texas is a hot spot for war. When Ellis' father and brother fighting, and word that her brother has been captured, it makes it necessary for Clay to proceed with his "mission", if only he could remember, and Ellis holds the key. This was a good book, a good insight to the beginning of how the Alamo fell. As the author says, some details were bent, but based on actual events. I thoroughly enjoyed this story and how Clay and Ellis fall in love, and the heartache and joy that comes with it. If you enjoy this series, you will really enjoy this book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn at Book Ink Reivews

    A copy of this review can be found at Book Ink Reviews. Thank you to NetGalley, Barbour Publishing, and Kathleen Y'Barbo for this free ARC in exchange for an honest review.  Obviously, I am a sucker for The Daughters of the Mayflower series (Mayflower, Pirate, Captured, Patriot, Cumberland, and Liberty) and Alamo was absolutely wonderful. A quick read, we meet a fiery, passionate, strong woman named Ellis. In a fun twist of fate, she ends up and saves Clay.  Clay is sweet, calm, and steady and the A copy of this review can be found at Book Ink Reviews. Thank you to NetGalley, Barbour Publishing, and Kathleen Y'Barbo for this free ARC in exchange for an honest review.  Obviously, I am a sucker for The Daughters of the Mayflower series (Mayflower, Pirate, Captured, Patriot, Cumberland, and Liberty) and Alamo was absolutely wonderful. A quick read, we meet a fiery, passionate, strong woman named Ellis. In a fun twist of fate, she ends up and saves Clay.  Clay is sweet, calm, and steady and the perfect opposite for Ellis. Their adventure in providing freedom for a free and independent Texas was the perfect blend of action, historical accuracy, and sweet romance. I also appreciate that as the series continues through time, the propriety changes and the authors make sure the voices change too. In all, if you need a sweet quick romance for a Sunday afternoon read, this is your best bet.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Tyree

    The Daughters of the Mayflower has been a great series and The Alamo Bride is a great addition to the series. What I love about each of the books is that they are so well written and they feature a strong woman who perseveres and finds love in the process. In The Alamo Bride, Ellis Dumont finds a man in an officer's uniform shot on a boat on her property. She and her mother take care of him. Neither of them trust him because they are in a time of war when the Texians are facing the Mexicans. Cla The Daughters of the Mayflower has been a great series and The Alamo Bride is a great addition to the series. What I love about each of the books is that they are so well written and they feature a strong woman who perseveres and finds love in the process. In The Alamo Bride, Ellis Dumont finds a man in an officer's uniform shot on a boat on her property. She and her mother take care of him. Neither of them trust him because they are in a time of war when the Texians are facing the Mexicans. Claiborne Gentry is a spy with an important meeting he has to keep that is a matter of safety for the Texians. He enlists in the armed forces so that he can get to a location that can help him uncover treasure that would help the cause, little did he know he would be shot while doing it. While Clay is recovering he makes many statements that Ellis records. These statements tell of a meeting and a mission. Ellis is unsure if they are real or if it is ramblings due to his injuries. When Clay heals and has memory loss, Ellis is the key to helping him remember who he is and the mission he needs to complete. When Clay and Ellis set off on a different mission, they realize they value one another and have come to love on another. The question is can they complete their missions and have a future together. Just when all hope is lost, well you gotta read the book. I received an ARC of this book and this is my honest feedback.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Monique

    The Alamo Bride is the seventh installment of the Daughters of the Mayflower series. I have had the privilege of reading the previous books, too, and I have developed a fondness for this series. Don’t worry, each book can be read seperately very well! Usually each book has all new characters, but this time the book went back to The Pirate Bride by the same author as this book, Kathleen Y’Barbo. Unfortunately that is the only book in this series I have not read, but that wasn’t a hindrance. What The Alamo Bride is the seventh installment of the Daughters of the Mayflower series. I have had the privilege of reading the previous books, too, and I have developed a fondness for this series. Don’t worry, each book can be read seperately very well! Usually each book has all new characters, but this time the book went back to The Pirate Bride by the same author as this book, Kathleen Y’Barbo. Unfortunately that is the only book in this series I have not read, but that wasn’t a hindrance. What I did expect to be a hindrance was my absolute zero knowledge of Alamo nor the Texas war (I’m not from the US). However, Kathleen explained all the background stuff very well, without an info dump. Her writing style is very fluid and is easy to read. There are many mentions of Christian faith, but it never gets preachy, nor are there weird voices etc. This makes the characters seem far more human and real. We have Ellis, who learns to be a healer under her mothers wing, and she is very stubborn, in a good way. Her grandfather plays quite a big role and he’s just amazing. Then we have Clay, who is found near to death and lost his memory. I usually dislike this trope, but in this story it is excellently done! Due to circumstances they end up spending a lot of time together and discovering what Clay knows and remembers and trying to fix the puzzle. There wasn’t much action in this novel, it was more about the characters, and love that. But don’t worry, there is action enough for everyone, it just doesn’t overshadow the plot. The only faults I can find with this novel is that some plot points weren’t resolved or were resolved in a sentence where it had been Clay’s basic drive from page 1, for me that fell a bit flat. But the writing and the characters made it a solid 4 star read. Also, can I just say how much I love this cover? It's stunning! This e-arc has been given to me through Netgalley (thank you!), but my opinions are my own!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Scarlett

    Thanks to NetGalley and Barbour Publishing for an ARC of this book! Release date - February 1, 2019 I definitely enjoyed this book, although it has been my least favorite so far in the series. While The Pirate Bride and The Liberty Bride, the other two I have read in this series, were still fluffy love stories, I felt like they had more depth and more exciting action. There was little to no action in The Alamo Bride, and the romance wasn’t that strong either, it was kind of obvious and not a lot Thanks to NetGalley and Barbour Publishing for an ARC of this book! Release date - February 1, 2019 I definitely enjoyed this book, although it has been my least favorite so far in the series. While The Pirate Bride and The Liberty Bride, the other two I have read in this series, were still fluffy love stories, I felt like they had more depth and more exciting action. There was little to no action in The Alamo Bride, and the romance wasn’t that strong either, it was kind of obvious and not a lot of suspense. With previous books, there was a legitimate reason for the characters not to be together, even though you knew they would be in the end. In this one, it’s memory loss and keeping secrets for no reason at all. As with the other two books, I really enjoy these fictional characters in real historical moments in history. And the books are clean, interesting, and easy to read. They also take place years apart, with ties to characters from previous books, but are basically stand-alones. This one was not my favorite, but that’s not to say I won’t continue to read the series.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    3.5 stars "She had to believe him an enemy until he could prove himself a friend." Hiding behind the shadows of obscurity, Clay Gentry is on a dangerous mission for his country, going undercover to deliver much needed funds to the Texans in their fight for independence from Mexico. His efforts have already been seriously thwarted, so he decides to capitalize on a family secret in order to prove himself trustworthy to his superiors; he just didn't plan on being shot and delivered to Ellis Valmont's 3.5 stars "She had to believe him an enemy until he could prove himself a friend." Hiding behind the shadows of obscurity, Clay Gentry is on a dangerous mission for his country, going undercover to deliver much needed funds to the Texans in their fight for independence from Mexico. His efforts have already been seriously thwarted, so he decides to capitalize on a family secret in order to prove himself trustworthy to his superiors; he just didn't plan on being shot and delivered to Ellis Valmont's shoreline in a stolen pirogue. Ellis Valmont doesn't know what to think about the handsome soldier in her family's barn who is on the verge of death after surviving two gunshot wounds and a serious blow to his head. Fortunately, Ellis and her mother are healers and have the capability to treat the anonymous man while they try to determine if he is friend or foe. During his fevers, he says all kinds of things in different languages that make little to no sense. . . . . unless they do. There's much to love about Ellis and Clay, for their journey will require great faith in the words spoken so long ago by another mighty warrior; "He shall cover thee with his feathers, and under his wings shalt thou trust".

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    The Alamo Bride is the seventh installment from the Daughters of the Mayflower series. I enjoyed this historical. It takes the reader back to the Texas Revolution in 1836. I loved Ellis from the start and admired her bravery and determination throughout. I liked The Alamo Bride and am giving it four stars. I found it to be a good addition to the Daughters of the Mayflower series. Looking forward to next installment from it. I received this book from the publisher, but was not required to write a The Alamo Bride is the seventh installment from the Daughters of the Mayflower series. I enjoyed this historical. It takes the reader back to the Texas Revolution in 1836. I loved Ellis from the start and admired her bravery and determination throughout. I liked The Alamo Bride and am giving it four stars. I found it to be a good addition to the Daughters of the Mayflower series. Looking forward to next installment from it. I received this book from the publisher, but was not required to write a review. This review is 100% my own honest opinion.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Susan F

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is another interesting story in the Mayflower Brides series. Clay is a member of the New Orleans Grays, or is he just posing as one? After being shot he is cared for by Texians, including Ellis, who isn't quite sure she trusts him. Unrest stirs the atmosphere as the Mexican army fights to lay claim to the land that the Texians want to declare independence for. Clay is a mysterious sort and Ellis is a proud independent fighter just as the people who are trying to give rise to Texas are. This This is another interesting story in the Mayflower Brides series. Clay is a member of the New Orleans Grays, or is he just posing as one? After being shot he is cared for by Texians, including Ellis, who isn't quite sure she trusts him. Unrest stirs the atmosphere as the Mexican army fights to lay claim to the land that the Texians want to declare independence for. Clay is a mysterious sort and Ellis is a proud independent fighter just as the people who are trying to give rise to Texas are. This is an interesting story that shows what life could have been like for one family during the days before the Alamo was marked for all time. It is a good addition to the series. Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for my advanced reader's copy.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kayla Tornello

    I loved the setting of this book in Texas, right before the Battle of the Alamo. The author did a great job of illustrating what daily life was like back then. The characters were all interesting. I particularly liked that the main female character, Ellis, was so strong and independent. The love story was very cute. I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway. Yay!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Boyd

    This cover is gorgeous, isn't it? Anyway, if you love history with lots of intrigue and detail, this is the book for you. A bit too much "telling" for my taste but otherwise the writing was good. I did learn a lot about the history of Texas that I had no previous knowledge of, which is always great. I was provided a copy by the publisher but as always, my opinions are my own.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jeanie

    The breathtaking sixth in the Daughters of the Mayflower multi-author series, The Alamo Bride is exciting and stirring. The historical research into Texas and the era is shared in a way that is fascinating, almost as if one is there. This is a beautifully-written Christian action and romance novel that fits well into the series and can easily be read as a standalone. Ellis Valmont loves living in Texas, even though she could have enjoyed family wealth in New Orleans. She is happy with her life as The breathtaking sixth in the Daughters of the Mayflower multi-author series, The Alamo Bride is exciting and stirring. The historical research into Texas and the era is shared in a way that is fascinating, almost as if one is there. This is a beautifully-written Christian action and romance novel that fits well into the series and can easily be read as a standalone. Ellis Valmont loves living in Texas, even though she could have enjoyed family wealth in New Orleans. She is happy with her life as a healer, a woman who uses herbs and training to help others who are ill, injured, or ready to give birth. Her ancestry is of Spanish noblemen and French privateers; she is a strong and loving young woman. Her father, Boyd, and older brother Thomas have gone off to fight the war for the freedom of Texas. Ellis, her mother, and her younger brothers are trying to keep the chores done and the land cared for until Papa’s return. Her grandfather lives nearby in Velasco, across the Brazos river from her home in Quintano. One day Ellis and her younger brothers are out; her brothers find a canoe in the reeds at the river’s edge. The man inside looks severely injured, so she sends her brothers to find their mama to help. He is taken, in the pirogue, to their barn where a bullet is removed and they treat his fever, other gunshot wounds, and head wounds. They don’t know whether he will survive; all they know is that he is wearing the uniform of a New Orleans Grey, troops from Louisiana who will fight against the Mexican army. As the soldier suffers, unconscious, with fever and pain, he murmurs various bits and pieces of the special mission he is on. Fascinated, Ellis writes down some of the unusual things he says while being unsure of whether he is friend of Texas or an enemy. He claims at one point to be working for President Jackson, but whose side is he really on? Finally, Clay regains consciousness. He remembers almost nothing, not even who he is, only that there is something important he is supposed to do. The primary connection they have when he is awake and recovering is Psalm 91, which Ellis was trying to memorize while she was watching over him, and Clay’s mother used to read to him. The character definitions are impressive; I like Ellis for choosing to live where she can participate in life rather than relax in luxury. Even when she may be inconvenienced, she will not turn aside someone in need of medical care or ready to deliver a baby. She and Clay made a journey together when looking for her father and brother, and their faith in the Lord and respect for each other improved their friendship. I enjoy seeing the people of faith and prayer, also, including Elli’s grandfather. This is an impressive novel on many levels – showing people of faith in less than favorable, even tragic wartime circumstances, the extensive history, and the plot and surprising twists. There is so much I have forgotten since those long-ago history classes that I appreciate a quality author weaving her research effortlessly in an appealing novel and as part of a series. I highly recommend The Alamo Bride to those who appreciate Christian historical fiction, learning more about 1800’s Texas, and romance. From a grateful heart: I received an ARC of this novel from the publisher and NetGalley, and this is my honest review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Perrianne

    This is a very historically rich story that builds slowly with the departure of Claiborne “Clay” Gentry from New Orleans as a “Grey soldier” to Velasco in what would later become Texas territory. A cryptic note from his grandfather after his death hinted at vast wealth to be used for something other than himself. The location of the riches are to be memorized, and the note destroyed. So he sets out to join the New Orleans Greys in order to obtain and use the funds in the fight against Mexico. Ell This is a very historically rich story that builds slowly with the departure of Claiborne “Clay” Gentry from New Orleans as a “Grey soldier” to Velasco in what would later become Texas territory. A cryptic note from his grandfather after his death hinted at vast wealth to be used for something other than himself. The location of the riches are to be memorized, and the note destroyed. So he sets out to join the New Orleans Greys in order to obtain and use the funds in the fight against Mexico. Ellis Valmont lives an interesting life in in 1835 Quintana, which is territory on the verge of war for freedom from Mexico. Her life is rather routine, although not glamourous with simple clothing and hard work. Things get interesting, however when she happens upon a New Orleans Grey soldier in a pirogue (boat) nearly dead of a gunshot wound. She later realizes that she recognizes the man from the day she was at the docks and they were giving Texania citizenship to the new arrivals. With her midwife mother’s direction and knowledge of herbal medicine, she nurses hm back to health. As his fever rages, the soldier says crazy things and she has to wonder if he is a friend or foe. His ramblings lead her to believe he could be a spy for the president or a spy for the Mexican army who threatens their very livelihood. Ellis has to make up her mind whether to trust him or not even though it seems as if his memory has failed him. This story is set mostly in the San Antonio area of which I am familiar with and live nearby. If you’ve ever visited the Alamo, you will be surprised at how small it is and marvel that such a great battle was fought there. It is literally in downtown San Antonio now! Ellis has family back in New Orleans and Clay is a native there. I am also from the area and can only imagine how this city would be back in the early to mid 1800’s. It can be a dark place now, so there’s no telling what it was like back then. As evidenced by the author’s notes, this book is as historically correct as she could possibly get it. It is interesting to read about Texas on the brink of its independence from Mexico. There is lots of adventure and danger towards the end but I will leave those items for the reader to discover and not be a spoiler. There is also a faith thread and the Book of Psalms is an integral part of the story. There are references to The Pirate Bride that was an interesting tie in to the rest of the series without it being a spoiler. This is part of The Daughters of the Mayflower series but each book is completely stand alone. However, it might be fun to read The Pirate Bride and find out about Ellis’s great grandmother. She was quite a character! I received an advanced reader copy from the publisher and am not required to give a positive review. However, the opinions and review are completely my own and I am in no way swayed by an advanced copy of the book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Phyllis

    Friend or foe? My rating is 3.5 stars I was very excited to read this story as I have really enjoyed the others in the series. The history in them along with the adventures and sweet romance. . . When Ellis discovered Clay, she feared he was dead. Upon discovering he still lived, she and her mother used their knowledge of healing herbs to bring him back to health. I liked the Ellis and Clay. She was very opinionated and determined (read that stubborn) and he was heroic even in his weakened conditio Friend or foe? My rating is 3.5 stars I was very excited to read this story as I have really enjoyed the others in the series. The history in them along with the adventures and sweet romance. . . When Ellis discovered Clay, she feared he was dead. Upon discovering he still lived, she and her mother used their knowledge of healing herbs to bring him back to health. I liked the Ellis and Clay. She was very opinionated and determined (read that stubborn) and he was heroic even in his weakened condition. Some of the scenarios the author created were very funny. Like the time Ellis’ grandfather offered some work to Clay that one of the “laborers” had done. Not too strenuous for a man recovering from multiple gunshot wounds and a concussion. But when I saw who the laborer was, I cracked up. And yes, you’ll have to read the story to find out for yourself who it was and why it was funny. I really appreciate creative stories like this which build those perfect moments – that one single line that is so laugh-out-loud-able but wouldn’t make a lick of sense unless you knew the story. Those lines I’m dying to make a meme out of but that no one would understand (sigh). Psalm 91 played a prominent role in the story. As a passage Clay had memorized as a child, it was one of the few things he could remember in his amnesia. As he recovered, Ellis read aloud to him from the Psalms. Feathers were used as a symbol of God’s protection throughout. The Alamo Bride was not quite what I had expected. I had fully anticipated there to be more action surrounding the battles at the Alamo. Very little of the story took place there and very few details about that battle were even mentioned at all. Though there was some action, it did drag a bit and was more about Clay’s healing and Ellis not being certain if he was friend or foe which got a little repetitious. There were also hints about something in Clay’s past that had motivated his actions and a point when his memory was returning that hinted at more of that past and yet those were never addressed. While I did care for the characters, I was glad the story wasn’t longer. Readers of historical fiction with a touch of a spiritual overtone might enjoy this. It was a good read, just not great. Read my full review with a Preview at Among the Reads I was given a copy of this book for free. I was not required to give a favorable review nor was any money received for this review. All comments and opinions are my own.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Since Kathleen Y’Barbo wrote “The Pirate Bride”, book 2 in The Daughters of the Mayflower series, it is also fitting that she penned “The Alamo Bride”, as there are direct connections between some of the characters. Although I mention this in most of my reviews for this series, it is worth echoing; each book in this series contains a solid plotline that allows it to stand on its own, yet with some mention of previous characters, and the series never feels formulaic. Each contains a romance, but Since Kathleen Y’Barbo wrote “The Pirate Bride”, book 2 in The Daughters of the Mayflower series, it is also fitting that she penned “The Alamo Bride”, as there are direct connections between some of the characters. Although I mention this in most of my reviews for this series, it is worth echoing; each book in this series contains a solid plotline that allows it to stand on its own, yet with some mention of previous characters, and the series never feels formulaic. Each contains a romance, but there is a fresh diversity with each new time period and couple. Part of this is no doubt due to having different authors, and the challenge of maintaining the overarching theme of faith and adventure is always met. Readers can start with any book in the series, but for the best experience, I would recommend reading them in order. Doing so also offers a nice chronological timeline of America’s pivotal historical events. Prior to reading this novel, I must admit that I had little knowledge about the Texas Revolution and the Alamo. Nor have I read many books about the Southwest. Thus “The Alamo Bride” was both enlightening and entertaining. The New Orleans Greys were new to me as well, and it was interesting to learn about their involvement in the conflict. Clay Gentry’s role in the novel surprised me, and Ellis Valmont always brought a smile to my face with her feistiness and devotion to her family and the cause. Jean Paul Valmont provided an appealing character because of the difficult decisions he had to make as a patriarch and businessman. The danger of everyday life during this time period was startling, but Y’Barbo does a nice job of presenting the humanity of both the Texian and Mexican sides. As a crucial element of the plot, the head injury was a fascinating and unique touch, adding an extra layer of intrigue. This novel delivers faith, conflict, humor, and love while exploring an often-overlooked piece of our nation’s history. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Fiction Aficionado

    It’s not often I feel ambivalent about a novel, but that seems to be the best word to describe how I felt when I finished this one. Which is a shame, because I didn’t start out that way. The story begins with Clay setting out on a mission to find treasure buried by his grandfather so that he can deliver it to General Houston to assist in the Texas Revolution. Unfortunately, his mission is interrupted when he is injured and then found by the Dumont family. The tension built nicely throughout Clay’ It’s not often I feel ambivalent about a novel, but that seems to be the best word to describe how I felt when I finished this one. Which is a shame, because I didn’t start out that way. The story begins with Clay setting out on a mission to find treasure buried by his grandfather so that he can deliver it to General Houston to assist in the Texas Revolution. Unfortunately, his mission is interrupted when he is injured and then found by the Dumont family. The tension built nicely throughout Clay’s nursing and recovery because Ellis wasn’t sure who Clay was and his ramblings seemed to hint at some kind of important mission. The question was, for which side? The fact that Clay doesn’t remember any of these details once he regains consciousness only added to the tension, especially as the attachment between Ellis and Clay grew. On Ellis’s side, there were also fears about the growing unrest in the area and the unknown status of her father and brother, who joined the fighting but haven’t been heard from for some time. I wouldn’t have said I was riveted by the story, but up until this point, I was engaged and anticipating what was to come. Where I think this novel lost traction for me—or perhaps gained too much traction—was in the last quarter, when Clay’s original mission, which seemed to be the point the story was heading towards for the majority of the novel, shifted to the background and became a “by the by”. Suddenly, the story had a new focus and, unlike the first three quarters of the novel where the story took its time advancing the plot, the action in the final quarter felt like watching scenery pass by a train window; there was plenty to see, but it all passed so quickly that I didn’t really have the chance to experience it or take it in, meaning some fairly dramatic events didn’t have the impact they could have had. Overall, I would have said this was a four-star read, if only it didn’t feel like the story lost its grip on the reins there at the end. I received a copy of this novel from the publisher. This has not influenced the content of my review, which is my honest and unbiased opinion.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y'Barbo (Daughters of the Mayflower) A Series for Lovers of History, Adventure, Romance, and Ancestry Will Ellis Lose All at the Alamo? Ellis Valmont finds a man in New Orleans Grey unconscious on Dumont property in 1836. As his fevers rage, the man mutters strange things about treasures and war. Claiborne Gentry has lost his mind or he’s a spy for the American president—or worse, for the Mexican enemy that threatens their very lives. With the men of her family away, Ell The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y'Barbo (Daughters of the Mayflower) A Series for Lovers of History, Adventure, Romance, and Ancestry Will Ellis Lose All at the Alamo? Ellis Valmont finds a man in New Orleans Grey unconscious on Dumont property in 1836. As his fevers rage, the man mutters strange things about treasures and war. Claiborne Gentry has lost his mind or he’s a spy for the American president—or worse, for the Mexican enemy that threatens their very lives. With the men of her family away, Ellis must stand courageous and decide who she can trust. Will she put her selfish wants ahead of the future of the republic or travel with Clay to Mission San Jose to help end the war? This is Ellis Valmont and Claiborne Gentry's story Ellis finds a man in New Orleans Grey unconscious. As his fevers rage, the man mutters strange things about treasures and war. she and her mother used their knowledge of healing herbs to bring him back to health. He was the nephew of a governor and statesman and the grandson of a pirate who sailed with the infamous Jean Lafitte, but tonight Claiborne William Andre Gentry was merely one of the many anonymous souls who walked along Magazine Street in the Vieux Carre. Back in Tennessee, his sisters had teased him about the dark hair that was so different from their blond braids and yet so similar to the pirate whose name was forbidden in their home. "I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review." The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo is a 4 star book. More in the Daughters of the Mayflower series: The Mayflower Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse – set 1620 Atlantic Ocean The Pirate Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo – set 1725 New Orleans The Captured Bride by Michelle Griep – set 1760 during the French and Indian War The Patriot Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse – set 1774 Philadelphia ​ The Cumberland Bride by Shannon McNear – set 1794 on the Wilderness Road The Liberty Bride by MaryLu Tyndall – set 1814 Baltimore The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo – set 1836 Texas

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