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Misery Audiobook PACK in French [Book + 2 CD MP3]

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Lida Chastain är hjältinnan i de romantiska romaner som gjort Paul Sheldon till en världsberömd bestsellerförfattare. En dag tröttnar han på Lida och låter henne helt enkelt dö i boken "Lidas barn". Det är något han kommer att få ångra. När han vaknar upp efter en våldsam bilolycka, helt hjälplös med krossade ben, befinner han sig i ett hus mitt ute i ingenstans och har Lida Chastain är hjältinnan i de romantiska romaner som gjort Paul Sheldon till en världsberömd bestsellerförfattare. En dag tröttnar han på Lida och låter henne helt enkelt dö i boken "Lidas barn". Det är något han kommer att få ångra. När han vaknar upp efter en våldsam bilolycka, helt hjälplös med krossade ben, befinner han sig i ett hus mitt ute i ingenstans och har tagits omhand av Annie Wilkes. Annie är ett stort Paul Sheldon-fan och hon avgudar böckerna om Lida Chastain. Ganska snart inser Paul att allting inte står rätt till hos sin vårdare och när Annie läser manuset där Lida dör, blir hon rasande. Annie sätter en gammal skrivmaskin i händerna på Paul och tvingar honom att skriva en ny bok där han återupplivar Lida. Hon håller Paul i ett järngrepp av kärleksfull vård, beroendeframkallande droger och skoningslöst våld. Den världsberömda författaren befinner sig nu i en situation där han måste skriva för att hålla sig vid liv . . .


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Lida Chastain är hjältinnan i de romantiska romaner som gjort Paul Sheldon till en världsberömd bestsellerförfattare. En dag tröttnar han på Lida och låter henne helt enkelt dö i boken "Lidas barn". Det är något han kommer att få ångra. När han vaknar upp efter en våldsam bilolycka, helt hjälplös med krossade ben, befinner han sig i ett hus mitt ute i ingenstans och har Lida Chastain är hjältinnan i de romantiska romaner som gjort Paul Sheldon till en världsberömd bestsellerförfattare. En dag tröttnar han på Lida och låter henne helt enkelt dö i boken "Lidas barn". Det är något han kommer att få ångra. När han vaknar upp efter en våldsam bilolycka, helt hjälplös med krossade ben, befinner han sig i ett hus mitt ute i ingenstans och har tagits omhand av Annie Wilkes. Annie är ett stort Paul Sheldon-fan och hon avgudar böckerna om Lida Chastain. Ganska snart inser Paul att allting inte står rätt till hos sin vårdare och när Annie läser manuset där Lida dör, blir hon rasande. Annie sätter en gammal skrivmaskin i händerna på Paul och tvingar honom att skriva en ny bok där han återupplivar Lida. Hon håller Paul i ett järngrepp av kärleksfull vård, beroendeframkallande droger och skoningslöst våld. Den världsberömda författaren befinner sig nu i en situation där han måste skriva för att hålla sig vid liv . . .

30 review for Misery Audiobook PACK in French [Book + 2 CD MP3]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    'Misery' is a gruesome story of torture with blood, guts, and a psychopath. It's a well told tale, the characters are well developed and the fact that there are only two of them never gets boring. It's a real page turner, in fact I finished it tonight after getting off the subway on the platform before I walked home. But, this book is more than just a thriller, just like King is more than just a pulp writer. I read an article by the ever optimistic and cheerful Harold Bloom in college about how 'Misery' is a gruesome story of torture with blood, guts, and a psychopath. It's a well told tale, the characters are well developed and the fact that there are only two of them never gets boring. It's a real page turner, in fact I finished it tonight after getting off the subway on the platform before I walked home. But, this book is more than just a thriller, just like King is more than just a pulp writer. I read an article by the ever optimistic and cheerful Harold Bloom in college about how dismayed he was that young people like Stephen King so much. All the literature crtics I've read hate King and it seems like it's just because people actually enjoy reading his work. Yeah, Bloom, I said 'work' just like I would about Tolstoy's 'work' because Stephen King as damned hard worker. Think of all the books he's churned out over the last few decades. I'd like to see Harold Bloom show enough imagination to write fiction instead of just criticizing it all the time. I'm actually new to Stephen King's fiction. I've read a few of the essays and articles he's written and a really great graduation speech he gave at UMaine awhile ago in which he extolled the virtues of our mutual home state, but this is only my 3rd novel by him. I like this guy, and I know why too. It's not just because he makes me scream and I have a hard time putting his books down, it's because King loves writing. He has a real and self-aware relationship with what it means to be a writer. He knows he's not Tolstoy or Faulkner, he doesn't try to write that way. He knows how to tell a good god damned story and he has a passion for it. I appreciate his self awareness as a writer and the fact that he ackowledges how difficult the whole process is while not making us feel like he's somehow superior because he's figured out how to do it. In 'Misery' it's almost like we get to watch King write this story. He doesn't just set us up for a crazy story and watch us discover things about his characters, it feels like he actually comes with us and makes the discoveries at the same time we do. That's what makes a good storyteller. And I don't give a damn if Bloom likes him or not.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kemper

    Honestly, who among us hasn’t gotten frustrated with their favorite writer and felt like holding them prisoner while forcing them to write the exact book that we want? Well, don’t do that because it would be wrong! What kind of twisted freaks are you people?!? Paul Sheldon is a best selling author who just ended his popular series of romance/adventure novels by killing off the lead character, Misery Chastain. After finishing a new novel at a Colorado resort Paul has a car accident and awakes to Honestly, who among us hasn’t gotten frustrated with their favorite writer and felt like holding them prisoner while forcing them to write the exact book that we want? Well, don’t do that because it would be wrong! What kind of twisted freaks are you people?!? Paul Sheldon is a best selling author who just ended his popular series of romance/adventure novels by killing off the lead character, Misery Chastain. After finishing a new novel at a Colorado resort Paul has a car accident and awakes to find that his legs have been shattered, but that he’s been saved by his self-proclaimed number one fan, Annie Wilkes. Unfortunately, Annie turns out to be more than just a little crazy, and when she learns that Paul killed Misery in the latest book she demands that he write a new one that brings back her favorite character. Held captive by a madwoman, Paul is almost helpless to resist the physical and psychological tortures she uses to get her way while insisting that it’s really for his own good. This book seems eerily prophetic of King’s career in some ways. Uncle Stevie hadn’t yet frustrated readers of his Dark Tower series with long delays between books, and yet he absolutely nailed the self-righteous fury of a fan who feels somehow cheated out of what they deserve. You gotta think that later on King worried that he had some version of Annie out there just waiting to chain him to typewriter to finish DT. He was also years away from suffering his own enormous physical trauma after being hit by a car, but he still makes you feel every agonizing moment that Paul suffers from his accident and at Annie’s hands. Like Paul, King would also have the experience of returning to writing being a matter of overcoming physical pain but also finding it to be a way to escape it. One of King’s biggest strengths is that he knows the power of a good story, and this plot serves him well by really letting him dig into that. Annie’s obsession with Misery is something that probably almost every reader can relate to, but what’s really interesting is how Paul’s need to tell the story becomes just as compelling as Annie’s threats. The set-up lets Uncle Stevie explore the whole notion of just why we gotta know what happens next as well as the rules that make it a satisfying resolution or a cheat. I could make a pretty solid argument that this is King’s best book. He was very much at the peak of his powers here, and either the simple two person structure of the story or good editing kept this at a normal novel length. That’d become a rarity in his bloated books after this, and it does feel like King at his most disciplined. In Annie Wilkes he crafted a character worthy of being included in a Villain’s Hall of Fame, and he makes good use of her as a figure who can be terrifying, sometimes tragic, and weirdly humorous at times. However, I’m not saying it’s my favorite King book. (Probably The Stand or the last Dark Tower hold that honor.) Why wouldn’t his best book be the one I enjoy most? Because he did just too good of job on making us feel Paul’s pain. Sure, this is a book about a man who suffered a terrible accident and then found himself brutalized at the hands of a psychopath so it makes perfect sense that Uncle Stevie would want us to ache along with Paul. Yet, it’s very hard to spend an entire book with a main character who is almost always at some level of agony without feeling worn down by it. It’s necessary for the plot, but it also makes it a slog at times. So it's definitely among King’s best, but it's also one I haven’t read it nearly as many times as some of his others because it’s simply too damn tough to get through at times. Still it’s a 5 star ride if you grit your teeth and keep reading as Paul keeps on writing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    Damn, I can never get over that one scene!!! She's bat sh•t crazy! Happy Reading! Mel Damn, I can never get over that one scene!!! She's bat sh•t crazy! Happy Reading! 🎃👻 Mel 🖤🐺🐾

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dita

    Read this, you Cockadoodie Dirty Birdies!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    To celebrate completing a novel, writer Paul Sheldon goes on a champagne-fueled drive in the Rocky mountains. He winds up in a near fatal car crash, but never fear. He's rescued by Annie Wilkes, his #1 fan... I watched the film version of Misery in those antediluvian days before Goodreads, hell, before the Internet, and decided to finally read the novel when it showed up on my BookGorilla email one day. It was $2.99 very well spent. Misery is a tale of obsession, addiction, and obsession. I wrote To celebrate completing a novel, writer Paul Sheldon goes on a champagne-fueled drive in the Rocky mountains. He winds up in a near fatal car crash, but never fear. He's rescued by Annie Wilkes, his #1 fan... I watched the film version of Misery in those antediluvian days before Goodreads, hell, before the Internet, and decided to finally read the novel when it showed up on my BookGorilla email one day. It was $2.99 very well spent. Misery is a tale of obsession, addiction, and obsession. I wrote "obsession" twice but it's a such a big theme I thought it was justified. Annie Wilkes is obsessed with her favorite series of books starring Misery Chastain, written by that dirty birdie Paul Sheldon. Paul is obsessed with finishing the book Annie has demanded of him and probably addicted to writing. Also to codeine. I've said it before but I'll say it again. If Stephen King wasn't addicted to scaring the bodily fluids out of people, he'd be a literary writer of some renown. The guy can flat out write. Just because he cranks out a best seller more often than most of us go to the dentist doesn't mean he's the real deal. The scariest horror stories are the ones that could actually happen and Misery is one of those. Who among us hasn't had visions of being held captive when driving through a remote locale? Annie is so much more than the scene-chewing maniac she could have been. She has dimension and believes she's in the right, which is the mark of a great villain. Her background is very fleshed out and my heart sank as I learned her past along with Paul. How the hell was he going to escape that monster? Paul's journey is painful, both to him and to the reader, thanks to King's skill. I had to make sure my foot was still attached a couple times. Annie puts him through hell and he finally gives her a taste of her own medicine but the ending is far from happily ever after. As is usually the case, the book was a notch better than the movie. I've been easy with the 5's this year but I'll give this one a cockadoodie 5 out of 5 stars just the same.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Johann (jobis89)

    "I am in trouble here. This woman is not right." Paul Sheldon, the best-selling writer of the Misery novels, finds himself rescued from a car accident by his number one fan, Annie Wilkes. As the former nurse takes care of him in her home, she finds out he killed off Misery in his latest novel and decides to keep Paul as her prisoner as he writes Misery back to life. I read a number of Stephen King books pre-bookstagram and pre-goodreads, therefore I have never written a proper review for these "I am in trouble here. This woman is not right." Paul Sheldon, the best-selling writer of the Misery novels, finds himself rescued from a car accident by his number one fan, Annie Wilkes. As the former nurse takes care of him in her home, she finds out he killed off Misery in his latest novel and decides to keep Paul as her prisoner as he writes Misery back to life. I read a number of Stephen King books pre-bookstagram and pre-goodreads, therefore I have never written a proper review for these books. Revisiting these books through readalongs and listening to audiobooks while running or at the gym gives me the opportunity to do so! Unfortunately when I revisited Misery it was in the form of the audiobook... and I was not a fan (and most certainly NOT its number 1 fan). The narrator did such a brilliant job of conveying the truly insane character that is Annie Wilkes, but otherwise it was very monotonous and boring at times. BUT I know that's not really the case for the book itself. Similar to Gerald's Game, the events of this book primarily take place in one location. Ordinarily that would bore the life out of me, but King has this ability to grab your attention and keep you hooked anyway. That being said, there are still some boring parts in this book - but they are very few and far between. It is literally quite impossible to look away during the interactions between Annie and poor Paul Sheldon. Anytime Annie is on the scene, she steals the show - it's those parts where it's just Paul's meandering thoughts that I would tune out of sometimes. This is much better portrayed in the movie for me. Something else that the movie benefits from is cutting out the parts where Paul is writing his new Misery book. I honestly have never cared less about anything in my entire life. I just DO NOT care. This is fair enough when you're reading the book and can just quickly skim over these parts - however, this is much more difficult when listening to the audiobook. I quite honestly feel like this is one of those rare scenarios in which the movie is much superior to the book. It takes the GREAT story that King tells and trims it down to a really effective movie. Annie Wilkes is one of King's most iconic characters and the story is one of his most terrifying, because there are no scary monsters or supernatural creatures, Annie is all human and 100% crazy. She also brings a lot of humour to the story (for me anyway), I can't help but crack up when she goes on rants about different things. And the scene with the axe... one of the most nail-biting, stressful and cringeworthy events I've ever read in a book. I really like Misery, but I don't seem to regard it as highly as lot of other Constant Readers. I can't pinpoint what is exactly, I just know it wouldn't make my top 20 list. I guess I never really connected with it on a personal level, and so many other King books DO make me FEEL so many emotions, so... it just slides down the list a bit. I do think it would be a great starting point for new King fans, as it isn't particularly scary, it's more of a psychological thriller. A nice way to introduce yourself to Mr King's works. 3.5 stars.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Humphrey

    Please don't come at me with your torches and pitch forks, but for me, this was just fine. I promise I'll explain! Please don't come at me with your torches and pitch forks, but for me, this was just fine. 🤷 I promise I'll explain!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stepheny

    My whole life people have had a hard time handling my obsessive passionate personality. I don’t ever just like things- I’m either completely enamored with it or not all that interested. It’s just how I was made. My obsession with Harry Potter is seen as “excessive” and I’m constantly made fun of for my fondness of it. I get asked “aren’t you a little old for that” almost regularly and I have given up trying to respond because I really don’t feel it necessary to explain myself to anyone. I am My whole life people have had a hard time handling my obsessive passionate personality. I don’t ever just like things- I’m either completely enamored with it or not all that interested. It’s just how I was made. My obsession with Harry Potter is seen as “excessive” and I’m constantly made fun of for my fondness of it. I get asked “aren’t you a little old for that” almost regularly and I have given up trying to respond because I really don’t feel it necessary to explain myself to anyone. I am also ridiculed for my obsession with Stephen King. I find his writing to be nothing short of amazing and people who aren't fans of his just think he writes “that horror and gore crap”. Surely a serious reader can’t be a King fan. According to a lot of people I know it works the same way when flipped around- a King fan cannot be a serious reader. Well, I will tell you I am both. I am a King fan and and a serious reader. But, I’m not always a serious reviewer. For you all I have compiled a list. This list is my defense: Reasons Why I’m NOT the Real Life Annie Wilkes 1.) I would never harm Stephen King in any way, shape or form. Not intentionally anyway- I may accidentally harm him by tripping over my own feet in a rush to get to him and crash into him causing him to fall through a window. Or I might tackle him from behind in an attempt to hug him fiercely. I might even bite him just to see if he’s real. BUT I would not hurt him. 2.) I have never killed anyone. (I think legally I am required to say that…) 3.)I don’t have an unlimited supply of any type of narcotic. I have a cousin who’s a doctor, but he’s of the Straight and Narrow variety. 4.) I don’t have….. lapses in my thoughts. 5.) I understand the severity of an addiction and understand fully that King has struggled with it in his past, therefore I wouldn't get him hooked on a painkiller to make him completely dependent on me. 6.) I wouldn’t want to have Stephen King in my home. Don’t get me wrong, I have a beautiful home, but his house is way fucking cooler. I mean- gargoyles on a wrought iron gate that looks like a spiderweb?! HOW fucking awesome. 7.) Being that I want to be in his house so bad, I would just like to sneak in a back window and hide in a cupboard and live in his house without him knowing for as long as possible. I’d sneak a shower in his shower, smell his clothes, lie on his side of the bed, lick his typewriter…you know those kinds of things. 8.) I want to be friends with Stephen King- not make him fear for his life. I think if he were to meet me he’d be completely charmed by my glowing personality and welcome me as one of his own by saying: “Welcome to the family, kid!” or something along those lines. 9.) I’d order take-out instead of making him eat all that soup in the event that he was in my home. We could eat Chinese food while watching old horror flicks together. BFFFL. 10.) My final point- my name is Stepheny, not Annie, so I can’t be her. All around this was a great read- you should totally check it out. And for the record, Stephen King, you have nothing to be afraid of. Signed, Your Number 1 Fan.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anne(marie)

    It took me longer than usual to get into this King book, which was largely down to the writing style. I felt it was different than his usual style (which is the one I adore so much). I had the same problem when reading The Shining. It was just lacking this "special something", and thus, I felt disconnected from the characters until about a halfway through. However, all the stuff that was happening up until this point still had an effect on me and absolutely terrified me. And then came the big It took me longer than usual to get into this King book, which was largely down to the writing style. I felt it was different than his usual style (which is the one I adore so much). I had the same problem when reading The Shining. It was just lacking this "special something", and thus, I felt disconnected from the characters until about a halfway through. However, all the stuff that was happening up until this point still had an effect on me and absolutely terrified me. And then came the big shift and I got really into it. As soon as I got to know the two main characters better, I got so excited and couldn't stop reading! It all got so interesting after a certain revelation and I was so relieved, because up until then, I had the feeling that I was missing out on whatever makes other people love this book so much. After reaching the halfway point, the genre "Psychological Horror" was truly embodied. There is just something about Annie Wilkes that is constantly frightening, no matter what this woman does. After reading that King wrote her as the personification of cocaine, I totally understand why she is so terrifying, even in the (rare) moments when she is acting nice. I wish I had the right qualifications to analyze this book and its characters on a psychological level, because I bet it would incredibly interesting. So even though it took me a while to be enthralled by the book, it is still definitely worth a read! I'd also like to mention how much I appreciated the little snippets of the actual "Misery"-novels that were included in the story. It added a lot more depth and realism.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Two Sundays ago our family experienced a rather harrowing emergency situation. I'm thrilled to report that tragedy was averted; I'm less excited to share that my arm was broken in the process. A broken arm is a perfectly acceptable price to pay for a whole family, but it is also a painful pain in the ass. And, because I'm a classic overachiever, I broke my arm in the “most painful way possible,” and I have been relegated to bone broth, limited mobility (to prevent the need for surgery) and left Two Sundays ago our family experienced a rather harrowing emergency situation. I'm thrilled to report that tragedy was averted; I'm less excited to share that my arm was broken in the process. A broken arm is a perfectly acceptable price to pay for a whole family, but it is also a painful pain in the ass. And, because I'm a classic overachiever, I broke my arm in the “most painful way possible,” and I have been relegated to bone broth, limited mobility (to prevent the need for surgery) and left handed, one finger typing (damn it!). As my convalescence began (10 long days ago), I found myself not only in pain and discomfort, but surprisingly more and more weepy as well. Melancholic, I believe they call it. So not my norm. A chipper friend quickly became flustered by my new, dark voice and demeanor and contributed that she bring me some “upbeat romantic comedies and light, humorous reads from the library.” “Fuck that,” I cheerfully responded. “I'm reading Stephen King's Misery.” Misery, in case you crawled out from under a rock or were just born, is one of Mr. King's most famous novels. Though I am a devotee of the King (and a total literary snob, by the way), I have always avoided his “horror” novels. I had assumed a “been there, done that,” attitude with Misery, having watched the movie. But, I'm so happy I finally read it. As usual, the book is an entirely different experience. The basic premise, without any overt plot spoilers is this: A 42-year-old, twice divorced novelist named Paul Sheldon, who has become famous for a series he created (but loathes) called Misery, finishes a new manuscript (in a hotel about 15 minutes from my house!), and celebrates his original, not Misery related writing achievement by drinking copious amounts of champagne. He mistakenly heads out, drunk, into a winter storm and badly crashes his car on a mountain road near the fictional town of Sidewinder, Colorado. Paul is badly injured. Left on his own in the storm, without immediate medical attention, he'd have most likely died. Lucky for him, a former nurse discovers his recently crashed car, brings him home and nurses him back to consciousness. When Paul “wakes” to his new reality, he is grateful to the nurse, the indomitable Annie Wilkes, but he is terrified and confused when he sees his mangled legs. Why hasn't she called for help? Turns out Annie's a real psychopath. She's his “number one fan,” and no outside help will be needed for Paul's poor legs, which are pointing every which way but loose. Mr. King introduces us to Annie: She was a big woman who, other than the large but unwelcoming swell of the cardigan sweater she always wore, seemed to have no feminine curves at all—there was no defined roundness of hip or buttock or even calf below the endless succession of wool skirts she wore in the house (she retired to her unseen bedroom to put on jeans before doing outside chores). Her body was big but not generous. There was a feeling about her of clots and roadblocks rather than welcoming orifices or even open spaces, areas of hiatus. Paul quickly realizes he's “in a jam,” but he also mistakenly believes himself to be in the worst mental and physical pain of his life: There comes a point when the very discussion of pain becomes redundant. No one knows there is pain the size of this in the world. No one. It is like being possessed by demons. (I hear you, Paul!). It doesn't take Paul long to understand that the current pain he's in is child's play compared to what will come. He's barely begun his journey with Annie before he recognizes that she was a woman full of tornadoes waiting to happen, and if he had been a farmer observing a sky which looked the way Annie's face looked right now, he would have at once gone to collect his family and herd them into the storm cellar. But Paul doesn't have family. Not really. He's got 2 ex-wives, no kids, no siblings, and parents who are only mentioned in the past tense. He's a loner, a lonely writer who wonders if anyone out there will even care enough to conduct a search for him. And here's the meat for me: I fell in love with him. Paul's sadness, his journey, the span of his suffering and grief are so tenable, so credible, too. We go deep into his psyche, learn his foibles and flaws and get taken along on some keen writing lessons, too. Mr. Sheldon quickly earned a place in heart as my second favorite “King character” (second only to Jake Epping from 11/22/63. So, you may be wondering. . . how gruesome does this get? Gruesome, but only one scene made me truly sick to my stomach. And, you may be wondering. . . Five stars, Julie? Really? Is it really that good? Yes. Other than one cheesy lag in the middle, when the reader gets taken down Memory Lane, and most of Annie Wilkes's backstory is too conveniently spoon-fed to us, it's that good. It's not 11/22/63, and it's not Lonesome Dove, but storytelling doesn't get much better than this, nor does it need to. (Entire review typed with the pointer finger of my left hand.)

  11. 4 out of 5

    ALet

    /5 Stephen King is an author whose books I always enjoy and Misery was not an exception. I really liked the first part of the book, I founded it very compelling and fascinating, others were a little bit disappointing but I still enjoyed reading them. In addition, it was very psychologically heavy book so it took me a long time to read, but on the other hand writing style really fitted the story. It was good book, but not my favorite. ★★★★ /5 Stephen King is an author whose books I always enjoy and Misery was not an exception. I really liked the first part of the book, I founded it very compelling and fascinating, others were a little bit disappointing but I still enjoyed reading them. In addition, it was very psychologically heavy book so it took me a long time to read, but on the other hand writing style really fitted the story. It was good book, but not my favorite.

  12. 5 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    me, a week ago: I dunno man I've tried a few King books and collections and maybe they're just not meant for me also me, a week ago: I'm gonna give Misery a try but I'm not expecting too much tbh me, now: WHAT IN THE NAME OF ALL THE OLD GODS DID I JUST READ, WOW Full review coming soon! Thank you so much to the eternally beloved Ellyn for buddy reading this with me and motivating me to finally give it a try! me, a week ago: I dunno man I've tried a few King books and collections and maybe they're just not meant for me also me, a week ago: I'm gonna give Misery a try but I'm not expecting too much tbh me, now: WHAT IN THE NAME OF ALL THE OLD GODS DID I JUST READ, WOW Full review coming soon! Thank you so much to the eternally beloved Ellyn for buddy reading this with me and motivating me to finally give it a try! 💗💗💗

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    After a car accident, bestselling novelist Paul Sheldon wakes up to find himself in the isolated house of Annie Wilkes, his "number one fan". Paul finds out that Annie has been taking care of him. Soon enough, he also discovers that Annie is totally insane. A roller-coaster ride of a story with two completely unforgettable characters that really came to life for me. I really enjoyed being inside Paul's head and knowing his thoughts as he comes to realize the situation he is in. I also thoroughly After a car accident, bestselling novelist Paul Sheldon wakes up to find himself in the isolated house of Annie Wilkes, his "number one fan". Paul finds out that Annie has been taking care of him. Soon enough, he also discovers that Annie is totally insane. A roller-coaster ride of a story with two completely unforgettable characters that really came to life for me. I really enjoyed being inside Paul's head and knowing his thoughts as he comes to realize the situation he is in. I also thoroughly enjoyed the interplay between prisoner and captor. An intense, graphic, horrifying, over-the-top story with some good crazy fun. Not a story I'll forget soon.

  14. 4 out of 5

    AMEERA

    i can tell this my favourite book of Stephen king so far

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joe Valdez

    Stephen King's bibliography conjures images for me of a sinister Santa's workshop, maybe in the South Pole. The elves seemed particularly active in the mid-1980s, hammering out nightmares with the publication of It (which is long enough to comprise four novels) in 1986 and four novels (The Eyes of the Dragon, Misery, The Dark Tower II, The Tommyknockers) in 1987. Production quotas like these make Misery all the more special, a supremely well-written gothic thriller that had me blowing through Stephen King's bibliography conjures images for me of a sinister Santa's workshop, maybe in the South Pole. The elves seemed particularly active in the mid-1980s, hammering out nightmares with the publication of It (which is long enough to comprise four novels) in 1986 and four novels (The Eyes of the Dragon, Misery, The Dark Tower II, The Tommyknockers) in 1987. Production quotas like these make Misery all the more special, a supremely well-written gothic thriller that had me blowing through pages like a leafblower while exploring a question that every honest writer of suspense scenarios should ask: what scares me? Set in the present day, Misery introduces us to Paul Sheldon, a 42-year-old author of two types of books: good ones and bestsellers. Divorced twice, smoking too much, he knows something very bad has happened to him as he comes through a haze of pain. His caretaker, the woman administering him painkillers and otherwise caring for his pulverized legs, is named Annie Wilkes. Told he's somewhere outside the town of Sidewinder, Colorado, it becomes clear very quickly to Paul that Annie has massive amounts of Novril and other drugs stashed in her house, that he's addicted to Novril and that Annie Wilkes is mayor of Crazytown. Annie describes herself to Paul as his number one fan, the woman who pulled him out of his '74 Camaro after a horrible accident on a remote stretch of I-70 headed up into the Rockies. Sheldon, a New Yorker, is author of a series of Victorian-era bodice rippers centered on Misery Chastain, and was on his way west with the sole manuscript of his new novel, a "good one," about slum kids he'd just completed in Boulder at the Hotel Boulderado. Paul senses that Annie isn't right and that he's in some trouble here. This is before she returns with a paperback copy of his latest book, Misery's Child, which concludes with the death of Sheldon's incessantly popular heroine. "Dirty bird!" she panted. "Oh you dirty birdie, how could you!" He spoke rapidly, urgently, eyes flashing, riveted on her face--he was positive in that moment that his life might depend on what he was able to say in the next twenty seconds. "Annie, in 1871 women frequently died in childbirth. Misery gave her life for her husband and her best friend and child. The spirit of Misery will always--" "I don't want her spirit!" she screamed, hooking her fingers into claws and shaking them at him, as if she would tear his eyes out. "I want her! You killed her! You murdered her!" Her hands snapped shut into fists again she drove them down like pistons, one on either side of his head. They punched deep into the pillow and he bounced like a ragdoll. His legs flared and he cried out. "I didn't kill her!" he screamed. She froze, staring at him with that narrow black expression--that look of crevasse. "Of course not," she said, bitterly sarcastic. "And you didn't, Paul Sheldon, who did?" "No one," he said more quietly. "She just died." Ultimately he knew this to be the truth. If Misery Chastain had been a real person, he knew he might very well have been called upon "to aid the police in their inquiries," as the euphemism went. After all, he had a motive--he had hated her. Ever since the third book, he had hated her. For April Fools Day four years ago he'd had a small booklet privately printed and had sent it to a dozen close acquaintances. It had been called Misery's Hobby. In it Misery spent a cheerful country weekend boffing Growler, Ian's Irish setter. He might have murdered her ... but he hadn't. In the end, in spite of his having grown to despise her, Misery's death had been something of a surprise for him. He had remained true enough to himself for art to imitate life--however feebly to the very end of Misery's hackneyed adventures. She had died a mostly unexpected death. His cheerful capering had in no way changed the fact. "You lie," Annie whispered. "I thought you were good, but you are not good. You are just a lying old dirty birdie." "She slipped away, that's all. Sometimes that happens. It was like life, when someone just--" She overturned the table by the bed. The one shallow drawer spilled out. His wristwatch and pocket-change spilled out with it. He hadn't even known they were in there. He cringed back from her. "You must think I was born yesterday," she said. Her lips drew back from her teeth. "In my job I saw dozens of people die-- hundreds, now that I think about it. Sometimes they go screaming and sometimes they go in their sleep--they just slip away, the way you said, sure. "But characters in stories DO NOT just slip away! God takes us when He think it's our time and a writer is God to the people in a story, he made them up just like God made US up and no one can get hold of God to make him explain, all right, okay, but as far as Misery goes I'll tell you one thing you dirty bird, I'll tell you that God just happens to have a couple of broken legs and God just happens to be in MY house eating MY food ... and ..." One of the most effective pieces of fiction tradecraft is the writer who knocks their protagonist into a well and forces them to climb out. The deeper the well, the more exciting the story. King doesn't stop digging. What's worse than going off a mountain road in your car? How about being held prisoner by a homicidal nurse. What's worse than those? How about being hooked on prescription painkillers. What's worse than those? How about being forced to write a novel under these conditions. What's worse than those? Knowing you're going to be killed--likely shot, chopped up and fed to a pig--as soon as you finish your task. What's worse than all of those? King isn't done imagining. Another characteristic of a great thriller is a great villain and Annie Wilkes is up there with the best. Details of what led to her to no longer being employed as a nurse would be frightening enough. King establishes a moral code for Annie, who murdered patients without remorse and inflicts suffering on her captive but refuses to take the Lord's name in vain. There's something unsettling about an adult who refuses to use profanity despite being profane, resorting to infantile expressions like "cockadoodie" instead. I'm also tickled by Annie being a fan of bodice rippers. Though Diana Gabaldon's books wouldn't start appearing on Barnes & Noble shelves until the early '90s, I see Misery as King's commentary on Outlander and its most diehard fans. One superficial complaint is that King falls in love with italics and give his characters line readings, which I prefer authors not do, especially on every page. Another is that he includes several passages of Misery's Return, typed to omit the missing "N" on the typewriter Annie provides Paul. I'm happy that King got the chance to cook up and even write prose for a bodice ripper, but I didn't want to read it. I wanted to read what would happen next between Paul and Annie and didn't like being interrupted. The story is also much more grisly than I felt it needed to be, but this is also a matter of taste. Readers who love Thomas Harris or Netflix's Mindhunter should love this while scaredy cats might not. The furnace was a dim bulk in the middle of the room. It looked like an octopus. He thought he would have been able to hear the chiming of the parlor clock if the night had been still, but a strong summer wind had blown up, as it so often did these nights, and there was only time, spreading out forever. He could hear crickets singing just outside the house when the wind dropped ... and then, sometime later, he heard the stealthy noises he had been afraid of: the low, momentary scuff-and-scurry of the rats. Only it wasn't rats he was afraid of, was it? No. It was the trooper. His so-fucking-vivid imagination rarely gave him the horrors, but when it did, God help him. God help him once it was warmed up. It was not only warmed up now, it was hot and running on full choke. That there was no sense at all in what he was thinking made not a whit of difference in the dark. In the dark, rationality seemed stupid and logic a dream. In the dark he thought with his skin. He kept seeing the trooper coming back to life--some sort of life--out in the barn, sitting up, the loose hay with which Annie had covered him falling to either side of him and into his lap, his face plowed into bloody senselessness by the mower's blade. Saw him crawling out of the barn and down the driveway to the bulkhead, the torn streamers of his uniform swinging and fluttering. Saw him melting magically through the bulkhead and reintegrating his corpse's body down here. Saw him crawling across the packed dirt floor, and the little noises Paul heard weren't the rats but the sounds of his approach, and there was but a single thought in the cooling clay of the trooper's dead brain: You killed me. You opened your mouth and killed me. You threw an ashtray and killed me. You cockadoodie son of a bitch, you murdered my life. I envy those capable of reading Misery without having seen the 1990 film adaptation by William Goldman and co-starring Kathy Bates in her Oscar winning performance as Annie Wilkes. The film does not age one bit, save that today's Paul Sheldon would've had a smartphone, likely damaged in the crash or out of its coverage area at Annie's farm. Directed by Rob Reiner, Misery also has a fascinating production history. Even with five good movies to his credit with no bad ones, Reiner was unable to find a leading man willing to play Paul Sheldon. Warren Beatty flirted with the role and was involved enough to suggest that Paul's (view spoiler)[foot amputation (hide spoiler)] would alienate viewers. William Hurt was offered and turned the part down twice, with Kevin Kline, Michael Douglas, Harrison Ford, Dustin Hoffman, Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Richard Dreyfuss, Gene Hackman and Robert Redford all passing before James Caan, rehabilitating his career after rehabilitating a drug habit, took the part. As a book lover, I love that this is a thriller where the protagonist uses his tormentor's love of fiction to defeat her.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Monroe

    Misery was my first ever Stephen King novel. There I was, an impressionable 14-year-old girl drunk on romances with none-fade-into-black sex scenes. Then my favorite English teacher recommended I read Misery. "Your life will never be the same," he said. He was right. Misery is about the kind of fan that loves their chosen celebrity a little too much. Like the man who shot John Lennon. Or stalkers that drive to Miley Cyrus's house with a bouquet of roses and a foam finger. The odd buttons that spoil Misery was my first ever Stephen King novel. There I was, an impressionable 14-year-old girl drunk on romances with none-fade-into-black sex scenes. Then my favorite English teacher recommended I read Misery. "Your life will never be the same," he said. He was right. Misery is about the kind of fan that loves their chosen celebrity a little too much. Like the man who shot John Lennon. Or stalkers that drive to Miley Cyrus's house with a bouquet of roses and a foam finger. The odd buttons that spoil a fandom. In this case, Paul Sheldon was rescued from a car crash by his number one fan, Annie. She loves his books, so when she finds out Paul killed her favorite character in the latest installment, she gets a little... upset. But no matter, she has the brains behind the masterpiece right here! Paul is going to bring his character back from the dead for one last encore or she'll get upset again. And you do not want to make Annie upset. You scared yet? King's writing has a way of putting you directly in a character's shoes. Only he can make the abhorred third-person into first-person, so you're there with Paul every second of the way. You feel his terror when he realized his caretaker is not quite right in the head. You feel his pain from drug withdrawal. You feel the resignation of burning your only first-draft manuscript in order to obtain said drugs. “The work, the pride in your work, the worth of the work itself...all those things faded away to the magic-lantern shades they really were when the pain got bad enough.” The shame. The rage. The hate. This is horror at its finest. One human imprisoned in a house by another. No cheap jump-scares. No bloody gore factor. No dime-store costume. This is nail-your-balls-to-the-wall psychological shit, and damn if you don't lie awake at night wondering if the dark shape in the corner is Annie with a chainsaw in hand. So come along with me, dear Constant Reader. And be King's number one fan.

  17. 4 out of 5

    emma

    a list of things this book was: - disgusting - disturbing - a quick read, surprisingly - really fond of using sexual assault as a metaphor (cool cool cool) - harmfully stereotypical in terms of race (the Africa references/setting) - harmfully stereotypical in terms of gender (so much man-goes-to-work woman-stays-home) - honestly just pretty hateful toward women?? - all for using the n word without blinking, apparently a list of things this book was not: - scary - all that great of a read for me bottom line: a list of things this book was: - disgusting - disturbing - a quick read, surprisingly - really fond of using sexual assault as a metaphor (cool cool cool) - harmfully stereotypical in terms of race (the Africa references/setting) - harmfully stereotypical in terms of gender (so much man-goes-to-work woman-stays-home) - honestly just pretty hateful toward women?? - all for using the n word without blinking, apparently a list of things this book was not: - scary - all that great of a read for me bottom line: i guess i get the stephen king appeal. but, uh. NOT A FAN. note from future me: if you're a stephen king fan and you feel like writing at length in the comments of this about why i'm wrong and you're a Correct Intellectual, consider, instead, writing me a letter and then throwing that letter right in the garbage (either way, i'm not going to read it) ----------- PRE-REVIEW okay, stephen king. time to show me what all the fuss is about. (in other words: this is my first stephen king book and i'm ready to scream in fear)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Will M.

    *I just watched the movie and I can safely say that the book was 100x more enjoyable for me. I didn't like the changes that they did, but the cast was spot on. Couldn't ask for a better Paul and Annie. ------------- After the two month hiatus from Stephen King, I promised myself that I'm not going to let the fact that he's my favorite author, affect my rating of whatever book of his I'm reading next. I think I've proven myself before by giving Wizard and Glass a 2-star rating, even if it was damn *I just watched the movie and I can safely say that the book was 100x more enjoyable for me. I didn't like the changes that they did, but the cast was spot on. Couldn't ask for a better Paul and Annie. ------------- After the two month hiatus from Stephen King, I promised myself that I'm not going to let the fact that he's my favorite author, affect my rating of whatever book of his I'm reading next. I think I've proven myself before by giving Wizard and Glass a 2-star rating, even if it was damn hard. I'm very straightforward when it comes to wasted time because of reading a horrible book. Misery is not one of those books. Misery is one of those I'd recommend it to everybody I know kind of books. I'm not going to dwell much on the summary, because it sucks when spoilers ruin one's book experience. I've had a few encounters with spoilers, and honestly that's the real reason why I haven't read Stephen King's "It" yet. I already know the secret/mystery to it, but I'm getting a first edition hardbound copy of it though, so I'm reading it soon. Anyway, back to Misery. To keep it short, it's all about Paul Sheldon, the writer, being held captive of the crazy psycho Annie. She's obsessed with him, but that's not the only reason why she did those crazy things. She's just normally cock-a-doodie in the head. Just like most of the King novels I've read, the main epitome of greatness lies on the characters. King has the gift of creating characters that would leave a mark. They're just so well developed that you'd learn to love them one way or another. Paul was quite similar to Louis Creed from Pet Sematary. His writer characters are quite similar in a few manners but they still have great qualities of their own. Paul exuded a genuine personality in this novel. It was hard not to like him because his panicky behavior right from the first ten chapters already made me like him a lot. Right till the end, he remained true to his character. Annie on the other hand was completely terrifying. I love psychological thrillers, but Stephen King managed to incorporate a huge amount of horror in the genre. Annie was not just scary, but she gave me a phobia. A phobia of crazy psychos capable of doing what she did in the novel. I liked her, despite all the craziness, because she delivered what she was supposed to in the first place. In the psycho thriller genre, the crazier and scarier the better. King can write anything he wants. Aside from the characters, I really liked the violence. Annie didn't hold back, she did crazy gut wrenching things. I've read and seen worse of course, but the things she did were still quite scary. Because it seems to fit the situation well, and hopefully you guys reading this used to watch spongebob, all I can say is "MY LEEEEEG". 5/5 stars. Like I said in the first part of my review, I was not biased when I rated this a 5. This novel deserves no less. It was amazing and I can't believe I've only read this now. I'm highly recommending this, but be warned that you might lose a few nights sleep. Pet Sematary was still a bit scarier that this, but Misery gave a different kind of scare because it didn't have that supernatural element that I knew was not going to happen in Sematary. Misery felt real because there might be an Annie waiting to kidnap me like that. King can give you different kinds of scare, and all of them are equally terrifying. One of those King novels I plan on reading again in the future.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sandeep

    An intense, graphic, horrifying story that will keep you at the edge of your seat throughout it's entirety. I've read a few thrillers this year and let me tell you, nothing comes near this. Not even CLOSE. He was a writer. She was his number one fan. She’d pulled him out of the car-wreck, brought him home, splinted and set his mangled legs. All he had to do in return was to write a very special book, just for her, all about her favourite heroine from his novels. There were so many layers to this An intense, graphic, horrifying story that will keep you at the edge of your seat throughout it's entirety. I've read a few thrillers this year and let me tell you, nothing comes near this. Not even CLOSE. He was a writer. She was his number one fan. She’d pulled him out of the car-wreck, brought him home, splinted and set his mangled legs. All he had to do in return was to write a very special book, just for her, all about her favourite heroine from his novels. There were so many layers to this story. The story (the one which Paul writes) within the plot, Annie's backstory and also several metaphors used by King throughout the book. There was also a good amount of humor present. Almost the entire story takes place inside a room, inside a house. Paul remains confined to a bed for a good amount of time so we also follow Paul's thoughts and conscience. Never, for once did I feel that the story was being stretched or boring even though nothing was happening for a while, it still felt engaging. Even though there were no supernatural elements involved, it was actually scary at times. The characterisation in Misery is spot on. The two main characters are Annie Wilkes and Paul Sheldon. Annie is a monster all right – a flesh and blood monster and those are the worst kind. She’s crazy. King brings her to vivid, unforgettable life. She was so real I expected her to step off the page. Paul Sheldon is also a very well written character. I felt real empathy for him as he was trapped in the house as Annie came apart. I found the scenes when they both interacted so intense. I found the plot in Misery very believable and quite frightening. It easy to imagine what would happen if a writer or someone famous became a prisoner of their ‘number one fan’ who also happened to be psychotic. In some way I found Misery even more disturbing because there’s nothing supernatural in it. The plot is plausible and even more unsettling because of this. There probably is a crazy fan a lot like Annie Wilkes out there. This was my first Stephen King book and what an incredible ride it was! King ticks all the boxes with this one. The characterisation is great and King turns it into something special. There are a few gory scenes that make me cringe but even these moments are compelling and well written. I think the execution of this book was as perfect as it could have been.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Raeleen Lemay

    Read for Popsugar's 2018 Reading Challenge #13: A Book that is Also a Stage Play or a Musical This was super great! It was suspenseful, and the characters were very vivid. The whole thing was bogged down a tiny bit by the book-within-a-book bits (I'm not as big of a fan of Paul's writing as Annie is lol) and it was less gory than I was expecting, but other than that it was fantastic! Definitely one of my favorite Stephen King books that I've read so far (It is still my favorite at the moment.)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kayla Dawn

    It took me AGES (4 1/2 fucking months smh) to read this and I have absolutely no idea why. I enjoyed it a lot. I thought I would like it even more than I did though. I had a few problems with King's writing style in this particular book (especially in the beginning) even though I'm normally a really big fan of it. And I was bored to death every time there were actual parts of "Misery" (the book that's being written by the author in this) to read. I don't know why, I just didn't care for them. It took me AGES (4 1/2 fucking months smh) to read this and I have absolutely no idea why. I enjoyed it a lot. I thought I would like it even more than I did though. I had a few problems with King's writing style in this particular book (especially in the beginning) even though I'm normally a really big fan of it. And I was bored to death every time there were actual parts of "Misery" (the book that's being written by the author in this) to read. I don't know why, I just didn't care for them. Other than that, this was pretty awesome. Annie was such a well written, interesting and absolutely terrifying character! She helped a lot with building the right atmosphere. I'm so excited for watching the movie!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Trudi

    (2018 re-read) (2012 review) I've been re-visiting some of my King All-star Team this year as audiobooks and am reminded yet again that Uncle Steve is The Man. No matter what asshats and embittered douchebags like "literary critic" Harold Bloom say, King is one of the greatest storytellers in any language of all time, full stop. Is everything he's written pure gold? Of course not. Given the sheer size of the man's canon, that's to be expected. But even when I think King has put up something less (2018 re-read) (2012 review) I've been re-visiting some of my King All-star Team this year as audiobooks and am reminded yet again that Uncle Steve is The Man. No matter what asshats and embittered douchebags like "literary critic" Harold Bloom say, King is one of the greatest storytellers in any language of all time, full stop. Is everything he's written pure gold? Of course not. Given the sheer size of the man's canon, that's to be expected. But even when I think King has put up something less than stellar, I always feel his heart is in the right place. In other words, King -- unlike so many other bestselling authors these days -- has integrity to spare. The words, the story -- they come first always. Even after all these years, I really believe he does it for the love of the craft, not for the next bloated paycheck (*cough* James Patterson *cough* whore). I first read Misery when I was seventeen years old. I started it about eight o'clock that evening, and finished it about four in the morning. Heart pounding, bleary eyed and afraid to open my closet door lest Annie Wilkes was waiting there for me with an axe or chainsaw raised over her head. Whenever we're excited about a book, readers will often say "OMG, I couldn't put it down!" but we probably did, at least once, to go to work, get supper, put the kids to bed, whatever. It's not meant to be a literal expression per se, though sometimes it is and whoah to the power of a book that can hold you in its ironclad grip with such uncompromising resolution. That will make you stay up til the wee hours of the morning even though you have work or school the next day. Or breakfast to make for a screaming brood of little ones. I couldn't put Misery down that first time. King has penned some page-turning mothers over the years, but the story of Paul Sheldon and his number one fan Annie Wilkes has got to be the most page-turning of them all. I guess you could classify this book as psychological suspense, since there are absolutely no supernatural elements introduced here, but for me Misery will remain classic horror because I really do feel like King's ultimate goal in writing it is to scare the shit out of us. And in this he succeeds brilliantly. We're trapped in that room with Paul Sheldon. The desire to escape is overwhelming. You begin to understand how an animal can chew its own leg off. And Annie Wilkes? Has there ever been a literary creation able to make you lose control of your bladder so effectively? She haunts my nightmares still. (view spoiler)[One of the things I love about Annie is that she's not just "crazy as a shit-house rat". King writes her with real depth and nuance. Like Paul, we can see who she might have been if the chemicals in her brain were balanced, or her childhood was different, or all the other permutations that contribute to madness were absent. One of my favorite scenes in the novel is when Paul discovers Annie's "Memory Lane" scrapbook, a collection of all her murders. I love that singular moment of pure, crystalline terror when Paul realizes what he's really up against. How deep her sickness really goes. How twisted her mind really is. (hide spoiler)] King not only does an amazing job examining the sometimes deranged and twisted fan/creator relationship when a mental illness is introduced, but more significantly, the beating heart of the writing life. In Misery, King is able to inject a lot of what he knows and believes about the craft and all the tics and challenges that come along with it. Until he published On Writing, Misery was King's most passionate description of the weird and wonderful life of a fiction writer. As always, the blessed relief of starting, a feeling that was like falling into a hole filled with bright light. As always, the glum knowledge that he would not write as well as he wanted to write. As always the terror of not being able to finish, of accelerating into a brick wall. As always, the marvelous joyful nervy feeling of journey begun. I like to think one of my favorite passages is King's version of a big middle finger to the critics who have lambasted him (and likely will continue to do so into the afterlife) as a hack: There's a million things in this world I can't do. Couldn't hit a curve ball, even back in high school. Can't fix a leaky faucet. Can't roller-skate or make an F-chord on the guitar that sounds like anything but shit. I have tried to be married and couldn't do it either time. But if you want me to take you away, to scare you or involve you or make you cry or grin, yeah. I can. I can bring it to you and keep bringing it until you holler uncle. I am able. I CAN. Can he ever. Am I right, Constant Readers? Can I get a witness? When I listened to Gerald's Game a few months back, I argued that it shared a lot more similarities to Misery than to the book it's always paired with Dolores Claiborne. In my review for Gerald's Game I write: "what King is really doing is looking at the human body under brutalizing physical duress... at the body in extremis and what humans are genetically hardwired to do to survive and go on living another day." Like Jessie Burlingame in Gerald's Game, Paul Sheldon is a miserable animal caught in a trap. While Paul has the indomitable Annie Wilkes to contend with, Jessie has her own problems, but it all adds up to the same thing in the end: "In telling Jessie's story King uncovers all the nitty-gritty minutia of human physical suffering and the desperation of one woman's attempt to end it. How far is any one person willing to go to keep on taking his or her next breath? Stephen King knows pretty damn far. Just ask Paul Sheldon or Ray Garraty. Or the castaway in "Survivor Type" -- him most of all. King also knows that the human body has an amazing capacity for trauma. It can withstand a lot -- so much so that the mind often breaks first." Yes it does. I'm going to end this review the same way I ended my review for Gerald's Game, with a quote from Bondama made in the Stephen King Fans forum here on Goodreads. I keep coming back to this quote because I think it really captures what is so deeply disturbing and terrifying about both these novels. And what makes them so very hard to put down once begun. Each go: straight to the oldest, reptilian part of the human brain: fight or flight -- but here, flight's out of the question. This is true horror -- helplessness.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Daviau

    This is my first time reading Misery and all I can think about is how I’ve been depriving myself of this masterpiece for years and I’m filled with regret about it. I could have feasted my eyes on the glory that is this book years and years ago! It has officially clawed its way into my top five King stories, it truly is phenomenal! I think Annie has to be one of my favourite King characters I’ve met yet, that is one crazy bitch! And that’s what makes this story so terrifying, there’s no monsters, This is my first time reading Misery and all I can think about is how I’ve been depriving myself of this masterpiece for years and I’m filled with regret about it. I could have feasted my eyes on the glory that is this book years and years ago! It has officially clawed its way into my top five King stories, it truly is phenomenal! I think Annie has to be one of my favourite King characters I’ve met yet, that is one crazy bitch! And that’s what makes this story so terrifying, there’s no monsters, just a 100% out of her mind crazy lunatic human that commits unspeakable acts on another human being. There are some truly terrifying and gut wrenching moments in this story, I was literally cringing and closing my eyes at some parts because it was just too much and I ADORED every second of it!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Leo .

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Wow! Imagine having a nasty car accident and being rescued by your number one FAAAN! A fan who happens to be a complete lunatic. This book is gripping. An accomplished author killing off his main character because he is stuck in a rut. Held prisoner by his number one fan. Many times he tries to escape and gets mutilated and hobbled. Coerced into writing his novel and not to dare finish the character off. Drugged and tied to a bed. What a book. Also a film starring Kathy Bates and James Caan. Good Wow! Imagine having a nasty car accident and being rescued by your number one FAAAN! A fan who happens to be a complete lunatic. This book is gripping. An accomplished author killing off his main character because he is stuck in a rut. Held prisoner by his number one fan. Many times he tries to escape and gets mutilated and hobbled. Coerced into writing his novel and not to dare finish the character off. Drugged and tied to a bed. What a book. Also a film starring Kathy Bates and James Caan. Good film but not as good as the book. I did not give it five stars because King has written better ones but, most of his work is 4+ stars🐯👍

  25. 4 out of 5

    Celeste

    October is all about the spooky for me, and King is my preferred supplier. I’ve read roughly a third of his body of work and, while I’ve enjoyed all of them for the most part, most of them have been suitably creepy without actually scaring me. Exceptions to this have been Revival and IT the first time I tried to read it. I can now add Misery to that list. This book legitimately gave me nightmares while I was reading, because, though not probable, every event in the book is actually possible. For October is all about the spooky for me, and King is my preferred supplier. I’ve read roughly a third of his body of work and, while I’ve enjoyed all of them for the most part, most of them have been suitably creepy without actually scaring me. Exceptions to this have been Revival and IT the first time I tried to read it. I can now add Misery to that list. This book legitimately gave me nightmares while I was reading, because, though not probable, every event in the book is actually possible. For the majority of the book there are only two characters present: Paul Sheldon, severely injured writer extraordinaire; and Annie Wilkes, former nurse and Paul’s number one fan. When Paul has a terrible car accident while driving through a snow storm, he is discovered and rescued by Annie, his aforementioned biggest fan. Instead of taking him to a hospital like any normal person would, she brings him home with her and becomes his caretaker. Over the course of the novel Paul grows to dearly wish that he had died on impact. As these two characters comprised the bulk of the narrative, I’m going to spend a bit of time breaking them down. Let’s talk baddies first. Annie Wilkes is perhaps the most terrifying villain King ever penned, and there’s nothing supernatural about her. Which just makes her all the more terrifying. King’s description of her as unnaturally solid, with no room for blood vessels and organs, like an idol from some ancient civilization, was incredibly disturbing. I’m of the firm belief that, should Annie Wilkes and Pennywise meet in some back alley, the sometimes clown would flee in mindless terror. I known I was petrified of her. She is a deeply disturbed woman and every artist is terrified of picking up such a fan over the course of their profession. And yet she was sometimes difficult for me to read, not because she was disturbing so much as the fact that her manner of speaking when enraged made me groan and roll my eyes.  Which is the only reason this book wasn't a 4.5 star read. I think that Paul Sheldon is the personification of some of King’s deepest, darkest fears. Every artist is afraid of getting trapped by their own creation, sentenced to recreating the same popular story or song over and over and over again instead of being given the freedom to craft something new. And every artist is afraid of the critics, of being relegated to the popular fiction corner where pedestrian fluff resides instead of being respected for their work. Paul Sheldon is an incredibly popular author who has just killed off his cash cow, so to speak, in hopes of writing something with a little more class and finally being taken seriously. Over the course of literary history this has happened time and again, the most famous example being Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s decision to kill off Sherlock Holmes. After the immense public outcry he felt forced to resurrect the character, finding himself once again boxed into writing stories about a character he had come to despise. Sheldon totally feels Doyle’s pain, and though the fury he faces is on a much smaller scale, it’s also deadlier. Something that King kept repeating through Sheldon’s character was the knowledge that he wrote stories first and foremost for himself, as do all authors. While the plot itself was incredibly compelling and disturbing, what I loved the most about this book was the raw honesty about himself that King allowed to shine through his protagonist. What he has to say about writing and being an author resounded with truth. I found these passages impactful and moving, which I honestly wasn’t expecting from this book. King has this openness in his writing that I really respect, and the way he lets himself shine through and be known even in his most disturbing fiction feels like a gift to his readership. “Writers remember everything...especially the hurts. Strip a writer to the buff, point to the scars, and he'll tell you the story of each small one. From the big ones you get novels. A little talent is a nice thing to have if you want to be a writer, but the only real requirement is the ability to remember the story of every scar. Art consists of the persistence of memory.” I didn’t expect this particular King book to become one of my favorites from him. But here we are. Misery is incredibly scary, far scarier than King’s more supernatural works. And the things this book had to say about writing and what makes a good story and the dangers of becoming or attracting radical fans are thoughts that will be staying with me for a while. If I ever manage to become a famous writer or musician, I know that the words “I’m your number one fan” will fill me with dread and make some part of me want to run away screaming. Anonymity seems so much safer. You can find this review and more at Novel Notions.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Update 1/8/17: There’s crazy, and then there’s the Mommy, I’m scared crazy. Annie is that second one. She’s the one you don’t want to cross - in any way. Ticking time bombs are called ticking for a reason. At some point, they’re going to go off. But Annie’s like a wasp compared to the honeybee because she’s the bomb that can explode, and explode, and explode. Poor Paul Sheldon. He didn’t even get the chance to avoid the crazy that is Annie. ”I’m your number one fan!” My ass. Movie confession. Yes, Update 1/8/17: There’s crazy, and then there’s the Mommy, I’m scared crazy. Annie is that second one. She’s the one you don’t want to cross - in any way. Ticking time bombs are called ticking for a reason. At some point, they’re going to go off. But Annie’s like a wasp compared to the honeybee because she’s the bomb that can explode, and explode, and explode. Poor Paul Sheldon. He didn’t even get the chance to avoid the crazy that is Annie. ”I’m your number one fan!” My ass. Movie confession. Yes, I‘ve seen it. Great flick, but at some point since then I’ve learned to read the book first. For Misery the order was reversed. Not a horrible thing to do, especially when the movie is a good one. But while reading, James Caan continued to flicker in and out of my mind as Paul Sheldon. Same thing for Kathy Bates/Annie Wilkes. Again, not a bad way to picture characters. I simply prefer a clean slate. Although the faces from the movie were clear, the details I remembered were not. Excepting a few scenes. I mean, some things cannot be forgotten. Sledgehammer anyone? So imagine my surprise when that oh-so-horrific moment arrived in the book. Slightly, yet completely different! I literally wanted to scream, “NO Annie please!” along with Paul. Oh, the pain. It was palpable. Misery is among King’s best. It’s also shorter than most. Condensed is the feeling. He still meanders with some tangents, but doesn’t dilly-dally for long before coming back for another blow to the senses. I will not be able to look at this book in the future without feeling a visceral response traveling directly to my legs. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1/7/17 You're the dirty bird Annie Wilkes, and this is for you: "I want to look her straight in the eye and tell her what a cheap, lying, no good, rotten, far flushing, snake licking, dirt eating, inbreed, overstuffed, ignorant, blood sucking, dog kissing, brainless, dickless, hopeless, heartless, fat assed, bug eyed, stiff legged, spotty lipped, worm headed, sack of monkey shit she is!!! Halleluah!! Holy shit!! Where's the Tylenol??" Ok, so those were Clark Griswold’s famous words from Christmas Vacation. I thought they fit Annie to a tee.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mario

    The reason authors almost always put a dedication on a book, Annie, is because their selfishness even horrifies themselves in the end. Goodbye sleep and hello Annie! I'm certain that my favorite book by King will always be Pet Sematary, but this book came pretty close to changing my mind. And just like I'm sure that Pet Sematary will always be my favorite, I'm also sure that Misery one will always remain my second favorite. I honestly don't know how King does it. This is, without a doubt, the most The reason authors almost always put a dedication on a book, Annie, is because their selfishness even horrifies themselves in the end. Goodbye sleep and hello Annie! I'm certain that my favorite book by King will always be Pet Sematary, but this book came pretty close to changing my mind. And just like I'm sure that Pet Sematary will always be my favorite, I'm also sure that Misery one will always remain my second favorite. I honestly don't know how King does it. This is, without a doubt, the most disgusting and the hardest book I've read so far. And I loved every second of it. (does that make me a weird person? probably) Now about the book... Meet Annie Wilkes, a nice old woman who likes to read (just like all of us), but who also has a hobby of capturing and torturing her favorite author (unlike all of us... at least I hope). Annie is one of those character that will definitely pay a visit to me in my dreams. She's even scarier than crazy Jack Torrance. (Wouldn't the two of them make an excellent couple?!) But on the other hand, we have Paul Sheldon. And, unlike Annie, he became my favorite King's character. Even though Annie made this book interesting, I loved hearing from Paul's POV. In my opinion, he as a character was even more interesting than Annie. And in the end, I'm just going to say that if you love King (or you're just a horror fan in general), but for some reason still haven't decided to pick up this book yet, do it. You definitely won't be disappointed. This is King at his best.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

    A group of two foursomes were stretching, swinging in practice, talking and otherwise getting ready for a morning round of golf. The first tee box was adjacent to the parking lot and a couple golfers were discussing that earlier in the week, a man had driven to the gold course, parked a few dozen yards from where we all now stood and had tragically ended his life with a gunshot. Several of us paused to reflect on this moment of grim calamity brought about so close to us. One golfer, who has a A group of two foursomes were stretching, swinging in practice, talking and otherwise getting ready for a morning round of golf. The first tee box was adjacent to the parking lot and a couple golfers were discussing that earlier in the week, a man had driven to the gold course, parked a few dozen yards from where we all now stood and had tragically ended his life with a gunshot. Several of us paused to reflect on this moment of grim calamity brought about so close to us. One golfer, who has a ridiculously powerful and consistent drive, and also a quick wit, said: “Well, he got a hole in one.” To which we all added appalled groans and variations on “Dude! That was f***ed up!” Stephen King, Dude! That was f***ed up! King’s 1987 novel Misery is, indeed f***ed up. Paul Sheldon, a successful writer of romance novels, but who longs to be regarded for his more serious works, finishes his most recent novel “Fast Cars” after having killed off his successful and famous romance novel heroine Misery Chastain. He drives away from his Colorado hotel, filled with achievement and too much champagne and wrecks his car in a snow-covered ditch. He is rescued by his number one fan – of the Misery books – Annie Wilkes, and so begins a psychological thriller the likes of which only King could pull off. Creepy, discomforting and truly scary, King has in Misery recreated the Thousand and One nights of Scheherazade, except Sheldon is staying alive by keeping Annie waiting for the next Misery novel. For those who have only seen the 1990 Rob Reiner film starring Kathy Bates and James Caan, that is a watered-down version of the torture King deals out. In Wilkes, King has crafted one of his most villainous characters. Not just for King fans, this is a modern horror tale that all fans of that genre will likely enjoy.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gabby

    I know I have an unpopular opinion on this one, but I thought this was just okay. I have a weird relationship with Stephen King books, I tend to either LOVE them or feel very meh about them, and unfortunately this one left me feeling very meh. The concept of of this book is great, and I love the idea of it: a huge fan of this author finds him in a car wreck and kidnaps him, forcing him to write the next book in a series about a girl named Misery which he has previously ended, and she's forcing I know I have an unpopular opinion on this one, but I thought this was just okay. I have a weird relationship with Stephen King books, I tend to either LOVE them or feel very meh about them, and unfortunately this one left me feeling very meh. The concept of of this book is great, and I love the idea of it: a huge fan of this author finds him in a car wreck and kidnaps him, forcing him to write the next book in a series about a girl named Misery which he has previously ended, and she's forcing him to re-write her story. Annie is an incredibly fascinating character to read about, she's one of those classic psychotic characters like Norman Bates or Hannibal Lectur. She was entertaining to read about, but I feel like because this book is told from Paul, the author's POV, it felt like it dragged at times for me. I struggled through the first 50% of this book, I found it very slow and boring. Maybe this is because I read thrillers all the time, it's one of my favorite genres, but this book just didn't really thrill me the way I wanted it to. The story got a lot better towards the end and I really ended up liking the last third of it a lot, but it still isn't my favorite from Stephen King, and I guess I just went into it with too high of expectations.Pet Semetary remains as my favorite Stephen King novel. This was my buddy read for the month of November with my friends Jacqueline and Zoe!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    Wow! What a gruesomely disturbing ride Mr King! I must admit, I watched Misery years ago, and I remember not thinking much of it, as it didn't really make me squeamish. In the case of "Misery" I think the book was better, and it took the term "Fucked up" to a new height. Although this was a great read, I found I didn't love this as much as Pet Sematary, but it was still classic King writing, and it kept me pretty unsettled, until the very end. And, talking of unsettled, lets talk about Annie Wow! What a gruesomely disturbing ride Mr King! I must admit, I watched Misery years ago, and I remember not thinking much of it, as it didn't really make me squeamish. In the case of "Misery" I think the book was better, and it took the term "Fucked up" to a new height. Although this was a great read, I found I didn't love this as much as Pet Sematary, but it was still classic King writing, and it kept me pretty unsettled, until the very end. And, talking of unsettled, lets talk about Annie Wilkes. What a woman! She is probably one of the most disturbingly crazy female characters in fiction. I find her layered, and by that I mean that she's a real mixed bag. You really never know what you're going to get. I cannot say I LIKE her character, because, lets face it, she's pretty evil, but she is interesting. The way she lives her life for one. She doesn't fit in to society, so she distanced herself from it on her little farm with her animals- until she met Paul Sheldon. And that is when shit hits the fan, and we learn, incredibly quickly actually, that nobody fucks with Annie Wilkes. I found myself rather on edge with this, eager to know what stunt Annie might pull next, especially if Paul made her angry. There was one scene, and I found myself thinking " Wow, he's not seriously written THAT, has he?" Obviously, the answer to that, was a yes. It's King. There is nothing he won't write about, especially when his words are able to crawl into the very depths of your mind, and set up home there for a while. This was another grand novel from King, and I'm itching to read my next!

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