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Justice League Odyssey, Vol. 1: The Ghost Sector

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When a cosmic menace threatens worlds beyond our own in the Ghost Sector, it falls to a new Justice League team to answer the call to battle! Cyborg, Starfire, Green Lantern Jessica Cruz and an out-of-his-element Azrael head to deep space inside a commandeered Brainiac Skull Ship. Spinning out of JUSTICE LEAGUE: NO JUSTICE comes Joshua Williamson’s amazing new series Justic When a cosmic menace threatens worlds beyond our own in the Ghost Sector, it falls to a new Justice League team to answer the call to battle! Cyborg, Starfire, Green Lantern Jessica Cruz and an out-of-his-element Azrael head to deep space inside a commandeered Brainiac Skull Ship. Spinning out of JUSTICE LEAGUE: NO JUSTICE comes Joshua Williamson’s amazing new series Justice League Odyssey! This ragtag team of new recruits will face threats in the deep reaches of space like no League ever before! First up? These wild-card teammates try to stop Despero from slave-trading Coluan refugees, only to discover something that nothing in the universe could have prepared them for: Darkseid…who says he’s there to help?! Written by Joshua Williamson (The Flash) with unbelievable illustrations from Stjepan Sejic (Aquaman), Justice League Odyssey takes the World’s Greatest Super Heroes to places they’ve never been before! Collects issues #1-5.


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When a cosmic menace threatens worlds beyond our own in the Ghost Sector, it falls to a new Justice League team to answer the call to battle! Cyborg, Starfire, Green Lantern Jessica Cruz and an out-of-his-element Azrael head to deep space inside a commandeered Brainiac Skull Ship. Spinning out of JUSTICE LEAGUE: NO JUSTICE comes Joshua Williamson’s amazing new series Justic When a cosmic menace threatens worlds beyond our own in the Ghost Sector, it falls to a new Justice League team to answer the call to battle! Cyborg, Starfire, Green Lantern Jessica Cruz and an out-of-his-element Azrael head to deep space inside a commandeered Brainiac Skull Ship. Spinning out of JUSTICE LEAGUE: NO JUSTICE comes Joshua Williamson’s amazing new series Justice League Odyssey! This ragtag team of new recruits will face threats in the deep reaches of space like no League ever before! First up? These wild-card teammates try to stop Despero from slave-trading Coluan refugees, only to discover something that nothing in the universe could have prepared them for: Darkseid…who says he’s there to help?! Written by Joshua Williamson (The Flash) with unbelievable illustrations from Stjepan Sejic (Aquaman), Justice League Odyssey takes the World’s Greatest Super Heroes to places they’ve never been before! Collects issues #1-5.

30 review for Justice League Odyssey, Vol. 1: The Ghost Sector

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    I thought this was actually a pretty neat idea to spin out of a crummy event Justice League: No Justice. All the planets that Colu shrank have all expanded now and form the Ghost Sector. Starfire, Cyborg, and Azrael are drawn there and Green Lantern Jessica Cruz actually is there to stop them. Azrael makes absolutely no sense in this book as his thing is that he's devoted to God as his avenging angel. Here he's trying to get people to worship him. It's just poor writing, trying to fit a square p I thought this was actually a pretty neat idea to spin out of a crummy event Justice League: No Justice. All the planets that Colu shrank have all expanded now and form the Ghost Sector. Starfire, Cyborg, and Azrael are drawn there and Green Lantern Jessica Cruz actually is there to stop them. Azrael makes absolutely no sense in this book as his thing is that he's devoted to God as his avenging angel. Here he's trying to get people to worship him. It's just poor writing, trying to fit a square peg in a round hole. There's a timey- wimey element that Williamson is definitely setting up as well. The reveal in issue 5 is actually kind of cool. I'm hoping the writing and art will tighten up in the next volume as the series has a lot of potential. Stjepan Šejić creates some awesome character designs. Unfortunately, he only drew the first 2 issues. Phillipe Briones did the next two and his art wasn't as polished as normal. Carmine Di Giandomenico draws the last issue and it's better than his typical acular artwork.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    By far the worse of the new JL titles. World: The art is not good, I love Sejic and he killed in Aquaman but the first two issues looked rushed, the line work was less detailed and the backgrounds looked simple and basic. The facial expressions were still there but Starfire’s hair is a perfect example of the lack of detail in the art and it’s not Sejic quality at all. The rest of the issues are just as bad they are bland and scratchy, with the last issue taking the cake. I know I don’t like the W By far the worse of the new JL titles. World: The art is not good, I love Sejic and he killed in Aquaman but the first two issues looked rushed, the line work was less detailed and the backgrounds looked simple and basic. The facial expressions were still there but Starfire’s hair is a perfect example of the lack of detail in the art and it’s not Sejic quality at all. The rest of the issues are just as bad they are bland and scratchy, with the last issue taking the cake. I know I don’t like the Williamson Flash art and this is that and wow is it every muddled and scratchy. The world building here is really suspect and takes a lot of logic leaps “because comics” and “because the writer wanted it” moments for this story to work. I don’t really know how to express it without spoilers but Grant Morrison already laid out very clearly where New Genesis and Apokolips existed outside of the DC Multiverse in “Multiversity” and that how there is only ONE even in the 52 DC universes, it’s canon, it’s established, it’s clearly known and talked about in DC books and most recently Dark Nights Metal also acknowledged it but now why is Williamson doing this entire premise with Darkseid that is completely different but also completely pointless? The problem with the world building is that this major fact is the anchor in which this entire book exists and it’s already wrong. Then there is the fact of the internal logic of how the Lost Sector works and how these new worlds works and the way time is portrayed in this new world and how it all works with the these ‘Old Gods’ that the book talks of. It’s all timey wimey bull that if written well would make internal logical sense, but it’s not here it is just a collection of half baked ideas that makes no sense at all and the world therefore is really just not created properly. Story: If the premise and the world itself does not make any sense how can the story make sense? Add to that the drive for the characters (which I’ll get to below) is spotty at best and you have a really poorly written book that barely makes any sense at all. The idea of a group entering the lost sector makes sense, it’s not difficult to imagine that JL sending a group into it to make sure it’s okay, same with the GL Corps, that makes sense but nope Williamson says that they are not allowed to enter and that only 1 sentry was set up outside the sector by the GL Corps...why?????? When they do enter, big surprise, the way they get in, the idea of what they do there and the Old Gods and the Darkseid stuff, all of it makes no sense. How does time work in there? Why are they worshiping these ‘Old Gods’ what does it tie together? It’s preposterous when you read the book, and it makes no sense that argh I don’t even want to talk about it. The dialog is bad, the world building is bad, the writing and pacing is bad, the premise is idiotic. This could have been a very straightforward adventure, action adventure space opera tale in a new and undiscovered sector, that would have been fun, but no...this book wants to be something more and grander and bigger than it should be without even doing the homework to set up this sector in the first place. I’ve said that Williamson is a bad writer and this is another example of it. Characters: Wow these characters don’t sound and act like themselves at all. I have had issue with Williamson in his writing for the Flash books and saying that those characters are off and not written correctly and this is the case here. Bringing this group of characters together was really spotty and iffy logically but let’s get past that and just listen to what words come out of their mouths and also the choices that they make in these 5 issues and you will want to rip the book apart. Cyborg is not like that, he’s not that dumb. John Paul Valley is not like that, he’s not that dumb. Jessica is not like that, she’s not that dumb. Kori is not like that she’s not that dumb. They are also not completely opposite of what they are as characters in all other books except this one. I hate this series, it’s poorly written, it’s not thought out properly, the world building is lazy and the character work is atrocious. Williamson is the new Lobdell of the DC (where Lobdell was racist and sexist...Williamson is just a lazy writer). Onward to the next book! *read individual issues*

  3. 5 out of 5

    Malum

    Decent start to DC's new cosmic book (and WAY better than Marvel's similar Asgardians of the Galaxy title). Just a few notes on this one: I like Darkseid's new look. I thought Azrael was super religious? He's running around like "I finally get my own worshippers, haha!". I don't know a ton about him, but this seems a little out of character from the little bit that I have read about him.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    This book was plagued with re-writes and re-draws even before it launched, which explains why this first volume isn't quite as strong as the other Justice League titles are right now. Cyborg, Starfire, Azrael, Jessica Cruz, and Darkseid find themselves in the middle of a millenia-long plot featuring all of the missing planets that were captured by Brainiac, and now only they can save the Ghost Sector and possibly the entire universe as well. It's a solid idea, and there's a lot more under the sur This book was plagued with re-writes and re-draws even before it launched, which explains why this first volume isn't quite as strong as the other Justice League titles are right now. Cyborg, Starfire, Azrael, Jessica Cruz, and Darkseid find themselves in the middle of a millenia-long plot featuring all of the missing planets that were captured by Brainiac, and now only they can save the Ghost Sector and possibly the entire universe as well. It's a solid idea, and there's a lot more under the surface, but it takes a while to get to it. It does feel like it's being made up as it goes along, and I think that's just a symptom of the book not getting to hit the ground running as it would have done if the behind-the-scenes stuff had been ironed out entirely to start with. The artwork's not bad, although Stejpan Sejic doesn't get to hang around quite as much as I'd have liked. Carmine Di Giandomenico is a good fit though, while Phillipe Briones does his best to keep up with the pair of them. Not a bad start, but definitely not reaching its potential just yet. I can confirm however that the current volume (which is about halfway through) is a vast improvement, so it's definitely worth sticking with it for now.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Great premise: The Justice League: No Justice series released a bunch of Ghost Worlds, and now some members of the Justice League need to explore them, out of guilt, loyalty, or desire to find home. Great setting: A whole sector of worlds previously lost to the galaxy. Great mystery: why were these precise worlds taken by the Coluans? And, from there, it pretty much falls apart. The Justice League is made up of C-grade heroes: Azrael, Cyborg, Starfire, and Green Lantern #6 (Jessica Bey). And they d Great premise: The Justice League: No Justice series released a bunch of Ghost Worlds, and now some members of the Justice League need to explore them, out of guilt, loyalty, or desire to find home. Great setting: A whole sector of worlds previously lost to the galaxy. Great mystery: why were these precise worlds taken by the Coluans? And, from there, it pretty much falls apart. The Justice League is made up of C-grade heroes: Azrael, Cyborg, Starfire, and Green Lantern #6 (Jessica Bey). And they don't really get much characterization. The worlds get even less detail than a one-note Star Wars planet. Darkseid, who was a big draw for this series as the fifth member, pretty much fades away. And then after five issues of pointless meandering we get a kinda dumb answer to our big mystery. The whole lots-of-Justice-Leagues idea was always a bit iffy, but this was worse than anticipated.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    Basic Plot: An odd conglomeration of JLA members heads into the Ghost Sector to find the source of a strange voice. This is an odd conglomeration of heroes, and they don't really gel together terribly well. They all have separate agendas, and Azrael is just obnoxious. Cyborg and Starfire work decently well, but Jessica Cruz just feels tacked on. The concept is good- Darkseid looking to bring back Apokolips, and using people to do so, but the execution isn't really coming together fully for me. Th Basic Plot: An odd conglomeration of JLA members heads into the Ghost Sector to find the source of a strange voice. This is an odd conglomeration of heroes, and they don't really gel together terribly well. They all have separate agendas, and Azrael is just obnoxious. Cyborg and Starfire work decently well, but Jessica Cruz just feels tacked on. The concept is good- Darkseid looking to bring back Apokolips, and using people to do so, but the execution isn't really coming together fully for me. The art is really quite good- vivid and detailed.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Roy

    I've become a Williamson fanboy so a bit biased with this. The art changing styles was annoying.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brian Poole

    Justice League Odyssey gets off to a much stronger start than its troubled launch might have suggested with The Ghost Sector. At the conclusion of No Justice, a collection of planets that had been miniaturized and hidden on the destroyed planet Colu were restored to normal size and pushed into a tight cluster, dubbed “The Ghost Sector.” Green Lantern Jessica Cruz guards the quarantined sector and follows when the heroes Cyborg, Starfire and Azrael go barreling through the radiation zone surroundi Justice League Odyssey gets off to a much stronger start than its troubled launch might have suggested with The Ghost Sector. At the conclusion of No Justice, a collection of planets that had been miniaturized and hidden on the destroyed planet Colu were restored to normal size and pushed into a tight cluster, dubbed “The Ghost Sector.” Green Lantern Jessica Cruz guards the quarantined sector and follows when the heroes Cyborg, Starfire and Azrael go barreling through the radiation zone surrounding the sector. The trio had been lured from Earth by an irresistible impulse that leads the heroes to the reborn Darkseid. He insists he wants to save the endangered multiverse, but proves elusive. The heroes make a rather startling discovery about their connection to the Ghost Sector and get enmeshed in local planetary skirmishes. Darkseid manipulates them from the shadows as the heroes discover the secret reason these planets had been locked away. The launch of Justice League Odyssey had been delayed by several months when editorial issues dictated that the creative team scrap a significant amount of already-completed material and start over. That could give potential readers pause, but with The Ghost Sector, writer Joshua Williamson makes the most of an oddball “Justice League in Space” concept to produce an appealing first arc. The book benefits from the friction of its random cast, a non-intuitive mix that winds up working better than it has any right to. This series provides a more natural leadership role for Cyborg and, in a nod to pre-New 52 history, acknowledges his long-time friendship with Starfire, who’s matured into a warrior in touch with her compassion. Out-of-his-element Azrael provides an agreeable X-factor, while Jessica Cruz has developed into a solid, steadying rock for this misfit non-team. Williamson devises a clever connection to the Sector that jolts the heroes, while deploying Darkseid as an operatic manipulator whose shadow looms over the quartet of heroes, even as his motivations emerge only slowly. This is a nice example of taking an unlikely group of characters and mixing them in a way that makes them a compelling whole. With new concepts and threats in the mix, Williamson is doing enough to keep the proceedings worth watching, with some potentially significant impacts for other books. One aspect of the delayed launch that has a significant impact is on the artists involved. Stjepan Sejic had been lined up for the entire first arc, but following the re-start was able to complete only two issues (providing his own inks and colors) before having to depart. And while this may not be peak Sejic, he’s always an interesting artist and sets the right visual tone for the book, getting the mix of horror-tinged sci-fi and space opera just right. His character work is expressive, even if the cast is prone to dramatic posing, and his design ideas are imaginative and mine Williamson’s plot for some fun visual riffs. Philippe Briones, working with colorist Jeremy Cox, plies a similar aesthetic on the next two issues, though not quite with the flair of Sejic. Carmine Di Giandomenico rounds out the arc, leaning more into the sci-fi aspects, which gives colorist Ivan Plascencia the opportunity to expand the issue’s palate beyond the darker, more muted colors of the earlier installments. The artwork is all interesting, but given the necessity of bringing in pinch hitters after Sejic’s departure, readers can’t help but wonder what the long-term look of the series will be. Even with some bumps and a few questions about its visual direction, The Ghost Sector establishes Justice League Odyssey as an agreeably odd book whose development bears watching.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    I feel a bit like the outlier in that I found Justice League Odyssey's first volume to be a great deal of fun. It reminded me a bit of Guardians of Galaxy, but with more ancient Gods and fewer scenes played for straight-up laughs. And it all made sense! Unexpected, I know. I think the fact that I recently finished Justice League: No Justice helped quite a bit. I can't imagine jumping into Justice League Odyssey with no background on why these random planets exist in the Ghost Sector or why all t I feel a bit like the outlier in that I found Justice League Odyssey's first volume to be a great deal of fun. It reminded me a bit of Guardians of Galaxy, but with more ancient Gods and fewer scenes played for straight-up laughs. And it all made sense! Unexpected, I know. I think the fact that I recently finished Justice League: No Justice helped quite a bit. I can't imagine jumping into Justice League Odyssey with no background on why these random planets exist in the Ghost Sector or why all the characters keep mentioning the destruction of Colu. In any case, the series revolves around Cyborg, Starfire, Azrael, and Jessica Cruz's Green Lantern, four heroes who I really know nothing about. Fortunately, their backstories are not required to understand the plot. Encountering Darkseid in the Ghost Sector, they learn that Cyborg, Starfire, and Azrael are worshiped as Gods by various cultures in the Ghost Sector. Darkseid also makes an ominous request of the heroes because he obviously has devious plans. Beautifully illustrated journeys to numerous cosmic destinations ensue as the heroes gradually come to terms with their strange place in the sector. And there's a less-than-surprising final issue revelation that certainly sets the next volume up for big things! I, for one, am looking forward to it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Beelzefuzz

    Allow me to recreate the experience of this book for you. Here are a bunch of characters that are terrible and they all go into outer space. The characters all stand around and tell you the plot for several pages. Now we need to move to a different location where plot just happened, but you don't need to see it, we will tell you about it with more dialogue instead. Oh what a twist, these C list characters are worshipped by an alien civilizations. I guess they have $1 bins in space, otherwise who wo Allow me to recreate the experience of this book for you. Here are a bunch of characters that are terrible and they all go into outer space. The characters all stand around and tell you the plot for several pages. Now we need to move to a different location where plot just happened, but you don't need to see it, we will tell you about it with more dialogue instead. Oh what a twist, these C list characters are worshipped by an alien civilizations. I guess they have $1 bins in space, otherwise who would have ever heard of these losers? More standing around and telling you the plot. Wait, did I say plot? None of that other stuff was coherent enough to matter really. Here comes the big reveal that was spoiled with the stilted dialogue from Darkseid in issue 1. Was that foreshadowing? No, that was broadcasting. Finally a little action. It is boring though, so let's hurry and move the characters to a new location where they can tell us some more events that may add to plot but probably will not. I just skimmed the last issue. I do not care anymore. Please get me out of here.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Fiction State Of Mind

    This series deals with the aftermath of DC comics Metal series. The galaxy is broken, Dangerous worlds are becoming free and Cyborg feels a call to go to them. He is joined by Starfire who is looking for her home planet, and a Green Lantern who is policing the sector that Cyborg and his crew want to enter. This series is an epic space yarn and I love it! Seeing different characters working together and all the characters that make up DC's galactic pantheon is really enjoyable. Coyer Scavenger Hun This series deals with the aftermath of DC comics Metal series. The galaxy is broken, Dangerous worlds are becoming free and Cyborg feels a call to go to them. He is joined by Starfire who is looking for her home planet, and a Green Lantern who is policing the sector that Cyborg and his crew want to enter. This series is an epic space yarn and I love it! Seeing different characters working together and all the characters that make up DC's galactic pantheon is really enjoyable. Coyer Scavenger Hunt Read a Book with a weapon on the cover 1 pt

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jaron | TheBookBaron

    2.5

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    A dull and unconvincing story, starring characters who spout really, really bad one liners, and a particularly bad showing from an artist I normally really like. This just doesn't work.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Butcher

    Not really a Justice League team per say. Honestly, it's a fine cosmic story, but maybe the mix of heroes falls a little flat for my tastes.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Westen

    3.5

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Cyborg, Starfire, and Azrael head into the mysterious Ghost Sector, picking up Green Lantern Jessica Cruz along the way and one other not-quite-ally Darkseid. Some of these characters are being worshipped as gods for some unknown reason by various peoples in the Ghost Sector, and there's generally the mystery of what Darkseid wants. It's a decent start but doesn't seem to go very far.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Steve Schafer

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rayfield

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tjavierb

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sameh Magdy

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ben Dorris

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dameon

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  24. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nick Zinn

  26. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  27. 4 out of 5

    Damion Palmertree

  28. 5 out of 5

    G

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nick Zambrano

  30. 4 out of 5

    Zach

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