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Carter Reads the Newspaper

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“Carter G. Woodson didn’t just read history. He changed it.” As the father of Black History Month, he spent his life introducing others to the history of his people. Carter G. Woodson was born to two formerly enslaved people ten years after the end of the Civil War. Though his father could not read, he believed in being an informed citizen. So Carter read the ne “Carter G. Woodson didn’t just read history. He changed it.” As the father of Black History Month, he spent his life introducing others to the history of his people. Carter G. Woodson was born to two formerly enslaved people ten years after the end of the Civil War. Though his father could not read, he believed in being an informed citizen. So Carter read the newspaper to him every day. When he was still a teenager, Carter went to work in the coal mines. There he met a man named Oliver Jones, and Oliver did something important: he asked Carter not only to read to him and the other miners, but also research and find more information on the subjects that interested them. “My interest in penetrating the past of my people was deepened,” Carter wrote. His journey would take him many more years, traveling around the world and transforming the way people thought about history. From an award-winning team of author Deborah Hopkinson and illustrator Don Tate, this first-ever picture book biography of Carter G. Woodson emphasizes the importance of pursuing curiosity and encouraging a hunger for knowledge of stories and histories that have not been told. Illustrations also feature brief biological sketches of important figures from African and African-American history.


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“Carter G. Woodson didn’t just read history. He changed it.” As the father of Black History Month, he spent his life introducing others to the history of his people. Carter G. Woodson was born to two formerly enslaved people ten years after the end of the Civil War. Though his father could not read, he believed in being an informed citizen. So Carter read the ne “Carter G. Woodson didn’t just read history. He changed it.” As the father of Black History Month, he spent his life introducing others to the history of his people. Carter G. Woodson was born to two formerly enslaved people ten years after the end of the Civil War. Though his father could not read, he believed in being an informed citizen. So Carter read the newspaper to him every day. When he was still a teenager, Carter went to work in the coal mines. There he met a man named Oliver Jones, and Oliver did something important: he asked Carter not only to read to him and the other miners, but also research and find more information on the subjects that interested them. “My interest in penetrating the past of my people was deepened,” Carter wrote. His journey would take him many more years, traveling around the world and transforming the way people thought about history. From an award-winning team of author Deborah Hopkinson and illustrator Don Tate, this first-ever picture book biography of Carter G. Woodson emphasizes the importance of pursuing curiosity and encouraging a hunger for knowledge of stories and histories that have not been told. Illustrations also feature brief biological sketches of important figures from African and African-American history.

30 review for Carter Reads the Newspaper

  1. 4 out of 5

    La Coccinelle

    I love it when picture books teach me things. Carter Reads the Newspaper is a picture-book biography of Carter G. Woodson, the man who created Black History Month. It's an interesting look at the importance of celebrating your history, even if it isn't included in the official narrative. The book talks about Woodson's life from his childhood up until 1926 when he was trying to spread the word about Negro History Week (which would later become Black History Month). His idea was spurred by on/>Carter I love it when picture books teach me things. Carter Reads the Newspaper is a picture-book biography of Carter G. Woodson, the man who created Black History Month. It's an interesting look at the importance of celebrating your history, even if it isn't included in the official narrative. The book talks about Woodson's life from his childhood up until 1926 when he was trying to spread the word about Negro History Week (which would later become Black History Month). His idea was spurred by one of Woodson's Harvard professors who told him that black people had no history. When Woodson argued that they did, the professor challenged him to prove him wrong... and Woodson spent the rest of his life doing just that. The illustrations are quite nice here, with the theme of the newspaper running throughout; some of the backgrounds feature soft, faded newsprint with washes of colour. On the endpapers are little portraits of a number of black leaders; mini biographies are included for these people at the back of the book. This book would be great for the classroom, or for any kid who enjoys learning about history. I wouldn't necessarily recommend it just to black kids, either; Woodson is an important and inspiring figure that everyone could benefit from learning about. Thank you to NetGalley and Peachtree Publishers for providing a digital ARC.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    Who was Carter G. Woodson? Why was he important? Woodson was the son of slaves. He strongly wanted an education but he was only able to attend school four months out of the year. When he was just a teen, he had to forego education and go to work in the coal mines. But while he was there, he began to read the newspaper to the miners, and he learned about the world from researching what he learned from the papers and the discussions held around what they learned from the papers.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I am grateful for these NF picture books telling us readers about the history we did not know before. This time, I'm sharing about the man who sowed the seeds of Black History Month by creating Negro History Week (2nd week of February) in 1926. They chose that week because it encompassed the birthdays of Frederick Douglas and Abraham Lincoln. Sadly, I admit that although I was in school long after that year, I don't remember anyone celebrating that week. It became official in 1976, but the firs I am grateful for these NF picture books telling us readers about the history we did not know before. This time, I'm sharing about the man who sowed the seeds of Black History Month by creating Negro History Week (2nd week of February) in 1926. They chose that week because it encompassed the birthdays of Frederick Douglas and Abraham Lincoln. Sadly, I admit that although I was in school long after that year, I don't remember anyone celebrating that week. It became official in 1976, but the first celebration occurred in 1970 at Kent State. That information and more can be found if you look further on Wikipedia. Thanks to Deborah Hopkinson and Don Tate for telling this inspiring story in their new picture book. Carter was the second African-American to earn a Ph.D. in history from Harvard University. (The first was W.E.B. DuBois.) He was the first and only Black American whose parents had been slaves to receive a doctorate in history. That reference to Woodson's education is really the "middle" of his life. He was born in 1875, ten years after the end of the Civil War. His parents had been slaves, scrapped together money for a small piece of land, made sure that Carter and his siblings got as much education as possible. Carter learned to read and when scraps of newspapers were found (sometimes wrapped around food), he read them to his father. His father loved that part, but Carter also remembered the family stories, too. He had to stop work to help the family, went to work in the mines and there met a man named Oliver Jones, and Oliver did something important: he asked Carter not only to read to him and the other miners, but also research and find more information on the subjects that interested them. “My interest in penetrating the past of my people was deepened,” Carter wrote. His curiosity and persistence led him back out of the mines, back to school and onward. One professor at Harvard told him that Black people had no history. According to this book, Carter spoke up. "No people lacked a history," he said. The professor challenged Carter to prove him wrong. For the rest of his life, Carter did just that. In addition to showing Carter's life story, Don Tate includes illustrations of important figures from African and African-American history, sometimes adding newsprint to the pages that echo the theme that underpins Carter's life story. Early in the book, there are a few stories from Carter's family, too, about his father and his mother. It's an illuminating book that I wish I'd had at the beginning of the month, to start a search for stories of more African-Americans. It certainly is a book that will inspire further research by readers to know more. There is an author’s note, illustrator’s note, resources, and a bibliography.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Carla Johnson-Hicks

    Carter Reads the Newspaper is the story of Carter G. Woodson, written for children. It is a picture-book biography of Carter G. Woodson, the man who created Black History Month. He was born to two former slaves and would read the newspaper to his illiterate father. His father knew how important it was to be an informed citizen. Woodson’s needed to go to work to help support his family, so did not attend high school as a teen. While working in the mines he met a man named Oliver Jones, Carter Reads the Newspaper is the story of Carter G. Woodson, written for children. It is a picture-book biography of Carter G. Woodson, the man who created Black History Month. He was born to two former slaves and would read the newspaper to his illiterate father. His father knew how important it was to be an informed citizen. Woodson’s needed to go to work to help support his family, so did not attend high school as a teen. While working in the mines he met a man named Oliver Jones, who was also illiterate. Like many former slaves, and civil war veterans, he valued learning and held meetings in his home to discuss current events. Carter attended and became a valuable part of this group because he could read the newspaper and research for them. Eventually continuing his education, he earned a PhD in history from Harvard. It was there that he met a professor who stated that Black People had no history. When Woodson argued that they did, the professor challenged him to prove him wrong. This motivated Carter to spend the rest of his life doing just that. Carter G. Woodson established what was then called Negro History Week in 1926, which eventually became Black History Month, a project that helped make Black history accessible to a non-academic audience. Woodson’s relationship to newspapers anchors Hopkinson’s book. This picture book has a lot of text and because of that I think it is more appropriate for middle grades (ages 9 and up). The illustrations are quite nice with the theme of the newspaper running throughout. There is also a lot of information in the end pages including resources to learn more about Carter G. Woodson and other important Black Americans in U.S. history. This book would be a great addition to classroom, school and public libraries. A great resource for Black History month. The publisher generously provided me with a copy of this book upon my request. The rating, ideas and opinions shared are my own.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jana

    This awesome picture book biography will help young readers appreciate the man who helped people understand that all kinds of people make history and that everyone's story matters. Carter G. Woodson was born in 1875 to parents who had been enslaved. While the Civil War was over, life was difficult for former slaves. Because everyone in the family had to work so hard, getting an education was not easy. When he read newspapers to friends and family, he began to realize that everyone's story wasn't This awesome picture book biography will help young readers appreciate the man who helped people understand that all kinds of people make history and that everyone's story matters. Carter G. Woodson was born in 1875 to parents who had been enslaved. While the Civil War was over, life was difficult for former slaves. Because everyone in the family had to work so hard, getting an education was not easy. When he read newspapers to friends and family, he began to realize that everyone's story wasn't being told. He made it his life's work to study history and make sure that everyone learned of the contributions to the world made by African Americans. Well-researched and written in kid-friendly text, this book also has endnotes and a list of resources for further research at the back of the book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lin Lin

    Carter Woodson, the founding father of Black History Month, reads the newspaper to learn about and change the world. Curious why he didn't learn enough about the history of African Americans, he started the Black History Week, and later becoming the Black History Month. My favorite quote from Carter G. Woodson (1944), "the teaching of the whole truth will help us in the direction of a real democracy."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Vern

    Great informative book about a man I had not heard of before. It is a bit wordy for Storytime but would be excellent for a book report for younger aged kids.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Walz

    This is an amazing book with tells of a man who changed the world. Every year in my memory I celebrate something that he started and I never knew it! Not only in reading this book did I learned about someone who changed the world, it has beautiful illustrations. I also love how the author told his story, by including stories of important people in Carter’s life.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jacqui

    Illustrations on the end pages are an extra addition. So is the back matter.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sandy Brehl

    Author Hopkinson and illustrator Tate have produced an important new picture book that suits any age. The tag line says it all, yet not nearly enough: "Carter G. Woodson didn't just study history. He changed it." I've been grateful, as a citizen and as an educator, for Black History Month. It's a resource and reminder of the countless contributions of Black men and women to the advancement of ALL people. Even so, I have long been concerned that the many resources, especially picture books, Author Hopkinson and illustrator Tate have produced an important new picture book that suits any age. The tag line says it all, yet not nearly enough: "Carter G. Woodson didn't just study history. He changed it." I've been grateful, as a citizen and as an educator, for Black History Month. It's a resource and reminder of the countless contributions of Black men and women to the advancement of ALL people. Even so, I have long been concerned that the many resources, especially picture books, will be relegated to a cabinet or back shelf once the month ends. This is a story of how Woodson (Carter) made it his life's work to develop literacy and Black history into an annual celebration. His passion for history grew from a childhood in which the legacy of enslavement, including illiteracy, was evident among Carter's own family and friends. The hardships he suffered as a child are heartbreaking, including being injured in a mine accident. He pursued his own education at every opportunity, despite severe adversity. In 1926, as a history professor, he was able to establish a national Black History Week, the origins of our present monthlong designation. This book is rich with images, names, dates, and taglines for both well-known and less famous Black innovators and leaders, as well as providing an author's note, bibliography, resources, and more. After reading this valuable biography of Woodson as a leader among his family and eventually for us all, I will temper my concerns about a designated "month" potentially limiting attention to neglected history-makers. Instead, I'll celebrate Woodson's leadership and encourage the reading and sharing of this book. Perhaps that alone will remind others to keep Black History books circulating all year long.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    First sentence: Each February we celebrate Black History Month. It's a time to honor heroes like Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks, and Martin Luther King, Jr. But there's one hero we sometimes forget. Carter G. Woodson didn't help people escape from slavery, start a bus strike, or lead a movement of millions. Yet without him, we might not have Black History Month. This is his story. Premise/plot: Carter Reads the Newspaper is a biographical picture book of Carter G. Woodson. Carter grew up First sentence: Each February we celebrate Black History Month. It's a time to honor heroes like Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks, and Martin Luther King, Jr. But there's one hero we sometimes forget. Carter G. Woodson didn't help people escape from slavery, start a bus strike, or lead a movement of millions. Yet without him, we might not have Black History Month. This is his story. Premise/plot: Carter Reads the Newspaper is a biographical picture book of Carter G. Woodson. Carter grew up hearing stories from his mom and dad about slavery--both of his parents were slaves. He worked hard; he valued education. But nothing came easy for him. That high school education he longed for was only possibly after several years of working in a coal mine. While working as a miner, he was encouraged and inspired by a fellow miner even though he couldn't read or write. Since he knew how to read, he helped others stay informed and continue to learn. He went on to get his education--even a doctorate in history. Once he was challenged by a professor that that was no such thing as black history--Carter knew he was wrong. He was determined to "prove" his people had a history worth knowing, worth studying, worth celebrating. My thoughts: I'd not heard of Carter G. Woodson before. This was an absolutely LOVELY way to meet him. What a legacy he left behind! I enjoyed this one so much. Text: 5 out of 5 Illustrations: 5 out of 5 Total: 10 out of 10

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    Picture Book Biography. I had not heard the name Carter Woodson, but I did hear a lot about this book. Woodson was the son of former slaves, born in Virginia ten years after the Civil War ended. He grew up hearing about the trials his parents had faced as slaves. He was one of seven children, and though he had a thirst for knowledge he was only able to attend school four months a year. He delayed high school attendance to work in the mines. He eventually went back not only to high school, but al Picture Book Biography. I had not heard the name Carter Woodson, but I did hear a lot about this book. Woodson was the son of former slaves, born in Virginia ten years after the Civil War ended. He grew up hearing about the trials his parents had faced as slaves. He was one of seven children, and though he had a thirst for knowledge he was only able to attend school four months a year. He delayed high school attendance to work in the mines. He eventually went back not only to high school, but all the way through graduate school. While earning his PhD at Harvard, he was confronted with the statement that black people had no history. Woodson set out to prove him wrong and became the father of Black History Month. An interesting part of this story was the distinction between having the ability to read and having an interest in the text contained in newspapers and books. Carter had both, and he shared the content of various texts with his family and friends around him that had the interest but not the ability. This book could obviously be used at the start of February, but also to discuss treatment of black people through history, how history is selective on whose story is told, and why it is important to learn to read. Well written and beautifully illustrated with sketches of famous historical and contemporary black figures throughout.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    “The teaching of the whole truth will help us in the direction of a real democracy.” Carter G. Woodson, the man who gave us Black History Month, is highlighted in this narrative nonfiction book. Born in 1875 to former slaves, Carter “grew up hearing about their [his parents’] lives.” He was raised to understand that education and being an informed citizen was important. Carter would often read the newspaper to his father. As he grew, he continued hearing the stories of other African A “The teaching of the whole truth will help us in the direction of a real democracy.” Carter G. Woodson, the man who gave us Black History Month, is highlighted in this narrative nonfiction book. Born in 1875 to former slaves, Carter “grew up hearing about their [his parents’] lives.” He was raised to understand that education and being an informed citizen was important. Carter would often read the newspaper to his father. As he grew, he continued hearing the stories of other African Americans. “My interest in penetrating the past of my people was deepened.” Carter became the 2nd African American to graduate from Harvard University. While at Harvard, Carter was told by a professor that “Black people had no history.” And it became his life’s mission to prove those professors wrong. Includes a bibliography for further reading and a timeline. Also included throughout the book in the illustrations are 40+ prominent African Americans.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    I received an electronic ARC from Peachtree Publishing via Netgalley. A biography of Carter G. Woodson for elementary level readers. Hopkinson tells his story from childhood through working to establish Negro History Week - the forerunner of Black History Month. He was the son of former slaves who believed in education. He was not able to attend much school as a child and youth but found ways to learn. One venue was reading newspapers to himself and others. The illustrations bring his story I received an electronic ARC from Peachtree Publishing via Netgalley. A biography of Carter G. Woodson for elementary level readers. Hopkinson tells his story from childhood through working to establish Negro History Week - the forerunner of Black History Month. He was the son of former slaves who believed in education. He was not able to attend much school as a child and youth but found ways to learn. One venue was reading newspapers to himself and others. The illustrations bring his story to life. They draw the reader into Woodson's world. Don't miss the various leaders drawn throughout the book (index at the end as well). The text is for a middle level elementary reader. It concisely tells about Woodson's life. Additional information included at the end of the book - Life timeline, citations for quotes, list of those included in the illustrations. Would make a good read aloud for older elementary level.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Erin Buhr

    I have celebrated Black History Month for over 3 decades but this was the first time I ever learned anything about Carter G. Woodson the Father of Black History. Born to slaves and the second Black American to ever graduate from Harvard with a PhD in History, Carter had a remarkable life. Carter is a testament to what can be accomplished with curiosity, intelligence and determination. When a professor at Harvard challenged him to prove that black people did indeed have a history, Carter made it I have celebrated Black History Month for over 3 decades but this was the first time I ever learned anything about Carter G. Woodson the Father of Black History. Born to slaves and the second Black American to ever graduate from Harvard with a PhD in History, Carter had a remarkable life. Carter is a testament to what can be accomplished with curiosity, intelligence and determination. When a professor at Harvard challenged him to prove that black people did indeed have a history, Carter made it his life's work. Readable, illustrated with lovely texture, and a true celebration of Black History, this is a wonderful book to share with children every February and have on your shelves all year round.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Reshamad

    Children's picture book biography of Carter Woodson, the father of Black History Month. Carter was fortunate to have had a father who taught Carter to read. And although Carter never got to finish school when he was young, he understood the importance of written word. Carter learnt about world events from the newspapers that he read to people around him. Later in life, Carter pursued his PhD and learnt that there were no books telling the black history. He knew he had to correct this and in Children's picture book biography of Carter Woodson, the father of Black History Month. Carter was fortunate to have had a father who taught Carter to read. And although Carter never got to finish school when he was young, he understood the importance of written word. Carter learnt about world events from the newspapers that he read to people around him. Later in life, Carter pursued his PhD and learnt that there were no books telling the black history. He knew he had to correct this and inspired the Black History month. A great read and well told. The illustrations in the book are beautiful!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

    Picture book biography on the early life of Carter Woodson. Woodson is most known for his fight against the idea that African Americans have no history and his establishment of black history week and later month. This is a great story of his life told for young independent readers. Tate's warm and friendly illustrations make it inviting. The Black leaders pictured throughout the book have labels and short descriptions in the back. Includes timeline. Smart features like this only enhance this bio Picture book biography on the early life of Carter Woodson. Woodson is most known for his fight against the idea that African Americans have no history and his establishment of black history week and later month. This is a great story of his life told for young independent readers. Tate's warm and friendly illustrations make it inviting. The Black leaders pictured throughout the book have labels and short descriptions in the back. Includes timeline. Smart features like this only enhance this biography. Needed in all public and school libraries. Must purchase. Thank you, NetGalley for a copy of this book for review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sue Poduska

    Do you ever wonder why we celebrate Black History Month? The contributions of African Americans and other groups have often been ignored or even actively covered up. So, if you really want to learn about history, highlighting this group becomes important. In his pursuit of his heritage, Carter G. Woodson became part of that heritage. In this beautiful new book, the author and illustrator reveal Carter's struggle to learn and encourage the reader to become part of the struggle too. I can’t recomm Do you ever wonder why we celebrate Black History Month? The contributions of African Americans and other groups have often been ignored or even actively covered up. So, if you really want to learn about history, highlighting this group becomes important. In his pursuit of his heritage, Carter G. Woodson became part of that heritage. In this beautiful new book, the author and illustrator reveal Carter's struggle to learn and encourage the reader to become part of the struggle too. I can’t recommend this book highly enough.

  19. 4 out of 5

    QueenAmidala28

    Illustrations: The people have oblong faces but the clothing looks historically accurate. The colors appear muted in a way. Nothing stands out. Story: great storyline. I love the additional timeline after the book that includes other important African American leaders that we should all know. The pages are sort of long so if you have a young one who likes to turn the pages this book may be a little hard to turn. Sentences are long and there are paragraphs to go with the illustrations. Maybe seco Illustrations: The people have oblong faces but the clothing looks historically accurate. The colors appear muted in a way. Nothing stands out. Story: great storyline. I love the additional timeline after the book that includes other important African American leaders that we should all know. The pages are sort of long so if you have a young one who likes to turn the pages this book may be a little hard to turn. Sentences are long and there are paragraphs to go with the illustrations. Maybe second grade and up?

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rcltigger

    4.5 Stars. Loved this book! Carter G. Woodson was the son of slaves, who grew up to be the second African American to get a doctorate from Harvard University (and the first to get a doctorate in history). While at Harvard, one of his professors said that "black people had no history" and later challenged Carter to prove him wrong. And prove him wrong he did! Carter G. Woodson established Negro History Week (later Black History Month) and today we know him as the Father of Black History. A g 4.5 Stars. Loved this book! Carter G. Woodson was the son of slaves, who grew up to be the second African American to get a doctorate from Harvard University (and the first to get a doctorate in history). While at Harvard, one of his professors said that "black people had no history" and later challenged Carter to prove him wrong. And prove him wrong he did! Carter G. Woodson established Negro History Week (later Black History Month) and today we know him as the Father of Black History. A great story, and one that deserves to be shared widely. Highly recommended.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lorie Barber

    LOVE LOVE LOVE this wonderful picture book about the history of Black History Month and its founder, Dr. Carter Woodson. And, no, it’s not just for reading during BHM, because stories about BIPOC must be read all year long so we no longer assume a single narrative about oppressed groups of people. My kids are learning about Reconstruction and were fully engaged in Woodson’s story of courage and perseverance.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

    The book really emphasizes how a community that valued reading (though many of them had been kept from learning to read) and knowing and understanding what was going on in the world raised, encouraged, and shaped Woodson--leading him to the interests and education that he pursued, building up his conviction that his people had a history. The book felt like it ended a little abruptly if you're looking for a history of Black History Month, but that's not really what this is; it's about The book really emphasizes how a community that valued reading (though many of them had been kept from learning to read) and knowing and understanding what was going on in the world raised, encouraged, and shaped Woodson--leading him to the interests and education that he pursued, building up his conviction that his people had a history. The book felt like it ended a little abruptly if you're looking for a history of Black History Month, but that's not really what this is; it's about Carter Woodson, and it's a pretty natural direction for his story. The use of newspaper in the illustrations is really fantastic. I really liked the illustrations of important Black leaders throughout this book, including on the end pages. There's a list of all of them with a brief description in the end notes.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I love reading about historical figures I never knew before, and this picture book fits the bill. Carter read the newspaper to learn about his world and share it with others. He was the founder of Black History Month, and is finally recognized in this text. The front and back matter are amazing; don’t forget to read the author’s note and further research opportunities.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rick Mccray

    I really enjoyed this book. I learned some new information about Carter G. Woodson (like the amazing fact that his father escaped the horrors of slavery to fight for the Union Army and bought land just ten years out of slavery). I lovvedd the pictures--they were simple, interesting and engaged my kids! Thank you for this book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Susanna Hargreaves

    This book taught me the incredible story of Carter G. Woodson and how he ensured we know the history of America’s greatest black leaders. This would be a great book for kindergarten through sixth grade. However, I enjoyed it as well. A great book for Black History Month. It also shares how someone born with little had the desire to learn and achieve and help others.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jamila

    Don Tate’s illustrations wonderfully underscore the beauty and power of reading about Black culture and history. I appreciate learning about Woodson’s parents’ stories. Our ancestors are watching. We serve, learn and teach for them and for our futures. This picture book biography reinforces that affirming philosophy.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    This is a wonderful biography of Carter G. Woodson, the man who helped found Black History Month. How fitting that I read it on the very last day of this month! Carter’s story will inspire young readers. I was so impressed by his determination to become educated, even in the face of so many obstacles.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Yapha

    An important addition to your picture book biographies! Use it with your younger readers to introduce Black History Month and with your older readers to start a discussion about who writes history and who decides what is included. Highly recommended for grades 2 and up.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Garland

    Carter G. Woodson was the first and only Black American whose parents had been slaves to receive a doctorate. This story is about what he did with his life to find, preserve, and share the truth about American history, establishing Black History Month.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marcie

    I enjoyed mostly because I knew about the Carter Woodson Award and a few years ago remember reading a biography for a much older audience. This one would make a fine read aloud for biography break or during black history month.

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