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Girl Gone Viral

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For seventeen-year-old Opal Hopper, code is magic. She builds entire worlds from scratch: Mars craters, shimmering lakes, any virtual experience her heart desires. But she can't code her dad back into her life. When he disappeared after her tenth birthday, leaving only a cryptic note, Opal tried desperately to find him. And when he never turned up, she enrolled at a boardin For seventeen-year-old Opal Hopper, code is magic. She builds entire worlds from scratch: Mars craters, shimmering lakes, any virtual experience her heart desires. But she can't code her dad back into her life. When he disappeared after her tenth birthday, leaving only a cryptic note, Opal tried desperately to find him. And when he never turned up, she enrolled at a boarding school for technical prodigies and tried to forget. Until now. Because WAVE, the world's biggest virtual reality platform, has announced a contest where the winner gets to meet its billionaire founder. The same billionaire who worked closely with Opal's dad. The one she always believed might know where he went. The one who maybe even murdered him. What begins as a small data hack to win the contest spirals out of control when Opal goes viral, digging her deeper into a hole of lies, hacks, and manipulation. How far will Opal go for the answers--or is it the attention--she's wanted for years?


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For seventeen-year-old Opal Hopper, code is magic. She builds entire worlds from scratch: Mars craters, shimmering lakes, any virtual experience her heart desires. But she can't code her dad back into her life. When he disappeared after her tenth birthday, leaving only a cryptic note, Opal tried desperately to find him. And when he never turned up, she enrolled at a boardin For seventeen-year-old Opal Hopper, code is magic. She builds entire worlds from scratch: Mars craters, shimmering lakes, any virtual experience her heart desires. But she can't code her dad back into her life. When he disappeared after her tenth birthday, leaving only a cryptic note, Opal tried desperately to find him. And when he never turned up, she enrolled at a boarding school for technical prodigies and tried to forget. Until now. Because WAVE, the world's biggest virtual reality platform, has announced a contest where the winner gets to meet its billionaire founder. The same billionaire who worked closely with Opal's dad. The one she always believed might know where he went. The one who maybe even murdered him. What begins as a small data hack to win the contest spirals out of control when Opal goes viral, digging her deeper into a hole of lies, hacks, and manipulation. How far will Opal go for the answers--or is it the attention--she's wanted for years?

30 review for Girl Gone Viral

  1. 5 out of 5

    Emma Giordano

    I received a copy of this book from Penguin Teen. I had no obligation to read or review this book and all opinions are my own.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kathy - Books & Munches

    > GAMES?! > Ready Player One-twist?! > GAAAAMES?! Like, I loved Warcross, Wildcard AND Ready Player One so I can only assume I'd love this one as well. On the TBR you go, dearie!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Adah Udechukwu

    Girl Gone Viral was disappointing. It started well and then it went downhill. The novel lost it's compelling edge. I actually expected a lot from the title.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amelia

    Ahhh slow paced book with a disappointing ending but very realistic characters and interesting concept = mixed feelings. When it comes to the characters, they are amazing. They are so realistic and I couldn't help but root for them, to feel their pain, to want them to succeed, to like them despite their mistakes. All of them were so. good. Opal was definitely an interesting MC because she was neither good nor bad. She made some questionable choices but you could understand why she did those thin Ahhh slow paced book with a disappointing ending but very realistic characters and interesting concept = mixed feelings. When it comes to the characters, they are amazing. They are so realistic and I couldn't help but root for them, to feel their pain, to want them to succeed, to like them despite their mistakes. All of them were so. good. Opal was definitely an interesting MC because she was neither good nor bad. She made some questionable choices but you could understand why she did those things. Secondary characters were layered as well and I liked all of them. Another thing I liked is the world building. The book is set in the future where technology is far more advanced and people are basically online 24/7 and everything is "tracked, filmed, shared, posted..". It's slightly scary but fascinating. But unfortunately, that's all I liked about this book. The plot starts out interesting enough - the author sets the main mystery and a couple of other plot lines. Unfortunately, none of them come through. The ending was very underwhelming and disappointing. I had dozens of crazy theories but it turned out bland and I was not impressed. There was also a bit of an open ending so you don't even know what the characters did with their lives - what they chose to do or anything. I was very frustrated to say the least XD Even though the plot moved very slowly, I wasn't bored because it was interesting enough learning about their world and seeing how these characters dealt with their problems. And yet...I can't give it more than 3 stars because the ending was so bad and it felt like I spent all this time reading it for nothing -.-

  5. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    3.5 stars. I really enjoyed the first 2/3 of this, thought it. Was a 5 star read but I found the last third to be an anti climax and felt a bit let down and disappointed.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Noha Badawi

    Thanks a million for Penguin Random House International for sending me an advance reader copy.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lindsi (Do You Dog-ear?)

    "Fairness is a rubber band, and the longer you stretch it--the more you rely on its elasticity--the more it stings when it snaps." I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. My thoughts and opinions are my own. Any quotes I use are from an unpublished copy and may not reflect the finished product. I really dislike it when books end without actually ending. Girl Gone Viral would have received a higher rating from me, if something had been resolved at its conclusion. We s "Fairness is a rubber band, and the longer you stretch it--the more you rely on its elasticity--the more it stings when it snaps." I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. My thoughts and opinions are my own. Any quotes I use are from an unpublished copy and may not reflect the finished product. I really dislike it when books end without actually ending. Girl Gone Viral would have received a higher rating from me, if something had been resolved at its conclusion. We spend the entire book with Opal, a girl that has struggled with the disappearance of her father, as she tries to fight for answers. However, once she learns the truth, the story just stops. I wanted to know what she did with that information, and how it impacted what the world thought to be true. Opal set a lot of things in motion, and she was a catalyst for world's current political upheaval. She inadvertently made people acknowledge a truth they were afraid to admit to themselves. It has the world hurdling down a dangerous path, but the story stops before we see the consequences of her actions. Again. I really liked the scientific aspect of the story, and it was never too hard to follow. Although, there were some jokes and references that went over my head. I understood that they were being funny, and that's all that really mattered. It was also interesting to see how the world could potentially function with advanced technology. What would a world look like if robots were our doctors, drivers, and police force? What if we took bias and emotion out of the equation? I'm sure that it would be beneficial in some scenarios, but it's also a little scary in others. Empathy is a large part of what makes us human, and it's not really possible for a robot to perceive the world in the same way. I enjoyed Arvin Ahmadi's writing, and really liked reading this book, but I feel like he set me up for disappointment. I was really invested in the mystery surrounding Opal's father and his disappearance, and thought there would have been more resolution at the end. When she finally gets answers, the information doesn't fall perfectly into place. There were still jagged holes that never get addressed. Also, I felt like the author made a really big deal about her college admissions essay, but then it stopped being important. She was having a lot of trouble with the prompt, and even missed getting her application in for early consideration. A few months later, Moyo brings up her application (because even he knows that she hasn't been able to finish it), and she tells him that it's already been completed and submitted. When did that happen? It felt like a really big deal, and then it wasn't. Another issue I had was the author's use of real late night talk show hosts. I'm very familiar with most of them, and his versions didn't really match up with the personalities I've experienced for myself. It's also supposed to be set in the future, and it felt weird to have Jimmy Fallon and James Cordon mentioned throughout the book. Seth Meyers played an even larger role, and it just felt wrong somehow. I wish the author had created his own late night talk show hosts, and feel like it would have made the story more believable. Opal is a very self-absorbed and unapologetically selfish character, but I still enjoyed reading the book from her perspective. She's intelligent and driven, but easy to manipulate and quick to throw her friends under the bus. I dislike people that are willing to use their friends to further their personal goals, and would have liked a more considerate and thoughtful Opal. Moyo is their moral compass, but no one listens to him, and he easily succumbs to peer pressure. Shane is the wild card of their group, and it's clear that he's struggling with more than we're shown. I have no idea why they were friends, when it was clear Opal was self-serving, Moyo wanted to live without sacrificing his beliefs, and Shane had more issues than he was willing to share with everyone else. Girl Gone Viral was a quick read that left me feeling mostly disappointed. There is very little resolution at the end, and the characters were unlikable and only show what's on the surface. I would have liked for the author to expand more on the characters, and the mystery surrounding Opal's father. Also, Opal has a nonexistent relationship with her mother that wasn't fully explained, especially since her mother wanted to be a part of her daughter's life. Opal's causal cruelty was unwarranted, and I wish she had been a more relatable character. Other things worth mentioning: There's an unnecessary romance and something that resembles a love triangle. Opal should have stood up for herself and her friends. There were very few adults in this book (even though it takes place on a school campus), and the few that were mentioned were creepy as hell. This review can also be found at Do You Dog-ear? on May 24, 2019.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    *4.5 stars* I would have given this a full five star rating if the ending wasn't so rushed. The rest of the book was paced very well, was highly entertaining, and easy to read. The characters were so fun to get to know! Each character was so interesting and very unique. Also, this book dealt with mental health which I was not expecting! I felt that this story had very accurate representation of mental illness. I would highly recommend this book to everyone! It comes out in May so be sure to get y *4.5 stars* I would have given this a full five star rating if the ending wasn't so rushed. The rest of the book was paced very well, was highly entertaining, and easy to read. The characters were so fun to get to know! Each character was so interesting and very unique. Also, this book dealt with mental health which I was not expecting! I felt that this story had very accurate representation of mental illness. I would highly recommend this book to everyone! It comes out in May so be sure to get your hands on a copy! *I won an advanced readers copy of this book from a Goodreads giveaway*

  9. 4 out of 5

    Carien

    I wanted a bit more nuance to the messages this story contains.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    This book was a rollercoaster. It took me a little while to get used to the technologies, but once I was immersed into it all, I really loved it, the discussions surrounding technologies, the central presence of complex friendships and the mystery at its heart, too. A very entertaining read! Read my full review of Girl Gone Viral on the blog. Thank you to Penguin Random House International and Bookworms Unite PH for sending me the e-ARC of this book and allowing me to take part in the INTL blog to This book was a rollercoaster. It took me a little while to get used to the technologies, but once I was immersed into it all, I really loved it, the discussions surrounding technologies, the central presence of complex friendships and the mystery at its heart, too. A very entertaining read! Read my full review of Girl Gone Viral on the blog. Thank you to Penguin Random House International and Bookworms Unite PH for sending me the e-ARC of this book and allowing me to take part in the INTL blog tour for this book. This did not, in any way, influenced my thoughts and rating. My Blog - Drizzle & Hurricane Books - Twitter - Bloglovin'

  11. 4 out of 5

    temi ★

    i swear there’s been a giveaway for this every week. god, if you want this in my hands....now is the time

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kayla Brunson

    So I really don’t know what to think about this one. I was going in thinking I was going to get Warcross vibes and a really kickass heroine. While I did get some Warcross vibes, that’s really the only part that I got. "Humans are experts in sharing. It started with cave paintings and evolved into books, tweets, virtual reality -- who knows what’s next. But the pieces of ourselves that we share are just that. Pieces." This book takes place in the far future where even iPhones are a joke of the past So I really don’t know what to think about this one. I was going in thinking I was going to get Warcross vibes and a really kickass heroine. While I did get some Warcross vibes, that’s really the only part that I got. "Humans are experts in sharing. It started with cave paintings and evolved into books, tweets, virtual reality -- who knows what’s next. But the pieces of ourselves that we share are just that. Pieces." This book takes place in the far future where even iPhones are a joke of the past. EVERYTHING is technology based. The worldbuilding here was so cool and very thorough. It was cool to read about everything Ahmadi thought to place in this book. The most fascinating part of this book was how scary dependent the world was on technology. Things from self-driving cars to robots at home that know your likes and dislikes almost better than you do. I honestly was getting afraid at how far they would take it. Also, while most people love the way technology has changed their everyday lives, there are people who want to take the world back to how it was before. Those people are called Luds and they are fighting for what they feel are a better world. "What you tech types need to understand is that humans are the dominant species." Basically, if I were to rate this book on just the worldbuilding how high tech everything is, then I would rate it very highly. What dragged the book down for me was our main character, Opal. I didn’t find her likable at all. I thought she was a terrible friend, manipulative, and selfish. True, she’s out for answers but the way she treated the people she claimed to care about irked me. With the ending of this book, it seems as if there will be another book after this. I don’t think I have it in me to read any more about Opal and her quest against the Luds. TW: cyber-bullying, depression, alcoholism, and talks of suicide. ✨I received an ARC via NetGalley for an honest review.✨ ✨Quotes were taken from an ARC and are subject to change upon publication.✨ Blog | Instagram | Twitter

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kal ★ Reader Voracious

    ARC sent by Penguin Teen in exchange for my honest review. Gone Viral is a fantastic coming of age contemporary that includes technology that really roots itself in how tech and social media are a big part of growing up today. You can read my post as part of Penguin's Blog Tour here! “Humans are experts in sharing. It started with cave paintings and evolved into books, tweets, virtual reality. […] We’re complicated beings who hardly understand our own selves, and that’s precisely why we put th ARC sent by Penguin Teen in exchange for my honest review. Gone Viral is a fantastic coming of age contemporary that includes technology that really roots itself in how tech and social media are a big part of growing up today. You can read my post as part of Penguin's Blog Tour here! “Humans are experts in sharing. It started with cave paintings and evolved into books, tweets, virtual reality. […] We’re complicated beings who hardly understand our own selves, and that’s precisely why we put those experiences out into the world. To find our place in it.” The book is told in the first person perspective of Opal Tal, a 17-year old coding genius who is determined to find the answers to her father’s disappearance seven years earlier. She’s tried to move on, reinventing herself as Opal Hopper to hide from her past in anonymity, but when a competition comes up with the prize of meeting reclusive tech genius Howie Mendelsohn she can’t help but enter for a chance to meet him and get the answers she is sure he can provide. WAVE is the latest craze, and you can think of it as the virtual reality equivalent of Youtube. Instead of vlogging on your kitchen floor in front of a camera, WAVE is a full-on production with design and digital avatar viewers when you go live. And Opal stumbles upon some information and her show goes viral with her honest depiction of reality and how the way we portray ourselves online doesn’t line up with how we truly feel. It is a really interesting take on how people put their best version of themselves up on social media, as well as how easy it is for people to hop onto a bandwagon because everyone else is doing it. The book honestly made me think a lot about my relationship with social media, which has definitely been evolving over the last two years. “Be careful putting yourself out there; privacy is hard to get back.” I love the characters so much. Opal, Moyo, and Shane are such a great friend group and I love how they support one another. It’s their senior year and with college applications looming and the pressures of soon venturing into a new stage of life, I think Ahmadi depicted the struggles of teenagers really well. (Also can I just reiterate again how glad I am that social media was not a thing when I was in high school? Because I am forever thankful.) I felt most connected to Opal and Shane, but I really enjoyed everyone… even Kara grew on me! What was most interesting for me was how Opal’s relationship with her friends evolves as the story progresses, as evidenced by how they interact with her. Her grief and desire for answers makes her selfish and a little difficult to like in that regard but she felt like a real person to me just doing her damn best. Girl Gone Viral is more than sci-fi: it’s about coming of age in a world rapidly changing & polarizing worldviews. It’s set in a plausible near future with tech that could launch tomorrow. Or very well could exist now but because I’m old and the opposite of hip I don’t know about it but that isn’t the point. Because with a society obsessed with tabloids and the voyeuristic nature of following online influencers, of course there would be paparazzi drones. Reading this one was especially fun for me because it is set in Palo Alto, CA and there’s so much discussion on the whole start-up/tech culture of Silicon Valley that is relatable as a person that currently lives in the vicinity. A big thing in the tech world is disruption, essentially challenging the way we’ve always done things and making things better. “Sometimes I wonder if people are right, when they refuse to treat me or talk to me with equal respect, because I’m a girl. Maybe we live in a world where I’m not meant to succeed. A world that actively fights to limit my success. And maybe, in that same world, my dad really did bring his fate upon himself.” When an investor appears and talks about how gloriously disruptive the show is, I couldn’t help but laugh because she was challenging the careful facades that everyone puts on online. But there are definitely challenges to getting an investor, as our characters discover. Opal struggles to have her experiences and opinions validated by the adults around her, asserting that they know what is best. Considering that she is in a high school for tech geniuses and how much women are underrepresented in STEM fields, I personally appreciated this added discussion because it felt believable to me but also challenges those ideas in the text. Ahmadi effortlessly crafted a future that parallels society today, using the lens of technology to discuss the post-2016 election Nationalistic world that America has found itself in. Instead of “Make America Great Again,” we have the Luddite “Back to basics” political movement that rises to power against all odds on a platform of “bring the jobs back to people from machines.” “It all boils down to comfort with the old way of doing things. It boils down to nostalgia.” It’s a social commentary that I really appreciated that has relevance well beyond the Trump Election comparison. The notion of nostalgia plays a bit role in the rise of nationalism has been sweeping the globe in recent years, but the methods are direct descendants what has been seen throughout history during colonization. The idea that society has been led astray from the time when things were perfect, and this group is the one position to bring back that Golden Era. The problem with a revisionist view of the past is that “better” is not for everyone, and often that idealized history didn’t exist in the first place. In the case of the Luddite argument, it completely disregards all the positives that technology brings society – and that throughout history when jobs have gone obsolete, people find new careers. We no longer have a need for lamplighters now that we have electricity, and we don’t have people phone operators anymore. But what we do need are the people capable of creating and maintaining technology, along with countless other fields. The pacing of the book is solid, building in tension towards the revelations but the ending did feel a little rushed compared to the rest of the book. The main mystery of what happened to Opal’s father is revealed but the ending of the book is left a bit too open for my tastes. My one complaint is that the book doesn’t feel like a standalone, it actually feels like the ending was a set-up for a sequel. I just feel like there was so much development on the political front to have it end where it did! But the fact that created a world that I cannot get enough of is impressive and I truly hope that he writes more. Overall, I loved this book so much! I found it to be fast-paced and engaging, with a good balance between making me think and being about the characters. I wouldn’t call this quiet YA at all, but the characters do each deal with their own internalized struggles of wanting to be good enough and succeed. I highly recommend this one and don’t think that the technology is too advanced to deter people that typically shy away from science fiction. REPRESENTATION: black rep (Nigerian), depression rep (Shane), women in STEM CONTENT WARNINGS: alcoholism, cyber bullying, depression, loss of a parent, on-page death, suicide Many thanks to Penguin Teen for sending me an ARC for my honest review and letting me participate in the blog tour! Quotes are taken from an unfinished ARC and may not match final publication. Blog | Twitter | Pinterest

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    3.5 stars. Overall I really enjoyed this. It was a fast fun read but the last quarter of the book kept me from rating it higher. The last part felt like a rush to wrap up all the dangling plot points and most of them were unsatisfactory in the end.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Richelle Delgado

    Not good, not great just OK!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bianca (The Ultimate Fangirl)

    HOLY AMAZEBALLS. THIS. BOOK. Now it sort off dawned on me why Penguin Teen called out Arvin on Twitter to submit this because heck, I WOULD HAVE PROBABLY DONE THE SAME THING. LOL That being said, I was in the middle of a ridiculous!! slump when I started reading this book, but it was the cure to my sanity. I love stories that deal with virtual reality, much so if it involves technology and discussions. There's all this talk about augmented reality, people against technology, and virtual talk show HOLY AMAZEBALLS. THIS. BOOK. Now it sort off dawned on me why Penguin Teen called out Arvin on Twitter to submit this because heck, I WOULD HAVE PROBABLY DONE THE SAME THING. LOL That being said, I was in the middle of a ridiculous!! slump when I started reading this book, but it was the cure to my sanity. I love stories that deal with virtual reality, much so if it involves technology and discussions. There's all this talk about augmented reality, people against technology, and virtual talk shows. I'm here for it and Arvin has executed it so well. I was engrossed with this book, because it is eerily familiar yet foreign to me, and I cannot help but be kept on my toes the entire time. My full review is slated to go up in May as I am contributing for the tour of this book, but some things to anticipate: - Opal Hopper, because she is amazing. Girls who code? UMM, YES. - Dynamic friendships - WAVE (eat your heart out, YOUTUBE.) - Discussions of grief, relationships, importance of taking care of your mental health, and moral grounds There are no words to describe the truth bombs that this book has up its sleeve. I can't even fully describe the emotions that I felt when I finished it. Hot tip: Do not read this book if you're bad at concealing your "WTF is going on here" face. Honestly May feels like it is still so far because I NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE ABOUT THIS BOOK BECAUSE IT IS JUST SO DARN GOOD AND THERE IS A LOT OF GROUND OPEN FOR DISCUSSION. Arvin this better have a sequel or so help me... Huge thanks to Bookworms Unite for letting me join the tour.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    Girl Gone Viral is kind of like a mashup of a slower, character-driven YA contemporary with elements from books like An Absolutely Remarkable Thing, Warcross, and Ready Player One. It is a near future story about a girl who codes on a virtual reality platform and is trying to discover what happened when her father disappeared years earlier. It is also about fame, social media, friendship, love, and betrayal. I liked a lot of what this book was trying to do and there is really thoughtful handling Girl Gone Viral is kind of like a mashup of a slower, character-driven YA contemporary with elements from books like An Absolutely Remarkable Thing, Warcross, and Ready Player One. It is a near future story about a girl who codes on a virtual reality platform and is trying to discover what happened when her father disappeared years earlier. It is also about fame, social media, friendship, love, and betrayal. I liked a lot of what this book was trying to do and there is really thoughtful handling of thematic content including women in STEM, the problems that come with overnight success and celebrity, what technological development means for people and society, and what it means to be a good friend. It even tackles mental health concerns and complex family dynamics. It is racially and ethnically diverse, but set in Palo Alto at a prestigious private school. However, while I appreciate the ambition of the project, I think perhaps there was too much going on here. There is a mismatch between the thriller elements of the story (I would expect more of a page-turner) and the slow-paced, thoughtful approach to character development and emphasis on unpacking high school relationships. That said, I did still enjoy it, I'm just having trouble categorizing it and I don't think it was quite what I expected. If you go in expecting to really sit with these characters, and expecting something that is really about the teen-coming of age experience in complicated times, then you might really love it. Content Warnings for cyber-bullying, depression, alcoholism, and discussion of suicide

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carmensutra

    FIVE reasons to read Girl Gone Viral: 1. Girl, Exposed: Opal Hopper is a girl unabashedly involved in STEM. There is no questioning of her place in the project, she knows it and she is confident in her choices. 2. Girl, In The Deep End: If you follow tech trends or even if you are a coder or somehow obsessed with social media and technology, YOU WILL ADORE THIS BOOK. Although the dust jacket describes this as The Social Network meets Black Mirror meets Ready Player One, I also see elements of Warc FIVE reasons to read Girl Gone Viral: 1. Girl, Exposed: Opal Hopper is a girl unabashedly involved in STEM. There is no questioning of her place in the project, she knows it and she is confident in her choices. 2. Girl, In The Deep End: If you follow tech trends or even if you are a coder or somehow obsessed with social media and technology, YOU WILL ADORE THIS BOOK. Although the dust jacket describes this as The Social Network meets Black Mirror meets Ready Player One, I also see elements of Warcross, Immoral Code and the technology of Minority Report. 3. Girl, Fully Loaded: Opal has a ready-built group of friends in Moyo and Shane, her two friends helping her create the Make-A-Splash contest entry. They have a very real friendship that gets challenged and rebuilt by secrets and jealousy. It was so authentically messy. I loved every moment of their interactions. 4. Girl, With The Truth: Opal Hopper is a girl on a mission—not only does she want to win a contest to meet Steve Jobs-level billionaire founder of WAVE Technologies, Howie Mendelssohn. Howie also happens to be the last person alive who spoke to her father the night he disappeared seven years ago. She is so driven and focused while still grieving and searching for answers. 5. Down and Across: if you haven’t read Arvin’s achingly charming debut novel, I urge you to pick it up. I will link my original review in my bio and stories. It is a book for anyone who has ever been lost and tried to find their way back to themselves and their identity. You can see threads of it in Girl Gone Viral and, I hope, many, many more books from Arvin to come!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Fanna

    || YA Science Fiction || Girl who loves to code || Virtual reality, missing dad, a contest to win! LIST & POSTS I'VE MENTIONED THIS BOOK IN: May 2019 - Ten Books To Look Out For This Month

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sara (A Gingerly Review)

    While I loved the narrator, the story itself never completely captivated me. Womp Womp. FRTC

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tara (Spinatale Reviews)

    Girl Gone Viral really surprised me. I enjoyed how Ahmadi explored social media, how we portray ourselves online vs. how we actually are, and the challenges of connecting with others in an increasingly technological-based world. Plus the story was fun to read! It was a quick and engaging read. Opal was a great character, I found it fascinating to watch her change throughout the novel. The romance could have been developed more though, it would kind of disappear sometimes only to reappear out of t Girl Gone Viral really surprised me. I enjoyed how Ahmadi explored social media, how we portray ourselves online vs. how we actually are, and the challenges of connecting with others in an increasingly technological-based world. Plus the story was fun to read! It was a quick and engaging read. Opal was a great character, I found it fascinating to watch her change throughout the novel. The romance could have been developed more though, it would kind of disappear sometimes only to reappear out of the blue later. The mystery surrounding Opal’s dad wasn’t that compelling to me but I loved seeing how she dealt with being infamous because of her connection to him. If you’re interested in a fun read that still explores some deeper themes, check out Girl Gone Viral. Also, I think this one would make a great movie! *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from the publisher. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kate (Reading Through Infinity)

    Thanks to the publisher for sending me an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. TWs: cyber-bullying, discussions of suicide, on-page death, depression, alcoholism, insomnia. At its heart, this book is about friendship, technology, and empathy. It's about community, finding the truth and looking to the future. I loved the characters, dialogue and the futuristic tech, as well as the representation of what it's like to be a teenager trying to get into university. The author stri Thanks to the publisher for sending me an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. TWs: cyber-bullying, discussions of suicide, on-page death, depression, alcoholism, insomnia. At its heart, this book is about friendship, technology, and empathy. It's about community, finding the truth and looking to the future. I loved the characters, dialogue and the futuristic tech, as well as the representation of what it's like to be a teenager trying to get into university. The author strikes a balance between the fast-paced scenes and slower-paced moments of character development and the narrative is crisp and well-written. Full review to come on during my stop on the blog tour!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hazel (Stay Bookish)

    Impressive sophomore novel– I was in awe of Ahmadi's futuristic setting and intrigued by the mysterious disappearance and the lengths the main character would go to meet the only man who might know something about it! Find my full review on the blog.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    A strange and confusing take on what the world would become if computers (specifically virtual reality) took over life. The writing was uneven, the ending jarring and I don't think the author thoroughly convinced me that this society could be real. On the other hand, I liked the kick-ass female protagonist and the mystery of her father was interesting (ended abruptly unfortunately).

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    This is up there with Andy Weir's follow-up to The Martian: a male author writing from a female protagonist's perspective in a way that ultimately feels reductive at best and fetishistic at its worst. I also felt like the author didn't have the teenage voice down.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bel

    The pros and cons of social media and the tech world in general, set in the near future. Great characters, choices and story line. The last 2 pages were kinda...meh... but that’s no reason not to read this... I enjoyed it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    4.5 stars

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stacey Maisch

    Endearing characters, swift-moving plot, and peppered with tons of current cultural & technological references. Great quick weekend read for both teens and adults.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    ACTUAL: 4.25 stars

  30. 5 out of 5

    Booklover925

    So good! The plot was amazing, I loved Opal and her friends. Arvin is such an amazing writer, and I can’t wait to see his work in the future.

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