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Vagina: A Re-education

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Part memoir, part practical guide to the vagina, this indispensable book sifts through myths and misinformation with the aim of empowering women with vital knowledge about their own bodies. For centuries, the vagina has been made mysterious, neglected, mutilated or mocked, and as a consequence few people know much about it. In Vagina: A Re-Education, acclaimed journalist Part memoir, part practical guide to the vagina, this indispensable book sifts through myths and misinformation with the aim of empowering women with vital knowledge about their own bodies. For centuries, the vagina has been made mysterious, neglected, mutilated or mocked, and as a consequence few people know much about it. In Vagina: A Re-Education, acclaimed journalist Lynn Enright charts the story of this crucial organ, encompassing fertility and hormones, pain and arousal, sex education and more, with the goal of empowering women with vital knowledge about their bodies. As women all over the world join together in conversations about consent and power, this investigation into the history, biology and politics of the vagina will be a valuable and urgent addition to the discussion.


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Part memoir, part practical guide to the vagina, this indispensable book sifts through myths and misinformation with the aim of empowering women with vital knowledge about their own bodies. For centuries, the vagina has been made mysterious, neglected, mutilated or mocked, and as a consequence few people know much about it. In Vagina: A Re-Education, acclaimed journalist Part memoir, part practical guide to the vagina, this indispensable book sifts through myths and misinformation with the aim of empowering women with vital knowledge about their own bodies. For centuries, the vagina has been made mysterious, neglected, mutilated or mocked, and as a consequence few people know much about it. In Vagina: A Re-Education, acclaimed journalist Lynn Enright charts the story of this crucial organ, encompassing fertility and hormones, pain and arousal, sex education and more, with the goal of empowering women with vital knowledge about their bodies. As women all over the world join together in conversations about consent and power, this investigation into the history, biology and politics of the vagina will be a valuable and urgent addition to the discussion.

30 review for Vagina: A Re-education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    Do I have a vagina? Yes. Do I let that define me? No. This book is a must read for everyone, whether one has a vagina or not. Even at my current age, I'm not embarrassed to admit, that I found this book educating, and there were a few aspects that Enright discussed, that I didn't know much about. That for me, is pretty damn embarrassing, that even today, girls and women are having to turn to books instead of well-rounded open discussions, because people are too embarrassed to talk about vaginas. Do I have a vagina? Yes. Do I let that define me? No. This book is a must read for everyone, whether one has a vagina or not. Even at my current age, I'm not embarrassed to admit, that I found this book educating, and there were a few aspects that Enright discussed, that I didn't know much about. That for me, is pretty damn embarrassing, that even today, girls and women are having to turn to books instead of well-rounded open discussions, because people are too embarrassed to talk about vaginas. We learn that many women do not know where the vulva is located, and they presume that the vagina is in fact, the entire area. This information didn't surprise me, but I did find it quite disturbing when I thought about it on the whole. Why is this happening? Why is it not talked about? I was sickened to learn about women and young girls that put themselves through pointless surgery to achieve the designer vagina look. I mean, we already have the pressure of ensuring that our hips don't get too big, or that we don't get wrinkly skin too rapidly, but now, now we have the added pressure that our labia lips look "neat." Enright tells us of the taboo of the clitoris, and how it isn't discussed in sex education classes. Yes, it gets a little mention, but to tell girls that the clitoris has no other function except to give pleasure? How terrible would that be? It is concerning that the male climax is regularly and openly discussed, and how his pleasure is more important, but the female climax, is quietly swept under that carpet we know so well. It needs to change, and I agree with Enright. Enright discusses the menstruation taboo, openly and thoroughly. We have to admit, it STILL exists. I think it's sad when I see a woman at a checkout purchasing sanitary products, and she feels the need to kind of hide them, under the other groceries, just so nobody spots them. We bleed. The pain bothers me like a bitch. Life goes on. I love the cover of this book, it is simple, but bold, and it made me want to read it. I appreciate Enright and her honesty in this book, and her own personal story was relatable with me, too. This has made me feel even more empowered, and prouder than ever, of me, myself and my vagina. "We have been far taught more about shame than about our anatomy. "

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    (3.5) This book might be more accurately titled Vulva, as it is about the whole set of female organs (especially the external ones), but that’s maybe a more obscure/icky as well as a less evocative/provocative word. Sex education is poor and lacking in many parts of the world, Enright argues, including the Ireland she grew up in in the 1980s. We need better knowledge about gender, anatomy (including the range of what’s ‘normal’) and issues of consent, she insists. To that end, she sets out to (3.5) This book might be more accurately titled Vulva, as it is about the whole set of female organs (especially the external ones), but that’s maybe a more obscure/icky as well as a less evocative/provocative word. Sex education is poor and lacking in many parts of the world, Enright argues, including the Ireland she grew up in in the 1980s. We need better knowledge about gender, anatomy (including the range of what’s ‘normal’) and issues of consent, she insists. To that end, she sets out to bust myths about the hymen, clitoris, female orgasm, menstruation, gynaecological problems, infertility, pregnancy and menopause. Her just-the-facts approach is especially helpful in her rundown of the female anatomy. She encourages women not to take no for an answer from doctors who try to deny or minimize their pain. This is a bold book sometimes marred by TMI (all in the name of openness and honesty, but still…) and repetitive writing. For me, there was too much overlap with other books I’ve read over the last five years or so: Naomi Wolf’s Vagina: A New Biography, a book that I never reviewed but that made enough of an impression on me to earn 5 stars and embolden me to read it on public transport during my London commuting days; The Wonder Down Under: A user’s guide to the vagina by two female Norwegian medical students; Gross Anatomy by Mara Altman (on waxing); and the recent Notes to Self by Emilie Pine (rape, menstruation and infertility) and the upcoming Constellations by Sinéad Gleeson (women’s pain), both of them Irish writers like Enright. Thus, after about page 50 I just skimmed this one. If you haven’t read anything like Vagina before, though, it would serve as a wonderfully comprehensive introduction. Some favorite lines: “With vaginas, it seems, we doubt what we know. With vaginas, we listen to the lies, more than we listen to the truth. … We perpetuate the unsureness with our silences – and with our acceptance of lies.” “Pregnancy, abortion, miscarriage and birth are common but extraordinary – each story is unique. Women benefit when those stories are told – and listened to.”

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cátia Vieira

    Why should you read this book? Vagina: A Re-Education by Lynn Enright was published last March and it’s an incredible book! I truly recommend it to everyone out there. You know I don’t say these things often but that’s how enlightening this book is! It is a fact: we know very little about vaginas and female sexuality because we live in a patriarchal society. Women aren’t taught to discover their body, their sexuality, their pleasure, their power. They are taught shame. When we look at the male’s Why should you read this book? Vagina: A Re-Education by Lynn Enright was published last March and it’s an incredible book! I truly recommend it to everyone out there. You know I don’t say these things often but that’s how enlightening this book is! It is a fact: we know very little about vaginas and female sexuality because we live in a patriarchal society. Women aren’t taught to discover their body, their sexuality, their pleasure, their power. They are taught shame. When we look at the male’s experience, we notice that it’s a different one. That needs to change. Vagina: A Re-Education sheds light on a number of topics: female anatomy, the hymen and its myths, the clitoris (including issues like FGM), female orgasm and masturbation, periods, women’s health, fertility, pregnancy and menopause. It also asks you questions like ‘are you a feminist if you wax your pubic hair’? Lynn Enright uses clear language turning this into a very accessible and interesting read. I’d also like to point out the merits of this research. The writer always supports her arguments and I think that’s crucial. We were in need of this book! I’d like to thank Atlantic Books for sending a review copy. For more reviews, follow me on instagram: @booksturnyouon

  4. 4 out of 5

    Portia (The Owlery Reader)

    I want to give a copy of this to every person in my life with a vagina. And then some. It's so informative, interesting, readable, and IMPORTANT. It reaffirmed a lot of my existing knowledge and views, but also re-educated me about a lot of things I thought I knew. I learned so much and so much made me angry. It talks about biology and science in an accessible way, backs up facts with statistics and references, but also includes personal stories and anecdotes that make it engaging and relatable. I want to give a copy of this to every person in my life with a vagina. And then some. It's so informative, interesting, readable, and IMPORTANT. It reaffirmed a lot of my existing knowledge and views, but also re-educated me about a lot of things I thought I knew. I learned so much and so much made me angry. It talks about biology and science in an accessible way, backs up facts with statistics and references, but also includes personal stories and anecdotes that make it engaging and relatable. The author acknowledges their white cisgender and heterosexual perspective as not being universal and makes a conscious effort to include statistics and stories from trans and non-binary people, as well as non-Western countries and ethnic minorities within Western countries. Seriously, every person with a vagina should read this, every person teaching sex ed should read this, every person making political decisions about women's healthcare should read this.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    I was lucky enough to win this in a Facebook competition run by the publishers (along with a pretty awesome tote bag). Enright covers various vagina related topics such as basic biology, sex, menstruation and childbirth. She also discusses personal stories about her own experiences and how women's bodies are and have always been controlled by men and the patriarchy. I found this very well-written and quite informative. It's certainly a book worth reading.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andi

    This book is easy to read, the author is considerate to her audience and is straight to the point with no waffle. She discusses her own personal feelings and experiences, some which are comical, others sadly aren't. A good book that was well worth the read. Thanks to NetGalley, Lynn Enright and Atlantic Books for the opportunity to read and review this book

  7. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    An ARC ebook copy of this book was provided by Atlantic Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. An absolutely must-read for anyone who has a vagina, and I would go as far as recommending it to anyone who is open-minded and in a close intimate relationship with someone who has a vagina. I learnt so much, it is outrageous thinking that I have lived 23 years of my life not knowing the basics of what having a vagina implies. It is tremendously enriching, surprising and empowering. The An ARC ebook copy of this book was provided by Atlantic Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. An absolutely must-read for anyone who has a vagina, and I would go as far as recommending it to anyone who is open-minded and in a close intimate relationship with someone who has a vagina. I learnt so much, it is outrageous thinking that I have lived 23 years of my life not knowing the basics of what having a vagina implies. It is tremendously enriching, surprising and empowering. The only problem I found in the book is that in some sections the balance between historical facts, scientific and biological facts, feminist theory/claims and the author's experiences is lost. At some points it felt like the author hadn't found enough feminist critics talking about certain topics, and specially around the 20% of the book I felt more feminist responses were needed. Nevertheless, in the rest of the book the balance is adjusted according to the needs of each chapter and topic. However, the book does an amazing job at putting out there a lot of information that usually is not within reach. I - a 23 year old woman that is not planning to have children any time soon and has her period regularly - still enjoyed reading the "pregnancy" and "menopause" parts. They were extremely enlightening and made me reconsider many things about the effects and consequences of having a vagina and its implications. All in all, please, read it - specially if you have a vagina.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gayle Noble

    Enright's book on the vagina (and the vulva, as they are not one and the same despite most people using the term vagina for the whole area) looks at why it is that so many people don't know anatomical detail or what a healthy and normal vulva looks like, and why women's health and sexual satisfaction seem to be afterthoughts. From the coy naming of the parts through the hiding or downplaying of menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause, this book spells it all out, but Enright also reiterates that Enright's book on the vagina (and the vulva, as they are not one and the same despite most people using the term vagina for the whole area) looks at why it is that so many people don't know anatomical detail or what a healthy and normal vulva looks like, and why women's health and sexual satisfaction seem to be afterthoughts. From the coy naming of the parts through the hiding or downplaying of menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause, this book spells it all out, but Enright also reiterates that we are more than our reproductive organs. It will annoy you that girls are made to feel they need plastic surgery on their genitals to look "normal", that it takes years of pain to get a diagnosis of endometriosis, and that fertility issues are automatically assumed to be on the woman's part even though it's not always the case. This is an inclusive no-nonsense guide for anyone with a vulva and vagina who wants to know more. I really wish this book had been around when I was in my early teens. Thanks to NetGalley and publishers, Atlantic Books / Allen & Unwin, for the opportunity to review an ARC.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bernard O'Leary

    I'm not a vagina owner myself but I am interested in lived experiences outside my own. This book is fine, I guess, but it's written in that very 2010s tone of an opinion column or tweetstorm, with lots of bombast and not a huge amount of original research.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katie Biscuit

    A well researched book really enjoyed some of the sections others not so much but a really needed book and a must read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kate Wyver

    vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital vital

  12. 5 out of 5

    April Leigh

    Originally gave this a 4... but i keep talking about it to everyone ! The sex education and fertility stuff in particular. It really is mindblowing how little we know about our own bodies once your eyes are opened to it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    E

    In this book Lynn Enright explores the marginalisation and misunderstandings around the vagina and vulva in common knowledge, science, and medicine. Enright investigates the biology of the vulva and deconstructs binary concepts of sex, gender, and genitalia, presenting thorough and well-researched information through a combination of statistical analysis and personal testimonies. Enright approaches feminist concepts with a clear voice and argues that an intersectional understanding of feminism In this book Lynn Enright explores the marginalisation and misunderstandings around the vagina and vulva in common knowledge, science, and medicine. Enright investigates the biology of the vulva and deconstructs binary concepts of sex, gender, and genitalia, presenting thorough and well-researched information through a combination of statistical analysis and personal testimonies. Enright approaches feminist concepts with a clear voice and argues that an intersectional understanding of feminism and an emphasis on education around the vulva and vagina in feminist politics are not opposing ideas. 'There is sometimes a sense that to be a feminist who cares about vaginas is to be a person who does not care about trans rights. I reject this notion completely. To put it plainly, I think the suggestion that a woman can’t care about vaginas and trans rights is deeply misogynistic. [...] I do not believe that there has to be a battle between those who care about vaginas and those who care about trans rights. I think it is possible to care about both.' I personally found much of the information on the menopause fascinating, as there is little general information about it and many women are reticent to share their experiences. The statistics about the representation of middle-aged men and women in film and television was shocking, and shows how the stories and knowledge of older women are silenced and censored through popular culture. 'Aged 42– 65, men had 55 million words: this was when they were most powerful, when they delivered impassioned monologues or portrayed sparring lawyers or wooed much younger women with long-winded jokes. Aged 42– 65, women had 11 million words. They were being disappeared.' One thing I found disappointing was the lack of information about Lichen Sclerosus. Enright described a multitude of medical conditions and symptoms, particularly those that affect perimenopausal, menopausal, and post-menopausal women, and yet didnt make a single mention of Lichen Sclerosus at all. Some conditions she mentions: Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause (GSM), cystitis, UTIs, vulvodynia, vaginal dryness, etc. She also goes into detail about hormone changes during the menopausal stages. LS is a serious and incurable condition found in all ages, but according to current statistics mostly in post-menopausal women (although in my opinion that's a result of lack of awareness and data). It causes scarring, atrophy, difficulty with sex, itching, and increased risk of cancer. Perhaps Enright didn't include LS because of the historic lack of scientific research and persistent misdiagnoses and lack of knowledge of the condition amongst doctors, but that ignorance is exactly the problem that this book is trying to interrogate. Ultimately I enjoyed Enright's authenticity and straightforward voice, and would absolutely recommend this book to anyone with a vulva. This book is focussed specifically on the vagina and vulva and menopause and representation, although with thorough awareness of the complexities of gender and sex in the conversations, and while for the majority of the text she uses cisnormative language, this awareness that binary language and thinking is outdated is sorely lacking in most texts on this subject. Thanks to Netgalley and Atlantic Books for an advance copy in exchange for an unbiased review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Niamh

    'I am more than my vagina. I am more than my ovaries.' I was very kindly given an e-ARC of this book through Netgalley, Allen & Unwin and Atlantic Books. If you ever needed a guidebook to the modern-day vagina, this is the one that should be pressed into your hands. Perhaps this book should be made required reading in schools that get squeamish about teaching proper sex education to girls and young women. All across the world, even in the most economically prosperous societies, people with 'I am more than my vagina. I am more than my ovaries.' I was very kindly given an e-ARC of this book through Netgalley, Allen & Unwin and Atlantic Books. If you ever needed a guidebook to the modern-day vagina, this is the one that should be pressed into your hands. Perhaps this book should be made required reading in schools that get squeamish about teaching proper sex education to girls and young women. All across the world, even in the most economically prosperous societies, people with vaginas are not being taught about them. Sex education, when it exists, is often awful. For me and my Catholic school education, where the only unplanned pregnancy they accepted was the one that happened to a 14 year old Virgin Mary, this book was completely eye-opening. Enright is always on the mark, exploring sex education, the anatomy of the vagina- both internal and external- menstruation, menopause, sex education for LGBTQIA+ people, trans and intersex opinions on vaginas, pregnancy, abortion and everything else that we as women and non-binary pals should already know. It's a testament to how shitty sex-ed is in the UK that I found myself learning a new thing on every other page. She writes with transparency and simplified explorations of the female anatomy so anyone can understand what's going on. This is an excellent look at how we as women- regardless of whether we have vaginas or not- need to get educated and truly understand what goes on in our bodies. Enright consistently notes how society is often against the flourishing and outspokenness of female sexuality, and she argues that we should own our individuality and make educate ourselves further. Clearly, sex-ed isn't going to teach us. A seminal book that deserves praise and attention from every facet of our society. 'Vagina' by Lynn Enright will be released in the UK on March 7th.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Little Green Teapot

    "We have been far taught more about shame than about our anatomy." I'm not even ashamed to say how much I learnt from this book. But I am ashamed that we live in a society that means I didn't know a lot of this before picking up this book at the age of 25. There are many issues which this book touches on that I could get into, but I don't want to turn this review into a rant! Instead, what I will say is that Lynn Enright perfectly balances three aspects in this book: memoir, fact and opinion. She "We have been far taught more about shame than about our anatomy." I'm not even ashamed to say how much I learnt from this book. But I am ashamed that we live in a society that means I didn't know a lot of this before picking up this book at the age of 25. There are many issues which this book touches on that I could get into, but I don't want to turn this review into a rant! Instead, what I will say is that Lynn Enright perfectly balances three aspects in this book: memoir, fact and opinion. She uses her own experiences to bring the facts to life and show how women have been disadvantaged by the lack of education on many topics whilst then rousing us all to push for change and make sure following generations can have it differently. Better. I love the cover - it's brazen but simple and I read it proudly in public. I came to the end of this book (after finding as much spare time as I could to finish it!) feeling frustrated at how things have been done, but mostly empowered in terms of my body. Yeah, being a woman isn't always fun (see chapter on periods) but our bodies are pretty damn amazing. I just wish I knew all of this when I was younger. Absolutely brilliant feminist non-fiction that I will definitely be recommending to all my vulva-owning friends! Grab yourself a copy from 7th March 2019. See more book reviews at www.littlegreenteapot.co.uk *Please note this was given to me by the publisher free of charge.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laura King

    'Vagina: A Reeducation' perfectly balances scientific study and emotional appeal, global concerns and more local events, wide ranging interview and personal experience to create a collection of essays that will absolutely make a difference in the lives of the people who read it. There is absolutely something for everyone, and even the essays that may not be relevant to the reader at their point at their lives are so accessable that you leave them more education than when you started. I wish 'Vagina: A Reeducation' perfectly balances scientific study and emotional appeal, global concerns and more local events, wide ranging interview and personal experience to create a collection of essays that will absolutely make a difference in the lives of the people who read it. There is absolutely something for everyone, and even the essays that may not be relevant to the reader at their point at their lives are so accessable that you leave them more education than when you started. I wish personally everyone would read the essays on periods, female pain and fertility, but the subjects of sex education, orgasm, FGM, menopause and pregnancy are just as important. I cannot recommend this highly enough

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pretty_x_bookish

    Enright’s chapters on the hymen and the socio-cultural construction of the virginity narrative is so powerful! I love that she makes a point to show that it’s not only “minorities” that have anti-women views about sex and the female body. Christian and Western ideology are steeped in the oppression of women and the dissemination of misinformation about women’s bodies. Enright also makes a strong argument for re-evaluating the way we teach sex-ed to focus not only on preventing pregnancy, but also Enright’s chapters on the hymen and the socio-cultural construction of the virginity narrative is so powerful! I love that she makes a point to show that it’s not only “minorities” that have anti-women views about sex and the female body. Christian and Western ideology are steeped in the oppression of women and the dissemination of misinformation about women’s bodies. Enright also makes a strong argument for re-evaluating the way we teach sex-ed to focus not only on preventing pregnancy, but also in the trials of fertility. Because too many women find themselves struggling to conceive - and the pain and stigma of that can be debilitating!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Megan Kelly

    This book is brilliant, educational, & eye opening to everything about our genitals. As a woman I grew up not knowing that much to be honest. Sex education in the UK was not good when I was at school, now kids can discover more about sex via their phones, but it's not going to be matter of fact it will be biased, based upon porn or films. Its an intricate subject that is needed in developed countries. But in the UK the facts talked about in this book makes me literally go read this book. This book is brilliant, educational, & eye opening to everything about our genitals. As a woman I grew up not knowing that much to be honest. Sex education in the UK was not good when I was at school, now kids can discover more about sex via their phones, but it's not going to be matter of fact it will be biased, based upon porn or films. Its an intricate subject that is needed in developed countries. But in the UK the facts talked about in this book makes me literally go 🙄🤦🏻‍♀️ read this book. It's a Bible on what makes us women. Also it's hilarious at times & shocking at others.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    I would urge everyone to read Lynn Enright's “Vagina” - not just women. I found the author's observations and thoughts around trans inclusion and feminism interesting (and sensible) at a time when there is a great deal of sensitivity around potential female erasure. Enright has clearly undertaken a staggering amount of research for this book and there are some fabulous references and recommendations for further investigation at the end. “Vagina” is well-written, in plain language, making it a I would urge everyone to read Lynn Enright's “Vagina” - not just women. I found the author's observations and thoughts around trans inclusion and feminism interesting (and sensible) at a time when there is a great deal of sensitivity around potential female erasure. Enright has clearly undertaken a staggering amount of research for this book and there are some fabulous references and recommendations for further investigation at the end. “Vagina” is well-written, in plain language, making it a highly informative, accessible and empowering read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kai

    I am so glad I decided to read this. I think every woman should read it and I agree with much of what the author says. The bit I got stuck at was the covering of the topic for trans. I think this needed deeper research and a better way to explain things. It felt like a ‘now topic’ that must be covered, at least superficially. I wish it had been better done. I would still recommend it to everyone!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tessa

    A good overview of the different issues related to women’s health and reproductive rights. At times I wish the author had gone more in depth about certain issues, but I do believe the book has showed me areas where I desire to read more and learn about. I think it’ll be especially helpful for people/women who have never been exposed to discourse about feminism and women’s right to read this book as an introduction to some of these issues.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Katy Wheatley

    A really powerful book. Well researched yet easily readable for non academics. It is personal, political and applicable to most women I know. I found I had to keep putting this down because I got so angry. I do think this is a book everyone should read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Amazing, every human should read it. Some of the chapters towards the end were slightly less engaging but it’s must-know-information. Every time someone asks why we need feminism or thinks we have a equality, ask them to read the Vagina book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Camotte

    (3.5) I really enjoyed reading this book, I learnt a lot about myself and my body. It raises many questions and willpower to dig the subject and keep learning about it. However, I sometimes missed some information to fully understand the medical facts.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mariana Cárdenas

    Super interesting read, learned a lot. The perfect balance between factual and engaging. The only negative for me is that it didn't go into the menstrual cycle as much as I was hoping or contraception choices and their back-story.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sandra V.

    A must read. All the things we never learned about our vagina (and sex, pregnancy...) this is so easy to read on the subject. I strongly agree with the message: educate girls AND boys with no taboo and judgments

  27. 4 out of 5

    Abbie Philpott

    An excellent re education about the female genitalia. I learned things I didn't even know I didn't know! Was also a really good introduction to many other topics with some brilliant further education suggestions. Highly recommended

  28. 5 out of 5

    Judi Fruen

    Entertainingly written, up-to-date summary of our understanding of the vulva, vagina etc., and its historical import.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Emily

    Everyone should have to read this.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Megan James

    A mandatory read for all. I learnt a lot amongst these pages & would recommend others do the same.

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