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A Wild and Precious Life: A Memoir

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A lively, intimate memoir from a marriage equality icon of the gay rights movement, describing gay life in the 1950s and 60s New York City and her longtime activism. "Brash, funny and brave." —NPR “A captivating and inspiring story of a queer woman who believed in her right to take up space and be seen.”— BuzzFeed "Windsor’s story fighting for what she believed in is one A lively, intimate memoir from a marriage equality icon of the gay rights movement, describing gay life in the 1950s and 60s New York City and her longtime activism. "Brash, funny and brave." —NPR “A captivating and inspiring story of a queer woman who believed in her right to take up space and be seen.”— BuzzFeed "Windsor’s story fighting for what she believed in is one that will leave readers inspired." — NBC OUT Edie Windsor became internationally famous when she sued the US government, seeking federal recognition for her marriage to Thea Spyer, her partner of more than four decades. The Supreme Court ruled in Edie’s favor, a landmark victory that set the stage for full marriage equality in the US. Beloved by the LGBTQ community, Edie embraced her new role as an icon; she had already been living an extraordinary and groundbreaking life for decades. In this memoir, which she began before passing away in 2017 and completed by her co-writer, Edie recounts her childhood in Philadelphia, her realization that she was a lesbian, and her active social life in Greenwich Village's electrifying underground gay scene during the 1950s. Edie was also one of a select group of trailblazing women in computing, working her way up the ladder at IBM and achieving their highest technical ranking while developing software. In the early 1960s Edie met Thea, an expat from a Dutch Jewish family that fled the Nazis, and a widely respected clinical psychologist. Their partnership lasted forty-four years, until Thea died in 2009. Edie found love again, marrying Judith Kasen-Windsor in 2016. A Wild and Precious Life is remarkable portrait of an iconic woman, gay life in New York in the second half of the twentieth century, and the rise of LGBT activism.


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A lively, intimate memoir from a marriage equality icon of the gay rights movement, describing gay life in the 1950s and 60s New York City and her longtime activism. "Brash, funny and brave." —NPR “A captivating and inspiring story of a queer woman who believed in her right to take up space and be seen.”— BuzzFeed "Windsor’s story fighting for what she believed in is one A lively, intimate memoir from a marriage equality icon of the gay rights movement, describing gay life in the 1950s and 60s New York City and her longtime activism. "Brash, funny and brave." —NPR “A captivating and inspiring story of a queer woman who believed in her right to take up space and be seen.”— BuzzFeed "Windsor’s story fighting for what she believed in is one that will leave readers inspired." — NBC OUT Edie Windsor became internationally famous when she sued the US government, seeking federal recognition for her marriage to Thea Spyer, her partner of more than four decades. The Supreme Court ruled in Edie’s favor, a landmark victory that set the stage for full marriage equality in the US. Beloved by the LGBTQ community, Edie embraced her new role as an icon; she had already been living an extraordinary and groundbreaking life for decades. In this memoir, which she began before passing away in 2017 and completed by her co-writer, Edie recounts her childhood in Philadelphia, her realization that she was a lesbian, and her active social life in Greenwich Village's electrifying underground gay scene during the 1950s. Edie was also one of a select group of trailblazing women in computing, working her way up the ladder at IBM and achieving their highest technical ranking while developing software. In the early 1960s Edie met Thea, an expat from a Dutch Jewish family that fled the Nazis, and a widely respected clinical psychologist. Their partnership lasted forty-four years, until Thea died in 2009. Edie found love again, marrying Judith Kasen-Windsor in 2016. A Wild and Precious Life is remarkable portrait of an iconic woman, gay life in New York in the second half of the twentieth century, and the rise of LGBT activism.

30 review for A Wild and Precious Life: A Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    Edie Windsor never could have expected to be at the forefront of a Supreme Court decision that would ultimately provide marriage equality at the federal level in the United States, and yet that’s exactly where she found herself in 2015. While that one day in June would catapult her into being an international icon within the LGBTQIA+ community, it was merely one defining moment in a life full of them. From her first moment of personal acceptance as a lesbian to her rise up the ranks of IBM, with Edie Windsor never could have expected to be at the forefront of a Supreme Court decision that would ultimately provide marriage equality at the federal level in the United States, and yet that’s exactly where she found herself in 2015. While that one day in June would catapult her into being an international icon within the LGBTQIA+ community, it was merely one defining moment in a life full of them. From her first moment of personal acceptance as a lesbian to her rise up the ranks of IBM, with all the love and loss that came along the way, she truly lived a wild and precious life. While Edie Windsor became famous for The United States vs. Windsor, it’s almost quaint that it’s become the most discussed portion of her life—and that’s perhaps why her memoir pulls the focus away from the court. With fierce confidence tamped down by wicked fun, Edie lays out a life not totally unlike many lesbians who navigated the 1950s and 60s. After ending an early marriage to a man, she grabbed at every opportunity she could, eventually entering the world of IBM as a computer programmer and finding love that would last four decades. She attacks these sections, spelling out the facts, warts and all, in her trademark firecracker style. Unfortunately, Edie died before completing this book. Fortunately, her co-author, Joshua Lyon, picked up the pieces and delivered an incredibly moving portrait. Lyon leaves Edie’s voice intact, letting her guide the action. But he also adds sections after every chapter which give greater depth and historical context for what was happening at the time. Through his own research as well as her own files, he provides a rich examination of both Edie and the world she occupied. Rather than seeing Edie only as she saw herself, Lyon taps into a host of contemporaries, including himself, who knew her. And while no one glosses over the difficult portions of her life, the result is a true celebration. Inspiring and deeply entertaining, A Wild and Precious Life shows what all memoirs should be. Note: I received a free ARC of this book through NetGalley.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jodi

    Edie Windsor's best-known legacy will forever be the 2013 Supreme Court case of The United States vs. Windsor. This case overturned the section of the Defense of Marriage Act which stated that only one woman and one man could claim the rights associated with marriage, including inheritance rights. Windsor had been forced to pay inheritance taxes on her deceased spouse Thea Spyer's estate that she wouldn't have had to pay if either she or her spouse had been male. Windsor's case brought American Edie Windsor's best-known legacy will forever be the 2013 Supreme Court case of The United States vs. Windsor. This case overturned the section of the Defense of Marriage Act which stated that only one woman and one man could claim the rights associated with marriage, including inheritance rights. Windsor had been forced to pay inheritance taxes on her deceased spouse Thea Spyer's estate that she wouldn't have had to pay if either she or her spouse had been male. Windsor's case brought American LGBT people and same-sex relationships further along the path to full legal equality. This is not what A Wild and Precious Life is about. This is a full memoir of Windsor's life, written with plenty of assistance by Joshua Lyon. Windsor died in 2017, so Lyon interviewed other people who had been part of Windsor's life to complete the job. The book alternates between Windsor's wonderfully intelligent voice and amazing stories and passages by Lyon that provide another point of view or some historical context. For example, after Windsor recounts her relatively comfortable adolescence in Philadelphia during World War II, Lyon mentions that Thea Spyer, her future spouse, was escaping the Nazis in the Netherlands at that time. Windsor's story is an amazing one of a determined, brilliant, willful, and confident woman trying to create the best life for herself and, eventually, the love of her life. She was born Edith Schlain, but in her early 20s, she asked the man who wanted to marry her to change his last name to Windsor because she didn't wish to be Mrs. Weiner. He complied, and she ended up divorcing him after 6 months when she realized that she was never going to be a straight woman. (The man, Saul, changed his last name back to Weiner, but Edie remained Windsor for the rest of her life.) Windsor's life encompassed many key moments in 20th century American history before she became a part of early 21st century history. Her descriptions of lesbian life in the 1950s and 1960s are valuable for anyone interested in that time and place. So is her account of her career as an early computer programmer at IBM. She became well-known for her skills at debugging programs. Technology would remain an important interest of hers. She would have the first IBM personal computer in New York City. Edie and Thea both left a trail of broken hearts behind them, but eventually, they found each other. Their love story is complex and fascinating. They eventually begin to pass on some hard-earned good advice, including using a number system to describe their anger (similar to the pain scale a medical doctor uses), "keep it hot", and "don't postpone joy". Even after Thea was weakened by MS and Edie became her caretaker, they practiced what they preached. This book will no doubt be inspirational for many gay and bisexual people. It is also a fantastic story of love, persistence, and the American quest for freedom and authenticity. Thanks to NetGalley for providing an ARC, and to St. Martin's Press for granting my wish at NetGalley, in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Edie Windsor really did lead a wild and precious life! Edie had a brilliant mind, a passion for life, and the stubbornness you need to make love last. She became internationally famous for taking on the supreme court regarding discrimination against the LGBTQ community, but while incredibly important, that case came in the last decade of her life and this book focuses more on all the living she did both before and after. Given where we find ourselves today and that Edie literally had to fight the Edie Windsor really did lead a wild and precious life! Edie had a brilliant mind, a passion for life, and the stubbornness you need to make love last. She became internationally famous for taking on the supreme court regarding discrimination against the LGBTQ community, but while incredibly important, that case came in the last decade of her life and this book focuses more on all the living she did both before and after. Given where we find ourselves today and that Edie literally had to fight the government for the rights many heterosexuals take for granted, I believe this is a particularly poignant and timely story with love and discrimination the two recurring and intertwined themes. As she passed away before this book was completed, her co-author wisely chose to intersperse the chapters with tidbits from her loved ones as well as history. Edie lived from The Great Depression though wars, the civil rights movement, and the beginning of AIDS and it was interesting to hear her take on major historical events. So many of us need the reminder of the stories of others throughout history. The story of a gay woman who had to hide who she was and who she loved, who excelled in a field largely dominated by men, who still managed to be bold and unapologetic, is one for us all. Thank you to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for an advanced copy in exchange for my honest review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bob H

    This is a powerful and lively biography of a long and adventurous life. It's not about the historic U.S. v. Windsor Supreme Court case -- but we learn just how much Edie Windsor and Thea Spyer meant to each other over 40 years together, and how much their marriage meant when it came time for Ms. Windsor to file suit. And, reading about Ms. Windsor's tumultuous life, and pioneering career in high tech, a reader might not find it surprising that she took the leadership role she did. We read of her This is a powerful and lively biography of a long and adventurous life. It's not about the historic U.S. v. Windsor Supreme Court case -- but we learn just how much Edie Windsor and Thea Spyer meant to each other over 40 years together, and how much their marriage meant when it came time for Ms. Windsor to file suit. And, reading about Ms. Windsor's tumultuous life, and pioneering career in high tech, a reader might not find it surprising that she took the leadership role she did. We read of her life and times, of a New York LGBT scene from the closeted 1950s to the Stonewall period and onward, and of her own rising self-consciousness and confidence. This is mostly autobiographical, in the first person, well under way when she died in 2017. In that sense, the story told "with Joshua Lyon" does not seem ghost-written; rather, Mr. Lyon did a sensitive job of adding commentary and context with each chapter, and completed the book with considerable research in Ms. Windsor's accumulated papers, letters and notes. In that sense, he was a kind and intelligent curator of her literary estate, and her biography is a luminous and life-affirming story. Others, has Mr. Lyon notes, can and should write more about aspects of her life and her legal importance. Here, however, Ms. Windsor speaks to us, and she comes to vivid life. Highly recommend.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jeimy

    I find myself crying, thankful that this account exists so that I could bear witness to such a lovely, long-lasting relationship. Despite the fact that she was well-known among NYC’s lesbian community, I had never heard of Edie Windsor before her landmark Supreme Court case. A case that was being argued on March 27, 2013 as Gloria and I were getting married in New York City’s Carl Schurz Park. Gloria and I—as well as countless other LGBTQ+ couples—owe a debt of gratitude to Edie’s grit and I find myself crying, thankful that this account exists so that I could bear witness to such a lovely, long-lasting relationship. Despite the fact that she was well-known among NYC’s lesbian community, I had never heard of Edie Windsor before her landmark Supreme Court case. A case that was being argued on March 27, 2013 as Gloria and I were getting married in New York City’s Carl Schurz Park. Gloria and I—as well as countless other LGBTQ+ couples—owe a debt of gratitude to Edie’s grit and determination and I wish more people would read this book so that they might not just understand that we are all just humans or that love is love, but also that this brave woman is a pioneer and a hero who deserves acclaim and recognition across the USA.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susie Dumond

    Edie Windsor rose to national fame as an LGBT activist in 2013 as the lead plaintiff in United States v. Windsor, the Supreme Court case that overturned the Defense of Marriage Act. But before becoming the queer icon many remember her as today, she led what is truly a wild and precious life. In this memoir, she looks back on exploring her identity, queer life in 1960s New York, and her decades long relationship with her wife, Thea Spyer. Edie Windsor was a legend, absolutely original and Edie Windsor rose to national fame as an LGBT activist in 2013 as the lead plaintiff in United States v. Windsor, the Supreme Court case that overturned the Defense of Marriage Act. But before becoming the queer icon many remember her as today, she led what is truly a wild and precious life. In this memoir, she looks back on exploring her identity, queer life in 1960s New York, and her decades long relationship with her wife, Thea Spyer. Edie Windsor was a legend, absolutely original and inimitable. And the Edie we all saw on TV interviews and in pride parades is only part of the story. She was a firecracker, and her tale is full of surprises and personality that you wouldn't necessarily expect if you only know her as the nice old lady waving from the Supreme Court steps. Her relationship with Thea was a bit tumultuous, but is also incredibly inspiring. Her co-writer, Joshua Lyons, ended up with a much tougher job than he realized going in, as Windsor passed away unexpectedly before the memoir was completed. I really admire how he chose to complete the book. Lyons says in the introduction that he didn't feel comfortable writing in Windsor's voice without her review and approval, so he chose to supplement what was already written with interviews with her family and friends, discoveries from her personal files, and his own comments on working with her. This works incredibly well, and makes for such a rich and meaningful view of Windsor's life. I absolutely adored this book and walked away with many life lessons on love, self-exploration, and living authentically. I'm incredibly grateful to Windsor, and to Lyons for making sure her story was told in the way she wanted it to be. Thanks to St. Martin's Press for the advanced copy in exchange for my honest opinion. I can't wait for everyone to read this book in October!

  7. 4 out of 5

    April Taylor

    Edie Windsor didn't become an LGBTQ+ icon by choice, but her decision to fight for equal rights was truly life-changing for many people in the LGBTQ+ community (myself included). If it wasn't for Windsor's battle to avoid paying inheritance taxes after her partner of 40 years died, same-sex marriage would probably still be illegal in the United States. Thankfully, she not only fought that battle but won. I'm grateful for her personal sacrifices every single day because they made it possible for Edie Windsor didn't become an LGBTQ+ icon by choice, but her decision to fight for equal rights was truly life-changing for many people in the LGBTQ+ community (myself included). If it wasn't for Windsor's battle to avoid paying inheritance taxes after her partner of 40 years died, same-sex marriage would probably still be illegal in the United States. Thankfully, she not only fought that battle but won. I'm grateful for her personal sacrifices every single day because they made it possible for me to marry the love of my life. This book is so much more than an examination of that very important court case, though. It's a true autobiography that covers much of Windsor's life in the '50s and '60s. There are also biographical sections that were pieced together by the co-writer after Windsor passed away in 2017. Readers are taken on a wild journey through Windsor's life, including her six-month first marriage to a man and the extremely turbulent beginning of the 40-year relationship that ultimately changed U.S. law. Windsor was rightfully known as a firecracker. She was also a brilliant IBM technology manager whose love of computers certainly made yet another notable difference in the nation's development. From 1958 to 1975 she worked her way up the IBM chain, which led to her being the first person in New York City to have an IBM PC. This book is inspiring, tragic, romantic, turbulent, and triumphant. Highly recommended to everyone, not just members of the LGBTQ+ community. Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for providing an ARC. This review contains my honest, unbiased opinion.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stella

    The images of Edie Windsor on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court steps, with her arms raised in triumph, beautiful in her dark suit and pink and orange scarf, is one of those images that will forever be part of history. As the lead plaintiff in United States v. Windsor, the Supreme Court case that overturned the Defense of Marriage Act, Edie Windsor rose to fame as an LGBT activist in 2013. A Wild and Precious Life is Edie's story. This memoir, with the assistance of Joshua Lyon, is one of a The images of Edie Windsor on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court steps, with her arms raised in triumph, beautiful in her dark suit and pink and orange scarf, is one of those images that will forever be part of history. As the lead plaintiff in United States v. Windsor, the Supreme Court case that overturned the Defense of Marriage Act, Edie Windsor rose to fame as an LGBT activist in 2013. A Wild and Precious Life is Edie's story. This memoir, with the assistance of Joshua Lyon, is one of a powerful, dynamic, and inspiring woman who from birth, was a spitfire. Brilliant, funny, open, honest and determined, Edie is a powerful example of a woman who lived her life by her own terms. While she is most famous because of who she loved, she contained multitudes. Throughout this book, I was most overwhelming impressed by Edie's brilliance. Her work with programming and IBM was so....beyond and just...inspiring. What an icon for women who code/in tech. This is a book that should be required reading for everyone. It's the story of women's rights, of LGBTQ rights, of human rights. It's a love story, it's a memoir, it's an adventure. Edie Windsor is an American hero and statues of her should be erected in every city. What a woman. Thanks to NetGalley and the publishers for the opportunity to read and review this book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristine

    A Wild and Precious Life by Edie Windsor & Joshua Lyon is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early October. An assembled first-person autobiography from written correspondence, interviews with loved ones, mementos, newsprint, and tenuous, yet savant memories as Windsor had grown more advanced in age before her death in late September 2017. Gosh, she's so grownup, alluring, zoftig, and charismatic. She and Thea meet in 1963, bond as dance partners, both being Jewish, highly motivated, and A Wild and Precious Life by Edie Windsor & Joshua Lyon is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early October. An assembled first-person autobiography from written correspondence, interviews with loved ones, mementos, newsprint, and tenuous, yet savant memories as Windsor had grown more advanced in age before her death in late September 2017. Gosh, she's so grownup, alluring, zoftig, and charismatic. She and Thea meet in 1963, bond as dance partners, both being Jewish, highly motivated, and devoted to their love, art, and their work, before maturing and growing together as a couple. Not long after they marry in Canada in 2007, Thea is diagnosed with MS and experiences a quick ascent in the severity of her symptoms. Around the time of the spread of AIDS, Windsor becomes involved in outreach groups and works in advocacy for elder gays and lesbians, which comes in horrible handy after Thea’s death in early 2009 when a giant estate tax as an unofficially married couple is billed to her. Fortunately, her case goes to court, her win refunds her tax payment, and President Obama turns against the Defense of Marriage Act.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jill Meyer

    Edie Windsor must have been quite a character. Windsor was the lead plaintiff in "United States vs Windsor", the landmark Supreme Court case which overturned Section 3 of DOMA, and led the way to gay marriage country-wide. But Edie Windsor was a news-maker and trend-setter her entire life. Edie Windsor began her memoir, "A Wild and Precious Life: A Memoir", after the court case. She died before the book was finished and her co-author Joshua Lyon finished it up, and annotated much of what Windsor Edie Windsor must have been quite a character. Windsor was the lead plaintiff in "United States vs Windsor", the landmark Supreme Court case which overturned Section 3 of DOMA, and led the way to gay marriage country-wide. But Edie Windsor was a news-maker and trend-setter her entire life. Edie Windsor began her memoir, "A Wild and Precious Life: A Memoir", after the court case. She died before the book was finished and her co-author Joshua Lyon finished it up, and annotated much of what Windsor wrote. The resulting book is like a wild-ride through her girlhood in Philadelphia, through her college years, and into her career in computers. But as important as her career was to her, she became very active in the LGBTQ movement. She writes a lot about how she came out to herself, and then led a double life for many years - straight at work, gay at home. She also writes about her long time affair/ultimate marriage to Thea Spyer. As with most memoirs, Edie wrote about people and events as seen through her eyes. Joshua Lyon occasionally "cleans up" after Edie by interviewing people and gently correcting Edie's memory, (if needed). It's an interesting memoir.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Peebee

    It must be immensely challenging to be working with someone on their memoir, only to have them pass away before the book is finished. I think the coauthor did an amazing job of filling in the blanks left at Edie Windsor's death. She was a remarkable woman who made a significant difference with the "wild and precious life" she had. I have worked in LGBT advocacy for several decades, and while our paths did not cross while she was alive, some people I know are mentioned in the book, and am It must be immensely challenging to be working with someone on their memoir, only to have them pass away before the book is finished. I think the coauthor did an amazing job of filling in the blanks left at Edie Windsor's death. She was a remarkable woman who made a significant difference with the "wild and precious life" she had. I have worked in LGBT advocacy for several decades, and while our paths did not cross while she was alive, some people I know are mentioned in the book, and am reasonably familiar with the world she inhabited. I went to the Supreme Court the day her case was argued before the Court, and read some of the briefing in her case, and so it was wonderful to know the woman behind the pleadings. Because she's gone, the book gets a pass on whether editing should have been tighter and whether the flow could have been better, as all of those are things that could only be fixed with the assistance of the memoir's subject. If you care about the subject matter and find memoirs interesting, then you'll want to make sure you read this book. I was provided with an advance copy of this book by Netgalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sage

    This was such a stunning book. It made me laugh and brought me to tears and made me feel so much pride and joy. Edie had such a badass, wild, amazing, incredible, inspirational life and so full of joy. Her relationship with Thea made me feel so many feels, they were so vibrant and passionate and BRB CRYING FOREVER. So many passages in the book made me exclaim out loud in joy, happiness, sadness. Edie had such a vibrant, interesting, unusual life, and seized the day for sure! Also, I loved This was such a stunning book. It made me laugh and brought me to tears and made me feel so much pride and joy. Edie had such a badass, wild, amazing, incredible, inspirational life and so full of joy. Her relationship with Thea made me feel so many feels, they were so vibrant and passionate and BRB CRYING FOREVER. So many passages in the book made me exclaim out loud in joy, happiness, sadness. Edie had such a vibrant, interesting, unusual life, and seized the day for sure! Also, I loved hearing about her experiences in Greenwich Village because I am super familiar with the area and knew pretty much everywhere that she was talking about! 1000000% would recommend.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary Vivian Gohd

    I enjoyed this mostly because its focus was primarily on Edie's relationships and life, not so much on the legal events. But what made the book so thoroughly good for me is that her life and relationships take the reader through a good cross section of LGBTQ+ history in America at its most important turning points. I felt thankful for having read it as I felt it broadened my appreciation for LGBTQ+ challenges past and present.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I really like Edie Windsor, so it was fun to learn more about her life. The details were messier than I'd realized, but it is also a relief to learn more about a celebrity you admire and end up still liking them just as much. As a sidenote, I'd always wondered how Edie and Thea were so wealthy and was quite surprised to find a brief mention of the fact that Edie was a successfully gambler and good at counting cards!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lynda Lippin

    In this memoir, written by Edie Windsor with commentary by Joshua Lyon, we get a history of gay NY, of technology and computing, and of LGBTQ rights. And all this fascinating history is intertwined in Windsor's life and love stories. I wish I had known her, and has shared just a little bit in her life and love. She was a powerhouse until the day she died, still planning events and activities.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Fay Jacobs

    This is a fascinating book, part memoir part biography, telling the story of a remarkable woman. It reads like a novel, gives insights into the social climate for the LGBTQ community from the 1950s through the 2010s....the growth and change in attitudes and events were momentous and this book shows and tells exactly how Edie Windsor influenced it all. Terrific book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    The best book I have read in ages. I generally can't finish non-fiction, I really have to have a plot. This one kept me laughing and crying and turning pages. A very compelling subject, but the writing is also just superb.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Pemme

    I loved this book. Edie's personality came alive through her voice and her description of her life. I especially liked the early adult years in New York, but her love with Thea was so moving. Their relationship seemed very real - two strong women living and loving together.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Heather Bennett

    A Wild and Precious Life is truly a fascinating look at Edie Windsor's life and the LGBTQ life in the 50's and 60s. Well written and interesting.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    A highly enjoyable and very conversational memoir. But a bit short on the depth and detail I’d hoped for.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Roland

    This book was very good. It was interesting to learn about the 50's in New York City.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Thank goodness I started off the year when a good book!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hufflepuff Wallflower

    I loved reading about this queen's trailblazing life!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alanna Maddox

    This was pretty good and a very interesting story about someone I knew nothing about.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Janna Singer-Baefsky

    Such an amazing, empowering story of love, determination and the importance of activism & advocacy. I couldn't put it down!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie King

    Edie is the best. Edie is amazing. She made all our lives better. It was an honor to have met her at one of her speeches.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chryssanthe

    A really fun read. Edie Windsor led an extraordinary life - and not just for the reason that made her famous. It was the life she had that made her the person who would become such an advocate of LGBTQ+ rights and take her case to the Supreme Court. But this story, is a coming of age tale, a tale of lifelong romance, of family dynamics, of feminism, of advocacy, of grief and of being true to oneself. It is a beautiful story.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christina

  29. 5 out of 5

    nancy a prout

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nadia

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