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Grown and Flown: How to Support Your Teen, Stay Close as a Family, and Raise Independent Adults

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PARENTING NEVER ENDS. From the founders of the #1 site for parents of teens and young adults comes an essential guide for building strong relationships with your teens and preparing them to successfully launch into adulthood The high school and college years: an extended roller coaster of academics, friends, first loves, first break-ups, driver’s ed, jobs, and everything in PARENTING NEVER ENDS. From the founders of the #1 site for parents of teens and young adults comes an essential guide for building strong relationships with your teens and preparing them to successfully launch into adulthood The high school and college years: an extended roller coaster of academics, friends, first loves, first break-ups, driver’s ed, jobs, and everything in between. Kids are constantly changing and how we parent them must change, too. But how do we stay close as a family as our lives move apart? Enter the co-founders of Grown and Flown, Lisa Heffernan and Mary Dell Harrington. In the midst of guiding their own kids through this transition, they launched what has become the largest website and online community for parents of fifteen to twenty-five year olds. Now they’ve compiled new takeaways and fresh insights from all that they’ve learned into this handy, must-have guide. GROWN AND FLOWN is a one-stop resource for parenting teenagers, leading up to―and through―high school and those first years of independence. It covers everything from the monumental (how to let your kids go) to the mundane (how to shop for a dorm room). Organized by topic―such as academics, anxiety and mental health, college life―it features a combination of stories, advice from professionals, and practical sidebars. Consider this your parenting lifeline: an easy-to-use manual that offers support and perspective. GROWN AND FLOWN is required reading for anyone looking to raise an adult with whom you have an enduring, profound connection.


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PARENTING NEVER ENDS. From the founders of the #1 site for parents of teens and young adults comes an essential guide for building strong relationships with your teens and preparing them to successfully launch into adulthood The high school and college years: an extended roller coaster of academics, friends, first loves, first break-ups, driver’s ed, jobs, and everything in PARENTING NEVER ENDS. From the founders of the #1 site for parents of teens and young adults comes an essential guide for building strong relationships with your teens and preparing them to successfully launch into adulthood The high school and college years: an extended roller coaster of academics, friends, first loves, first break-ups, driver’s ed, jobs, and everything in between. Kids are constantly changing and how we parent them must change, too. But how do we stay close as a family as our lives move apart? Enter the co-founders of Grown and Flown, Lisa Heffernan and Mary Dell Harrington. In the midst of guiding their own kids through this transition, they launched what has become the largest website and online community for parents of fifteen to twenty-five year olds. Now they’ve compiled new takeaways and fresh insights from all that they’ve learned into this handy, must-have guide. GROWN AND FLOWN is a one-stop resource for parenting teenagers, leading up to―and through―high school and those first years of independence. It covers everything from the monumental (how to let your kids go) to the mundane (how to shop for a dorm room). Organized by topic―such as academics, anxiety and mental health, college life―it features a combination of stories, advice from professionals, and practical sidebars. Consider this your parenting lifeline: an easy-to-use manual that offers support and perspective. GROWN AND FLOWN is required reading for anyone looking to raise an adult with whom you have an enduring, profound connection.

30 review for Grown and Flown: How to Support Your Teen, Stay Close as a Family, and Raise Independent Adults

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amyiw

    Instead of "Grown and Flown: How to Support Your Teen, Stay Close as a Family, and Raise Independent Adults" it should be "... :How to help launch your kid to a University with success" not ... Independent adults. This book goes ad nauseam into how to prepare you child for the University. Yes, there is some talk of we need tech and some kids will go into community college (no some kids don't even do that!) So how do you launch them? Or what about the kids that do drop out, 58% after the first Instead of "Grown and Flown: How to Support Your Teen, Stay Close as a Family, and Raise Independent Adults" it should be "... :How to help launch your kid to a University with success" not ... Independent adults. This book goes ad nauseam into how to prepare you child for the University. Yes, there is some talk of we need tech and some kids will go into community college (no some kids don't even do that!) So how do you launch them? Or what about the kids that do drop out, 58% after the first year of a University, yes, some go to local C.C./J.C. but what about the other So 84% of kids graduate high school, 93% when adding G.E.D. or other (National Center for Ed... and that article claims 47% earn at least an AA, 37% a bachelors and 9% higher degree. So less that 1/2 go on to even get an A.A. or A.S. degree. So using those numbers 10% of kids get an A.A. that don't go on and get a University degree. So there are a lot more that end up without any college degree. Where is the support for those that don't even look into that, that go into cosmetology like she said. This doesn't help those people. And unluckily, a lot of those people are the one where the kids had a failure to launch and come home and try working, and going back to school, and working, and... whatever. This book failed there completely and if you are going to claim "Raise Independent Adults" you cannot hand pick only the ones that are going to University. And yes, a lot of famous people started at community college like Tom Hanks, etc... (I think that is one that is missed) So, really this is halfway for me as I'm looking at highschool for my daughter and yes, we will probably look at Universities for her. My son is a failure to launch child. I believe she did touch on some of the issues he had/has, what to do now, not so much but there were some. As for my H.S. student, yes there is a bit of good advice mixed in with A LOT of "stories" and these are stories of helicopter parents that are into buying everything that is needed for the dorm, lists and lists of necessities, it is enough for me to want to crawl under a rock. I was like that with my first but I think it does a disservices and the kids are not adjusted as well to independence. Somethings have to be learned on their own. And because we do this today, our kids fail in the first year away. Independence isn't taught, it is given. Yes, you give the values to follow and safety net but over all they have to make the choices. If they have no practice, only advice, that isn't good enough. I think this did go into this nicely at some points but it also then wrote lists and lists of things to note at the dorm. OK at that point it should be the child noting these things mom. You already went into this with the preparing through H.S., argh. So 15-20% of the book is talking about moving in your child and want to "do" for him and the emotions that go along. The emotions that are touched upon are the sadness, crying, very emotional. Yes, she does mention that not all mothers do this and those that don't, doesn't mean that they are not emotional, and those that do, doesn't mean they are not happy for their child. OK then why do we have to get several stories on crying and emotional moms, how to deal with the emotions, the different ways to cope. Is this "How to Cope with Your Child Going to the University" or is this, how to raise an independent adult and their emotions. So there was a lot of filler to get through to get to some very good information. And then there was a lot of, "yes, I already know that but thanks for reminding me". It was good, on the fence to as I though 3 1/2 but it just wasn't great and didn't answer the front cover completely. So 3 I think. I will use some of the advice that I bookmarked.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    As a former teen who drove off in a snit to move herself into the dorms (soiled nest much?), I deeply appreciate the insights shared here that are a great blend of both practical experience & professional experts to navigate 21st century transitional parenting. Several books about this subject tend to lean towards droll or dry academic but this warmly engaging one is neither, organized well by topics and timeframe after an intro that could be edited down a bit. An optimal time to get the As a former teen who drove off in a snit to move herself into the dorms (soiled nest much?), I deeply appreciate the insights shared here that are a great blend of both practical experience & professional experts to navigate 21st century transitional parenting. Several books about this subject tend to lean towards droll or dry academic but this warmly engaging one is neither, organized well by topics and timeframe after an intro that could be edited down a bit. An optimal time to get the most from this book is from about the sophomore year of high school but I will come back to this plenty as the parent of a senior. I particularly found the 9 questions to assess a teen's college readiness helpful, and some of the tips shared in College Admissions were entirely new to me & others in this boat I quickly messaged about them when I thought I'd read every blog post possible about the process already. Thank you for the opportunity to review this ARC!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Nothing earth shattering and leaned way more involved than I think they were trying to advocate. Feel like both sides presented but still overtly involved in the launch.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laura K

    2.5 stars. Audiobook. It was ok. Some decent points but nothing all that revelatory. Also, some of the anecdotes I found to be annoying and humble bragging. I liked this line: "There are only a few days in life that are like none other."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Judy F.

    A helpful guide for parents of teenagers. Once they get by the too long introduction, the book is full of good advice, well-presented. My kids are long out of college, but I will give them this book to guide them with our grandchildren.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lee Woodruff

    Any parent of a teenager knows that this stage of child-rearing is where the real work begins. The physical exhaustion of chasing toddlers is no match for the extended roller coaster of school, social life, mean kids, friendships, broken hearts, first loves and potential dangers that lurk as we help our children navigate the shoals of high school and college. As kids change, so must our parenting. The challenge of staying close and connected as a family only increases. That’s why the authors Any parent of a teenager knows that this stage of child-rearing is where the real work begins. The physical exhaustion of chasing toddlers is no match for the extended roller coaster of school, social life, mean kids, friendships, broken hearts, first loves and potential dangers that lurk as we help our children navigate the shoals of high school and college. As kids change, so must our parenting. The challenge of staying close and connected as a family only increases. That’s why the authors created the website Grown & Flown, which reaches millions of parents each month with children ages 15-25. This book is a wonderfully rich compendium of so much great information and wisdom, from the mundane (shopping for the dorm) to the serious (what if my child self-harms?) This book is packed with highly readable practical advice, individual stories and professional guidance. It’s a great gift for every parent, even if you aren’t there yet.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    In the real world, I would give this book a four-and-a-half. Subject-wise, this book is just what I need as my oldest son starts high school. And, there are some part (College Admissions, and the first year of college) that I don't fully need yet, but will come back to. The only reason that I won't give it five stars is that the parts of the book taken from the authors' blog sometimes seem at awkward spots to me. Maybe this is just a matter of opinion. Overall, I would highly recommend this book In the real world, I would give this book a four-and-a-half. Subject-wise, this book is just what I need as my oldest son starts high school. And, there are some part (College Admissions, and the first year of college) that I don't fully need yet, but will come back to. The only reason that I won't give it five stars is that the parts of the book taken from the authors' blog sometimes seem at awkward spots to me. Maybe this is just a matter of opinion. Overall, I would highly recommend this book to anyone parenting high school and college-age kids.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dawnt

    4.5 stars - Would have loved this book a couple of years ago, as most of it deals with the end of high school years. There is definitely some awesome advice in those chapters, but for me was a little late. The final chapters on the college years were really were this book hit home (as you would imagine), and there were parts that I felt were written specifically for me. It described feelings that seemed to come directly from my heart. At one point, I had to put the book down and just let it out 4.5 stars - Would have loved this book a couple of years ago, as most of it deals with the end of high school years. There is definitely some awesome advice in those chapters, but for me was a little late. The final chapters on the college years were really were this book hit home (as you would imagine), and there were parts that I felt were written specifically for me. It described feelings that seemed to come directly from my heart. At one point, I had to put the book down and just let it out and have a good cry.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Hillary

    Loved this book! My oldest when I read this is just starting high school. So I enjoyed the perspective it gave me looking forward. It’s a great road to be heading down and now my visibility is a little better. That being said, this book definitely focuses on life for 17-22 year olds and kids leaving home. There are many chapters dedicated to college and leaving home. Great chapters for sure. This will be one for me to re-read in a couple years for sure.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ally

    I've been a fan of the Grown and Flown blog and FB posts for over a year and was thrilled when the book version was announced. I downloaded the audible the day it was released and listened to over the next two days. I really relate to the topics and am grateful someone recognized the need for a community, resources and a book on this stage of parenting. I highly recommend to anyone with older teens.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Listened on Audible. Meh. It was mostly common sense. If you went away to college, you know everything they’re going to say in this book. There was one section that explained why we miss our children so much when they leave for college, where I did feel like, yes, this put my thoughts into the right words. The rest of it was just okay.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Phaedra

    A lot of this falls under common sense once a person sees it laid out in a tidy fashion. the DOH, of course! factor hits. Some anecdotes I really connected with, some not so much. I did like the lists of practical advice for college admissions, dorms etc. Always good to have those freshly in mind through the end of high school

  13. 5 out of 5

    Liz Askew

    I can definitely see myself re-reading this again in the near future. Real life advice from those who have been there from Middle School through college graduation.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    A wealth of knowledge for any parent helping their child transition from high school to college. Shopping lists for dorm rooms to how to keep yourself emotionally strong throughout the process.

  15. 5 out of 5

    BanginBooks

    5 stars

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Thinking about buying this one

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    Meh. It's a bunch of stuff to teach your high schoolers ... but I'd rather just hand them the book and have them read it. I know most of that stuff.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Interesting ideas for parents. this was a goodreads giveaway

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Brown

    This was useful, especially the sections related to academics. The sections about college weren't relevant at the minute but I'm definitely going to be re-reading closer to the time!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    This book was really helpful. I recommend it to parents of both high school and college students. It contains a mix of research, interviews with kids and parents, and great advice.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I wish I had read this book years ago!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jana

    This book had some really helpful parts and some parts that I didn't find as helpful. It is worth a read and I will read some sections again as we are closer to the college drop off.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sanna

    Recommend for parents of HS juniors and up!! Lots of good things to consider and addresses very clearly the emotions parents feel upon leaving children at college and starting a new stage of life.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Judith von Kirchbach

    Concise and helpful guidebook for the teenage years that shines light on some of the speed bumps that may come up while keeping things light and highly readable. Wonderful conversation starters and practical ideas for when things are just rolling along and time is going all to quickly, addressing the light stuff as well as the tough stuff and keeping the focus on raising independent adults that enjoy their parents company for a coffee ...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Janell DeGennaro

  26. 4 out of 5

    J

  27. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Hutchinson

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tanaya

  29. 5 out of 5

    Angela Marie

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

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