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Highway of Tears: A True Story of Racism, Indifference and the Pursuit of Justice for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

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A penetrating and deeply moving account of the missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls of Highway 16, and a searing indictment of the society that failed them. For decades, Indigenous women and girls have gone missing or been found murdered along an isolated stretch of highway in northwestern British Columbia. The highway is known as the Highway of Tears, and it has co A penetrating and deeply moving account of the missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls of Highway 16, and a searing indictment of the society that failed them. For decades, Indigenous women and girls have gone missing or been found murdered along an isolated stretch of highway in northwestern British Columbia. The highway is known as the Highway of Tears, and it has come to symbolize a national crisis. Journalist Jessica McDiarmid meticulously investigates the devastating effect these tragedies have had on the families of the victims and their communities, and how systemic racism and indifference has created a climate where Indigenous women and girls are over-policed, yet under-protected. Through interviews with those closest to the victims--mothers and fathers, siblings and friends--McDiarmid provides an intimate, first-hand account of their loss and unflagging fight for justice. Examining the historically fraught social and cultural tensions between settlers and Indigenous peoples in the region, McDiarmid links these cases to others across Canada--now estimated to number up to 4,000--contextualizing them within a broader examination of the undervaluing of Indigenous lives in the country. Highway of Tears is a piercing exploration of our ongoing failure to provide justice for missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, and testament to their families and communities' unwavering determination to find it.


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A penetrating and deeply moving account of the missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls of Highway 16, and a searing indictment of the society that failed them. For decades, Indigenous women and girls have gone missing or been found murdered along an isolated stretch of highway in northwestern British Columbia. The highway is known as the Highway of Tears, and it has co A penetrating and deeply moving account of the missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls of Highway 16, and a searing indictment of the society that failed them. For decades, Indigenous women and girls have gone missing or been found murdered along an isolated stretch of highway in northwestern British Columbia. The highway is known as the Highway of Tears, and it has come to symbolize a national crisis. Journalist Jessica McDiarmid meticulously investigates the devastating effect these tragedies have had on the families of the victims and their communities, and how systemic racism and indifference has created a climate where Indigenous women and girls are over-policed, yet under-protected. Through interviews with those closest to the victims--mothers and fathers, siblings and friends--McDiarmid provides an intimate, first-hand account of their loss and unflagging fight for justice. Examining the historically fraught social and cultural tensions between settlers and Indigenous peoples in the region, McDiarmid links these cases to others across Canada--now estimated to number up to 4,000--contextualizing them within a broader examination of the undervaluing of Indigenous lives in the country. Highway of Tears is a piercing exploration of our ongoing failure to provide justice for missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, and testament to their families and communities' unwavering determination to find it.

30 review for Highway of Tears: A True Story of Racism, Indifference and the Pursuit of Justice for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jaidee

    3 "empathic, well-researched but much rewriting/reorganizing needed" stars !!! Thank you to Netgalley, the author and Atria Books for a copy of this e-book in exchange for my review. There are thousands of unsolved cases of missing and/or murdered aboriginal women and adolescent girls across Canada. This is a very dark stain on our country and needed to be addressed since Colonial times. I am aghast that our refugees are given a fair number of opportunities while our indigenous people have subpar healthca 3 "empathic, well-researched but much rewriting/reorganizing needed" stars !!! Thank you to Netgalley, the author and Atria Books for a copy of this e-book in exchange for my review. There are thousands of unsolved cases of missing and/or murdered aboriginal women and adolescent girls across Canada. This is a very dark stain on our country and needed to be addressed since Colonial times. I am aghast that our refugees are given a fair number of opportunities while our indigenous people have subpar healthcare, few addiction resources and a hypervigilance on taking the children away from caregivers. The poverty on some of the reservations is abysmal and there continues to be horrible victim blaming on these first nations. This book focuses on a number of women that have gone missing or murdered in Northern British Columbia. The author compassionately and empathetically tells many of the stories through the eyes of families and loved ones. There are wonderful photographs of both the women and families and my heart broke over and over again on their pain, their struggle and their grief. The author also in a balanced way examines the constraints and inadequacies of our RCMP, government agencies and social service organizations. There is some history and sociology thrown in to give a fuller picture of why Indigenous peoples continue to be impoverished, victimized and vilified. This book could have and should have been five stars except that much of the writing was middling, the stats could have been presented in tables and the flow from facts to narrative could have been more artfully and compellingly done. This detracted from the immense importance of this topic. The research and interviews are complete. The finished product is not. May these womens' souls be blessed and rest at peace.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Valerity (Val)

    This true crime book is the first by journalist Jessica McDiarmid. She tackles the sad, yet powerful topic of the many missing and murdered young aboriginal females who have disappeared through the years along the road that is called The Highway of Tears in Canada. It gives some good background on the road and on the young women who have disappeared.. Some were eventually found dead, others never were found at all, leaving the families in agony, always to wonder about their loved one. The pain i This true crime book is the first by journalist Jessica McDiarmid. She tackles the sad, yet powerful topic of the many missing and murdered young aboriginal females who have disappeared through the years along the road that is called The Highway of Tears in Canada. It gives some good background on the road and on the young women who have disappeared.. Some were eventually found dead, others never were found at all, leaving the families in agony, always to wonder about their loved one. The pain is only intensified when occasionally a young white female would go missing and the response would be so great to help the family search. It just exaggerated the size of the canyon of difference between what happened when an aboriginal family needed help after their child went missing, namely not much. No great outpouring of people and sympathy and funds for flyers and a reward. No helicopters or trained search dogs. Many mostly ignored for the first couple of days, turned away with excuses. This is a really good read with true crime, racial bias and injustice, and more. You can see that the author has really done a deep dive on the subject Advance electronic review copy was provided by NetGalley, author Jessica McDiarmid, and the publisher. First published on my BookZone blog viewable here: https://wordpress.com/post/bookblog20...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Disclaimer: ARC via Netgalley I don’t know when I first heard about The Highway of Tears (Highway 16 in BC, from Prince George to Prince Rupert). Most likely when I was reading about women dying on the border between the US and Mexico (there are parallels). I also know that it is more of sign than an abnormality both in the US and Canada. While I have read a few books on the subject, Jessica McDiarmid’s book is one of the best. McDiarmid covers not only some of the cases Disclaimer: ARC via Netgalley I don’t know when I first heard about The Highway of Tears (Highway 16 in BC, from Prince George to Prince Rupert). Most likely when I was reading about women dying on the border between the US and Mexico (there are parallels). I also know that it is more of sign than an abnormality both in the US and Canada. While I have read a few books on the subject, Jessica McDiarmid’s book is one of the best. McDiarmid covers not only some of the cases that make up the Highway of Tears, what is more important, she spends time placing the murders in context and showing the families as more than just victims, and how such families are really not disposable no matter what society thinks. McDiarmid also presents the viewpoint of police as well as the reasons for the far less than cordial relationships between the Indigenous Community and police. She also details the various community efforts to get answers. But if you are picking up this book, you know that the story isn’t a happy one. It is to McDiarmid’s credit that she not only presents the victims as real people whose absence greatly affects those around. The taking one life impacts a community and that is detailed. More importantly, the history of the area in general and in terms of Indigenous populations as well as their treatment at the hands of the government. She also refers to other cases, such as the Pickton murders and the Gilbert Paul Jordan murders. The Highway of Tears isn’t quite as unique as you may hope it to be. The report that came out at the end of the summer was not referred to in this digital ARC, not surprising given the time frame. In part, the book does also challenge us to do better – not only terms of Canada and the Indigenous Women there but also those in the United States because there really isn’t that much difference unless it is that Canada situation is drawing more national and international attention. McDiarmid’s writing is engrossing and she carries the reader well. She lets the emotions of the people speak for themselves instead of trying gilding them with flowery phrases. It is the language that makes the details of the book far more chilling.

  4. 5 out of 5

    ElphaReads

    Thanks to NetGalley for providing me with an eARC of this book! I'm a huge true crime nut, but that said I am definitely aware that there are a number of problematic issues that come with the genre. One of those is that many of the stories that really take off due to media scrutiny involve victims who are white women, whereas victims who are POC tend to be lost in the shuffle. One of the most tragic and egregious examples of this is the Highway of Tears in Canada, where over the years Thanks to NetGalley for providing me with an eARC of this book! I'm a huge true crime nut, but that said I am definitely aware that there are a number of problematic issues that come with the genre. One of those is that many of the stories that really take off due to media scrutiny involve victims who are white women, whereas victims who are POC tend to be lost in the shuffle. One of the most tragic and egregious examples of this is the Highway of Tears in Canada, where over the years dozens of Indigenous Women have gone missing and/or wound up murdered. It's a story that has so many components, players, victims, and systemic problems, that I've wanted to dig into it but haven't been able to find many centralized or consolidated sources of information. So when I found out about HIGHWAY OF TEARS by Jessica McDiarmid, I knew that I absolutely needed to read it. For decades, Indigenous Women along Highway 16 in British Columbia, Canada have gone missing, and in many cases have turned up dead. Very little headway has been made in the investigations, and as more women disappear and die, very little changes. More attention has been brought to this horrific travesty in recent years, and HIGHWAY OF TEARS is a book that tries to bring together not only the stories of the victims, but also tries to show how social injustice for Indigenous populations in Canada has made these women more vulnerable, and more invisible. This is a gut-wrenching read, but it's also incredibly necessary that attention be put on this horrible ongoing trend. What I appreciated most about this book is that McDiarmid does her very best to give a huge swath of the victims a lot of time on the page, letting us get to know them, the hardships that they faced in life, and the lives and people that were left behind after their disappearances and/or murders. Far too often have these women been lumped together as a group, which in turn dehumanizes them and makes them more of an idea than actual people, but McDiarmid is very careful to give them each a voice. I also really, really appreciated that McDiarmid doesn't shy away from the social injustices that First Nations face in Canada, and how a Canadian society, government, and criminal justice system DEEPLY entrenched in racism has created conditions that has made these populations incredibly vulnerable. She also shows a direct line from past colonial efforts (like those horrific Residential Schools) to the effects that are still present from passed down trauma and persecution. Powerful and incredibly upsetting stuff. And finally, she also compares and contrasts other women who disappeared during this time, but got far more attention and effort put towards the investigations because they were white. HIGHWAY OF TEARS is a must read. It's well written, it's a story that needs to be told, and it shines a light on an ongoing and terrible injustice.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    "A penetrating and deeply moving account of the missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls of Highway 16, and a searing indictment of the society that failed them." I don't really have anything to add. Read this book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Desiree

    Huge thank you to Atria Books and NetGalley for gifting me a copy of this book. This was such a heartbreaking read. I had to step away and take breaks while reading, therefore it took longer than it normally would for me to read a book of this size. Women and girls began disappearing along Highway 16 back in the 1990s, and now, decades later, the estimated number of connected cases is now up to 4,000. 4,000 missing or murdered women and teenage girls. Let that sink in. I wo Huge thank you to Atria Books and NetGalley for gifting me a copy of this book. This was such a heartbreaking read. I had to step away and take breaks while reading, therefore it took longer than it normally would for me to read a book of this size. Women and girls began disappearing along Highway 16 back in the 1990s, and now, decades later, the estimated number of connected cases is now up to 4,000. 4,000 missing or murdered women and teenage girls. Let that sink in. I wouldn’t even call what the police did an “investigation”. These women and their families were completely failed by those sworn to protect them. I am the mother of two daughters. I have sisters. And I cannot fathom one of my vulnerable loved ones disappearing, never to be looked for, never given much of a thought. I can’t imagine the police not taking me seriously when I demand they search for my daughter or my sister. These families had no one to count on but themselves. I think it is absolutely disgusting the way these missing and murdered women were treated. Leads weren’t followed, tips weren’t followed up on or were tossed aside and deemed irrelevant. They refused to say the cases were connected. This was a true act of racism — the fact that many of these women came from less than favorable backgrounds (drugs, prostitution, bad family life) caused the police to throw their hands up and claim they had just run away or that this was just the kind of thing that happens to someone when they live that type of lifestyle. McDiarmid is a fantastic investigative journalist. She dug deep into these stories and made me feel so much sadness for the victims and their families. Reading this book felt like watching an episode of 20/20, with the perfect mix of hard facts and a storyline. I loved that she gave us specific examples of victims so that we could put names (and faces, in fact — the book contains photos of each of the women written about) to these cases and truly grasp what their families had to go through. Some of these women have never been found. This book is very statistic heavy, so do keep that in mind when reading. I didn’t expect as many statistics, but including them assisted in painting a clear picture of the systemic racism and discrimination against Indigenous people in that area of Canada. The statistics were also helpful in piecing together just how badly these families were failed by everyone in the Canadian justice system. This was an eye-opening read and I would recommend it to anyone who likes true crime or nonfiction.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cass

    I had no idea that this kind of racism against the Indigenous people occurs in Canada, of all places. Mcdiarmid broke my heart and left me in tears and very angry. She writes about the thousands of Indigenous women and teenagers who have gone missing or found raped, tortured and murdered, along a stretch of highway in B.C. There's background on some of the victims and their families, the poverty and the apathetic attitude of the government. A definitive and well written must read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Highway of Tears is an important look at racial relations, their history, and impact on the current time. It provides the perfect balance of background information with current crime investigation so the reader can see the full scope of the issues. You will get to know the victims and their families so you can see and feel the impact of the crimes. There is quite a lot of information here that makes for a very interesting read. Thank you to NetGalley for my copy of this book in exchan Highway of Tears is an important look at racial relations, their history, and impact on the current time. It provides the perfect balance of background information with current crime investigation so the reader can see the full scope of the issues. You will get to know the victims and their families so you can see and feel the impact of the crimes. There is quite a lot of information here that makes for a very interesting read. Thank you to NetGalley for my copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Curtis Runstedler

    "She was fifteen years old. She never made it home." This is really powerful and thorough journalism (much like Tanya Talaga's Seven Fallen Feathers) that examines the missing indigenous girls and young women who died along the Highway of Tears in northern B.C. in Canada and the aftermath and resulting inquiry. I liked the victim-focused approach to the content, which is meticulously researched and very sensitive. Through each of their stories, we learn and care about the girls who were lost, an "She was fifteen years old. She never made it home." This is really powerful and thorough journalism (much like Tanya Talaga's Seven Fallen Feathers) that examines the missing indigenous girls and young women who died along the Highway of Tears in northern B.C. in Canada and the aftermath and resulting inquiry. I liked the victim-focused approach to the content, which is meticulously researched and very sensitive. Through each of their stories, we learn and care about the girls who were lost, and McDiarmid debunks the stigma of many of them being runaways - many of these girls were role models in their families and communities, they were good people even from troubled backgrounds who had hopes and dreams and ambitions, and they all wanted to live. I cared about each of them and it's a heavy hit every time you discover what happened to them, how their lives were cut so brutally short. The indigenous women in my life are some of the bravest, strongest, and most resilient people I have ever met. We also see the devastating impact these deaths have upon their families and loved ones; the alcoholism, the lifelong trauma, but also the activism and commitment to change that stems from these tragedies. McDiarmid also confronts the racism and indifference of the police, media, and non-indigeous community, particularly how indigenous lives are marginalized and forgotten, and also how these young girls were sexually exploited rather than prostitutes. The inquiry should have been launched as soon as one of those girls disappeared, and we should continue to raise awareness and more funding on public transportation and infrastructure (maybe a buddy system and increased job opportunities - maybe in the green economy?) to combat poverty and provide safer travel options and networks for these girls. She also points out the RCMP's origins as a paramilitary force, and I wonder if a municipal police force like the OPP would have been more effective for dealing with these cases? Yet the underlying problem is systemic racism, and this is the problem for the foster case system and intergenerational trauma. McDiarmid offers some possibilities for resolution, including increased funding in public transportation and more career opportunities for indigenous youth, but many of these problems are deeply rooted and there are no easy answers. Things finally seem to be happening for some these families, justice is slowly happening, but it is too long coming, and still so far to go. We can't bring these girls back but we can remember them and we can learn from them. We can create better lives for indigenous communities if we start listening and communicating. I hope that justice serves all of these girls and young women. This book will break your heart but it will also open your eyes.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    Thank you to NetGalley and Atria Books for this eGalley in exchange for an honest review. Jessica McDiarmid's debut true crime novel tackles the tough topic of murdered young women who have disappeared throughout the years. However, these aren't just any young women, they are aboriginals. These poor young women disappeared on what is known as The Highway of Tears located in Canada. The book gives insight into the road itself and the disappearance of some of these women. There were some who were Thank you to NetGalley and Atria Books for this eGalley in exchange for an honest review. Jessica McDiarmid's debut true crime novel tackles the tough topic of murdered young women who have disappeared throughout the years. However, these aren't just any young women, they are aboriginals. These poor young women disappeared on what is known as The Highway of Tears located in Canada. The book gives insight into the road itself and the disappearance of some of these women. There were some who were found dead and there were others who were unfortunately never found. This heartbreaking story tells not only of the disappearances, but of the anguish and agony the families go through over their missing loved ones wondering if they will ever see their family member alive again. McDiarmid's novel also highlights the injustices these women faced. There were no helicopter searches. No trained search dogs. No public outcry. No publicity whatsoever. Yet, when a young white female went missing all of these things were put in place to help try and find her and return her safely to her family. These aboriginal families did all that they could to try and find their loved ones, but were turned away with excuses being given and resources being left untouched. This story is hard to read and I had to step away from it a couple times. It is a good true crime read and will open your eyes to the racial bias and injustices of these poor women. McDiarmid is a fantastic investigative journalist and she dug deep into the story of The Highway of Tears and really conveyed a sad yet compelling story. She artfully mixed story with facts and I felt like this book was the product of a Dateline or 20/20 expose. I really enjoyed the fact that there were specific examples given, it made the book even more realistic and it allowed for me to connect in a way I might not have been able to had it just been a general story. One thing I think is of important note is the fact that this book is very statistic heavy. I personally thought it really cemented the gravity of the story, but I can see how it might be too much for some. The statistics also helped present how much the Canadian justice system failed these poor young women.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Haylee Lott

    Thank you NetGalley, Jessica McDiarmid, and Atria Books for a free advanced copy of this book. Let me start with what I really enjoyed about this book. It was very well researched and it approached a very important subject with a great deal of respect. There was a lot of care and attention put into retelling the stories of these victims. We generally don’t see that much attention given to the victims in true crime, even for cases that are still unsolved. However, I felt like this book Thank you NetGalley, Jessica McDiarmid, and Atria Books for a free advanced copy of this book. Let me start with what I really enjoyed about this book. It was very well researched and it approached a very important subject with a great deal of respect. There was a lot of care and attention put into retelling the stories of these victims. We generally don’t see that much attention given to the victims in true crime, even for cases that are still unsolved. However, I felt like this book did a really good job of highlighting the lives of the women who unfortunately went missing. The book presented a strong analysis of the treatment of the indigenous since colonial times, and the author reasoned these are the things that may have made the women targets. I appreciated the analysis and felt the author had strong arguments. Now what didn’t work for me was the organization. I found that it often jumped from idea to idea with no real transition. It would take me three to five paragraphs to understand why the story shifted and how the new idea was tied to the previous idea. Unfortunately, this really hampered the flow of the story. Also, the statistics that were provided were interesting, but I felt like I had to read them over a few times to understand what was being said. I think if they had been presented differently, say with a table of some kind, it would have been a lot easier to follow. That being said, this is a highly moving story and I would still recommend reading it. It is a highly important story that needs to be told and I think the author did an amazing job crafting the stories of these women. It's been one of the best sources on this topic that I have found so if you can look past the few flaws, then it is worth it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Geoffrey Kelley

    This book tells the story of some of the murdered or missing girls and women who disappeared along Highway 16 in northern British Columbia. It does not make for easy reading when in chapter after chapter we are introduced to another family, another tragic loss, and another endless battle with grief and anger. In addition, the families were too often met with indifference by the police, by the media, by government, and by wider society. The fact that the author, Jessica McDiarmid, grew up in nort This book tells the story of some of the murdered or missing girls and women who disappeared along Highway 16 in northern British Columbia. It does not make for easy reading when in chapter after chapter we are introduced to another family, another tragic loss, and another endless battle with grief and anger. In addition, the families were too often met with indifference by the police, by the media, by government, and by wider society. The fact that the author, Jessica McDiarmid, grew up in northern B.C. is an asset. She knows this part of the world, its natural beauty, and the vast distances and isolation found in her region. She is well informed about the harsh realities of the relationship between indigenous communities who “stood in the way” as settlement pushed into the region. And she has ably earned the trust of the families who shared their too too sad stories. To her credit, she also interviews some of the police officers who dedicated long hours over the years in an attempt to solve these crimes. It is easy to be critical of the police and leave it at that. But McDiarmid allows the officers to explain the constraints they faced, including inadequate manpower and resources, and the necessary burden of proof to lay charges. However, there is also an acknowledgement that in many of the cases, the police were slow to react and take missing persons reports seriously. This book sheds light on this sad chapter in our recent history, and honours the memory of the lost women and the grief that their deaths or disappearances caused.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Since the 1970s, thousands of Indigenous teenaged girls and women along Highway 16 in British Columbia have gone missing and been murdered. The true number isn’t known. In Highway of Tears, Jessica McDiarmid blends heartbreaking stories about the missing and murdered and their families’ struggles to find answers with the many mistakes and prejudices that lead to this human rights crisis. This book will rightly make readers sob and burn with anger... Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I rece/>Read Since the 1970s, thousands of Indigenous teenaged girls and women along Highway 16 in British Columbia have gone missing and been murdered. The true number isn’t known. In Highway of Tears, Jessica McDiarmid blends heartbreaking stories about the missing and murdered and their families’ struggles to find answers with the many mistakes and prejudices that lead to this human rights crisis. This book will rightly make readers sob and burn with anger... Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, for review consideration.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paperclippe

    This book is as much a treatise on the inner workings of the RCMP and its failings as it is the story of the young Indigenous women who have been kidnapped and murdered along a fateful strip of highway in British Columbia. The stories of these women and the testimony of their very often broken families are only made worse by the prevalent racism and laissez-faire attitudes of the police force that was supposed to solve the crimes. An incredibly in-depth and absolutely heart-wrenching look not ju This book is as much a treatise on the inner workings of the RCMP and its failings as it is the story of the young Indigenous women who have been kidnapped and murdered along a fateful strip of highway in British Columbia. The stories of these women and the testimony of their very often broken families are only made worse by the prevalent racism and laissez-faire attitudes of the police force that was supposed to solve the crimes. An incredibly in-depth and absolutely heart-wrenching look not just at the tales of these crimes but at the insurmountable odds native peoples seem to face when it comes to getting justice.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vickie T

    Very difficult book to read about murdered Indigenous women who were and are still, being killed on a highway in British Columbia. The failure of the authorities is appalling and rooted in colonialism and racism.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Marvin Fender

    I received this book from the Goodreads Giveaway program on 11/9/2019.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie

    Read this.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shawna Corner

    Causes me embarrassment to be a Canadian!

  20. 5 out of 5

    KatieRose

    Heartbreaking, powerful, and required reading. Advance copy provided by NetGalley.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christine Cazeneuve

    First thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an eARC of this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Wow what an amazing book and stunned that this is the authors debut. An eye opening journey into the lives and the history of Highway 16 in British Columbia, Canada. I have heard about the Highway of Tears through some documentaries and such but like most people didn't pay much attention to it. You need to! As a society we should be ashamed to not onl First thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an eARC of this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Wow what an amazing book and stunned that this is the authors debut. An eye opening journey into the lives and the history of Highway 16 in British Columbia, Canada. I have heard about the Highway of Tears through some documentaries and such but like most people didn't pay much attention to it. You need to! As a society we should be ashamed to not only have let this happen but continue to let it happen. The author does a terrific job of balancing the stories of some of the lost souls and their families as well as telling the history of the Highway and the constant struggle of getting action taken. This is a must read - I couldn't put it down and I recommend you don't either.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Juan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jamilee Pelletier

  24. 4 out of 5

    Helen Bright

  25. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Field

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marcus Blair

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jodi McLeod

  28. 4 out of 5

    L. Alex Kappel

  29. 4 out of 5

    Emily Hiller

  30. 4 out of 5

    Heather

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