Hot Best Seller

The Ten Thousand Doors of January

Availability: Ready to download

In the early 1900s, a young woman embarks on a fantastical journey of self-discovery after finding a mysterious book in this captivating and lyrical debut. In a sprawling mansion filled with peculiar treasures, January Scaller is a curiosity herself. As the ward of the wealthy Mr. Locke, she feels little different from the artifacts that decorate the halls: carefully mai In the early 1900s, a young woman embarks on a fantastical journey of self-discovery after finding a mysterious book in this captivating and lyrical debut. In a sprawling mansion filled with peculiar treasures, January Scaller is a curiosity herself. As the ward of the wealthy Mr. Locke, she feels little different from the artifacts that decorate the halls: carefully maintained, largely ignored, and utterly out of place. Then she finds a strange book. A book that carries the scent of other worlds, and tells a tale of secret doors, of love, adventure and danger. Each page turn reveals impossible truths about the world and January discovers a story increasingly entwined with her own. Lush and richly imagined, a tale of impossible journeys, unforgettable love, and the enduring power of stories awaits in Alix E. Harrow’s spellbinding debut–step inside and discover its magic.


Compare

In the early 1900s, a young woman embarks on a fantastical journey of self-discovery after finding a mysterious book in this captivating and lyrical debut. In a sprawling mansion filled with peculiar treasures, January Scaller is a curiosity herself. As the ward of the wealthy Mr. Locke, she feels little different from the artifacts that decorate the halls: carefully mai In the early 1900s, a young woman embarks on a fantastical journey of self-discovery after finding a mysterious book in this captivating and lyrical debut. In a sprawling mansion filled with peculiar treasures, January Scaller is a curiosity herself. As the ward of the wealthy Mr. Locke, she feels little different from the artifacts that decorate the halls: carefully maintained, largely ignored, and utterly out of place. Then she finds a strange book. A book that carries the scent of other worlds, and tells a tale of secret doors, of love, adventure and danger. Each page turn reveals impossible truths about the world and January discovers a story increasingly entwined with her own. Lush and richly imagined, a tale of impossible journeys, unforgettable love, and the enduring power of stories awaits in Alix E. Harrow’s spellbinding debut–step inside and discover its magic.

30 review for The Ten Thousand Doors of January

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chaima ✨ شيماء

    I almost didn’t write this review. I felt that to speak of this book would be to contain what it did to me, to diminish it somehow. And I didn’t want to do that. The Ten Thousand Doors of January is almost less a novel than an experience: never have I felt more like I was part of things, moved by the same current, like my soul had disconnected from my body and drifted among fictional souls in a mist somewhere between fantasy and reality. It seemed hardly credible when I finished reading that I couldn’tthat. The I almost didn’t write this review. I felt that to speak of this book would be to contain what it did to me, to diminish it somehow. And I didn’t want to do that. The Ten Thousand Doors of January is almost less a novel than an experience: never have I felt more like I was part of things, moved by the same current, like my soul had disconnected from my body and drifted among fictional souls in a mist somewhere between fantasy and reality. It seemed hardly credible when I finished reading that I couldn’t follow the words back to a world where this wasn’t mere fiction. Of course the sensible part of me informed me, patiently, that none of it had any more bearing on real life than a dream, yet in the surreal fuzziness of the night, I felt—on a bone-deep, irrational, completely unshakable level—the possibility that I might turn a key, open a door and unlock the mysteries of the world. Even the morning’s clarity couldn’t snatch that away. You see—to read The Ten Thousand Doors of January is to fill your whole life with it. Those minutes—hours—that my gaze was connected to the page, were the only moments in my day that I felt anything at all. Which is why I feel that to share this account, or give anything away, would do a disservice to a reader just coming to this novel, but suffice it to say this: It all started, as great tales often do, with a book. The rush of turning a page and a story beginning. But that isn’t the true beginning of this story. Perhaps it is more apt to say that it all started with a Door. (Really, though. Semantics.) January Scaller grew up uneasily lodged with the immensely wealthy Cornelius Locke, her childhood a half-painted picture without her father in it while he disappeared for days, months, to buy off with Locke’s gold coins—more often, plunder—marvels and oddities that emerged every day from rumors and fables carried by travelers across oceans and deserts to fire the imaginations of rich folk around the world. For years, January was as molten glass in Locke’s hands, to be spun into the (dutiful, docile, un-temerarious) shape he liked, and with the pall of every goodbye, what once used to be fluent between January and her father soon became incomprehensible, and far more difficult to translate. Now consumed by a sense of dreary imprisonment within Locke’s sprawling mansion and suffering an undimmed longing for an absentee father, January’s spirit grew feeble, as though some river within herself had long since dried. Until one day, January Scaller stumbles upon a book, and she is suddenly lost and found and wandering, all at once. Following the threads of history through its tangle, January reads about locked Doors that opened at your knock if you put enough faith into the turn of your key, about young girls who wished for surprises around each road’s turning and yearned for adventure with a hard, physical longing, like a craving for air underwater, and young boys who could never really step back from brinks no matter how perilous was the drop and whom the world almost no longer held a place (or a Door, for that matter) to hide from. Stories that made January feel that the world went on so much further than she could see, and carried with them the faint scent of—if not freedom, then the coiled charge of its possibility. When one enters a door, one must be brave enough to see the other side. Like a lighthouse at sea drawing us to safety, The Ten Thousand Doors of January is a tonic for anyone who feels the world is too much sometimes. Harrow has written a jewel of a novel that grips readers from the opening sentence, and the author’s gifts as a writer are unmistakable, as keen as an unsheathed blade. She delivers a pleasurably devoured piece of prose, but placed within a novel about people who all have a whiff of the unwanted silently hovering about them, and a forlorn wish for belonging lodged within them, finding each other across worlds guided by nothing but the small, sickly faith they keep between them, she creates a story saturated with so much yearning and ache. And even more than the plot, the characters, the astoundingly unique turns of phrase, and the skill with which the author brings the intersecting storylines to a resounding ending that was both healing and fraught with pain, what I loved most about this book—and what I will remember most ardently about it—is the way the author succeeds in giving the desperate earnestness of her storytelling the quality of a memory, so that her words ring as resonantly as aged wood. And although I knew none of it was real, I also knew it wasn’t not real, and the two knowings drunkenly chased circles in my mind, dizzying me. And therein, I think, lies the book’s biggest triumph: in its ability to convince and compel, to conjure up the indescribable—the unfathomable—through language, to make you believe. To show you a door and hand you a key and invite you to embrace the thrilling and sickening lurch of the drop. So, if you ever wondered how it would feel to stand on the threshold of a living dream, I promise this book is your key. My long years of research have taught me that all stories, even the meanest folktales, matter. They are artifacts and palimpsests, riddles and histories. They are the red threads that we may follow out of the labyrinth. It is my hope that this story is your thread, and at the end of it you find a door. ✨ wishlist ✨ blog ✨ twitter ✨ tumblr ✨

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    5 thousand stars first for wonderful, amazing illustration on the cover and five thousand stars go for rest of the heart throbbing, one of the most creative, colorful, joyful journeys to many different imaginary portals you can never imagine to visit! FASTEN YOUR SEAT BELT, OPEN YOUR EYES, READY TO COUNT TO 10 THOUSAND! This is amazing combination of McGuire’s Wayward Children Series and Stephen King’s Dark Tower series! BLURB: Seven years old January’s revelation of finding a door op 5 thousand stars first for wonderful, amazing illustration on the cover and five thousand stars go for rest of the heart throbbing, one of the most creative, colorful, joyful journeys to many different imaginary portals you can never imagine to visit! FASTEN YOUR SEAT BELT, OPEN YOUR EYES, READY TO COUNT TO 10 THOUSAND! This is amazing combination of McGuire’s Wayward Children Series and Stephen King’s Dark Tower series! BLURB: Seven years old January’s revelation of finding a door opens to Faerie, Atlantis, Valhalla, and the places never found on a map. Of course I’m intrigued and wanted to learn more! HEROINE: January is definitely; brave, witty, sarcastic, loyal, gifted, young heroine. It’s enjoyable how she compares herself with regular book heroines with her great sense of humor! FAVORITE CHARACTERS: Of course the badass, loyal, brave dog! SUPPORTING CHARACTERS: Mr. Locke, blood freezing, teeth grinding, nerve bending villain who deserves to be putted on a dart chart so you can be more concentrated to hit the target! Jane is memorable Amazon woman! Straightforward, tough, protector. Samuel: sweet, loyal, romantic, impossible not to love and care for! And January’s parents and their love story are definitely heartbreaking! I sighed so many times when I’m reading their parts! WRITING STYLE: Pacing was not fast but not too slow! It keeps your attention alert and hooked you from the first page, you don’t want to stop, want to learn more and more till your head starts to turn because you passed your sleep time five hours ago and you start to see the sunrise and you realize it’s too late to go to the bed so you’d better finish the book! ENDING: When I close a book and see my smile like Cheshire cat cover my face all night, it means I’m so satisfied with the ending. So yes! It’s the best emotional, joyful, smart ending to this unconventional, creative, well-crafted, remarkable story! FANTASY LOVERS, GOOD STORY CHASERS, PORTAL TRAVELERS, this book is highly recommended for you!

  3. 4 out of 5

    karen

    oooh, goodreads choice awards semifinalist for BEST FANTASY *AND* BEST DEBUT NOVEL 2019! what will happen? i mean, it’s a perfect book. that should be the alpha and the omega of this book review, because you’ve probably already read the synopsis, and if it takes more than that to convince you of this book’s desirability, i’m sure i don’t have the words to do it. if you like seanan mcguire’s wayward children series, you will probably enjoy this. obviously, they both involve doorways to other worlds, young(ish) protag oooh, goodreads choice awards semifinalist for BEST FANTASY *AND* BEST DEBUT NOVEL 2019! what will happen? i mean, it’s a perfect book. that should be the alpha and the omega of this book review, because you’ve probably already read the synopsis, and if it takes more than that to convince you of this book’s desirability, i’m sure i don’t have the words to do it. if you like seanan mcguire’s wayward children series, you will probably enjoy this. obviously, they both involve doorways to other worlds, young(ish) protagonists, and adventure, but their more significant shared characteristics are tonal—haunting and yearning and saddish; themes of displacement and otherness and an aching inability to fit into the world, how it feels to be “an in-between sort of thing.” it also made me think of The Book of Speculation and Saga, with how it handles its themes of fate, family and separation, and in its use of books and letters to carry the narrative. all of these books have given me a very specific and rare kind of sadness-shiver, and i’m always gladdened to encounter another source. it is a formidable debut—the concept, the characters, the language; she’s got it all on lock; there’s a richness to her prose that sparkles up off the page and there’s a VERY GOOD DOG named bad. even the romantic subplot, which ordinarily activates my eyeroll-muscles, was perfect and understated and my eyeballs remained unrolled. there are enough unfinished edges and unexplored territory that this could easily expand into a second book or series, but i kind of don’t want it to. i definitely want her to write more words for me to read, but the bittersweet ambiguity of the ending is perfect and i want to just close the book and leave them to work the rest out unobserved. i mean, it’s a perfect book. ***************************** it's some top-notch book schwag when even the mailing envelope is fancy this is the debut novel by the woman who wrote Autobiography of a Traitor and a Half-Savage, which i LOVED, and is one of those free tor shorts you can read here while you wait for this book to come out. oh, and now MORE! a bookmark handmade by alix e. harrow herself! am i charmed? i AM! my TBR stack might just kill me, but i will die happy. and squashed. happy and squashed. come to my blog!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Petrik

    ARC provided by the publisher—Orbit—in exchange for an honest review. 4.5/5 stars Gorgeous and magical; it’s not a stretch to call The Ten Thousand Doors of January a magnificent physical manifestation of a grimoire. Orbit did it again. The Ten Thousand Doors of January has shot to the top of my TBR since the moment I saw the cover and heard about the premise; I was charmed and can safely say that I don’t think I’ve read many books as beautifully written as this novel. I’ve been saying this over and over again for a while now; wh ARC provided by the publisher—Orbit—in exchange for an honest review. 4.5/5 stars Gorgeous and magical; it’s not a stretch to call The Ten Thousand Doors of January a magnificent physical manifestation of a grimoire. Orbit did it again. The Ten Thousand Doors of January has shot to the top of my TBR since the moment I saw the cover and heard about the premise; I was charmed and can safely say that I don’t think I’ve read many books as beautifully written as this novel. I’ve been saying this over and over again for a while now; when it comes to modern SFF debuts, just read everything that Orbit publishes. SFF books published by Orbit these days has a strong chance to satisfy your reading preferences and this novel amplified that notion. I would also like to give a shout out to Emily Byron, who made sure this book reached me for my review, and Maddie Hall, the one in charge of the design behind the ARC packaging of this book; easily the most beautiful ARC package I’ve ever received. Picture: My ARC of The Ten Thousand Doors of January The Ten Thousand Doors of January revolves around January Scaller. January was seven years old when she first found a Door. Years later, January starts forgetting about her brief encounter with that Door, until one day she stumbles upon a book. Reading the book changes everything as she begins to discover the truths and revelations surrounding her worlds, and the Door she found when she was a kid. This is not an action-packed book; if you read this book expecting warfare and intricate battle scenes, you’ll be sorely disappointed. Instead of filling the pages with action and brutality, Harrow opted for dazzling readers with everlasting stories of wonder brimming with a nostalgic and elegant atmosphere. This is a novel about a book, about stories, and about escapism. “How fitting, that the most terrifying time in my life should require me to do what I do best: escape into a book.” I truly believe that escapism, for me, is not only a want but a necessity. Whether this is in the form of video games, movies, or reading; they’re all a form of art that makes our harsh realities saner and more livable. The Ten Thousand Doors of January felt like a letter written by a voracious reader to another reader. From the very first page, I was immediately struck with the notion that this book will resonate a lot with me and each page gradually continued to strongly enhance that early impression. I just can’t help but say that this is a book that must be read by most readers as long that you’re okay with not having battle scenes in your stories. “He consumed books as if they were as necessary to his health as bread and water, but they were rarely the books he had been assigned.” Harrow implemented the importance of stories into the plot wonderfully. Family, love, and adventures were also some of the main themes contained in the novel. A book has the power to change a reader’s perception; to be more open-minded and knowledgeable; to experience adventure and transport us to a different world; reading or writing is magic and many of us are capable of it. “Books can smell of cheap thrills or painstaking scholarship, of literary weight or unsolved mysteries. This one smelled unlike any book I’d ever held… It smelled like adventure itself had been harvested in the wild, distilled to a fine wine, and splashed across each page.” As someone who’s born in January, I found the main character and the meaning behind her name to be a huge plus of the book. This doesn’t mean that you HAVE to be born in January to appreciate it. Names have a power, a meaning, and life of its own; these were discussed within the book and I enjoyed reading them all. Most importantly, January is a heroine that resonated with me. There weren’t a lot of characters, but I found the characterizations splendidly written. Each character has a distinctive personality and attitude that felt genuine and flawed. “It’s a profoundly strange feeling, to stumble across someone whose desires are shaped so closely to your own, like reaching toward your reflection in a mirror and finding warm flesh under your fingertips. If you should ever be lucky enough to find that magical, fearful symmetry, I hope you’re brave enough to grab it with both hands and not let go.” If you’ve seen reviews of this book before, you’ll probably notice that the majority of them—whether they loved the book or not overall—agreed that the prose is beautiful; I definitely agree with this statement with all my heart. Seriously, Harrow has a highly-polished prose that totally didn’t feel like a debut effort. The prose was lush, lyrical, enchanting, gorgeous, and immersive. This novel marks the dawn of a new fantasy author with immaculate prose that’s very rare to find in the genre. The contemplative and philosophical nature of the writing made me wish I can tell you all the resplendent phrases I’ve stumbled upon. Words easily translated into imagery; every locale and scene were visualized in my head. I’m in disbelief that this is a debut, the author has such an immense subjugation over the structure of words. I can’t wait for you to find out how spectacularly written this book was. “Words and their meanings have weight the world of matter, shaping and reshaping realities through a most ancient alchemy. Even my own writings—so damnably powerless—may have just enough power to reach the right person and tell the right truth, and change the nature of things.” Alluring passages comprising meticulously chosen words were conjured and evident in every page; Harrow exhibited storytelling skill that gives justice to the saying that the pen is mightier than the sword. The Ten Thousand Doors of January is one of the most beautifully-written debuts I’ve ever read; a big contender for the new tale as old as time, and a must-read fantasy book for every reader who loves books and enjoys reading a superb elaboration of stories and escapism. Every story opens a door, and every door opens a story. Once you opened the door behind the cover of this book, you’ll be happily compelled to search every nook and cranny of the story before you’re able to close the door again. An eternal charm lies in January’s adventure, and believe me when I say that you need to get the key to open the magic door called The Ten Thousand Doors of January as soon as possible. “Let that be a lesson to you: if you are too good and too quiet for too long, it will cost you. It will always cost, in the end.” Official release date: September 12th, 2019 (UK) and September 10th, 2019 (US) You can pre-order the book from: Amazon UK | Amazon US | Book Depository (Free shipping) The quotes in this review were taken from an ARC and are subject to change upon publication. You can find this and the rest of my reviews at Novel Notions

  5. 4 out of 5

    megs_bookrack

    ((awkward silence due to highly unpopular opinion)) ((sound of crickets)) I'm sorry, everyone. I just did not enjoy this book. I really wanted to, I was so hyped for it, then I saw all the reviews coming in and they were fantastic! I couldn't wait to get into it. Then I started reading. The writing was a little qclass="gr-hostedUserImg">((sound ((awkward silence due to highly unpopular opinion)) ((sound of crickets)) I'm sorry, everyone. I just did not enjoy this book. I really wanted to, I was so hyped for it, then I saw all the reviews coming in and they were fantastic! I couldn't wait to get into it. Then I started reading. The writing was a little quirky at first but my interest was still high. Then it just seemed to not be going anywhere. I wasn't feeling anything. Like, at all. The writing was flowery and beautiful but I felt like the plot got lost in all of that. I dreaded picking it back up and really struggled almost the entire way through. There was a sweet spot for me between 50% and 80% where I felt briefly connected but sadly, that's just not enough. If you read through the reviews, I am clearly in the minority opinion. I have read the reviews. I know. When I first finished, I contemplated giving this a 2.5-star and rounding up to 3, but then I slept on it and came to the conclusion that I would just be doing that to appease people. I genuinely did not enjoy this book. I can understand why so many people have loved this and I am happy that they found something in here that resonated with them, that's just not me. I love portal fantasy; The Dark Tower or Wayward Children series are great examples but this fell so flat for me. The characters seemed one dimensional and I had zero connection to any of them. I don't need to like characters but I do need to actually care about what ultimately happens to them. The only character I cared about was the dog, Bad. I was so worried about that dog, and traumatized by things that happened to him, that I was never able to relax into the story. That is 100% a personal preference and it has spoiled books for me in the past -- see my review for The Deep by Nick Cutter -- but yeah, there's not much here to save this story from that pitfall. With all of this being said, I would never want a personal review from myself to keep people from picking up a book that really interests them. If you think this sounds intriguing, please pick it up and try it for yourself. There is a book for every reader and a reader for every book. Unfortunately, this just wasn't my cuppa tea. Thank you so much to the publisher, Redhook Books, for providing me with a copy to read and review. I truly appreciate the opportunity and know that many, many readers are going to absolutely adore January's story.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    ETA: On the Fantasy Literature website, at the link, there's a truly fascinating and insightful interview with this author, Alix Harrow. All the stars! Final review, first posted on Fantasy Literature (along with my co-reviewer Marion's excellent review): The Ten Thousand Doors of January is perched at the top of the mountain of portal fantasies that I’ve read in my life. It’s set apart by Alix E. Harrow’s intelligent and truly gorgeous writing, unique characters ― including true friends and a fiercely/>The ETA: On the Fantasy Literature website, at the link, there's a truly fascinating and insightful interview with this author, Alix Harrow. All the stars! Final review, first posted on Fantasy Literature (along with my co-reviewer Marion's excellent review): The Ten Thousand Doors of January is perched at the top of the mountain of portal fantasies that I’ve read in my life. It’s set apart by Alix E. Harrow’s intelligent and truly gorgeous writing, unique characters ― including true friends and a fiercely loyal dog ― and a complex and twisty plot, combined with thoughtful consideration of racial and class prejudice, powerful men who make rules to benefit themselves, and other social issues. January Scaller is a young girl in early 20th century America, living in the mansion of Mr. Locke, a wealthy collector of rare and unique items. January’s mother is missing and presumed dead, while January’s father Julian spends months on end traveling the globe in search of Mr. Locke’s rare items. And perhaps, searching for something more. Because January and her father are both aware that there are Doors ― portals to different worlds ― and Julian, a black man, has a particular reason for searching out these Doors. Meanwhile, January is being raised by the mysterious Mr. Locke, a man she both loves and fears, though she tries to convince herself that the fear is unreasonable. With her cedarwood-colored skin, January has never entirely fit into the world of wealth and privilege that she inhabits with Mr. Locke. But she has a strong-willed companion, Jane Irimu, sent to her by her father, and a protective dog, Bad (short for Sinbad, and it’s clear that both versions of his name are appropriate … though he’s bad only to the hidebound or evil characters), given to her by her equally loyal friend Samuel. Just before her seventeenth birthday, January finds a strange book titled The Ten Thousand Doors that purports to be a monograph on passages and portals between worlds. Primarily, though, it’s about the life and adventures of a young woman named Adelaid Lee Larson (Ade), who finds some Doors of her own.Books can smell of cheap thrills or painstaking scholarship, of literary weight or unsolved mysteries. This one smelled unlike any book I’d ever held. Cinnamon and coal smoke, catacombs and loam. Damp seaside evenings and sweat-slick noontimes beneath palm fronds. It smelled as if it had been in the mail for longer than any one parcel could be, circling the world for years and accumulating layers of smells like a tramp wearing too many clothes. It smelled like adventure itself had been harvested in the wild, distilled to a fine wine, and splashed across each page.And then one day January makes the mistake of mentioning Doors to Mr. Locke … I loved Harrow’s meditations on the nature of doors that she weaves into the text: they’re portals, of course, passageways to adventure or love, but also a symbol of healthy change and openness. And occasionally doors are books or even words (“Sometimes I feel that there are doors lurking in the creases of every sentence, with periods for knobs and verbs for hinges.”). Characters’ names have power in this book: Mr. Locke is, unsurprisingly, antithetical to open magical doors and passageways; the irimu is a creature of African legend, sometimes called a were-leopard. The unprepossessing name Scaller might be (I conjecture here) derived from “scall,” a scabby disorder of the scalp, or the sculling of a rowboat … or, perhaps, something more that’s initially hidden from both the reader’s and January’s understanding. Through January and other characters, Harrow warns of the dangers of being too good, too quiet, and too accepting of the status quo.The will to be polite, to maintain civility and normalcy, is fearfully strong. I wonder sometimes how much evil is permitted to run unchecked simply because it would be rude to interrupt it.The entire book is an encouragement to take action. If I have any complaint at all, it’s that sometimes the narrator is overtly preachy where I would have preferred a more subtle approach (footnote 6, I’m looking at you). But the overall message, to have the courage to do what needs to be done, and to “run through every open Door and tell stories when you return,” is an overwhelmingly positive one. The Ten Thousand Doors of January is a magical entry to a wondrous universe. Don’t miss the chance to walk through this doorway! Initial post: Cheers! I finally got the NetGalley ARC for this book! I was beating the bushes on this one because I really wanted it (I emailed the author and the publisher last week as well as putting in a NetGalley request, which they had ignored for a couple of months. One of those methods finally worked). :)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paromjit

    If there is a part of you that has always felt there is magic in the world ever since childhood, despite voices to the contrary, and have a penchant for the whimsical, then Alix Harrow has written the perfect novel for you. It is a story of doors, portals if you will, existing in places of particular resonance, stepping through the void, into fables, folklore, adventure, love and sanctuary, and the infinite power of words and stories. In 1901, at the age of 7, the red skinned, wilful and cantank If there is a part of you that has always felt there is magic in the world ever since childhood, despite voices to the contrary, and have a penchant for the whimsical, then Alix Harrow has written the perfect novel for you. It is a story of doors, portals if you will, existing in places of particular resonance, stepping through the void, into fables, folklore, adventure, love and sanctuary, and the infinite power of words and stories. In 1901, at the age of 7, the red skinned, wilful and cantankerous January Scaller lives with her guardian, the enormously wealthy, white and powerful William Locke on a sprawling estate, in a house crammed full of stolen treasures in his collections, mostly acquired by her black father on his global adventures, occasionally returning, whilst she stays behind in Vermont. January is in Kentucky when she encounters her first door, but Locke does not believe her and she is punished. In her efforts to please him she grows up trying to be a good girl, curbing her natural instincts and desires, to conform to his stringent expectations. January is a strange oddity, only tolerated by the outside world riven with racism because she accompanies the man of substance that is Locke, the Chairman of the Archaeological Society, on his business trips. He informs her ' Power, my dear, has a language, a currency....and a color', as she grows up lonely, with only one, below the radar, non-fictional friend, Samuel Zappia, who gives her a beloved dog, (Sin)Bad. Until Jane arrives, a brave and courageous Amazon woman, sent to protect January by her father. A griefstricken and drunk January responds with unpalatable truths to Locke and his much vaunted Archaeological Society, an act which is to shatter the world as she knows it. In the gripping narrative, the lives of Adelaide Larson and Yule Ian (Julian) are outlined culminating in a meeting that triggers adventures, journeys through doors and dedicated scholarly research that results in a remarkable book, The Ten Thousand Doors, which falls in the hands of January, with its shocking revelations. As January is ferociously hunted and facing grave dangers, will she be able to find the inner resources to fight the deadly threats? Harrow writes a bewitching story, about powerful underhand forces that are determined to eliminate all threats to the existing political establishment, about family, loss, grief, and a coming of age tale. The characterisation is stellar, a January facing life altering challenges, and her poignant battles to fight the ingrained responses instilled in her from childhood, and I adored Jane, Samuel and the loyal Bad. This is an enchanting read, lyrical, full of charm, that manages to connect with our inner desires and belief that there is magic and hope out there, although perhaps it is unlikely to appeal to those who have a more sceptical nature. An unmissable read for those who adore this type of fantasy, brilliant, colourful, vibrant, with echoes of the darkest of fairytales, and infused with the grim realities of our contemporary world when it comes to issues of race. Highly recommended. Many thanks to Little, Brown for an ARC.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Teodora

    Seeing the cover? - Want it! Seeing the synopsis? - Need it! Realising it is about escaping the reality? - Well, run a DNA test cuz I and this book relate for sure

  9. 4 out of 5

    jessica

    ‘words and their meanings have weight in the world of matter, shaping and reshaping realities through a most ancient alchemy.’ and the words in this story shape a most delightful world - filled with imagination, wonder, adventure, and love. any story that focuses on the importance of words and stories is one that i will always find comforting. i appreciate how january is a character who also finds comfort in books and the power of words and also sees stories as a means of escape. it makes to her relatab ‘words and their meanings have weight in the world of matter, shaping and reshaping realities through a most ancient alchemy.’ and the words in this story shape a most delightful world - filled with imagination, wonder, adventure, and love. any story that focuses on the importance of words and stories is one that i will always find comforting. i appreciate how january is a character who also finds comfort in books and the power of words and also sees stories as a means of escape. it makes to her relatable to every reader, myself included. the writing is also a great asset to this story. its very exquisite. it feels traditional, but approachable. vivid, yet grounded. its really quite a pleasure to read such beautiful words. my only critique would be the story is very slow and lost my interest at times. theres only so much a relatable character and lovely writing can do. maybe i was in the mood for something more engaging and not something so narrative heavy. but it feels quite unfair to give this anything less than 4 stars. i think that readers who are willing to be patient enough to see this story through will find it just as comforting and magical as i did, if not more! ↠ 3.5 stars

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amalia Gavea

    ''Maybe you've even seen one for yourself, standing half-ajar and rotted in an old church, or oiled and shining in a brick wall. Maybe, if you're one of those fanciful persons who find their feet running toward unexpected places, you've even walked through one and found yourself in a very unexpected place indeed.'' January is a young girl torn between two worlds. Her parentage makes her special, yet people see what they want to see, dictated by the (twisted) preconceived notions of the early 20th-centur ''Maybe you've even seen one for yourself, standing half-ajar and rotted in an old church, or oiled and shining in a brick wall. Maybe, if you're one of those fanciful persons who find their feet running toward unexpected places, you've even walked through one and found yourself in a very unexpected place indeed.'' January is a young girl torn between two worlds. Her parentage makes her special, yet people see what they want to see, dictated by the (twisted) preconceived notions of the early 20th-century society. Motherless and with an absent father, January tries to find an escape and a purpose to satisfy her ever-searching mind and soul. And then, doors start appearing. Doors leading to different worlds, doors hiding adventure and danger. And, perhaps, the key that leads to her past and her family. ''Those of you who are more than casually familiar with books-those of you who spend your free afternoons in frusty bookshops, who offer furtive, kindly strokes along the spines of familiar titles- understand that page raffling is an essential element in the process of introducing oneself to a new book. It isn't about reading the words; it's about reading the smell, which wafts through the pages in a cloud of dust and wool pulp. It might smell expensive and well bound, or it might smell of tissue-thin paper and blurred two -colour print, or of fifty years unread in the home of a tobacco - smoking old man. Books can smell of cheap thrills or painstaking scholarship, of literary weight or unsolved mysteries.'' If nothing else, this novel is rich in beautiful bookish references. I found some of the most powerful descriptions of the impact of books in our lives, the way they shape our souls, the difference we unwittingly form in relation to people who don't touch a book, remaining prisoners of the telly and their mundane microcosm. Books make us soar, imagination runs wild and doors open, leading to new worlds and new characters that become our company. Some momentary, others become friends and loves for life. January discovers a new life through a book of Ten Thousand Doors, aided by a brave young woman. The same adjectives can be used to characterize January and Jane, two memorable characters that become the perfect companions for such a story. They are faithful to their course, fearless and realistic. But for me, the crown jewel is Ade. Ade and Jul's relationship is beautiful and moving and it touched me so much that once Ade was kept out of the picture, I began to lose interest... At times the narration drags and the dialogue becomes too contemporary, arguably unfaithful to the era depicted. Certain incidents and twists were repetitive and predictable. Once January discovers her past, the writing and the story slow down. In addition, certain parts of the plot seem too neatly wrapped and others were left loose. I am certain that Fantasy lovers will adore this novel. It was definitely a satisfying and unusual read but it didn't particularly stick with me. Which is fine, not all books can enter the Favourites squad. The writing was beautiful and the themes powerful but I lost focus and grew tired towards the final chapters. Therefore, four stars from me. ''[...] my long years of research have taught me that all stories, even the meanest folktales, matter. They are artifacts and palimpsests, riddles and histories. They are the read threads that we may follow out of the labyrinth. It is my hope that this story is your thread, and at the end of it you will find a door.'' Many thanks to Orbit and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. My reviews can also be found on https://theopinionatedreaderblog.word...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Emer (A Little Haze)

    NOW PUBLISHED The blurb from NetGalley: EVERY STORY OPENS A DOOR In a sprawling mansion filled with peculiar treasures, January Scaller is a curiosity herself. As the ward of the wealthy Mr. Locke, she feels little different from the artifacts that decorate the halls: carefully maintained, largely ignored and utterly out of place. But her quiet existence is shattered when she stumbles across a strange book. A book that carries the scent of other worlds and tells a tale of secret do/>EVERY NOW PUBLISHED The blurb from NetGalley: EVERY STORY OPENS A DOOR In a sprawling mansion filled with peculiar treasures, January Scaller is a curiosity herself. As the ward of the wealthy Mr. Locke, she feels little different from the artifacts that decorate the halls: carefully maintained, largely ignored and utterly out of place. But her quiet existence is shattered when she stumbles across a strange book. A book that carries the scent of other worlds and tells a tale of secret doors, of love, adventure and danger. Each page reveals more impossible truths about the world, and January discovers a story increasingly entwined with her own. This was a beautiful read. I was thoroughly enchanted by it. The story follows a girl called January... I loved this name for her because of its origins with the god Janus and how he looked both forwards and backwards, bridging doorways. January's father travels constantly. He works for a man named Mr. Locke and is tasked with locating all manner of unusual objects and trinkets for this wealthy man. January is therefore left at home in Locke house where she is akin to Mr. Locke's ward... But her life doesn't feel as if it's her own. She feels like a fish out of water so to speak. Until one day she discovers a book about Doors between worlds... And her world is never the same again. I so enjoyed this story. It was simply charming. I do love books within books and this really had a great plot with how the "book within the book" ultimately connected with January's own story. The plot had everything I love; adventure, a quest, a love story for the ages, magic, secret societies, good guys, bad guys, a trusty canine companion... I was basically in heaven! January herself was a wonderful character. I loved how this book portrayed her as ultimately being quite spunky but at the beginning having her be rather more subdued echoing how she was being treated as Mr Locke's ward. Her character arc was very interesting to read about in how it explored how societal views on racial differences, pertaining to skin colour and wealth, affected January at the different stages of her quest in the novel. I also enjoyed how this book didn't shy away from upturning gender stereotypes and made the main female characters feel like incredibly authentic women who could be both soft and strong. These topics really added a sense of gravitas to the whole proceedings. This is the type of book that makes you long for the story to be real. I long to believe that there are doors between our world and elsewhere. That these doors can transport us to places that we couldn't even possibly imagine. Places that are exquisitely beautiful and yet ordinary at the same time. Places where people live lives entirely different to our own... And yet are entirely the same in that they share our need for love, family, companionship... 'The Ten Thousand Doors of January' is a book for people who are still children at heart. People who want to believe in fairytale and magic. It's a book that really calls to mind that way that you feel about reading when you are a little kid; when imagination and story know no limits. I don't mean to say that the book or the story are any way childish but reading it just evokes that childish gleefulness of getting completely lost within the pages of your book. I highly recommend it to lovers of historical fiction who like a little bit of magical realism sprinkled in with the storyline. Four and a half stars *An e-copy of this book was kindly provided to me by the publisher, Orbit/Little Brown Book Group UK, via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.* For more reviews and book related chat check out my blog

  12. 4 out of 5

    🌻darmera🌻

    Well written, but a tiiiiiinnny bit draggy for my taste. Bonus points for the way challenging themes were handled though - definitely a ya book with a message and a punch. However, not a good choice if you are in a reading slump, but if you were pondering over it - do pick it up, it is an eye opening book, and if you can dedicate the adequate attention and time to it's details - it is worth the read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Emily May

    In the summer of 1901, at the age of seven, January Scaller found a Door. You know the kind of door–they lead to Faerie, to Valhalla, to Atlantis, to all the places never found on a map. These portal fantasy premises get me EVERY TIME. This sounds a bit like McGuire's Wayward Children series, which I love. Also exciting that this comes highly recommend by Josiah Bancroft 😍 Can't wait! ARC provided in exchange for honest review 🔑

  14. 5 out of 5

    Scarlett Readz and Runz....Through Novel Time & Distance

    Upon reading the first few pages of The Ten Thousand Doors of January, it is pretty clear that Alix E. Harrow has a way to write most eloquently and organic, a whimsical tale reminiscent of childhoods' past imaginary wonders, curiosities, and secrets. The most beautiful, exquisite passages of words strung together so naturally, they elude to the calm and quiet brilliance within, ever so gently evoking the reader's attention wrapped around in every line, page by page. The Ten Thousand Upon reading the first few pages of The Ten Thousand Doors of January, it is pretty clear that Alix E. Harrow has a way to write most eloquently and organic, a whimsical tale reminiscent of childhoods' past imaginary wonders, curiosities, and secrets. The most beautiful, exquisite passages of words strung together so naturally, they elude to the calm and quiet brilliance within, ever so gently evoking the reader's attention wrapped around in every line, page by page. The Ten Thousand Doors of January is the coming of age tale of one girl's quest to find her past, present, and future behind doors that act as gateways to find her answers. "If we address stories as archaeological sites, and dust through their layers with meticulous care, we find at some level there is always a doorway. A dividing point between here and there, us and them, mundane and magical. It is at the moments when the doors open, when things flow between the worlds, that stories happen." January Scaller is seven years old around the turn of the last century when her story begins in Vermont, New England. Growing up on a large estate in the trust of Mr. Locke, a member of the Archeological Society. While her father is in his employ to gather interesting objects to add to Mr. Locke's collection of trinkets and artifacts, January longs to see her father more often and dreams of the affections of her mother. Raised by a German housemaid to give her needed structure in the day, she grows up with her studies and a love for reading and scribbling stories. Around the time the fog of adolescence lifts, she is confronted with her differences in social status and skin color, albeit being subjected to lectures in good manners all her years. "Power, my dear, has a language. It has a geography, a currency, and - I'm sorry - a color. This is not something you may take personally or object to; it is simply a fact of the world, and the sooner you accustom yourself to it, the better." January hadn't thought of her future much until she finds a leather-bound book written by her father. She discovers a story written in segments about someone's life that will most impact her self worth, her curiosity, and her longing to see her father even more. When January and an unlikely friend decide to pursue what they have learned of in the leather-bound book, the ranks of the Archeological Society will show their true colors and a sinister truth will come forth. "Do you want to leave?" I swallowed, tucking my fear away for some future time when I would be strong enough to look directly at it. "Yes," I answered and in answering realized it was true. I wanted wide-open horizons and worn shoes and strange constellations spinning above like midnight riddles. I wanted danger and mystery and adventure. Like my father before me? "Oh, yes." While January is told that her father has died, she has nothing left but to follow her heart and instinct. And when a sign from her father gives her a strong warning not to trust anyone, she has to make it across worlds through doors to find safety. A story in a story, beautifully imagined. An adventure of a different kind, most uniquely crafted and precious in details. *** To read this novel was a breath of fresh air. I fell for the writing style and prose immediately. It's the kind of book I haven't read in a long time but that brought me back to happy times and places, where long summer days, running in fields, reading outside and childhood play was the most important thing in my life. While one travels in the book within a book, Harrow makes use of events in time and societal differences as reference points to imbue further a feel for its present and change, or the lack thereof. Exploring different worlds and ethnic backgrounds behind the doors and lives of others, it adds different views with an emphasis on family ties, strength, and love. Towards the latter middle of the book, the novel loses its tranquil tone, trading it for the action and deception that follows and crescents in turmoil to solve the mystery of the leather-bound book and January's race against time. Preferably, I could have continued reading more whimsical passages, but the scope and ideas were intriguing and became decisively textured more sharply. A special book you cannot go wrong with reading or gifting. So, add some lovely magic to your book diet and enjoy the world of Ten Thousand Doors... *** I received a digital copy of this novel from Netgalley in exchange for my honest opinion. Thank you kindly to the publisher. Other reviews of mine can be found here: https://scarlettreadzandrunz.com/

  15. 4 out of 5

    Norma * Traveling Sister * On hiatus due to health

    Bewitching, creative, & magical! THE TEN THOUSAND DOORS OF JANUARY by ALIX E. HARROW is an imaginative, enchanting, intriguing, and unique story that wasn’t the easiest book for me to read. I was a little bit bored in the beginning and almost called it quits quite a few times. I am so glad that I persevered because at approx. 58% in is when things started to get a lot more exciting and come together for me. The writing is quite beautiful but extremely wordy and dense that definitely bogged d Bewitching, creative, & magical! THE TEN THOUSAND DOORS OF JANUARY by ALIX E. HARROW is an imaginative, enchanting, intriguing, and unique story that wasn’t the easiest book for me to read. I was a little bit bored in the beginning and almost called it quits quite a few times. I am so glad that I persevered because at approx. 58% in is when things started to get a lot more exciting and come together for me. The writing is quite beautiful but extremely wordy and dense that definitely bogged down the story for me. I found that I needed total peace and quiet while I was following January on her journey to find those secret doors to other worlds. The writing style definitely distracted me from the actual storyline which was a shame because I absolutely loved this storyline. The details and workings of the doors was a little confusing for me as well. I felt it was left to our own imagination and devices......or I totally missed it! I had to channel the show "Supernatural" to help me visualize it on my own. Who knows if I got it or not.....but I'm satisfied. LOL I was going with three (3) stars for the most part but the ending definitely bumped it up to four (4) stars for me. It was an absolutely beautiful end to the story (that is definitely worthy of that beautiful cover) that gave me that warm fuzzy satisfied feeling that I seek and love. Thank you so much to Hachette Book Group for providing me with a physical copy!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Josiah Bancroft

    THE TEN THOUSAND DOORS OF JANUARY by Alix E. Harrow is a beautifully written and absorbing tale of lost love, stately prisons, ghastly villains, and terrible secrets. It’s a smart and roving adventure that has a full and thumping heart. Harrow has created a mythology that is both tangible and tantalizing, and has injected that vision into turn of the 20th century America. The historic details greatly enrich and never distract from a narrative that spans generations, continents, and wo THE TEN THOUSAND DOORS OF JANUARY by Alix E. Harrow is a beautifully written and absorbing tale of lost love, stately prisons, ghastly villains, and terrible secrets. It’s a smart and roving adventure that has a full and thumping heart. Harrow has created a mythology that is both tangible and tantalizing, and has injected that vision into turn of the 20th century America. The historic details greatly enrich and never distract from a narrative that spans generations, continents, and worlds. This is an ambitious, expansive story that never loses its sense of intimacy. Perhaps what impressed me most about THE TEN THOUSAND DOORS OF JANUARY was the inventive narrative structure, which incorporates texts within the text, weaving them together in compelling and surprising ways. This is a wonderful, insightful, and imaginative book. I highly recommend it, especially to fans of deft prose, historical settings, portal fantasy, and coming-of-age stories.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Spencer Orey

    Really good! Beautiful and precious prose. Somehow I didn’t expect it to be so YA, but I ended up liking that too. There’s a lot of clever treatment of imperialism and rich collectors. Really the whole book feels deeply grounded in critical history, which for me also made the magic of doors and their fantastic worlds feel fantastically grounded too. I loved that. There are some fierce antiracist and anti-imperialist politics woven in here, and they work wonderfully. If you’ve been int Really good! Beautiful and precious prose. Somehow I didn’t expect it to be so YA, but I ended up liking that too. There’s a lot of clever treatment of imperialism and rich collectors. Really the whole book feels deeply grounded in critical history, which for me also made the magic of doors and their fantastic worlds feel fantastically grounded too. I loved that. There are some fierce antiracist and anti-imperialist politics woven in here, and they work wonderfully. If you’ve been interested in this one, go get it! The hype is real.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Celeste

    You can find this review and more at Novel Notions. Actual rating: way more than 5 stars. I received a copy of this book from the publisher (Orbit/Redhook) in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. “Listen, not every story is made for telling. Sometimes just by telling a story you’re stealing it, stealing a little of the mystery away from it.” The Ten Thousand Doors of January is quite possibly the most achingly beautiful novel I’ve ever read, and I find it mind-bog/>“Listen,/>I You can find this review and more at Novel Notions. Actual rating: way more than 5 stars. I received a copy of this book from the publisher (Orbit/Redhook) in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. “Listen, not every story is made for telling. Sometimes just by telling a story you’re stealing it, stealing a little of the mystery away from it.” The Ten Thousand Doors of January is quite possibly the most achingly beautiful novel I’ve ever read, and I find it mind-boggling that anything this lovely could possibly be a debut novel. There are a scant handful of novels I’ve experienced in my life (The Name of the Wind, The Resurrection of Joan Ashby, and The Night Circus come to mind) that were breathtaking debuts of this caliber, and they remain my very favorite books I’ve ever had the pleasure of reading. I’m so incredibly happy to add Alix E. Harrow’s novel to that list. “If we address stories as archeological sites, and dust through their layers with meticulous care, we find at some level there is always a doorway. A dividing point between here and there, mundane and magical. It is at the moment when the doors open, when things flow between worlds, that stories happen.” As soon as the synopsis and cover art (isn’t that cover almost painfully pretty?) for this book became public, Ten Thousand Doors immediately catapulted to my most anticipated book of 2019. I preordered it for my birthday in February, even though it’s not scheduled to be released until September. Imagine my delight when, less than a week ago, I returned home from church to find an envelope featuring this book’s stunning artwork waiting for me on my doorstep. I’ve never received a more beautiful ARC, and this is the first time I have ever seen a galley delivered in special packaging such as I saw on my stoop. My husband laughed when I darted out of the car before it was even fully in park, leaving my phone and house key and everything else in the vehicle because I was so insanely excited. I tried desperately to pace myself, trying not to read more than 50 pages or so per day so that the book would last as long as possible. Alas, I was hopelessly incapable of sticking to that pace and found the story drawing to a close far too quickly. “You see, doors are many things: fissures and cracks, ways between, mysteries and borders. But more than anything else, doors are change.” When you have such a high level of excitement going into a book, it’s very hard to temper your expectations and not be disappointed. And yet, I never once felt disappointed in Ten Thousand Doors. From page one, I fell in love with January Scaller. When we first meet January, she is seven years old and, though her father is living, finds herself being raised by Mr. Locke, his benefactor, as her father travels the world, searching for exotic treasures to bring back to his employer. January is wild and sullen and headstrong and oddly colored, an unfortunate circumstance considering the time and place in which she lives. Worst of all, she’s imaginative. Throughout her childhood years, she is herded and tamed into submission by Mr. Locke and militant nursemaids, and sees less and less of her father. But though she has been bent by her benefactor, she has managed to remain unbroken, and finds many opportunities to test and marvel at the strength of her own character. “I escaped outdoors (see how that word slips into even the most mundane of sentences? Sometimes I feel there are doors lurking in the creases of every sentence, with periods for knobs and verbs for hinges).” What I loved the most about January was how alive she seemed. From the very beginning, she had an incredibly strong, distinctive voice, and an open honesty to her character that made her wonderfully believable. She’s far from perfect, and that’s what makes her so engaging. The amount of character development packed into less than 400 pages is astounding. I loved watching this fiery little girl grow into a woman and recapture that spark that had been smothered within her. January has also been blessed with a trio of amazing friends who will do anything in their power to aid her on her quest. I don’t want to describe them and inadvertently take anything away from the reading experiences of others, so I’ll just say that they’re all three brave and loyal and steadfast, but in radically different ways. I’m so impressed that Harrow was able to imbue even her side characters with such heaping amounts of personality and believability. “At this point, you’re thinking that this story isn’t really about Doors, but about those more private, altogether more miraculous doors that can open between two hearts. Perhaps it is in the end—I happen to believe that every story is a love story if you catch it at the right moment, slantwise in the light of dusk—but it wasn’t then.” Something else that I loved about this book was its duality. Though January is our protagonist, we also trek right along with her as she reads through a magical book that she found in an antique trunk. The chapters of said magical book are very different in tone and voice than January’s chapters, and I thoroughly enjoyed this added variance. January’s insatiable need to see how that story ended increased my own desire to continue reading. I felt that the author and purpose of the little book were both a bit obvious, but that they were meant to be so, which ensured that the predictability of that particular information couldn’t be in any way disappointing. “If you are wondering why other worlds seem so brimful of magic compared to your own dreary Earth, consider how magical this world seems from another perspective.” Between the magical book and the otherworldly Doors mentioned in the title, I was strongly reminded of two books that I adore: Inkheart and Every Heart a Doorway. However, as much as I dearly love the two aforementioned titles, The Ten Thousand Doors of January surpassed them both in my eyes by intermingling the things I love so much about both. As with Inkheart, Ten Thousand Doors makes much of not only books but the words with which they’re crafted. And, as with Every Heart a Doorway, there are magical portals to a multitude of realms, hidden behind and beneath the mundane, and the search for these Doors is an all-consuming quest for certain characters involved. I won’t talk more about January’s Doors, as they are the backbone of her story and readers should learn about these portals as they read, but I love the entire idea of them and desperately wish I could find one of my own, and found them even more enticing than those in McGuire’s Every Heart a Doorway. “Worlds are too complex, too beautifully fractured to be named.” Though I loved January and her friends, and I rooted for them as they faced down their foes, that was not my favorite element of this novel. And though the plot was everything I could hope for and more, keeping me enthralled and remaining at the forefront of my mind far after I had closed its pages, that was not my favorite aspect, either. The thing I loved most about this book was the absolutely exquisite prose. Harrow is more than an author; she is a Wordsmith, a sorceress wielding a pen in place of a wand. Her writing is effortlessly stunning and unconsciously literary. I’ve read a lot of literary fiction, and fantasy, and literary fiction trying to also be fantasy. I have found very few novels that managed to bridge the gap from literary fiction to fantasy in a compelling and convincing way, though I have found many fantasy authors who, in my opinion, can hold their own with any literary author. The Ten Thousand Doors of January is one of a mere handful of books that I’ve come across that could sit comfortably in either the literary or fantasy genre, and I think it beautifully combines both. “Doors, he told her, are change, and change is a dangerous necessity. Doors are revolutions and upheavals, uncertainties and mysteries, axis points around which entire worlds can be turned. They are the beginnings and ending of every true story, the passages between that lead to adventures and madness and—here he smiled—even love. Without doors the world’s would grow stagnant, calcified, storyless.” Not only does Harrow have a gorgeous way with words, but she appreciates the building blocks of language in a way that I’ve rarely if ever seen in fiction. Something she did that I felt was incredibly unique was drawing attention to letters themselves. When a word is important, you capitalize it. And when you capitalize a word, that first letter suddenly becomes a representation of that word. At least, that is what Harrow points out through the eyes and mind of January. For example, when you capitalize the first letter of Villain, doesn’t that V speak of daggers and fangs? That’s what January thinks. When you read this book, which I desperately hope you will, watch for explanations of words like Door and Threshold, Companion and Home. They were such beautiful ideas that my heart kept them, and I know they will come back to me every time I come across these words. Worlds were never meant to be prisons, locked and suffocating and safe. Worlds were supposed to be great rambling houses with all the windows thrown open and the wind and summer rain rushing through them, with magic passages in their closets and secret treasure chests in their attics.” This is among the longest reviews I’ve ever written, and I still feel that I haven’t said enough. Or perhaps I’ve said too much. In either case, I hope I was able to convey how much I adore this book, and how deeply it touched me. For the first time in my adult life, I’m honestly contemplating rereading a book immediately, or at least within the same year. Maybe I’ll hold out until release day, and experience it again when I receive my preordered copy. I haven’t read a book twice in one year since I was in middle school. I can already tell that January is going to be one of my dearest friends, and that I’ll be revisiting her often. The Ten Thousand Doors of January is a marvel, and I can’t wait for the world to read it. The quotations in the review above were taken from an advance reading copy and are subject to change upon the book's publication.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hamad

    This Review ✍ Blog 📖 Twitter 🐦 Instagram 📷 “How fitting, that the most terrifying time in my life should require me to do what I do best: escape into a book.” 🌟 Disclaimer: ARC provided by the publisher in exchange of an honest review! 🌟 I am not a big fan of history in general and it was always my least favorite subject in school. I found that the same applies to the bookish world and that I am not a big fan of historical fiction. I saw someone describing this as historical fantasy and I was int/> This Review ✍️ Blog 📖 Twitter 🐦 Instagram 📷 “How fitting, that the most terrifying time in my life should require me to do what I do best: escape into a book.” 🌟 Disclaimer: ARC provided by the publisher in exchange of an honest review! 🌟 I am not a big fan of history in general and it was always my least favorite subject in school. I found that the same applies to the bookish world and that I am not a big fan of historical fiction. I saw someone describing this as historical fantasy and I was intrigued! Like one of my most favorite things combined with my least favorite subject. Where would this combination lead to and it looks like there are a ten thousand doors that it can lead to. 🌟 I was seeing 5 stars after 5 stars for this book and that made my curiosity peek even more! I requested an ARC from the publisher and I was provided with a hardcover!!! I still can’t get over that! The level of attention to details and aesthetics in this book is astounding. From the cover design to the chapters headers and more. 🌟 The first thing that I noticed when I was reading is the writing style, Alex definitely has a magical prose that is fitting for a story of this kind! I was bored at some points and I will explain more on that later but the prose was what made me continue and I did not regret it. There was a change in the narrative voice at some points and it was intentional and I like how the characters pointed it out! “It is at the moments when the doors open, when things flow between the worlds, that stories happen.” 🌟 All the talk about doors and portals made me -and other readers- get the “Every heart a doorway” vibes which is a great hit by Seanan McGuire. I like that series but I assure you that this is totally different and they may share only few superficial similarities. I said at the beginning that I am not a fan of historical fiction and that’s because I am usually bored while reading it. There were like 2 stories in one here and they fuse into one bigger story at the end. I may have been bothered a little bit by this because there was a difference in my interest between them. One of my friends was enjoying the book but when the second story began he lost interest and DNF the book!! 🌟 The characters are well written and I liked how things turned out toward the end and I felt that I should have made connections earlier in the story but I missed them and was surprised in a good way! “Books are Doors and I wanted out.” 🌟 Summary and Prescription: This is a book with a very beautiful prose for those who like magical writing. I would say the fantasy parts were not large and it reads more like an interesting historical fiction. I still like the description Historical Fantasy so if it sounds like something you would enjoy, don’t hesitate to give the book a try. You can get more books from Book Depository

  20. 5 out of 5

    Em Lost In Books

    4.5* Absolutely stunning and gorgeous! 💕

  21. 4 out of 5

    Larry H

    "There's only one way to run away from your own story, and that's to sneak into someone else's." The Ten Thousand Doors of January is a wild, magical, fascinating story about incredible journeys, love, family, loss, and loyalty. At the turn of the 20th century January Scaller is a young, curious girl whose father travels for business, hunting the world for antiquities and oddities, so he leaves her in the care of his employer, the eccentric collector of artifacts, Mr. Locke. Locke/> "There's only one way to run away from your own story, and that's to sneak into someone else's." The Ten Thousand Doors of January is a wild, magical, fascinating story about incredible journeys, love, family, loss, and loyalty. At the turn of the 20th century January Scaller is a young, curious girl whose father travels for business, hunting the world for antiquities and oddities, so he leaves her in the care of his employer, the eccentric collector of artifacts, Mr. Locke. Locke treats January with some indulgence until he realizes she has a wild spirit that requires taming. One day she finds a door in the middle of an abandoned field. When she steps through the door she finds herself in an entirely different world, a phenomenon she can hardly explain. Yet when she does try to share her find with Locke, she doesn’t understand the vehemence of his reaction or the punishment that follows. Of course, when you are forbidden to act or think a certain way, it only exacerbates your need to do so. January starts to find that she has inexplicable skills that help her when needed. One day she finds a strange book which talks of journeys between different worlds, mysterious doors, and ultimately, a love story, and she starts to see some similarities to things in her own life. But the more she tries to pursue these worlds, and find these doors, the more she is pursued, putting herself and those she cares about in grave danger. This is a pretty magical story about the ability to travel through time and different worlds. It’s the story of finding courage when you are at your most vulnerable, and realizing that our assumptions about how people feel about us can often be wrong. But as crazy as this story is, at its core it’s a love story, an adventure, a story of friendship, family, and how easy it is to fear the things we cannot understand. This book has memorable characters and is beautifully written. One trigger warning: there is some animal cruelty in the book, but it’s not a significant part of the book. I enjoyed The Ten Thousand Doors of January , although I found it a bit confusing from time to time. It definitely requires you to suspend your disbelief. But if this type of book appeals to you it’s definitely worth the journey. See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com. Check out my list of the best books I read in 2018 at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2019/01/the-best-books-i-read-in-2018.html. You can follow me on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/the.bookishworld.of.yrralh/.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Fran

    Locke House was "an immense red stone castle" in Vermont. William Cornelius Locke, Chairman of the Archaeological Society, had amassed an impressive collection of objects "of particular unique value". These magnificent treasures were pilfered from around the world by employees like Julian Scaller. Globetrotting for Mr. Locke, arguably a less than desirable occupation, afforded 'motherless' January the privilege of learning proper etiquette and mixing with high society. Julian was seldom able to Locke House was "an immense red stone castle" in Vermont. William Cornelius Locke, Chairman of the Archaeological Society, had amassed an impressive collection of objects "of particular unique value". These magnificent treasures were pilfered from around the world by employees like Julian Scaller. Globetrotting for Mr. Locke, arguably a less than desirable occupation, afforded 'motherless' January the privilege of learning proper etiquette and mixing with high society. Julian was seldom able to come home to Locke House and bond with his disappointed daughter. According to January, "Sometimes I felt like an item in Mr. Locke's collection labeled January Scaller...purpose unknown". Locke informed January that she is now an orphan. Her father had not sent any expeditionary reports to Locke House for months. Julian is missing, presumed dead. As Locke's ward, January is being groomed for success. She travels with him to Kentucky for the annual Archaeological Society meeting. "Odd-colored young orphans didn't fare well out in the wide world, with no money or prospects...Mr. Locke was my other shelter and anchor now that my father was gone." Frustrated and angry, January bolted, running from the society gathering. She discovered a lonely overgrown field and a "...raggedy blue door standing so lonesome in the field...The following day, the blue door wasn't there." "I bet there are more Doors just like it. I bet I could find them and write about them and they'd all open." "I wanted wide-open horizons...danger...mystery...adventure. Like my father..." January discovers a leather-bound journal written by her father. "Books can smell of cheap thrills or painstaking scholarship, of literary weight or unsolved mysteries. This one smelled unlike any book I'd ever held." January discovers a different life by reading this journal entitled "The Ten Thousand Doors". "...doors are portals between one world and another existing only in places of 'weak coupling' between two universes." Ade was raised in poverty but was "radiant, wild and fierce". Julian was "...a scientist studying his own soul". Two people, chance meeting...one from our world, one from the City of Nin. Doors will introduce change, but in what ways? Is there any connection between January, Ade and Julian? "The Ten Thousand Doors" by Alix E. Harrow is a work of portal fiction. "Portals generate a certain amount of 'leakage' and this "leakage and resultant storytelling" allow author Harrow to address issues such as race, adventure, love and the power of the written word. I enjoyed the addition of Samuel, Jane and most especially January's faithful canine companion, Bad. The descriptive writing style had this reader enchanted, however, lack of familiarity with the portal fantasy genre created some challenges for this reader. A solid 4 star read. Thank you Redhook Books and Net Galley for the opportunity to read and review "The Ten Thousand Doors of January".

  23. 4 out of 5

    TS Chan

    ARC provided by the publisher, Orbit, in exchange for an honest review. Incredibly lush, exquisite and enchanting, The Ten Thousand Doors of January has all the makings of a classic. One which I'm certain will be well-loved and much-read. And I dare say not only by those who enjoy fantasy, for this novel is pure joy in literary form that is a tribute to almost every reader out there. Do you love books? This book is for you. Do you love the written word? This book is for you. Do you love stories and escapism? This/>Do/>Do/>Do/>Incredibly ARC provided by the publisher, Orbit, in exchange for an honest review. Incredibly lush, exquisite and enchanting, The Ten Thousand Doors of January has all the makings of a classic. One which I'm certain will be well-loved and much-read. And I dare say not only by those who enjoy fantasy, for this novel is pure joy in literary form that is a tribute to almost every reader out there. Do you love books? This book is for you. Do you love the written word? This book is for you. Do you love stories and escapism? This book is for you. When I first laid my eyes upon the cover of The Ten Thousand Doors of January, it was love at first sight. Far from it for me to advise anyone to judge a book by its cover, but in this instance its entire package justified my feelings when I gaze upon such glorious beauty. A few months' back, I came across Alix E. Harrow's beautiful short story "A Witch’s Guide to Escape: A Practical Compendium of Portal Fantasies", which made my anticipation to read her debut novel grow even further. It did not surprise me at all that said short story even won the Hugo Awards this year. You can read this wonderful little tale here. With such eager anticipation and high expectations, I was naturally anxious when I finally started reading The Ten Thousand Doors of January. And especially when my co-reviewer Celeste, who adored the book with all her heart, ardently believed that I will love it as well. I read the first few sentences and I was entranced. The writing was simply exquisite. It felt like reading a classic but without the pretense; the prose was literary without trying to be so. It felt familiar in tone but there was also a sense that I'll be taken on a journey like no other. And in no time, I was swept off my feet. I am not going into any description about the story. What I will say is that it has one of the most beautiful love stories I've read. It was not just a love story between two persons, however, but a love story dedicated to books, to the power of the written word, to wanderlust and to mankind's ever faithful companion. “At this point, you’re thinking that this story isn’t really about Doors, but about those more private, altogether more miraculous doors that can open between two hearts. Perhaps it is in the end—I happen to believe that every story is a love story if you catch it at the right moment, slantwise in the light of dusk—but it wasn’t then.” The main character of January Scaller felt real and alive under the masterful strokes of Harrow's penmanship. This is not a particularly long book, but the characterisation of the January and the supporting characters was marvellously rendered. The story was told from a combination of January's perspective and from the author of the in-world book "Ten Thousand Doors". Each with its distinctive personality and tone, but both equally enthralling to read. As a portal fantasy, the magical backbone of the story dealt with Doors which can transport anyone who crosses its Threshold into other realms and worlds. Being readers of fantasy, we can easily appreciate the joys of escapism. Books are our portals to imaginary worlds and to great adventures with new friends (and sometimes even old ones), all while remaining physically safe although I can't say the same about our hearts. "Worlds were never meant to be prisons, locked and suffocating and safe. Worlds were supposed to be great rambling houses with all the windows thrown open and the wind and summer rain rushing through them, with magic passages in their closets and secret treasure chests in their attics.” Where did the power of the written word come in then? That I cannot reveal for it begs to be discovered. In any case, the sheer beauty of the writing in this book should convince you that the written word has a magic of its own. Reading The Ten Thousand Doors of January was a sensorial experience, where every word and every immaculate and wondrous turn of phrase tantalized my senses. "Words and their meanings have weight the world of matter, shaping and reshaping realities through a most ancient alchemy. Even my own writings—so damnably powerless—may have just enough power to reach the right person and tell the right truth, and change the nature of things." This is unlike any fantasy book you would've read before. Almost literary in flavour but eminently magical in essence, The Ten Thousand Doors of January will transport you into another world within the world we know of. The pacing can be said to be languid for most of the narrative but it is thoroughly engaging. With such an spellbinding read, why would you want it to be over so soon anyway? Do not miss entering this Door to an amazing and wondrous journey through a magical landscape of words and stories. Official release date: September 12th, 2019 (UK) and September 10th, 2019 (US) You can pre-order the book from: Amazon UK | Amazon US | Book Depository (Free shipping) The quotes in this review were taken from an ARC and are subject to change upon publication. You can find this and my other reviews at Novel Notions.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    It is a rare thing to relate to a book’s character in such a way that similar situations evoke empathy across your lives. Enough parallels can be drawn to feel almost as if the book is catered specifically toward you in some existential way. I have not read much portal fantasy, but I have always felt a feeling of smothered repression through my youth that has tamped down my will to explore. Instead, my portals to elsewhere revealed themselves in books and stories at an early age, and they’ve bee It is a rare thing to relate to a book’s character in such a way that similar situations evoke empathy across your lives. Enough parallels can be drawn to feel almost as if the book is catered specifically toward you in some existential way. I have not read much portal fantasy, but I have always felt a feeling of smothered repression through my youth that has tamped down my will to explore. Instead, my portals to elsewhere revealed themselves in books and stories at an early age, and they’ve been with me ever since. Alix Harrow captures this feeling of finding oneself through the stories we share in her stunning and unforgettable debut novel The 10,000 Doors of January. It is a beautifully written and lovingly crafted adventure about the strength of love, the importance of stories, and the timeless power of words. I’ll be brief with the plot synopsis; the less you know ahead of time, the better. The book is set at the turn of the 20th century. January Scaller is young ward to an unfathomably rich benefactor; her father travels the world working for him. As January approaches the end of her youth, she thinks about her early carefree days and wonders if she’ll ever reclaim that feeling of freedom and wanderlust. And then a book comes into her life that might change everything. Harrow’s gift of prose is immediately apparent within the first few pages of the story. The writing is accessible and wise, thoughtful and humorous. Stories within stories allow for opportunities to dance around different character voices and the cast feels genuine and lifelike after only a short time of knowing them. Trigger warning: towards the end of the story, there is a promise that January makes to a long-time companion in a letter. “So will I,” it ends, and you, too will sob uncontrollably while repeating that phrase to yourself over a tissue box. At the risk of sounding redundant, this is a remarkable novel that I plan to revisit again. This is a rare fantasy book that I can recommend with confidence to my friends and family who don’t normally read the genre. Read this book before the inevitable Hollywood film is made. It deserves to be fully experienced from within. 10/10

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay - Traveling Sister

    3 stars. A spellbinding, imaginative, unique journey! This novel is a creative, haunting and original story. The main character, January, is a young girl who finds a magical book that takes her on a journey through hidden doors into other worlds. In search of her family and of herself, January tries to piece together her past. Based on the synopsis, I knew this was a bit of a risky read, but I wanted to take the plunge and try something outside of my usual genre. The first 3 stars. A spellbinding, imaginative, unique journey! This novel is a creative, haunting and original story. The main character, January, is a young girl who finds a magical book that takes her on a journey through hidden doors into other worlds. In search of her family and of herself, January tries to piece together her past. Based on the synopsis, I knew this was a bit of a risky read, but I wanted to take the plunge and try something outside of my usual genre. The first half of the book was intriguing and exciting, however, my connection began to fade and confusion set in around the halfway point. My mind just doesn’t “go there”. I am not a fantasy or magical realism reader so this is a matter of me simply not being the right target audience for this novel. The writing was excellent. I loved the characters and thought they were entertaining and endearing. The storyline simply didn’t work for me. Please check out the many raving reviews from others who are more comfortable in this genre and can provide better insight. This was a Traveling Sister read with Norma and Brenda. We were happy to have had the chance to step outside of our comfort zone to read this together. Thank you to Hachette Book Group for providing me with a physical copy to read and review!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. January Scaller is an oddity. A ward of the rich and powerful Mr Cornelius Locke, her father's employer, with skin the colour of cinnamon, she spends her childhood trying to be a good girl and conforming to the society of 19th century America. Until, aged 7, she finds a Door that opens onto a world smelling of sea brine and possibilities and is changed forever. Scattered among her world are Doors, all leading to different worlds an I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. January Scaller is an oddity. A ward of the rich and powerful Mr Cornelius Locke, her father's employer, with skin the colour of cinnamon, she spends her childhood trying to be a good girl and conforming to the society of 19th century America. Until, aged 7, she finds a Door that opens onto a world smelling of sea brine and possibilities and is changed forever. Scattered among her world are Doors, all leading to different worlds and offering different adventures. But January soon finds herself locked in a world filled with unkindness and enemies that will do anything to destroy the Doors, with only a mysterious book to guide her. I loved this. There's something so distinctly nostalgic about the magic, with it's mixture of portals and adventure that just calls to me. It's told over two separate perspectives, as January recounts her past, as well as by an unknown narrator of 'The Ten Thousand Doors', the book which January finds in a box within Mr Locke's collection. The way the two stories begin to intertwine is extremely well done, and neither story took anything away from the other, or slowed the pace. Instead, they serve to enhance each other - almost like two worlds colliding, or sitting beside each other - much like the Doors themselves, they bolster the magical feeling and give emotional depth to the stories. It's almost Ouroboros in nature too, and beautifully written with it, and makes me want to reread this all over again with my new perspective. January is a wonderful heroine, with plenty of passion and exuberance to carry the story all by herself. She's willful, likeable, yet woefully repressed and lonely due to Mr Locke and the social constructs of being an 'odd' colour in a world that hates anyone who isn't white, privileged and powerful. To see her emerge as a strong woman, and grow into herself by her own means was wonderful to see. Her relationships with dog Bad, Italian grocery boy Samuel and 'maid' Jane are also well written and beyond the one dimensional. None of these characters are perfect, or morally all 'good', but each has a love for January that transcends worlds and allows her to carry on when she's at her lowest. Some of the injustices she faces during her story made me so angry, and I really cared about what happened to her. The romance elements to this are also minimal, touching yet sweet, and only further enhance January as a character. Love is used as a tool to being a better person, one who understands their own abilities and strength. I loved that. January's relationship with Mr Locke is also complex and difficult to define. She's woefully naive as to his nature, constantly hoping to see the good in him, believing that he loves her as a daughter. From the outside looking in, the reader could come to a different conclusion, but January's feelings for him are understandable - if a little wrong and ultimately frustrating (in a good way) in my opinion. Also, the name. Mr Locke. Honestly, there's so many subtle nuances to this story it's unreal. This wasn't perfect by any means. I wanted more time spent within the many, many different worlds and the various adventures that could have occurred here. It missed a few golden opportunities with regards to Jane and the cat-women in this respect. Also, some parts of the story are a little rushed and could have been slowed down to accommodate a break in the relentless pace during the second half of the book. (view spoiler)[ In particular, within Arcadia. This was a place I wanted to explore more, and be expanded on, as well as have more details about Molly and her motley crew of forgotten/lost people. She seemed an absolute dynamite character. I also would have liked more time exploring the mysterious secret society and it's members. The ones we do see are incredibly unique and interesting, and I think this was a bit of a missed opportunity. (hide spoiler)] . However, the depth and warmth of the main characters and the magical portals just shines through. I admit, I cried several times because I loved these people so much, and on finishing I sat for a good ten minutes with a smile on my face. It was that special. I would love the author to continue telling January's story, but this does sit perfectly as a stand alone. Magical. Adventurous. Beautiful. Do judge this book by it's cover.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    HOLY SH*T. This book was like a drug to me. Portals and the multiverse and word magic and fascinating women and crisp, textured prose I wanted to fold and unfold like a letter. It's truly one of those books that's bigger on the inside, a house with countless rooms.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Haïfa

    I would like to thank the publisher, Orbit, for providing an early copy in exchange for an honest opinion. All opinions expressed in this review are my own and the quotes included may change in the released copy. This book was everything I hoped it would be, and more! It was sweet, it was heartbreaking and heart-mending at the same time. Rarely has a book exceeded my expectations, stimulated my imagination and filled me with wonder the way The Ten Thousand Doors of January has. Rarely has a book rekindle I would like to thank the publisher, Orbit, for providing an early copy in exchange for an honest opinion. All opinions expressed in this review are my own and the quotes included may change in the released copy. This book was everything I hoped it would be, and more! It was sweet, it was heartbreaking and heart-mending at the same time. Rarely has a book exceeded my expectations, stimulated my imagination and filled me with wonder the way The Ten Thousand Doors of January has. Rarely has a book rekindled my love for reading, my hunger for a good story and beautiful words as this book has. It is at the moments when the doors open, when things flow between the worlds, that stories happen. And rarely has a book come knocking at my door in such a timely fashion. Reading has been and will always be my passion, my companion and my means of evading. But we’ve had some difficulties lately, what with me swinging in and out of book slumps, being too busy, too tired, too lazy, re-shelving a multitude of books not because they’re bad, but because the timing wasn’t right. I’ve been longing for a book that will erase the fatigue, the indifference and carve a doorway into my heart and mind. …and some naive corner of my soul was holding its breath in expectation, waiting for something magical to happen. And something magical did indeed happen to my reading self! I’ve been meaning to take a break after I closed The Ten Thousand Doors. But some Doors aren’t meant to be closed! Here I am, starting a new book and barely able to stop myself from leaping to the next chapter. "You see, doors are many things: fissures and cracks, ways between, mysteries and borders. But more than anything else, doors are change." What else to expect from a book that is an ode to books and readers, to the written word and to the “word-workers”? But also an ode to dreams untouched by adulthood's shackles, to the flame that animated us as children and made us believe everything was possible and within our reach. I loved how it celebrated freedom and adventure and how it accurately dealt with loneliness, loss, abandon and broken promises. And I loved the ever-presence of books and stories and fairytales in the narrative. I wanted wide-open horizons and worn shoes and strange constellations spinning above me like midnight riddles. I wanted danger and mystery and adventure. January was an endearing main character. And she was the perfect narrator in my opinion, sometimes a detached (but not without wit and cheekiness) storyteller but mostly an ever growing, continuously learning, realistically painted protagonist. Despite a mostly absent father, a deceased mother and being “oddly colored” (in a hostile world and era for people of color), January has lived a rather luxurious and sheltered life under Mr Locke’s wing. But a sheltered life isn’t synonymous for a happy one. And underneath the thick layers of submissiveness and good manners lurks an adventurous, dreaming, barely tamed soul whose constraints would be tested the day she discovers The Thousand Doors, hidden in one of Locke’s treasures. At this point, you’re thinking this story isn’t really about Doors, but about those more private, altogether more miraculous doors that can open between two hearts. Just take a look at the simple beauty of those lines! Alix Harrow has such a beautiful, charming, clever and evocative writing that at the same time seems almost effortless. Her debut (Debut! See that capital D, like a mouth hanging open, incredulous before such a ridiculously exquisite prose?) reads like a modern classic or like my friend Celeste astutely remarked “like a children book for adults”. I highlighted furiously, I smiled fondly and I cried tears of joy and of sorrow. Since the first chapters, I guessed and kept guessing until the end. Almost all my theories were true and you know what? That’s what made the book even more special for me! How I love this feeling in books, when I guess (or think I guessed) something, or suspect a hidden goal, an endgame and I cannot wait to see it come to pass. Like a love declaration one perceives early on or an inevitable battle between good and evil you expect since the beginning... The beauty of The Ten Thousand Doors wasn’t (only) in its revelations and closure for me but in the way leading to them. “Journey before destination”, right? I think that the author intended for some revelations to be discovered, dropping subtle hints like a trail of breadcrumbs and leaving her reader’s imagination to run freely and try to gather the pieces of the puzzle. "Sometimes just by telling a story you’re stealing it, stealing a little of the mystery away from it." This is a story for every reader, whether you’re a fantasy lover or more of a literary person. Choose a comfortable seat, take your inner child on your lap and let Alix E. Harrow’s beautiful words take you through magical Doors and into ten thousand worlds. You can find this review and more at Novel Notions.

  29. 5 out of 5

    April (Aprilius Maximus)

    “It is at the moments when the doors open, when things flow between the worlds, that stories happen.” oh. my. god.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Umut Reviews

    The Ten Thousand Doors of January is definitely one to watch for. I loved the writing, and I think Harrow is a very promising writer, and I look forward to what she'll come up in the following years. Sometimes you gel with a writer's style immediately, and that was the case with this book. I really liked the style of writing. The beginning of the book was sort of a coming of age tale, where we get to know January, the main character. Then, we slowly start to learn about the doors, and start to d The Ten Thousand Doors of January is definitely one to watch for. I loved the writing, and I think Harrow is a very promising writer, and I look forward to what she'll come up in the following years. Sometimes you gel with a writer's style immediately, and that was the case with this book. I really liked the style of writing. The beginning of the book was sort of a coming of age tale, where we get to know January, the main character. Then, we slowly start to learn about the doors, and start to discover about the two worlds and what happened to January's parents. The beginning of this book was great, I was super hooked. I loved the historical details sprinkled very nicely in the narration. It was almost perfection. However, it followed very slowly for my liking. It took a long time to get to the milestones & the . fantasy elements of it. This slowness decreased the tension and the pace of the book massively. Overall, I loved the uniqueness of the story, I loved January, I LOVED the writing. It was so beautiful. But, the reason of 4 stars instead of 5 is really slow pace, lack of tension and enough action. Had it been a bit more energetic and shorter, it would be easily 5 stars. Regardless, I really recommend this book. Still a very enjoyable read. Harrow's talent for storytelling is remarkable and one to watch.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.