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Beverly, Right Here

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Revisiting once again the world of Raymie Nightingale, two-time Newbery Medalist Kate DiCamillo turns her focus to the tough-talking, inescapably tenderhearted Beverly. Beverly put her foot down on the gas. They went faster still. This was what Beverly wanted — what she always wanted. To get away. To get away as fast as she could. To stay away. Beverly Tapinski Revisiting once again the world of Raymie Nightingale, two-time Newbery Medalist Kate DiCamillo turns her focus to the tough-talking, inescapably tenderhearted Beverly. Beverly put her foot down on the gas. They went faster still. This was what Beverly wanted — what she always wanted. To get away. To get away as fast as she could. To stay away. Beverly Tapinski has run away from home plenty of times, but that was when she was just a kid. By now, she figures, it’s not running away. It’s leaving. Determined to make it on her own, Beverly finds a job and a place to live and tries to forget about her dog, Buddy, now buried underneath the orange trees back home; her friend Raymie, whom she left without a word; and her mom, Rhonda, who has never cared about anyone but herself. Beverly doesn’t want to depend on anyone, and she definitely doesn’t want anyone to depend on her. But despite her best efforts, she can’t help forming connections with the people around her — and gradually, she learns to see herself through their eyes. In a touching, funny, and fearless conclusion to her sequence of novels about the beloved Three Rancheros, #1 New York Times best-selling author Kate DiCamillo tells the story of a character who will break your heart and put it back together again.


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Revisiting once again the world of Raymie Nightingale, two-time Newbery Medalist Kate DiCamillo turns her focus to the tough-talking, inescapably tenderhearted Beverly. Beverly put her foot down on the gas. They went faster still. This was what Beverly wanted — what she always wanted. To get away. To get away as fast as she could. To stay away. Beverly Tapinski Revisiting once again the world of Raymie Nightingale, two-time Newbery Medalist Kate DiCamillo turns her focus to the tough-talking, inescapably tenderhearted Beverly. Beverly put her foot down on the gas. They went faster still. This was what Beverly wanted — what she always wanted. To get away. To get away as fast as she could. To stay away. Beverly Tapinski has run away from home plenty of times, but that was when she was just a kid. By now, she figures, it’s not running away. It’s leaving. Determined to make it on her own, Beverly finds a job and a place to live and tries to forget about her dog, Buddy, now buried underneath the orange trees back home; her friend Raymie, whom she left without a word; and her mom, Rhonda, who has never cared about anyone but herself. Beverly doesn’t want to depend on anyone, and she definitely doesn’t want anyone to depend on her. But despite her best efforts, she can’t help forming connections with the people around her — and gradually, she learns to see herself through their eyes. In a touching, funny, and fearless conclusion to her sequence of novels about the beloved Three Rancheros, #1 New York Times best-selling author Kate DiCamillo tells the story of a character who will break your heart and put it back together again.

30 review for Beverly, Right Here

  1. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Quite honestly, I am becoming a big Kate DiCamillo fan. Having enjoyed Lousiana's Way Home last year, I just couldn't resist reading her latest middle grade novel. Fourteen year old Beverly Tapinski is devastated after the death of her dog and so she decides to leave and head out for adventure. Eccentric characters and hilarious situations occur and I fell into this tale immediately. I would certainly recommend it to a classroom library. Goodreads review published 25/08/19 Publication Date 24/09/1 Quite honestly, I am becoming a big Kate DiCamillo fan. Having enjoyed Lousiana's Way Home last year, I just couldn't resist reading her latest middle grade novel. Fourteen year old Beverly Tapinski is devastated after the death of her dog and so she decides to leave and head out for adventure. Eccentric characters and hilarious situations occur and I fell into this tale immediately. I would certainly recommend it to a classroom library. Goodreads review published 25/08/19 Publication Date 24/09/19 Thanks to Netgalley and Candlewick Press for a digital galley in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Schizanthus

    I read the Three Rancheros series out of order. Louisiana’s Way Home was my first Kate DiCamillo read (ever) and it remains my favourite of the series. I absolutely adored Louisiana and every Burke Allen competed to become my favourite character. When I read Raymie’s story I was introduced to this wonderful spitfire of a young girl called Beverly. I suspected at the time that Beverly would wind up being my favourite character of the series and couldn’t wait to read more about her. A little over three months I read the Three Rancheros series out of order. Louisiana’s Way Home was my first Kate DiCamillo read (ever) and it remains my favourite of the series. I absolutely adored Louisiana and every Burke Allen competed to become my favourite character. When I read Raymie’s story I was introduced to this wonderful spitfire of a young girl called Beverly. I suspected at the time that Beverly would wind up being my favourite character of the series and couldn’t wait to read more about her. A little over three months ago I read her story and was shocked to discover that it was my least favourite book of the series at the time. I didn’t want to accept that so I decided a reread was in order. I’m so glad I tried again because I absolutely fell in love with Beverly’s story this time! Before I go any further I want to share with you what is quite possibly my favourite passage of the entire series. It’s an excerpt of the author’s letter to the reader at the beginning of this book. It’s so beautiful that I keep rereading it. It makes me want to be a better person every time I see it. Raymie Nightingale is about the saving grace of friendship. Louisiana’s Way Home is about deciding who you are. And Beverly, Right Here is about acting on that knowledge of who you are. They are all stories of becoming, I think. And all three of these books are about the power of community - the grace of someone opening a door and welcoming you in, and maybe most of all, having the courage to walk through that door once it’s open. I get a little misty eyed even thinking about it. Anyway, without further ado … It’s August 1979 and Beverly Tapinski is now 14 years old. Buddy, the one eyed “Dog of Our Hearts”, has died and Beverly has decided to leave home. She had run away from home plenty of times, but that was when she was just a kid. It wasn’t running away this time, she figured. It was leaving. She had left. Grieving the loss of her dog but determined not to cry, Beverly winds up at Seahorse Court. There she meets Iola Jenkins, an elderly lady who lives in a pink trailer with His Majesty, King Nod, an overweight grey cat. In a crooked little house by a crooked little sea. Pretty soon Beverly, who doesn’t like fish, is working in a seafood restaurant and eating tuna melts regularly. This child who believes she belongs to no one becomes important to some new friends and despite her best efforts not to let anyone into her heart, they find a way. With a horse that takes you on a ride to nowhere, a determined and hopeful seagull and Christmas in July in August, this story cracked my heart wide open during my reread. I wanted to adopt both rough around the edges Beverly and quirky but loveable Iola, but my favourite character was Elmer. He’s polite, smart, sensitive and willing to step outside of his comfort zone, and he’s the type of friend that you know will be there for you no matter what. I adore him and would love to read about what happens to him in the years after this book finishes. Or he can just be my friend. Whatever comes first. While I feel more satisfied after my reread and aren’t as desperate in my search for a nonexistent epilogue, I would love to one day learn that a fourth Rancheros book is being published, one that takes place 20 or 30 years later. It would be wonderful to catch up with this trio once they’re all grown up to find out what’s become of their lives and their friendship. I’ve already read two of the Ranchero books twice and I loved both more the second time. I get the feeling that no matter how many times I return to them in the future I’m going to enjoy them more with every reread. Content warnings include (view spoiler)[mention of the death of a beloved pet, inappropriate touching, bullying, abandonment and neglect (hide spoiler)] . Thank you so much to NetGalley and Candlewick Press for the opportunity to read this book. Original Review 15 June 2019 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Just finished reading and I have no idea what to write in my review so I’m going to ponder for a while. Oh, and while I’m at it, I’m going to frantically search for an epilogue because I don’t want to accept that the end is truly the end. I have too many question marks about everything that’s unresolved. I need closure!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Susan's Reviews

    My thanks to the author, publisher and NetGalley for a free ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. Magical writing and great character development. I was riveted, watching a closed-off Beverly slowly evolve into a fuller, happier young person. This book really highlights the damage people do to one another when we isolate or exclude anyone in a community, or fail to ensure that children are adequately cared for, emotionally and physically. Beverly had to leave town, get a job an My thanks to the author, publisher and NetGalley for a free ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. Magical writing and great character development. I was riveted, watching a closed-off Beverly slowly evolve into a fuller, happier young person. This book really highlights the damage people do to one another when we isolate or exclude anyone in a community, or fail to ensure that children are adequately cared for, emotionally and physically. Beverly had to leave town, get a job and learn to become a part of a community of her own choosing. Just a wonderful story with enough loose ends to keep you reading on in this series. Highly recommended.

  4. 5 out of 5

    KC

    Fourteen year-old Beverly Tapinski is no stranger to running away from her alcoholic mother, but after the death of her beloved rescue dog Buddy, she leaves for good, ending up moving in with an elderly woman whom she befriends, driving her to BINGO, gets hired to bus tables, and finds a town full of people that give her the courage to come to terms with her loss and to eventually face herself. Everything Kate DiCamillo writes is golden.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura Harrison

    Beverly, Right Here is a work of art. I am in awe of its beauty, perfection and nuances. This is how a middle grade masterpiece is written. I loved Raymie Nightingale. The book was magical. I may love Beverly, Right Here just as much if not more. How I adore reading middle grade books written with actual middle grade children in mind. Too often children's literature is written to please adults. In content and maturity level. Today's kid's are bombarded with depressing news and images in various Beverly, Right Here is a work of art. I am in awe of its beauty, perfection and nuances. This is how a middle grade masterpiece is written. I loved Raymie Nightingale. The book was magical. I may love Beverly, Right Here just as much if not more. How I adore reading middle grade books written with actual middle grade children in mind. Too often children's literature is written to please adults. In content and maturity level. Today's kid's are bombarded with depressing news and images in various media formats. Author's should allow them to have some escapism through their stories. Every character in Beverly, Right Here is well developed and interesting. I think children will really "get" Beverly and come to care for her deeply as well as Iola, Elmer and Nod (the cat). I also love that the color Lapis Lazuli is mentioned frequently in the book. A favorite color of mine! It is easy to tell when a book is so good. The writing feels easy and personal. Almost like it was written just for you. A characteristic only the best children's classic titles possess. Books written by E.B. White, Beverly Clearly and Paula Danziger come to mind. There will be many accolades when Beverly, Right Here is officially released. It is truly a gem.

  6. 4 out of 5

    DaNae

    In BEVERLY, RIGHT HERE DiCamillo proves again that she is the master of proving that small acts of generosity matter, as simple as a dime for a horse that goes nowhere. That looking out for each other matters, like teaching someone to dance or writing someone's name over and over again eighty times. And that even flawed people deserve happiness, acceptance and a place to call home. I was whining to myself the other day about how weary I was growing of reading books where children suffered from t In BEVERLY, RIGHT HERE DiCamillo proves again that she is the master of proving that small acts of generosity matter, as simple as a dime for a horse that goes nowhere. That looking out for each other matters, like teaching someone to dance or writing someone's name over and over again eighty times. And that even flawed people deserve happiness, acceptance and a place to call home. I was whining to myself the other day about how weary I was growing of reading books where children suffered from the bad choices and sins of their parents. And by sins, I mostly mean illnesses: alcoholism, depression and other mental illnesses. I understand, I really understand, that an important benefit of literature is allowing children to see the the hard parts of their own worlds reflected back, reinforcing that they are not alone. And to build empathy and compassion in readers who are on the outside of a particular issue. But in the case of 2019, my shoulders are sagging under the pure weight of the terrible issues children face. Makes a girl want to turn to reruns of the Penderwicks. Then along comes Beverly, a runway escaping her alcoholic mother, who flies straight into the caring hands of an older woman dealing with depression. At their first meeting, she moans to Beverly that she has, 'mislocated my capabilities.' Instead of feeling burdened with Beverly's problems, this book elevated my mood and sent it floating into the sky, (on the wings of angles, to steal a metaphor from the book at hand).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    The whole series was great, but this one is my favorite out of the three. It had so many beautiful themes and emotions that, even as an adult, I was emotionally moved by. I would recommend reading the series in order though, so you can approach each book with a fuller understanding of the characters. I’m going to need a hardcover of this one.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Clara

    THIS ISN'T OUT FOR EIGHT MONTHS BUT IT GETS 5 STARS BECAUSE KATE DICAMILLO. Come quickly, September. O_O - September 2019 - *cries for a million years* GO READ IT.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Pallavi

    ****5.0**** Kate DiCamillo always amazes me. She can write perfectly well about imperfect things in life. Story of Beverly is connected to Louisiana's Way Home and Raymie Nightingale. Beverly has left her house, her alcoholic mother, her best friend Raymie and Her best friend Buddy's grave, a Dog. She doesn't have a reason to stay. She sets out into the world and tries to stay on her own. But she meets Iola, who takes her in into her Trailor, People in Mr. C's where she finds a job and Elmer, a grocer ****5.0**** Kate DiCamillo always amazes me. She can write perfectly well about imperfect things in life. Story of Beverly is connected to Louisiana's Way Home and Raymie Nightingale. Beverly has left her house, her alcoholic mother, her best friend Raymie and Her best friend Buddy's grave, a Dog. She doesn't have a reason to stay. She sets out into the world and tries to stay on her own. But she meets Iola, who takes her in into her Trailor, People in Mr. C's where she finds a job and Elmer, a grocery store clerk who likes Poetry and she again falls for them. Everyone she meets is broken in some or other way but she sees a spark of life in them which in turn helps her to find her own spark. “Just because you can’t stand to think about something doesn’t mean it ain’t happening, that it ain’t true. People wait on other people. People rely on other people.” I loved this book. It has the feel of Louisiana's Way Home and I am eager to read Raymie's story next :) DiCamillo is wonderful in narrating Friendship, Dreams, hope.... totally LIFE. ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an unbiased review. Thanks for making this available! Happy Reading!!!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Afoma Umesi

    Beverly, Right Here is the perfect finale to Kate DiCamillo’s wonderful series. This book is both heartwarming and heartbreaking. But above all, it highlights the importance of seeing the good in others, the need to trust and rely on other people, and the power of letting people in. If you’re looking for a book with complex, utterly lovable characters, and insightful dialogue, pick up Beverly, Right Here! Read my full review here. I received an e-ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review

  11. 4 out of 5

    Zoey

    The story of three friends that began in Raymie Nightingale is concluded in this third book. Beverly's spunk and honesty has made her one of my favorite characters from the beginning. But it's in Beverly, Right Here that we really get that final picture of who she is and who she wants to be. Kate Dicamillo has created a masterful series. It's not packed with action or daring plot twists or subplots so don't approach it with those expectations! But rather it a straightforward look at t The story of three friends that began in Raymie Nightingale is concluded in this third book. Beverly's spunk and honesty has made her one of my favorite characters from the beginning. But it's in Beverly, Right Here that we really get that final picture of who she is and who she wants to be. Kate Dicamillo has created a masterful series. It's not packed with action or daring plot twists or subplots so don't approach it with those expectations! But rather it a straightforward look at the longings and intricacies of the heart. We watch as these lovable but hurting characters are handed hope through humor and friendship. Highly recommend! Thanks to NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for my honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Donna Merritt

    I'm a huge Kate DiCAmillo fan and I enjoyed this book. It's a quick read, but touches upon important issues. Who are we? Is it worth the risk to connect with others? What's the definition of real family? Beverly was a character in Raymie Nightingale and I liked learning more about her (same as the character Louisiana in Louisiana's Way Home). I'm a grade 4/5 school librarian and would happily add this to our collection except for one part. Beverly gets a job busing tables and a man grabs her butt. The waitress e I'm a huge Kate DiCAmillo fan and I enjoyed this book. It's a quick read, but touches upon important issues. Who are we? Is it worth the risk to connect with others? What's the definition of real family? Beverly was a character in Raymie Nightingale and I liked learning more about her (same as the character Louisiana in Louisiana's Way Home). I'm a grade 4/5 school librarian and would happily add this to our collection except for one part. Beverly gets a job busing tables and a man grabs her butt. The waitress explains that if she doesn't complain, he'll tip more. While this story is set in the past (1970s?), I can't put this on our shelves. It's never okay for someone to touch you without your consent. I wish that small scene had been left out or revisited at some point. The end also left the reader hanging. Maybe it means there is another book on the way. Maybe it means we have to imagine what comes next. Either way, the end was not as satisfying as I'd hoped, but, yes, I did enjoy the story overall.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hizatul Akmah

    Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with the digital ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review actual rating: 4.6/5 ⭐ well, what do i expect from this amazing author??? she literally did it again!! reading this book makes me want to hug Beverly so badly. This is a story of Beverly Tapinski after the events of Raymie Nightingale and Louisiana's Way Home and after the death of his dog, Buddy. She lived with her alcoholic mother who barely acknowledged Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with the digital ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review actual rating: 4.6/5 ⭐️ well, what do i expect from this amazing author??? she literally did it again!! reading this book makes me want to hug Beverly so badly. This is a story of Beverly Tapinski after the events of Raymie Nightingale and Louisiana's Way Home and after the death of his dog, Buddy. She lived with her alcoholic mother who barely acknowledged her existence in their home so she decided to run away. I love her characterization and how she managed to pull everything off; she got herself a job and she met new people just to survive in an unfamiliar place. She was supposed to be a cold-hearted girl but something happened that turned her all soft and belonged again. If you love reading Kate's other books, this one should be in your anticipated list too because it has all the right mixture of tragedy, friendships, poetic and melodramatic rhythms!!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Leonard Kim

    Listened to audiobook, but I'm going to read it as soon as my copy comes in. Stands among DiCamillo's very best, though I don't think it will be as popular as Winn-Dixie or Despereaux. In some ways, it is more similar to DiCamillo's earliest books, Winn-Dixie and Tiger Rising, than anything she's written since. Her later books tended to have similar authorial voices -- very different characters would all sound like Kate DiCamillo, as great as that is. What's especially impressive here is that th Listened to audiobook, but I'm going to read it as soon as my copy comes in. Stands among DiCamillo's very best, though I don't think it will be as popular as Winn-Dixie or Despereaux. In some ways, it is more similar to DiCamillo's earliest books, Winn-Dixie and Tiger Rising, than anything she's written since. Her later books tended to have similar authorial voices -- very different characters would all sound like Kate DiCamillo, as great as that is. What's especially impressive here is that this book has essentially the same setup as Louisiana's Way Home, but feels completely different, and is still completely Kate DiCamillo without being a caricature of Kate DiCamillo. It is very slightly older than her previous fare (again more Tiger Rising than anything) - the words "piss" and "crap" are here and one sexual innuendo and more than a touch of romance. Last thing -- perhaps this is not DiCamillo's plan, and yes there's already a book called Raymie Nightingale, which was caricature DiCamillo, but after Louisiana and Beverly, DiCamillo really should give Raymie a solo book of her own -- it would be a towering trilogy (with Raymie Nightingale a sort of prequel.)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lana

    Beverly, Right Here was a touching middle grade story that connected the characters from two of DiCamillo’s early books; Louisiana’s Way Home and Raymie Nightingale. The story starts off with a girl who feels lost after her dog dies, while living in a less than suitable home and she decides to runaway. I did enjoy reading this one, and loved all the characters surrounding Beverly. I think Louisiana’ way Home is still my favorite, but would recommend all three! Thank you to Candlewick Beverly, Right Here was a touching middle grade story that connected the characters from two of DiCamillo’s early books; Louisiana’s Way Home and Raymie Nightingale. The story starts off with a girl who feels lost after her dog dies, while living in a less than suitable home and she decides to runaway. I did enjoy reading this one, and loved all the characters surrounding Beverly. I think Louisiana’ way Home is still my favorite, but would recommend all three! Thank you to Candlewick Press and NetGalley for the opportunity to review this advanced copy.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Queen Cronut

    After the emotional rollercoaster of Louisiana's Way Home, I thought I was prepared for this one. Correction: I thought wrong because alas, I was not ready for this one. Beverly, Right Here finishes the series about the Three Rancheros. My rating system of the series looks something like this now: Louisiana's Way Home > Beverly, Right Here > Raymie Nightengale Although Beverly Tapinski wasn't my favorite... I adored her by the end of this. Following the aftermath of h After the emotional rollercoaster of Louisiana's Way Home, I thought I was prepared for this one. Correction: I thought wrong because alas, I was not ready for this one. Beverly, Right Here finishes the series about the Three Rancheros. My rating system of the series looks something like this now: Louisiana's Way Home > Beverly, Right Here > Raymie Nightengale Although Beverly Tapinski wasn't my favorite... I adored her by the end of this. Following the aftermath of her beloved dog's death, Beverly runs away to pursue a new life. What really made this book shine was the eccentric cast of characters and Beverly's character growth. As the title suggests, Beverly must learn who she wants to be right here, in the present as she comes to terms with her past. This book explores Beverly's journey of self-discovery and her character arc was absolutely phenomenal Loved this book- can't wait for more of Kate DiCamillo's works. *Thank you to NetGalley and Candlewick Press for providing a free ARC

  17. 5 out of 5

    Julie Kirchner

    I have been a huge Kate fan since meeting her the week she won the Newbery Honor for Because of Winn Dixie, so I admit am a bit biased when I read her books. I love the way her writing flows. It is lyrical in a way that feels like I am dancing through the storyline. I can sit down one moment and not even realize I have plowed through 50 pages. I think this makes her writing appealing to students of varying levels as well and brings joy to the reader. Beverly is no different I have been a huge Kate fan since meeting her the week she won the Newbery Honor for Because of Winn Dixie, so I admit am a bit biased when I read her books. I love the way her writing flows. It is lyrical in a way that feels like I am dancing through the storyline. I can sit down one moment and not even realize I have plowed through 50 pages. I think this makes her writing appealing to students of varying levels as well and brings joy to the reader. Beverly is no different. The third installment in Raymie, Louisiana, and Beverly’s stories is a delightful adventure through Kate’s creative imagination. Her quirky characters and unique storyline had my heart aching to finish in order to see how she would resolve Beverly’s journey. I am happy these characters weren’t finished with their story and they convinced Kate to keep quiet and still to wait for Beverly’s story to unfold.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    I like Kate DiCamillo's work, and I've really liked the other two companions to this one. I liked this one too, but it was oddly...existential, perhaps, for a middle grade book. There were moments where it felt more YA or even adult based on the action or the atmosphere or the characterizations, and I wondered whether this was more of a book with child characters that adults were meant to like rather than an actual book for young people. The arc of the plot was also fairly short, although perhap I like Kate DiCamillo's work, and I've really liked the other two companions to this one. I liked this one too, but it was oddly...existential, perhaps, for a middle grade book. There were moments where it felt more YA or even adult based on the action or the atmosphere or the characterizations, and I wondered whether this was more of a book with child characters that adults were meant to like rather than an actual book for young people. The arc of the plot was also fairly short, although perhaps for the length of the book that's to be expected. Overall, as I said, I enjoyed the book, but I'd like to see what readers in the actual intended age range would say. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for the ARC.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joey

    I could read 100 more books about Raymie, Beverly, and Louisiana.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mathew

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. When Kate Di Camillo wrote Raymie Nightingale I realised that I had found a book that sang to me on many levels and considered it a novel for children that had no room for improvement. It was faultless. So when she announced that a book about Louisiana Louisiana's Way Home was in the pipeline along with this book, I had my concerns. I had grown incredible attached to these three characters and wanted them left alone. But I now understand completely why Di Camillo went back to these girls' stories. There was so When Kate Di Camillo wrote Raymie Nightingale I realised that I had found a book that sang to me on many levels and considered it a novel for children that had no room for improvement. It was faultless. So when she announced that a book about Louisiana Louisiana's Way Home was in the pipeline along with this book, I had my concerns. I had grown incredible attached to these three characters and wanted them left alone. But I now understand completely why Di Camillo went back to these girls' stories. There was something about their futures that she wanted to explore and, perhaps, resolve. With Louisiana having left and Beverly's beloved dog, Buddy, in the ground, there was nothing keep Beverly at home. An alcoholic mother, an absent father and nothing but bad memories in the home meant that all that was left for Beverly was to takes up and leave. Without wanting to reveal who she meets or where she goes, Beverly, Right Here should be considered as a more bildungsroman text than either of the others and it a novel awash in symbols, themes and repeating phrases: intergenerational wisdom, trust, wings, non-static homes and the endlessness of the sea all echo in Beverly's story and help to highlight her inner struggle. It's all quite beautiful really. Beverly was always the one with the highest walls yet probably the most sensitive and I thought that this book was all about Di Camillo supporting her character by gradually pulling down some of those bricks and show her that the world is worth trusting. It is common to consider that an author writes with an audience in mind. Usually, when they write for children, it is for the child that they once were. In this case, I think this is especially true but she is also writing for Beverly. This is a beautiful short story and a gift from an author to a character who has always deserved better.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Wendi Lee

    Beverly, Right Here is the third book featuring characters from DiCamillo's beloved Raymie Nightingale. After Beverly's dog dies, she decides to escape her old life and make a new one. She ends up in a beach town, bunking with an elderly woman who lives in a trailer park, and busing tables at a fish restaurant. She has no intentions of making connections (and possibly breaking her heart - again), and indeed, brusque Beverly is sometimes hard to love. But an eccentric cast of characters surround her, giving her Beverly, Right Here is the third book featuring characters from DiCamillo's beloved Raymie Nightingale. After Beverly's dog dies, she decides to escape her old life and make a new one. She ends up in a beach town, bunking with an elderly woman who lives in a trailer park, and busing tables at a fish restaurant. She has no intentions of making connections (and possibly breaking her heart - again), and indeed, brusque Beverly is sometimes hard to love. But an eccentric cast of characters surround her, giving her the push she needs to move forward. I'll be absolutely honest. Beverly was my least favorite of the Three Rancheros, so it's not surprising that I felt the least attached to her novel. That said, this was a very compelling read, and mature for a middle grade book. Beverly grapples with the bad relationship with her mother, feelings of abandonment (by her father and Louisiana), and a resigned suspicion that her life doesn't really matter. The book ends a bit awkwardly, but it reveals the evolution of her character, which is kind of a beautiful thing. I do hope more books are written about these characters. They are all deeply multi-dimensional and interesting to read about. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for an ARC.

  22. 5 out of 5

    legenbooksdary

    Beverly, Right Here is a story about a girl who is dealing with grief of the loss of a pet that was so dear to her and runs away to seek herself. She wanted a happier and a more normal life which her home and family cannot provide for her. So, she went away and it may just be the best decision she'll ever make in her life. Beverly is someone who is going through a lot, emotionally speaking. She lost her dear pet, a friend of hers moved far away (I was pleasantly surprised that is was Louisiana f Beverly, Right Here is a story about a girl who is dealing with grief of the loss of a pet that was so dear to her and runs away to seek herself. She wanted a happier and a more normal life which her home and family cannot provide for her. So, she went away and it may just be the best decision she'll ever make in her life. Beverly is someone who is going through a lot, emotionally speaking. She lost her dear pet, a friend of hers moved far away (I was pleasantly surprised that is was Louisiana from Louisiana's Way Home) and her mother is not exactly the best mother figure. She seeked for more than it could provide her—a life with more happiness, comfort and surrounded by people who cares for her. It is a basic necessity to want to feel cared for and loved so I completely understand what Beverly is going through. The character Iola that Beverly ends up staying with reminds me so much of another character from another book. The book that I'm talking about is Toffee and the character is Marla and they're both so similar that I'm constantly reminded of her. They share a pretty same personality trait and even the situation that they both deal with are similar. The ending was pretty inconclusive but I'm glad to see that she's happier now, surrounded by people who actually wants her to be by their side. It was all in all an uplifting story which makes me unable to put the book down that I read the whole story in one day.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mary Lee

    Now I need to go back and read Raymie and Louisiana. But I'm pretty sure Beverly will still be my favorite. She and Iola and Elmer and Doris and Charles (and Nod, and the seagull at the back door of the restaurant) have found their way into my heart. Oh, Beverly. How much do I love that you saw into Elmer's heart and cared about what was there and not what you could see on the outside? This book is so full of all the hard parts about life -- age, loss, death, the amount of crap in con Now I need to go back and read Raymie and Louisiana. But I'm pretty sure Beverly will still be my favorite. She and Iola and Elmer and Doris and Charles (and Nod, and the seagull at the back door of the restaurant) have found their way into my heart. Oh, Beverly. How much do I love that you saw into Elmer's heart and cared about what was there and not what you could see on the outside? This book is so full of all the hard parts about life -- age, loss, death, the amount of crap in convenience stores -- but it is also full of all that makes life meaningful -- art, music, poetry, friendship, believing in/finding the goodness in others. Thank you, Candlewick. I can't wait for everyone else to read this so we can talk about our favorite parts!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Anmiryam

    Like all truly great middle grade books, this one can be read by anyone from 10 or 11 to 100. While it is nominally a realistic novel, it is spare, and Beverly's journey of building a place for herself is a happy fairytale. It's nice to read a book that reminds you that sometimes people can be good to each other. First book to make me cry this summer.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Grace Keen

    Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with a digital advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. Beverly, Right Here by Kate DiCamillo is the third book in the Raymie Nightingale trio. When we first meet Beverly in Raymie Nightingale, she is hardened by life, angsty, and cantankerous. Despite these things, we soon learn that underneath her tough exterior Beverly possesses a heart of compassion for others and a strong sense of loyalty to her friends.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Richie Partington

    Richie’s Picks: BEVERLY, RIGHT HERE by Kate DiCamillo, Candlewick, September 2019, 256p., ISBN: 978-0-7636-944-7 “If there is a load you have to bear That you can’t carry I’m right up the road I’ll share your load If you just call me” -- Bill Withers “Lean on Me” (1972) "’The person who wrote this actually took the time to see the person she was describing. That's what writing is all about. Seeing. It is the sacred duty of the writer to pay attentio Richie’s Picks: BEVERLY, RIGHT HERE by Kate DiCamillo, Candlewick, September 2019, 256p., ISBN: 978-0-7636-944-7 “If there is a load you have to bear That you can’t carry I’m right up the road I’ll share your load If you just call me” -- Bill Withers “Lean on Me” (1972) "’The person who wrote this actually took the time to see the person she was describing. That's what writing is all about. Seeing. It is the sacred duty of the writer to pay attention, to see the world.’" --On her website, in talking about the process of writing, Kate DiCamillo recalls her first college expository writing course and what her professor told the class after having read aloud Kate’s assignment submission. 20 years ago this month, I read an advance reader copy of BECAUSE OF WINN-DIXIE. Since then, Kate DiCamillo has won two Newbery Medals, a Newbery Honor, and a Boston Globe Horn Book Award. She’s part of the lives of millions of kids and former kids. During her earlier years of being published, I read her books aloud to my children. Now, I’m beginning to share them with the next generation.. And, for the nth time over these 20 years, I’m here to sing the praises of Kate’s latest release, which is another winner. BEVERLY, RIGHT HERE contains stellar examples of the author’s ability to observe and describe the world. For instance: “The office smelled like fish and cigarette smoke. It had a big desk and three metal filing cabinets. The desk was piled high with stacks of paper. There was a fan balanced on one of the stacks. ‘There’s a lot of work to do around here,’ said Mr. Denby. He waved his hand in the general direction of the desk. ‘As you can see.’ Beverly nodded. ‘So I need someone with a good, strong work ethic,’ said Mr. Denby. ‘I need someone who believes in getting things done.’ He reached out and turned on the fan The top layer of papers blew off the desk. ‘Shoot,’ said Mr. Denby. ‘Do you see what I’m talking about here? He turned the fan off and moved it to the floor. The papers fluttered and sighed. Mr. Denby sat down at the desk. He folded his hands. ‘Sit down,’ he said. He nodded in the direction of an orange plastic chair. Beverly sat down. Mr. Denby looked at her. ‘Let’s see,’ he said. ‘Have you ever worked in a restaurant before?’ ‘No,’ said Beverly. ‘Do you like fish?’ ‘Not really,’ said Beverly. Mr. Denby sighed.” Set in 1979, BEVERLY, RIGHT HERE is a companion book to RAYMIE NIGHTINGALE and LOUISIANA’S WAY HOME. It begins with fourteen-year-old Beverly Tapinsky, having just buried her beloved dog Buddy under the orange trees out back, running away from home. She ends up in Tamaray Beach and, stumbling across a funky seaside lunch place, seeks a job there at Mr. C’s. She is immediately hired, off-the-books, as the new busser. A couple of passages caught my attention. They depict contrasting philosophies. The first one involves Beverly and Doris the cook, who is giving Beverly the low-down on getting tipped out by the waitress: “‘Pay attention to what’s going on,’ said Doris. ‘See what people leave on the table. Know what things cost. Pay attention. Nobody watches out for you in this world.’ ‘But you’re watching out for me,’ said Beverly to Doris’s wide, solid back, ‘aren’t you?’ Doris snorted again.” The second involves Iola, the old woman in the nearby trailer park who impulsively takes Beverly in, totally trusting the teen and giving her free lodging in exchange for Beverly driving her to nightly bingo games at the VFW: “Beverly stood on the steps, and Iola stood in the doorway. Somewhere behind them, the ocean was muttering. ‘Don’t wait for me,’ said Beverly. ‘I can’t stand to think about you waiting for me.’ ‘I waited,’ said Iola. Her glasses slipped down her nose. She pushed them up with one finger. ‘Just because you can’t stand to think about something don’t mean it ain’t happening, that it ain’t true. People wait on other people. People rely on other people.’” So which philosophy guides you? Beverly has grown up with a mother who was rarely there for her, so we can see how she might relate to the go-it-alone philosophy. But as Beverly comes to learn, people do need others to lean on, and there are, in fact, generous, caring people in the world who will offer much-needed support, even if you’re a newcomer. Here, as is the case in many Kate DiCamillo books, a collage of disparate and colorful characters find solace and meaning as a result of coming together and creating community. They rely upon one another, lean on one another, and care for one another. We also meet scoundrels and busybodies who are only in it for themselves and who add tension and comedy to the story. Raymie, Louisiana, and now Beverly. I sure love this trilogy. I find it notable that these girls, in the late 1970s, are the same age Kate DiCamillo was back then. Do we dare hope that Kate still has more to mine from her adolescent years, and has another in this series up her sleeve? Richie Partington, MLIS Richie's Picks http://richiespicks.pbworks.com https://www.facebook.com/richiespicks/ [email protected]

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alex Baugh

    It's 1979 and it's been four years since Raymie Nightingale, Louisiana Elefante, and Beverly Tapinski found each other and became the Three Rancheros, promising to rescue each other whenever they are needed. In 1975, it had been necessary rescue 10-year-old Raymie (Raymie Nightingale) in order for her to find to true home. And, in 1977, it was 12-year-old Louisiana's turn (Louisiana's Way Home) who needed to rely on her friends to find her true home. Now, it's 14-year-old, Beverly who needs resc It's 1979 and it's been four years since Raymie Nightingale, Louisiana Elefante, and Beverly Tapinski found each other and became the Three Rancheros, promising to rescue each other whenever they are needed. In 1975, it had been necessary rescue 10-year-old Raymie (Raymie Nightingale) in order for her to find to true home. And, in 1977, it was 12-year-old Louisiana's turn (Louisiana's Way Home) who needed to rely on her friends to find her true home. Now, it's 14-year-old, Beverly who needs rescuing. Beverly has always been known for running away from home, and being returned to a alcoholic mother who just wasn't very interested in her. Now, she's done with running away, and after burying her beloved dog Buddy, Beverly figures there's nothing to keep her at home anymore and so she decides to simply leave. Hitching a ride with Joe Travis, a cousin she doesn't much care for (and the feeling is mutual), Beverly makes it as far as Tamaray Beach, Florida. Walking down the A1A, she comes upon Mr. C's fish restaurant. There, she meets Freddie, the waitress with big, big unrealistic dreams, and owner Mr. Denby, disorganized and depressed now that his wife and three daughters have left him. Open only for lunch, Beverly gets an under-the-table job the busing tables. Beverly also finds a place to stay with lonely widow Iola Jenkins, who gives her a place to sleep and a flowered nightgown, feeds her a steady diet of tuna melts, and in return Beverly drives Iola's Pontiac to the VFW so she can play bingo. Beverly also meets cook Doris and dishwasher Charles at work, and Elmer, a bullied, sensitive Dartmouth-bound teen who loves art and is working in the local convenience store for the summer. As Beverly gets to know each of these people, as she begins to be a part of their lives, and they hers, she starts to realize some things about herself as well. They are an eccentric cast of characters as only Kate DiCamillo can put together, but the focus is always on Beverly. Raymie and Louisiana are present throughout the book, mostly in Beverly's thoughts, although only Raymie makes the briefest of appearances at the end of the book. Their presence. however, proves how strong their bond of friendship is and how important they are to Beverly. In fact, friendship is one of the dominant themes, along with loss, trust, hope, home and how we define it, and the importance of just being there for people who rely on Beverly and on whom Beverly rely. Beverly, Right Here unfolds as languidly as a hot summer day, as Beverly searches and finds her emotional truth. DiCamillo's sentences are simple enough, yet so powerful and there's not a single gratuitous word in any of them. Beverly's story is a wonderful coming of age tale, and like life, it doesn't come to a neat conclusion, but leaves lots of questions about Beverly's future. It does make me sad to think that this is probably the last time we will hear about the Three Rancheros, yet I know that one day, I will revisit each their narratives and I suspect it will yield a greater truth then do their individual stories. You can download a useful Discussion Guide for Beverly, Right Here courtesy of the publisher, Candlewick Press. This book is recommended for readers age 9+ This book was an EARC received from NetGalley

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    Have things ever been so bad that you felt the need to run away? Beverly was done living with a mother that didn't even care if she was around. She had to bury her beloved dog, Buddy. Louisiana had moved to Georgia. There was nothing to keep her at home so when she saw her cousin visiting from Tamaray, a town near the ocean, she jumped in the car with him and left. She didn't' tell her mother, she didn't tell Raymie, she just left. In Tamaray she got a job bussing tables at Mr. C's fish restaura Have things ever been so bad that you felt the need to run away? Beverly was done living with a mother that didn't even care if she was around. She had to bury her beloved dog, Buddy. Louisiana had moved to Georgia. There was nothing to keep her at home so when she saw her cousin visiting from Tamaray, a town near the ocean, she jumped in the car with him and left. She didn't' tell her mother, she didn't tell Raymie, she just left. In Tamaray she got a job bussing tables at Mr. C's fish restaurant and found a place to stay. Iola was standing outside her trailer at the Seahorse Court when Beverly walked by. Beverly promised to drive Iola to bingo (even though she was fourteen and not supposed to be driving) in exchange for a place to stay. Beverly is just going through the motions of life with no happiness at all, that is until she walks into Zoom City and meets Elmer. As the people in this seaside town start to get into Beverly's heart, she actually learns what it is like to be happy. But will this happiness last? What will happen in Iola's son finds out that his mother has a stranger living with her? What will happen at work when the waitress, Freddie, and her horribly mean boyfriend bust into the restaurant and threaten the employees and steal money from Mr. C? Will Beverly and her new friends survive? And what will happen between Beverly and Elmer when he goes off to college? Read the third installment in the Three Rancheros series by best-selling author, Kate DiCamillo!! Beverly, Right Here is probably my favorite of all three of the Three Rancheros books. Raymie and Louisiana have a special place in my heart but I think Beverly just took center stage! This book is so sad and I just want to wrap my arms around Beverly. Also, Elmer is probably one of my favorite characters. He has endured a lot in school yet he loves art, poetry, and has not let a bully dampen his spirits. Friendship is the main theme in this book, and age does not matter! This is a must read for 2019!!!!!! Follow me: Blog - Blazer Tales - https://blazertales.com/ Facebook - Laurie’s Library Place - https://www.facebook.com/LauriesLibra... Instagram - laurieslibrary - https://www.instagram.com/laurieslibr... Twitter - @laurieevans27 https://twitter.com/laurieevans27?lan... Goodreads - Laurie Purser - https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/1... Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/auburngirl2... YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCulD... Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/laurie-ev...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kelley

    Kate DiCamillo is anything but predictable, which is I one thing I love about her. Beverly, for example, gets a job in a restaurant called Mr. C’s – owned by a guy named Denby. I can’t stop smiling about that. But that unpredictability also sometimes means my feelings about her books can be all over the place. Her writing it unfailingly sharp and funny. She gets what life feels like and how people process it. I’m in awe of the way she puts these things onto a page. But her stories, fo Kate DiCamillo is anything but predictable, which is I one thing I love about her. Beverly, for example, gets a job in a restaurant called Mr. C’s – owned by a guy named Denby. I can’t stop smiling about that. But that unpredictability also sometimes means my feelings about her books can be all over the place. Her writing it unfailingly sharp and funny. She gets what life feels like and how people process it. I’m in awe of the way she puts these things onto a page. But her stories, for me, sometimes veer into impossibly odd. I know. It’s strange for me to say that when her Mercy Watson series is among my favorites ever, complete with a family that treats a pig as a daughter. But the situations she puts real people in, the non-fantasy worlds she creates, are sometimes just hard for me to swallow. That’s where Beverly lands. There some really strange moments – a few that felt way out of place, a few that bugged me, a few I just couldn’t believe. I’m not sorry I read her story, though. It completes a set about three friends introduced in Raymie Nightingale. Of the three, I think I’d only recommend Louisiana’s Way Home unless you’re someone who reads everything DiCamillo writes (which is the safest and best choice). Even in a book I sometimes felt half-hearted about, DiCamillo gets the words so right (a truck parked at a “rude angle,” for example) and is so good at capturing the jumbled mess life makes of our emotions. Take the time when Mr. Denby is settling the terms of Beverly’s employment and ends up talking to her about his daughters. “What happens with kids is you want to protect them, and you can’t figure out how to do it, and it drives you crazy. It drives you right out of your head. It keeps you up nights.” And then Beverly takes a side trip after work one day and comes home late to find someone waiting on the porch. “I can’t stand to think about you waiting for me,” she says. “I waited. Just because you can’t stand to think about something don’t mean it ain’t happening, that it ain’t true. People wait on other people. People rely on other people.” It might be the first time that life, or a person, has demonstrated that to Beverly. Someone will ask Beverly who she is. She will answer the question in her head, in a passage so beautiful, it’s worth five stars on its own. But she never says a word. “See? You’re nobody.” On second thought, you’d better read this one, too.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn White

    Beverly, Right Here is the third book in the “Three Rancheros” trio by Kate DiCamillo. Each book is about a different girl in the trio: Raymie Clark (Raymie Nightengale), Louisiana Elefante (Louisiana’s Way Home), and now Beverly Tapinski. I feel that they could be read as standalone books, but I don’t know why you wouldn’t read all of them after you experience the magic of any one of the three! When Beverly Tapinski’s dog (Buddy) dies, she decides it’s time to leave, not run away- sh Beverly, Right Here is the third book in the “Three Rancheros” trio by Kate DiCamillo. Each book is about a different girl in the trio: Raymie Clark (Raymie Nightengale), Louisiana Elefante (Louisiana’s Way Home), and now Beverly Tapinski. I feel that they could be read as standalone books, but I don’t know why you wouldn’t read all of them after you experience the magic of any one of the three! When Beverly Tapinski’s dog (Buddy) dies, she decides it’s time to leave, not run away- she’s done that plenty of times before. She finds herself in Tamaray Beach walking down the side of the A1A. In Tamaray, she finds a job at a fish restaurant even though she hates fish and a place to stay with Iola Jenkins at the Seaside Court RV Community. Beverly meets so many interesting people in her new little world and finally discovers who she is. I should have really started this by saying that Kate DiCamillo has been and will always be my favorite author. I couldn’t contain myself when I received notification that I was approved to read this ARC! As always, I was transported to a world that I wish I could just pack up and move in to. The characters (even the unlikable ones) are amazing. This could have been a quick read for me, but I found myself taking my time to get through the book just so I could enjoy it more. I look forward to reading it again and again in the future! *Thank you to Netgalley and Candlewick Press for the ARC of this book. This was a voluntary review.*

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