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Floodtide

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The streets are a perilous place for a young laundry maid dismissed without a character for indecent acts. Roz knew the end of the path for a country girl alone in the city of Rotenek. A desperate escape in the night brings her to the doorstep of Dominique the dressmaker and the hope of a second chance beyond what she could have imagined. Roz’s apprenticeship with the The streets are a perilous place for a young laundry maid dismissed without a character for indecent acts. Roz knew the end of the path for a country girl alone in the city of Rotenek. A desperate escape in the night brings her to the doorstep of Dominique the dressmaker and the hope of a second chance beyond what she could have imagined. Roz’s apprenticeship with the needle, under the patronage of the Royal Thaumaturgist, wasn’t supposed to include learning magic, but Celeste, the dressmaker’s daughter, draws Roz into the mysterious world of the charm-wives. When floodwaters and fever sweep through the lower city, Celeste’s magical charms could bring hope and healing to the forgotten poor of Rotenek, but only if Roz can claim the help of some unlikely allies. Set in the magical early 19th century world of Alpennia, Floodtide tells an independent tale that interweaves with the adventures.


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The streets are a perilous place for a young laundry maid dismissed without a character for indecent acts. Roz knew the end of the path for a country girl alone in the city of Rotenek. A desperate escape in the night brings her to the doorstep of Dominique the dressmaker and the hope of a second chance beyond what she could have imagined. Roz’s apprenticeship with the The streets are a perilous place for a young laundry maid dismissed without a character for indecent acts. Roz knew the end of the path for a country girl alone in the city of Rotenek. A desperate escape in the night brings her to the doorstep of Dominique the dressmaker and the hope of a second chance beyond what she could have imagined. Roz’s apprenticeship with the needle, under the patronage of the Royal Thaumaturgist, wasn’t supposed to include learning magic, but Celeste, the dressmaker’s daughter, draws Roz into the mysterious world of the charm-wives. When floodwaters and fever sweep through the lower city, Celeste’s magical charms could bring hope and healing to the forgotten poor of Rotenek, but only if Roz can claim the help of some unlikely allies. Set in the magical early 19th century world of Alpennia, Floodtide tells an independent tale that interweaves with the adventures.

30 review for Floodtide

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lex Kent

    4.25 Stars. This was a real quality read. This is the fourth book in Jones’ Alpennia series. I had read the first book and liked it a lot, but due to time constraints I had never read book two or three. As most of you know I’m really anal about reading books in order so for me to skip around like this is not normal. Plus, this series is pretty hardcore historical fantasy. This is not light fantasy, there are many names, places and new words to learn not to mention a religion that is part magical 4.25 Stars. This was a real quality read. This is the fourth book in Jones’ Alpennia series. I had read the first book and liked it a lot, but due to time constraints I had never read book two or three. As most of you know I’m really anal about reading books in order so for me to skip around like this is not normal. Plus, this series is pretty hardcore historical fantasy. This is not light fantasy, there are many names, places and new words to learn not to mention a religion that is part magical based. I clearly remember struggling to keep everything straight in my head while reading the beginning of book one. Eventually, everything clicked and the book was wonderful, but it’s not an easy breezy read. My worry with Floodtide was that missing two series books would leave me too lost to really recover. Luckily, this book is really a standalone book that takes place in the Alpennia universe. I recognized some characters from the first book, and it took me a bit to get everyone’s names straight, but once I settled into this book it was smooth sailing. While it is a book you still need to pay attention too, I think this book was even more approachable than book one. And I’m surprised and happy to say that if you are new to this series you can actually start here. If anything it might get you interested in reading the other Alpennia books. These are historical-fantasy books. Think about that Regency era feel in Europe when everything was about proper manners, who were marrying whom, fancy balls and even duels. Jones captures that feel but creates a religion that is based in magic. I’m not a big historical fiction fan but I like this Jane Austen-ish period and I think Jones does the mix really well. I would also put the YA tag on this book because we are in the eyes of a 16 to 17 year old laundry maid who has dreams of becoming a dress maker. It’s funny because while there are some everyday mundane tasks we read about, I was never bored for a second. The book went at a really nice pace. And while book one was about a character who had money, a woman who was expected to marry, I liked being in the POV of someone who had to work hard every day just to stay fed and to support her family back home. Not to keep comparing this to book one but I would not put the romance tag on this while book one was a romance. The main character in Floodtide is a lesbian who has feelings for some of the other characters but this is not a romance. I do have to admit I was hoping to see the main character find love, but she is still a teenager and with everything else she had going on, I ended up not missing the romance after all. This was a really good read. Jones writes very well and this book was no exception. I can’t wait to have some time to be able to read the other books in this series. I would recommend this to fantasy fans and fans of the Regency era. It does take a few chapters to get used to all the new names, but this book is worth it. I’m not sure if Jones is planning a sequel to this book, but I personally would love to read more about these characters. They are still young and I think they have more stories left to be told. An ARC was given to me for a honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    K.J. Charles

    A fascinating look into the world of Alpennia (a sort of alt-mittelEurope with magic) from the perspective of a servant. And it really is that perspective, with a *lot* of washing and mending and very little free time. It's fascinating both in the detail and in seeing the events of the first books from such a different point of view--trivial things become important and vice versa. Roz starts off in a very bad place--thrown out on the streets because she's caught with another female servant--and A fascinating look into the world of Alpennia (a sort of alt-mittelEurope with magic) from the perspective of a servant. And it really is that perspective, with a *lot* of washing and mending and very little free time. It's fascinating both in the detail and in seeing the events of the first books from such a different point of view--trivial things become important and vice versa. Roz starts off in a very bad place--thrown out on the streets because she's caught with another female servant--and the focus is at first very much on her struggle to survive and not cause any problems or upset anyone. She doesn't have much in the way of social graces (and we can see how that is both her and an upbringing that didn't put any particular stock on such things, unlike the ladies she serves) and her narration is quite...I'm reaching for 'affectless' here though that's not quite right. She doesn't always have the words or the experience to say what she passionately feels, which is really interesting in a first person narration. The story starts with her personal travails and slowly moves to focus on the floodtide and its consequences--river fever that devastates the poorer parts of the city. The class aspects here are inescapable, and our earlier upper class heroines of the series don't come out with entirely clean hands in their ignorance of the lives of the poor--which is very much plausible. The building tension of the sections waiting for the flood is goosebumpy, absolutely immersive. Alpennia is one of those fantasy places like Astreiant that is so real and vivid you feel like you've been there yourself and just forgot. Not a romance but features Roz's love life and ends on a very hopeful note, plus there is a lovely secondary trans m/f romance. I love this series--the domestic detail, the focus on the female, and the heroism of small details. Marvellous.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Betty

    Floodtide by Heather Rose Jones is the fourth book in the Alpennia series. As with the other three books in the series, Floodtide is set in Ms. Rose’s historical and magical world of Alpennia. In this tale we meet Roz who has just been fired as the laundry maid without a character reference to help her find a new job. She is now totally alone in the city of Rotenek with nothing to her name but the clothes on her back, and no place to go. This is very dangerous for Roz. A young homeless woman Floodtide by Heather Rose Jones is the fourth book in the Alpennia series. As with the other three books in the series, Floodtide is set in Ms. Rose’s historical and magical world of Alpennia. In this tale we meet Roz who has just been fired as the laundry maid without a character reference to help her find a new job. She is now totally alone in the city of Rotenek with nothing to her name but the clothes on her back, and no place to go. This is very dangerous for Roz. A young homeless woman with no protection roaming the streets is in serious jeopardy. After several days she luckily ends up at the home and dressmaker shop of Mefro Dominique and her daughter Celeste. With the help of Mefro Dominique and the patronage of the royal thaumaturgist, Roz is apprenticed to the dressmaker. Not only does she learn dressmaking skills, but she helps Celeste who happens to have a talent for magical charms. This becomes very important when the river that divides the city floods and brings the dreaded river fever that could kill thousands. It is possible that only Roz, Celeste, and their young friends can save these lives through magic…if they dare. This is an excellent historical fantasy novel. Since it is set in a world that has already been used in other stories, there was no real need for world building. It has already been done. The story flows well and the characters are real for the time period and the world they live in. I connected with Roz and her friends, though there were times in the story that I wished Roz would mature a little faster than she did. The only real problem I had was the number of characters in the book as a whole and trying to keep up with their names. That is a problem I often have with fantasy stories, but this one wasn’t too bad. I found that as long as I paid attention to the story, I could figure out who was who. I really enjoyed the novel as a whole, so that wasn’t too hard. This is my first novel in the Alpennia series, but I chose to read it anyway. This is an independent story, set in the same world and with some of the same characters as the other books in the series. This can be read as a standalone book. Those of you who have read the other novels will enjoy seeing a few characters you know from those books as minor characters here. I enjoyed the book even without reading the others. I will be getting the earlier novels since I’m now invested in this world and the characters I’ve met. This book could be shelved as Young Adult, but don’t let that stop you from reading this. I received an ARC from NetGalley and Bella Books for an honest review. Rainbow Reflections: https://rainbowreflections.home.blog/

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kitty McIntosh

    ‘Floodtide’ by Heather Rose Jones is a historical fiction story, set in a land where magic and mystery has its place. Told from the point of view of a teenage servant girl, it lets the reader see all echelons of society, and how they deal with an impending flood - and the serious health and societal implications it brings. Roz was dismissed from her previous job as a laundry maid after being reported for indulging in indecent acts with another young woman. What looks like the worst thing that ‘Floodtide’ by Heather Rose Jones is a historical fiction story, set in a land where magic and mystery has its place. Told from the point of view of a teenage servant girl, it lets the reader see all echelons of society, and how they deal with an impending flood - and the serious health and societal implications it brings. Roz was dismissed from her previous job as a laundry maid after being reported for indulging in indecent acts with another young woman. What looks like the worst thing that could happen turns out to be the start of a new life, with its share of challenges - but with new friends and a new purpose. I was transported to another place and time by the author. Heather Rose Jones has a talent for meticulous world-building and her writing shows intelligence and a flair for her craft. The story was beautifully teased out, with secrets we get to know as Roz does. Roz was an interesting character. She knew what she could expect from life but there were some things she was willing to defy expectations for. And that could get her into a lot of trouble. Liking girls was always going to be a problem - but she wasn’t the only one. The hierarchy of society was integral to this story, and adding that to the idea of charms and mysteries made it a fascinating read. The word that comes to mind when finishing this book is exquisite. I loved it. I was given this ARC for review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Corgel

    This was a very good historical fantasy that fans of the series will enjoy, and is more accessible for new readers. I say this because while there's not a lot of explanation about the magic system, it is due to the fact that the lead character, Roz, isn't as involved with the magic that the characters from the main series are. She knows about charms and mysteries (spells), and how the religion plays into the strength of the magic in the world, but she doesn't have the aptitude for it. Instead, This was a very good historical fantasy that fans of the series will enjoy, and is more accessible for new readers. I say this because while there's not a lot of explanation about the magic system, it is due to the fact that the lead character, Roz, isn't as involved with the magic that the characters from the main series are. She knows about charms and mysteries (spells), and how the religion plays into the strength of the magic in the world, but she doesn't have the aptitude for it. Instead, she's simply trying to find a place in the world that shuns people like her: poor and romantically attracted to people of the same gender as her. I enjoyed this book because Roz is very much a common person doing her best in her world, especially after being caught with her sweetheart and her sweetheart basically pinning the blame all on her. When she meets Celeste, the dressmaker's daughter and talented magic user, she is pulled into a world of magic that she only knew stories about. Celeste is an amazing character - she's smart and compassionate, even as her observations are sharp and painful. As I said before, fans of the Alpennia series will jump in with a lot of eagerness, especially since some of the leads in the earlier books have roles here. People new to the series will find a richly built world that does a fantastic job of melding fantasy with historical fiction. Highly recommended. I received this ARC in exchange for my honest opinion.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Angel

    I've always been a huge fan of historical novels but this author allowed me to have my cake and eat it as well because she's skillfully blended two of my favorite genres—historical and fantasy! I've managed to fall deeply in love with the Regency era through this author's lyrical and compelling style of writing. I firmly believe that this story is my favorite one out of the entire Alpennia series because I got to experience the lives of the haves and have-nots in Rotenek's society through Roz, I've always been a huge fan of historical novels but this author allowed me to have my cake and eat it as well because she's skillfully blended two of my favorite genres—historical and fantasy! I've managed to fall deeply in love with the Regency era through this author's lyrical and compelling style of writing. I firmly believe that this story is my favorite one out of the entire Alpennia series because I got to experience the lives of the haves and have-nots in Rotenek's society through Roz, Celeste and Iulien's point of view. I'm one of those people who read books and see everything playing out like a movie in my mind and I must tip my coffee cup to this author because her story has entertained me long into the night and I'm going to keep my fingers crossed with the hope that she has another wonderful story to add to this series because I'm rather fond of all the quirky characters in this novel!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    Floodtide is the fourth book set in the Alpennia universe, but unlike the previous books, this one is entirely stand-alone. Myself, I haven’t read the first three books, but when I saw that this one could be read alone I thought it was the perfect place to dive in. I will say, that the beginning of the book took a little bit of work on my part to fully understand. It’s not that you need to have read the previous books, it’s more that Jones has an incredibly complex world — there are lots of Floodtide is the fourth book set in the Alpennia universe, but unlike the previous books, this one is entirely stand-alone. Myself, I haven’t read the first three books, but when I saw that this one could be read alone I thought it was the perfect place to dive in. I will say, that the beginning of the book took a little bit of work on my part to fully understand. It’s not that you need to have read the previous books, it’s more that Jones has an incredibly complex world — there are lots of invented titles and a very unique magic system — she doesn’t baby you through this. The story expects you to keep up. This made the world truly immersive and fascinating to discover, but I had to take my time getting to know both the characters and the world Once I got a grip of what was happening, I was hooked. I was fascinated by the characters, especially (what I would call the main characters) Liv, Celeste and Roz. There’s a very large cast of secondary characters (some of whom I believe are protagonists in previous books) but everyone felt fully fleshed out and fully realised. Something I really liked was that this book had a very large female and/or queer cast. I always think it’s great when not only do books have a lot of female characters but also show come in the different ways in which women can be unique and strong in different ways. I really enjoyed the below-stairs world that we got to see when Roz was at her work as a lady’s maid. You got to see all the political dynamics within a noble house and I always find that very interesting. I also really loved the scenes where she was working on her dressmaker’s apprenticeship, there are so many nice little details and character moments. As much as I went into this thinking it would be a historical fantasy, the magical side of it is relatively underplayed. I get the feeling that the previous novels have more direct fantasy content but this little but more subtle to me, like almost magical realism. It’s all to do with little charms to clean linens or healing charms etc. There are much bigger, more obvious magic mentioned but this book doesn’t dive into those as much. I really enjoyed the slow unravelling of the plot, and the calm, steady pacing. It built-up tension in both the ‘main’ plot and all the relationships, leaving you on the edge of your seat. I loved the way everything tied together at the end and all the little domestic details of the book. Floodtide is a wonderful novel and one which has really interested me in discovering more of the Alpennia world. A copy of this was provided free of charge from the publisher in return for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    A very strong beginning and quite a strong ending were let down, for me, by a weak middle, and a viewpoint character who was neither the most interesting person nor the person with the most at stake. These craft missteps brought a well-edited and generally appealing book down to three stars. I always say that if you give me a motivated character in a dynamic situation, you'll have my attention for as long as you want it. At the beginning of the book, it looked like that was what I was going to A very strong beginning and quite a strong ending were let down, for me, by a weak middle, and a viewpoint character who was neither the most interesting person nor the person with the most at stake. These craft missteps brought a well-edited and generally appealing book down to three stars. I always say that if you give me a motivated character in a dynamic situation, you'll have my attention for as long as you want it. At the beginning of the book, it looked like that was what I was going to get. Roz is dismissed, without references, pay, or anything more than the clothes she's wearing at the time, for "lewd conduct" with another female servant. Desperate, she wanders the streets, homeless, penniless, and hopeless. However, she quickly falls on her feet and gets not one, but two good opportunities. The biggest point of tension for her is that she'll eventually have to decide between them, but that decision isn't imminent or urgent. There are some half-formed romantic longings, but they never become plot drivers either, and the middle devolves into a long series of mostly inconsequential events. Roz is not striving for anything specifically, or trying to resolve any story question in particular, so there's really no plot to speak of, and she isn't a true protagonist, just a main character. Interesting things are happening just offstage and to people who aren't Roz, but she (and, therefore, the audience through her first-person viewpoint) gets to hear about them only indirectly and not in any depth. I got the impression that this is a side story to a series that may tell some of those stories; I very much wished that I was reading the books that told those stories, and not this one, at times. Roz's is an engaging viewpoint, despite or, at times, because of its naivite, and she's one of those characters I sometimes wish we saw more of: the reliable, hard-working person of low status who isn't a noble in disguise or a fated Chosen One. The Samwise Gamgee, if you like. But in the whole of the book, she only does one thing that affects events to any degree worth speaking of, apart from perhaps bringing together characters who do more - and then holding things for them and handing them things while they do the interesting stuff. Because there is interesting stuff on stage again, there at the end, and the characters collectively save the day. I'm all for ensemble casts, and I have no issue with that whatsoever; I'm even quite happy that, at the end, Roz makes something of a sacrifice (that still leaves her in a good position) to enable someone else to fulfil their potential. Unfortunately, that doesn't make up for the aimless middle. What kept me reading through the aimless middle was the promise offered by the beginning; Roz's voice; and the fact that, even in an ARC from Netgalley, the copy editing was to a high standard (only five minor errors, two vocabulary and three apostrophe-related). The world-building was also interesting, with ubiquitous magic enmeshed with both folk tradition and Catholicism. But that middle part did drag the book down to three stars for me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anders

    Floodtide takes place in Heather Rose Jones' Alpennia universe, an early 19th century alt-Europe. It's one of my favorite series and it focuses on women exploring miracles, mysteries, and alchemy, as well as their romances with other women. I can recommend the entire series, and this book, without any reservations! Floodtide switches the perspective quite a bit, focusing on a young maid who does not have the privilege or connections previous main characters have had or ended up with. She has to Floodtide takes place in Heather Rose Jones' Alpennia universe, an early 19th century alt-Europe. It's one of my favorite series and it focuses on women exploring miracles, mysteries, and alchemy, as well as their romances with other women. I can recommend the entire series, and this book, without any reservations! Floodtide switches the perspective quite a bit, focusing on a young maid who does not have the privilege or connections previous main characters have had or ended up with. She has to fight for everything she gets and has no safety net for what she's doing, raising the stakes for the challenges she faces. Those challenges are also less immediately esoteric, focusing more on the challenges of everyday people on the "wrong side of the tracks", or river, as it were. This is a worthy sequel which I plowed through in a day (sadly, I want more time in this universe :'( ). Buy it!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Diana Green

    I didn't like this as much as Daughter of Mystery, (the first book), but I thought is was still a worthy fourth installment for the series. As always, Heather Rose Jones' world building is detailed and immersive, with believable characters, and masterful writing. I appreciated the different angle she took in Floodtide, focusing on the servants and common people, rather than the elite. The class dynamic became particularly relevant when fever struck the poorer section of the city, and I thought I didn't like this as much as Daughter of Mystery, (the first book), but I thought is was still a worthy fourth installment for the series. As always, Heather Rose Jones' world building is detailed and immersive, with believable characters, and masterful writing. I appreciated the different angle she took in Floodtide, focusing on the servants and common people, rather than the elite. The class dynamic became particularly relevant when fever struck the poorer section of the city, and I thought this element of the plot was excellent. My biggest complaint is that too much of importance happened "off stage" and was simply summarized by our narrator, Roz. This reduced the immediacy of the story and made it drag more than Daughter of Mystery. Despite this, I enjoyed revisiting Alpennia and plan to read books 2 and 3 in the series soon.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aleana Harris

    I received an ARC copy of this book from the Publisher via Netgalley and voluntarily leaving my review. This was a good read set in world where magic and mystery has its place. It took me a minute to get into because there was a lot of characters from previous books that haven't read and even though this book is told from the pov of a teenage servant girl name Roz. Roz was dismissed from her job as a laundry maid because she was to believe to have indecent acts with another young woman. When she I received an ARC copy of this book from the Publisher via Netgalley and voluntarily leaving my review. This was a good read set in world where magic and mystery has its place. It took me a minute to get into because there was a lot of characters from previous books that haven't read and even though this book is told from the pov of a teenage servant girl name Roz. Roz was dismissed from her job as a laundry maid because she was to believe to have indecent acts with another young woman. When she has nowhere to turn she wind up at dressmaker place asking for chance and she becomes apprentice I love going into details on how to make dresses and how each titch is connected. Roz get drawn into the dressmaker daughter Celeste web when she starts to learn magic which is in this book but it most in the background but to me the book is more about how Roz find her place and the secrets we learn through her eyes. I like the difference dynamics between each women and how they are unique and strong in different ways. I did like how everything was tied together that made a great ending.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Best Lesfic Reviews

    Set in an imagined 19th century French kingdom of Alpennia, this is a thoroughly engrossing read. A little bit of Downton Abbey with a whole lot more magic and a whole lot more lesbian couples, the world it creates completely captures the reader. Read the full review @ https://www.bestlesficreviews.com/201...

  13. 4 out of 5

    jess

    heather rose jones is DOING IT – working class lesbians, women intellectuals in middle europe, fully fleshed out jewish and black characters on top of what's already a spectacular bit of just-realistic-enough fantasy worldbuilding... in contrast to the previous alpennia books, which focus largely on romances between older women, floodtide is told first person from the pov of a teenage girl named roz who works in the saveze household with her own little crew of younger friends – particularly heather rose jones is DOING IT – working class lesbians, women intellectuals in middle europe, fully fleshed out jewish and black characters on top of what's already a spectacular bit of just-realistic-enough fantasy worldbuilding... in contrast to the previous alpennia books, which focus largely on romances between older women, floodtide is told first person from the pov of a teenage girl named roz who works in the saveze household with her own little crew of younger friends – particularly celeste if you remember her! background characters and relationships make appearances that are super rewarding for readers of the previous books, but i think this book could very effectively be read as an intro to the series as well (as jones meant for it to be). it's testament to jones' incredible versatility in jumping from the regency romance register of daughter of mystery to the domestic fiction-esque mother of souls to what is really a delightful romp of a bildungsroman. also it features an epidemic plot where roz, celeste, and their teenage friends struggle to stop the spread of river fever in the poorer quarters of rotenek. as if this book did not ALREADY hit all the right notes for me!!!!! i'm spoiled by heather rose jones.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Darlene Vendegna

    This book is an excellent continuation of the wonderful Alpennia series, but is also a great stand alone story in its own right. It’s the same fascinating country with the same type of engaging and well drawn characters. What’s different this time around is that the story is told with a first person viewpoint. That person, Roz, is a young lesbian, who wears her heart on her sleeve, and frequently gets herself in trouble because of it. Because of Roz’s lower station in the city, the reader is This book is an excellent continuation of the wonderful Alpennia series, but is also a great stand alone story in its own right. It’s the same fascinating country with the same type of engaging and well drawn characters. What’s different this time around is that the story is told with a first person viewpoint. That person, Roz, is a young lesbian, who wears her heart on her sleeve, and frequently gets herself in trouble because of it. Because of Roz’s lower station in the city, the reader is introduced in depth and detail to the lower classes, as well as brought along on youthful excursions and experiences. As I said, this book is an excellent continuation of the series, but I dare say it could also serve as a wonder entry point. One could read this and easily want to know more about all the other characters and their stories that led to this one. I couldn’t put it down and anxiously await the next. If you enjoy youthful protagonists, coming out stories, magic, excellent world building or just plain good writing, welcome to Alpennia.

  15. 5 out of 5

    sigaloenta

    Well this was a hot mess-- or rather, a cold mess. As in the previous book in the Alpennia series, the author tries to center the point of view of someone from the margins (in Mother of Souls an Ethiopian-Italian woman; here: a laundry maid dismissed without a reference when she is caught kissing another girl). But HRJ can't quite manage to give us a fully-realized person; rather, she just has the character reflect out the historical social constraints that the author has so carefully and Well this was a hot mess-- or rather, a cold mess. As in the previous book in the Alpennia series, the author tries to center the point of view of someone from the margins (in Mother of Souls an Ethiopian-Italian woman; here: a laundry maid dismissed without a reference when she is caught kissing another girl). But HRJ can't quite manage to give us a fully-realized person; rather, she just has the character reflect out the historical social constraints that the author has so carefully and ostentatiously taken into consideration. Serafina was buried under the weight of every kind of transcultural narrative of immigrant alienation and racism. Roz, on the other hand, clunkily embodies every simple peasant stereotype as she blunders her way into ablism, transphobia, and racial microagression and Learns Important Lessons, while standing in wide-eyed awe of the beauty and grace of her betters. (view spoiler)[Neither gets a lasting romance or a happily-ever-after (hide spoiler)] . This is what happens when well-meaning new historicists try to write fiction, I think, but it's especially odd in this setting. In most fantasy series, the ultimate end would be revolution, reform, and justice. But the tight historical setting (despite the magic and the extra country stuffed into the Alps) makes that implausible, here. The injustices that keep Serafina and Roz down aren't going to be resolved even in the 21st century. What is the point of pointing out that only the wealthy and white and able-bodied get easy happily ever afters in such a universe? In most fiction, historical and contemporary, about social injustice unresolved the point is to galvanize the reader against the hypocrisies of the society that allows it, and reflect on the suffering below the surface of their glorious history or happy middle-class literary world present. But Alpennia is magical Ruritania regency Romanceland, for crying out loud, and one that the previous books in the series have treated as such. Is HRJ trying to ironize and subvert her own work? Yet the POV characters of previous books remain nearly above reproach. This isn't Longbourn. So that's the meta-problem. The more basic problem is that there's no plot in this book. The first 200 pages of this 250 page book are a blow-by-blow of Roz's days as laundry-maid and apprentice seamstress, with brief encounters with other characters and friendships that are told rather than shown, and occasionally check-ins with the plot of the previous book, which this one largely overlaps with, as Roz learns from a distance about the characters and plot-strands we already know. That's it! That's nearly the whole book! The last 50 pages finally introduce a bit of action that ties a few things together (but not nearly all), but the plodding first-person narrative makes even this feel like reading the summary of an interesting book, but not the book itself. I'm going to keep reading Alpennia, but I no longer have very high expectations on the level of craft.

  16. 5 out of 5

    gwendalyn _books_

    This book was received from the Author, and Publisher, in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own My Bookish Links: Twitter: http://twitter.com/gwendalyn_books Book Blog :http://gwendalynbooks.wordpress.com Instagram :http://Instagram.com/gwendalyn_books_ Goodreads:https://www.goodreads.com/user/edit/p... Floodtide, by the author Heather Rose Jones is a “alternate-Regency-era Ruritanian adventure” coined by the author, is the fourth book in This book was received from the Author, and Publisher, in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own My Bookish Links: Twitter: http://twitter.com/gwendalyn_books Book Blog :http://gwendalynbooks.wordpress.com Instagram :http://Instagram.com/gwendalyn_books_ Goodreads:https://www.goodreads.com/user/edit/p... Floodtide, by the author Heather Rose Jones is a “alternate-Regency-era Ruritanian adventure” coined by the author, is the fourth book in the the much loved Alpennia series. The lead protagonist is a laundry maid Rozild Pairmen, who struggles under her formidable enemy is a housekeeper, who holds the power to dismiss her at a whim. Roz is Dismissed because of her indiscretions that cause a series of events. Roz, is then presented with a second chance from the dressmaker Mefro Dominique, The dressmaker is understanding of Roz’s plight, but also knows what favors to call in. Mefro Dominique, carefully collects and hoards favors from the women who are her clientele. Rozild becomes an apprentice steady rising in her position. The household has a close relationship of woman, and Roz becomes close to Celeste, who happens to have a talent for magical charms. This very important talent becomes needed when the river that divides the city floods and brings the dreaded river fever that could kill thousands. This captivating novel is rich and vibrant, with wonderful diverse characters. An historical magical realism book at its best. transporting the reader to another place and time. I was completely immersed into Heather Rose Jones meticulous world building, The storyline flows beautifully and the intriguing secrets we get to know as the main protagonist does. Roz is headstrong character, knowing what she could expect out of life, But struggles at the bonds that have been placed on her. This add depth to the plot line. Wonderful characters development and complex relationships, along with the setting period drama are brought to life with unique details. This is a splendidly exquisite book!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ry Herman

    In Floodtide, Heather Rose Jones has successfully pulled off one of the most difficult feats in literature -- telling the same story as a previous book from a different character's point of view. While this has been attempted many times, it usually falls into any of a number of pitfalls: repetitiveness, a dearth of originality, a story with a plot contorted around the events of the previous one, or the simple lack of any reason for the story to exist. Floodtide avoids all of these problems, and In Floodtide, Heather Rose Jones has successfully pulled off one of the most difficult feats in literature -- telling the same story as a previous book from a different character's point of view. While this has been attempted many times, it usually falls into any of a number of pitfalls: repetitiveness, a dearth of originality, a story with a plot contorted around the events of the previous one, or the simple lack of any reason for the story to exist. Floodtide avoids all of these problems, and instead offers a fresh and very different take on Alpennia from a point of view that, as it turns out, adds a great deal to the story and the ongoing events. This one may have the strongest writing yet of all the Alpennia novels, and that's saying a lot for a series whose charms I will wax rhapsodic about at the slightest provocation.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karen Williams

    I've read the three previous novels set in Jones' Alpennia universe, and I found this one just as fascinating, just as dramatic, and just as charming as all the others (though you don't need to have read any of the others to thoroughly enjoy this one). This is the story of Roz, a girl in service who is tossed out for behaving unmentionably with another girl. She stumbles on a new position, and makes a life with new friends, one of whom knows how to make charms. Unlike the church mysteries or the I've read the three previous novels set in Jones' Alpennia universe, and I found this one just as fascinating, just as dramatic, and just as charming as all the others (though you don't need to have read any of the others to thoroughly enjoy this one). This is the story of Roz, a girl in service who is tossed out for behaving unmentionably with another girl. She stumbles on a new position, and makes a life with new friends, one of whom knows how to make charms. Unlike the church mysteries or the alchemy of jewels, these are simple spells for solving simple, everyday problems. And there are problems to be solved. I loved the way Roz and her friends, who aren't titled nobles of any sort, are blended in with what we already know of Alpennia, and find their own ways of making a difference.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Patti Andon

    This book is a stand alone in the Alpennia series. It was told from the point of view of a 16/17 year old. I really enjoyed it especially the beginning with the harsh realities of the time hitting you in the face. The growth of the main character, Roz, was nice to see. The ending was nicely done with a bit of suspense. I would have liked to have seen Iuliens response to Rozs decision.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Doris Raines

    NICE BOOK.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lynnet

    Probably my favorite of the Alpennia series so far.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn Langlois

    I had been wanting to read this series for a while now and started with this one. It was very enjoyable and the world building excellent. I can't wait to read the 3 previous books.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Beth Bernobich

    I had the privilege of reading a draft of Floodtide, and I love how Jones is adding layers and complexity to the world of Alpennia. Highly recommended!

  24. 4 out of 5

    DropDead23

  25. 5 out of 5

    T

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kerri

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mélissa

  28. 5 out of 5

    Affreca

  29. 5 out of 5

    Irina

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shiori

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