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Lifespan: Why We Age—and Why We Don't Have To

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It’s a seemingly undeniable truth that aging is inevitable. But what if everything we’ve been taught to believe about aging is wrong? What if we could choose our lifespan? In this groundbreaking book, Dr. David Sinclair, leading world authority on genetics and longevity, reveals a bold new theory for why we age. As he writes: “Aging is a disease, and that disease is It’s a seemingly undeniable truth that aging is inevitable. But what if everything we’ve been taught to believe about aging is wrong? What if we could choose our lifespan? In this groundbreaking book, Dr. David Sinclair, leading world authority on genetics and longevity, reveals a bold new theory for why we age. As he writes: “Aging is a disease, and that disease is treatable.” This book takes us to the frontlines of research many from Dr. David Sinclair’s own lab at Harvard—that demonstrate how we can slow down, or even reverse, aging. The key is activating newly discovered vitality genes, the descendants of an ancient genetic survival circuit that is both the cause of aging and the key to reversing it.


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It’s a seemingly undeniable truth that aging is inevitable. But what if everything we’ve been taught to believe about aging is wrong? What if we could choose our lifespan? In this groundbreaking book, Dr. David Sinclair, leading world authority on genetics and longevity, reveals a bold new theory for why we age. As he writes: “Aging is a disease, and that disease is It’s a seemingly undeniable truth that aging is inevitable. But what if everything we’ve been taught to believe about aging is wrong? What if we could choose our lifespan? In this groundbreaking book, Dr. David Sinclair, leading world authority on genetics and longevity, reveals a bold new theory for why we age. As he writes: “Aging is a disease, and that disease is treatable.” This book takes us to the frontlines of research many from Dr. David Sinclair’s own lab at Harvard—that demonstrate how we can slow down, or even reverse, aging. The key is activating newly discovered vitality genes, the descendants of an ancient genetic survival circuit that is both the cause of aging and the key to reversing it.

30 review for Lifespan: Why We Age—and Why We Don't Have To

  1. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    If I am being honest, I expected more from a 400+ page book written by one of the leaders in longevity. It is well written and the illustrations are lovely, but the information on extending healthspan could be summarized in a paragraph (which it is). I was also disappointed in how shallow some of the explanations were for why the healthspan extending mechanisms occur in humans. If the subject promised by the title is scarce, then what is taking up the bulk of these 400+ pages? Anecdotes, personal If I am being honest, I expected more from a 400+ page book written by one of the leaders in longevity. It is well written and the illustrations are lovely, but the information on extending healthspan could be summarized in a paragraph (which it is). I was also disappointed in how shallow some of the explanations were for why the healthspan extending mechanisms occur in humans. If the subject promised by the title is scarce, then what is taking up the bulk of these 400+ pages? Anecdotes, personal background, topics related to government budgeting, why healthspan research is important, and other things I did not buy this book for. For those of you who wanted something deeper, check out the Landmark Cell Reviews collections on Aging and Metabolism (These research papers are all open archive and not blocked by journal fees): https://www.cell.com/cell/collections... https://www.cell.com/cell/collections...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Being part of the health enhancement community for my entire career I was familiar with the topics and theories on aging as presented by Havard Med School staffer Dr. David Sinclair. Many of Dr. Sinclair's recommendations such as calorie restriction (CR), exercise, sleep and moderate to low protein intake are well vetted. Other suggestions including the intake of NAD, Metformin, and Rapamycin MAY have anti-aging effects but are less well known and have potential downsides. Since living long Being part of the health enhancement community for my entire career I was familiar with the topics and theories on aging as presented by Havard Med School staffer Dr. David Sinclair. Many of Dr. Sinclair's recommendations such as calorie restriction (CR), exercise, sleep and moderate to low protein intake are well vetted. Other suggestions including the intake of NAD, Metformin, and Rapamycin MAY have anti-aging effects but are less well known and have potential downsides. Since living long sounds dreadful with a broken body and mind I tend to focus more on healthspan. My personal recommendations did not change as a result of reading this book. -Sleep 7-9 hours each night. Find your sweet spot. -Strength Train 2-3 times per week -Do 3 conditioning sessions per week mixing sessions that are long and easy to short and challenging. Murdering yourself with three ten minute WODS leaves a lot to be desired. -Eat when the sun comes up and stop when the sunsets. Time-Restricted Eating (TRE) On occasion skip a meal. -Don't get fat. Limit your sugar and alcohol. -Read, play word games, Lumosity and meditate -Find someone to love -Get a dog, walk them, pet them. Never forget, Your DNA loads the gun, but your lifestyle pulls the trigger.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mario Tomic

    Coming from a perspective of someone who studies evidence-based nutrition, exercise, and healthy lifestyle factors for over a decade now, this book is a must-read. Solving aging is one of the final frontiers for humankind, and the information David has provided here is a big step in the right direction. It has the power to bring more awareness to solving aging as well as shift strong limiting beliefs that have been deeply rooted in public as well as the scientific community. We've come very far in Coming from a perspective of someone who studies evidence-based nutrition, exercise, and healthy lifestyle factors for over a decade now, this book is a must-read. Solving aging is one of the final frontiers for humankind, and the information David has provided here is a big step in the right direction. It has the power to bring more awareness to solving aging as well as shift strong limiting beliefs that have been deeply rooted in public as well as the scientific community. We've come very far in research, but sadly the mainstream still hasn't caught up as many of the theories often mentioned have already been invalidated. Big thanks to David and his team for putting together all the most up-to-date longevity research in one place. Having read this book I'm even more excited about future research and grateful to be alive in this time where such research is taken seriously.

  4. 4 out of 5

    G

    The book consists of 1) a history of aging and longevity related science, 2) a a handwavey survey of some interesting metabolic pathways and genetic/epigenetic programming techniques that Prof. Sinclair and friends have pursued, 3.) philosophical, aesthetic, and moral arguments on why pursuing lifespan extension is good. It's well-written and I enjoyed Prof. Sinclair's distinctive writing style and purview. I learned a bit on what papers and authors I should read more deeply for Parts (1) and The book consists of 1) a history of aging and longevity related science, 2) a a handwavey survey of some interesting metabolic pathways and genetic/epigenetic programming techniques that Prof. Sinclair and friends have pursued, 3.) philosophical, aesthetic, and moral arguments on why pursuing lifespan extension is good. It's well-written and I enjoyed Prof. Sinclair's distinctive writing style and purview. I learned a bit on what papers and authors I should read more deeply for Parts (1) and (2), but I was disappointed in the overall depth and lack of systematic, holistic discussion of how the individual research streams came together. I thought (3) was finely articulated, but no conceptual new grounds were covered. The main thesis that Sinclair builds up is his "Information Theory of Aging." He's inspired by Claude Shannon's seminal work and the TCP/IP protocol, but the analogy is not very well-fleshed out and feels like a forced analogy. Essentially, Prof. Sinclair believes that epigenetic 'debris' accrues on DNA and aging cells lose differentiation. Sinclair believes this can be reversed because each cell has a stored copy of 'youthful' epigenetic state that can re-programmed towards. It's an intriguing idea but he unfortunately doesn't provide much evidence or even a mechanism of how this actually works in practice. Recommended for novice longevity enthusiasts, but there's not much new insight for the serious reader unfortunately.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elise

    I read this for work and while the science/DNA-level detail in the front part is pretty dense, the book really opens up when he writes about the possibility for treating aging as a disease and all the things that currently kill us (heart disease, cancers) as its symptoms. And then the social impacts of society living much, much longer than we currently do. I am now operating as if I will live to 100, and we're talking GOOD years, not wasting away. So this book has really changed the way I think I read this for work and while the science/DNA-level detail in the front part is pretty dense, the book really opens up when he writes about the possibility for treating aging as a disease and all the things that currently kill us (heart disease, cancers) as its symptoms. And then the social impacts of society living much, much longer than we currently do. I am now operating as if I will live to 100, and we're talking GOOD years, not wasting away. So this book has really changed the way I think about aging, which I used to just accept as something inevitable.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jack Kresa-Reid

    Highly recommended for anyone wanting to understand the hallmarks of ageing and how to manage them. Understandable and well-communicated science underpinning human longevity. David wrote it in a way a layman like myself could easily understand. The book lays down the existing science. Past (what we know) and moves to where we are now. Present. (what we are learning). Then moves through to where we are going (future - breakthrough science) and this is where it starts to get really existing. The Highly recommended for anyone wanting to understand the hallmarks of ageing and how to manage them. Understandable and well-communicated science underpinning human longevity. David wrote it in a way a layman like myself could easily understand. The book lays down the existing science. Past (what we know) and moves to where we are now. Present. (what we are learning). Then moves through to where we are going (future - breakthrough science) and this is where it starts to get really existing. The future looks bright.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    The authors have written an excellent book on a subject that affects everyone. It's not too technical and has personal stories to make you really think about treating aging as a disease. It was a very enjoyable read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marios

    Absolutely fascinating read about the past (what we know), present (what we are learning) and future (where we are going) of the anti-aging science research. Along with “Why we Sleep” of Matthew Walker this is another of those fundamental books one should read. Actually I can’t help but imagine future generations looking back in our times and wondering how were people going about their lives without learning about or caring to understand longevity factors such as nutrition, exercise, sleep, Absolutely fascinating read about the past (what we know), present (what we are learning) and future (where we are going) of the anti-aging science research. Along with “Why we Sleep” of Matthew Walker this is another of those fundamental books one should read. Actually I can’t help but imagine future generations looking back in our times and wondering how were people going about their lives without learning about or caring to understand longevity factors such as nutrition, exercise, sleep, mental health, preventive health checks, body monitoring etc. Returning to the book, apart from providing a general background of how our bodies work on the molecular (DNA, RNA, proteins) and cellular level, the author proposes the hypothesis that aging is a result of a loss of information. This theory suggests that over time our cells loose the ability to accurately “read” the genetic information which remains always intactly stored into our DNA (this genetic information is what tells the cell what to be and how to behave), resulting in malfunction, loss of cellular identity or death, which manifests as the symptoms and diseases we all associate with aging. If this hypothesis proves correct (and there are many experiments that support it), if we could eventually prevent, slow or even reverse this information loss, it follows that could directly target the origins and cure all symptoms and diseases of aging at once, instead of trying to find treatments for each individual disease (ie. cardiovascular, dementia etc) as scientists have been trying to do until now. It is plausible that in the future we could regenerate and reverse the age in tissue (this works already in mice), or restore our overall health and vitality to the levels of a 20 or 30 year old on demand. How could that happen? Without giving out more fascinating research and experiments referenced in the book, this is one of the best talks of the author I found online summarizing his theory: https://youtu.be/9nXop2lLDa4 Then, what could you do today to help your body slow the aging process? The author takes 1g of NMN every morning + 0,5-1 g of resveratrol powder with yoghurt to raise his NAD levels. These can be found over the counter. He also takes 1 g of metformin in the night (needs prescription). He checks his blood regularly and supplements with vitamin D, K2 and 83mg of aspirin. Eats as few carbohydrates (sugar, pasta, breads) as possible. Usually skips one meal per day or makes a meal smaller. Tries to walk, go to gym, sauna, ice cold pool and keep a low BMI. Doesn’t smoke, avoids toxins, excessive radiation and other common sense damaging factors. And what should you do? If you are under 30 or even maybe 40, I would probably avoid the supplements. There are no long term studies of the effects of the NMN and no human studies. On the other hand, in short term or animal studies no toxicity or side effects have been demonstrated and many anti-aging researchers allegedly take it. If I was older I would probably give it a shot and I actually intend to experiment with my parents with NR (similar to NMN and tested in human trials). Of course science has the annoying habit of regularly disproving theories and crashing dreams, but until that happens I look forward to a future of scientific revolutions and increased lifespan and healthspan.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sergio Alonso De Leon

    I have been following David Sinclair for a while in interviews podcasts and so, and I had incredibly high expectations on this book. From a science point of view, there is no huge discovery, the recommendations are basically metformin, NMN and a couple of other things. The book is impregnated with Sinclairs optimism and, more precesily, life satisfaction. He is a really nice person, beyond with intellect. What he says still sounds science fiction, and probably not all what he claims will happen, I have been following David Sinclair for a while in interviews podcasts and so, and I had incredibly high expectations on this book. From a science point of view, there is no huge discovery, the recommendations are basically metformin, NMN and a couple of other things. The book is impregnated with Sinclairs optimism and, more precesily, life satisfaction. He is a really nice person, beyond with intellect. What he says still sounds science fiction, and probably not all what he claims will happen, but still he brings hope that our lives will be longer and more healthy.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cain S.

    Within our lifetimes many will be able to live longer than 120 years, while enjoying at age 80-90 the health of 30-40 year olds. Gene therapies that can reverse organ damage, like macular degeneration, and get rid of senescent cells, which increase with age and cause the various illnesses of old age, are already proving to be successful in the lab. We will be able to program genes in a way that makes humans immune to most fatal diseases. A Chinese doctor has already gene edited a girl who is Within our lifetimes many will be able to live longer than 120 years, while enjoying at age 80-90 the health of 30-40 year olds. Gene therapies that can reverse organ damage, like macular degeneration, and get rid of senescent cells, which increase with age and cause the various illnesses of old age, are already proving to be successful in the lab. We will be able to program genes in a way that makes humans immune to most fatal diseases. A Chinese doctor has already gene edited a girl who is immune to AIDS. One of Sinclair's students has been able to grow nerves connecting the eyes to the brain in mice, and there is confidence among researchers that the same could be done for humans. Aging has been reversed in 12month old mice, the equivalent of 60 year old humans; treated 12month old mice (who've practically reached ripe old age) were able to run more than 3kilometers, which greatly exceeds the running capacity of even young mice over their lifetime. Similar effects can be induced in humans using similar enzymes and gene editing technologies in the near term future which Sinclair places at a maximum of 30 years from now. Also, pointers on how to live longer: Fasting so you are sort of hungry as frequently as possible, and generally consuming 25% fewer calories than currently recommended for your Body Mass Index is ideal. Exposing yourself to lower temperatures than you're most comfortable at, where your body needs to do some work to keep you warm, triggers the survival circuit and slows down cellular aging and so the process of aging itself. Regular exercise, at an intensity where you can't complete sentences and are short of breath, also slows down aging. Read this interview where Sinclair touches on most of the topics in the book: https://www.themonthly.com.au/issue/2...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    I've been following David Sinclair's research into aging for many years, and this book is a great summary of his work and that of others, where the field of aging research is headed, and what we can expect. Dr. Sinclair is and has always been an optimist. I'm an optimist too, so that's fine by me. While he isn't a medical doctor and can't give medical advice, he discusses supplements he takes and lifestyle choices he makes that he feels are helping him and his own family too, including his I've been following David Sinclair's research into aging for many years, and this book is a great summary of his work and that of others, where the field of aging research is headed, and what we can expect. Dr. Sinclair is and has always been an optimist. I'm an optimist too, so that's fine by me. While he isn't a medical doctor and can't give medical advice, he discusses supplements he takes and lifestyle choices he makes that he feels are helping him and his own family too, including his 80-year-old father who has returned to work and is enjoying vibrant good health. My own disclaimer, I have been taking an NAD booster for almost five years. I do believe it makes a difference. At 56, I have far more energy than same-aged friends, and I haven't been sick since I started taking it, something Dr. Sinclair mentions too. Because I have inherited a copy of the APOE4 gene for Alzheimer's, I'm always interested in learning about anything I can do (exercise) or take (supplements) that will help prevent that gene from turning on. Toward the final quarter of the book, Dr. Sinclair turns to the ethics of slowing or even preventing aging. What would a world look like in which people might start a new career in their seventies, or enjoy spending time with their great-great-grandchildren, still vital and engaged? How would it impact global overpopulation and use of resources? These are all important questions, and he presents various scenarios in a balanced way. Overall, a fabulous read. I'm going to get the PDF as well so I can look at the charts and images references (recommended by the author as well). I do truly feel that we're on the brink of longevity escape velocity, and I couldn't be more excited!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    This is quite good. A heck of a lot of info packed into this, which essentially covers what might become available in the next 10-40 years, and touches on on the potential impacts on society as a result of people living longer. You're not going to learn how to live longer, but you will learn some interesting stuff. Recommended for curious minds. I really appreciate the advanced copy for review!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    NK

    I love this book so much! It has a deep personal connection and justifies its facts. Definitely favourite book ever!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Steve Fox

    From the laboratories of Harvard and scientists around the world: a book that turns the concept of growing old and dying on its head. I have long held the belief that 70 good years would be more than enough for me. That many don’t make it get long and many others suffer greatly in later years. I do not want extra suffering in exchange for more years. But maybe that isn’t necessary. Maybe our health span and lifespan can be extended significantly. If not in time to benefit me, then my children and From the laboratories of Harvard and scientists around the world: a book that turns the concept of growing old and dying on its head. I have long held the belief that 70 good years would be more than enough for me. That many don’t make it get long and many others suffer greatly in later years. I do not want extra suffering in exchange for more years. But maybe that isn’t necessary. Maybe our health span and lifespan can be extended significantly. If not in time to benefit me, then my children and potential grandchildren and many generations to come. Bravo to David Sinclair and Matthew LaPlante for bringing this topic to light in a readable, understandable format. Cheers to a long, fruitful life!

  15. 5 out of 5

    beingCristina

    If you want to understand the hallmark of aging, this is the book you should be reading. Thoughtfully explained with personal stories and structured images designed to help the non-medical readers. The future of humanity seems appealing in the context of aging, I just hope though that the structure is not just design for the vital few which in this case are the rich, richer and the richest.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dan Connors

    How would you feel about living an extra thirty years? And how about if those years were relatively disease-free and healthy ones? If everybody lived that extra thirty or more years, would that necessarily be a good thing? What would happen to families, work, and society with double the elderly population as today? These questions and more are examined in this fascinating book by Dr. David Sinclair, one of the leading experts on aging and founder of a prestigious laboratory at Harvard How would you feel about living an extra thirty years? And how about if those years were relatively disease-free and healthy ones? If everybody lived that extra thirty or more years, would that necessarily be a good thing? What would happen to families, work, and society with double the elderly population as today? These questions and more are examined in this fascinating book by Dr. David Sinclair, one of the leading experts on aging and founder of a prestigious laboratory at Harvard University. Dr. Sinclair gives a detailed description of the research that's going on today related to aging and how it affects the human body. The author spends a good amount of time advocating for a new type of healthcare, one that looks at aging as a treatable disease and not something that's inevitable. He compares our current system to a whack-a-mole game where different diseases pop up and are treated, only for new ones to keep coming. The focus on individual diseases like cancer and heart disease overlook the big picture of what's going on with the march of time. According to Dr. Sinclair, aging is really a loss of information, as our DNA gets corrupted by contaminants, diseases, and stressors. If you can find a way to repair the DNA through time, you can slow and even reverse aging. He theorizes a prehistoric survival circuit in our genes that turns this repair system on in times of stress and hardship. When the cells are healthier, the system is dormant and aging progresses. The trick, therefore is to fool the cells into thinking they need to switch into repair mode while the body is still in good shape. Some of the best ways to accomplish this anti-aging rejuvenation is through behavioral changes. Intermittent fasting is supposed to help with longevity, as are calorie restricted diets, because the body has to struggle just a bit more to operate. (This doesn't work if the body gets to the starvation point and lacks required nutrients) Exercise is also a great rejuvenator, as even brief periods of strenuous exercise wakes can wake up repair circuits. Spending time in cold environments helps as well, as long as it's not too cold to risk hypothermia or serious damage. Of course one of the biggies that I've heard from several books, that may or may not be related to the repair system, is proper diet, including mostly fruits, nuts, beans, and vegetables with little amounts of starches, sugars, or meats. This goes against the standard American diet, but I see more and more research pointing to the Mediterranean diet as the best way to head off diseases before they hit. In addition to the behavioral changes there are some pills and supplements that the author recommends. I won't mention them here (read the book if you want to know), but I'll be looking into them in the future. If the leading expert in the country is taking them, they might just work. Several chapters of the book detail current research in medicine that almost looks like science fiction. There may soon be vaccines that we can take that can remain dormant and activated when we get older to help stall the aging process. Cells that we thought could never be regrown, like spinal cord cells and optic cells are being manufactured that give new hope to the blind and paralyzed. Wearable biosensors are available today that can monitor your vitals while you exercise, sleep, or work, collecting vital information that can help you find diseases before symptoms ever show up. The most amazing process that is becoming easier and cheaper is DNA sequencing. Your entire genome in the future could become a part of your medical records, letting doctors prescribe drugs with laser like efficiency and giving diagnostic tests critical information for the best diagnoses and treatment plans. The impact on life-expectancy for all these innovations is substantial. We will live longer and have less disease, which sounds awesome. This is all apparently just ten years away or less. In the final part of the book, Dr. Sinclair looks at the possible ramifications to society if all of this comes to pass. He predicts that humans could live to 150 years of age in the not too distant future, with average life expectancy rising from around 80 now to 110 or higher. He addresses the current problems of environmental destruction and climate change that the current population of 7.5 billion creates. Some scientists believe we are already at the carrying capacity of the planet, and more people will only lead to a gradual decline in food, energy and raw materials as too many people chase too few resources. Using the city of London as an example, the author disputes those claims in an optimistic leap saying that human innovation over the next century can solve a lot of the problems that we see today, making the maximum sustainable population much higher. Not only is earth's population growing, but people in third world countries are improving their lives and expecting to consume more resources like the Americans and Europeans have been doing for so long. While I don't necessarily agree with the author's unbridled optimism about the future, he opens up a lot of fascinating questions. What happens to retirement if and when people live past 100. Our current system is already struggling under life expectancy predictions from the 20th century that proved wrong, and will become bankrupt if over half the nation wants to live in retirement. People will be healthier and more will want to work, but will we have enough jobs for them? Already there are concerns that artificial intelligence and outsourcing will strip most of the good jobs in the 21st century. Will family reunions now include great-grandparents and great-great grandbabies? People in positions of power cling to it as long as possible, and it's reasonable to predict that we would have hundred year old politicians, judges and CEO's calling the shots for decades. The problem with that is that the older you get, the less you're willing to look at the world in different ways and progress would take twice as long. The wealthiest of the wealthy could amass even more money and let it sit idly while the world gets starved of capital for new projects. How on earth would we choose where to celebrate family holidays like Christmas and Thanksgiving if four sets of parents and grandparents all in good health want to host them? In a way, death is a blessing. It clears the way for new ideas and new approaches, and without it we would feel no urgency to do something with our lives. What would society look without death and disease? Healthier? More crowded? Would inequality get worse and bigotry more entrenched? The approaches mentioned by Dr. Sinclair don't conquer death- just push the inevitable off a bit. Still, most of us would love to have some extra healthy years and the train has already left the station. This book is a real thought-provoker and anyone in the medical field, business, or government needs to start thinking about these ideas. As I write this, life expectancy is actually getting shorter. Problems with drug abuse and suicide are claiming more of the young, and American food and drink over-consumption is taking years off of lives. Hopefully some of the items in this book will come to pass before I kick the bucket. But before science gives us the means to live longer lives, we have to find a better meaning of life. Why are we here and what were we each put on earth to accomplish? Thirty more years won't necessarily answer that question. And we still will all die. Whether you live 10 years or 150, make each one the best you can.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mike Lisanke

    This book could have been excellent... I am a true fan of life extension and the author Dr. Sinclair as an obvious insight in the current state of art in the biochemistry of life extension. He gave an excellent introduction to many detailed topics in this biochemistry: sirtuins, NMN, mTOR, and DNA mods to test repair effect on ageing... mention of Metformin, Resveratrol and the search for other potential triggers of sirtuins repair... potential for a genetic reset button and adding this to our This book could have been excellent... I am a true fan of life extension and the author Dr. Sinclair as an obvious insight in the current state of art in the biochemistry of life extension. He gave an excellent introduction to many detailed topics in this biochemistry: sirtuins, NMN, mTOR, and DNA mods to test repair effect on ageing... mention of Metformin, Resveratrol and the search for other potential triggers of sirtuins repair... potential for a genetic reset button and adding this to our DNA with a one time CRISPR change (and tiny flu)... All this and many more stories of the biology of life extension. Then, starting near the middle of the book, a constant drone of libidiotic SJC PC that came to pervade the entire story, building to an almost overwhelming crescendo in part 3 of the book... where he launches into an almost inexplicable exercise in Why we shouldn't extend human longevity. OK, it's a rational part of any life extension story to answer the Malthusian, limits of growth, constraints of Earthly resources... in the end, like myself, the author Believes technology will achieve the necessary changes to sustain humanity (as I do)... but along way, preaches at US about how Australia and the EU's socialism is the answer And how humanity Will Have to Be Taught how to live within our Earthly resources.... yes, folks another affluent Communist in the making. Along with the usual references to "well-known" anthropocene extinction, man-made climate alarmism, and negativity to animal based foods was a wide-assortment of liberal+progressive agenda including identity politics. In all, this author Had an Opportunity to do some Solid informing about Longevity Research. It could have been a 300 page tome on the intricacies of these longevity mechanism of our human bodies (something he's an expert on)... instead, we were treated to half a book full of #MSM platitude from our current overlords on how will need to Sacrifice to Save our Planet... Clearly, this will become another popular possibly Best Seller for hitting all of the Politically Correct buttons all good little unthinking members of humanity have been told to believe! I hope this review at least amuses someone! I would buy and read the book Only for its good description of human longevity biochemistry.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Dewalt

    Excellent book by Sinclair. He makes this arcane topic very digestible for non-experts. He presents both the state-of-the-art of the research and general advice for anyone interested in the topic. An easy, fun read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jorge Zavala

    Everyone who is alive and wants to be healthy should check this out. My medical background was helpful only because it reassured me that his ressarcir is ethically done. Other than that, the language is quite accessible to everyone.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Fred Azimi

    Profound... insightful and addictive... as a surgeon I am always looking to evidence based ideas that will shift our lives, I found these in this body of work.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Payel Kundu

    I quite liked this book, both for its content as well as it’s format. The team writing style employed by Sinclair (scientist) and LaPlante (journalist) made the book factual and also readable. I do think it’s on the dense side for someone without a science background, but I don’t think making it less dense would do the subject justice. If you’re a little familiar with biology, I think you’d find that Sinclair’s discussion of the findings are presented in a logical and clear structure, just one I quite liked this book, both for its content as well as it’s format. The team writing style employed by Sinclair (scientist) and LaPlante (journalist) made the book factual and also readable. I do think it’s on the dense side for someone without a science background, but I don’t think making it less dense would do the subject justice. If you’re a little familiar with biology, I think you’d find that Sinclair’s discussion of the findings are presented in a logical and clear structure, just one you have to read a little carefully. If you don’t have a background in biology, I suspect you’d find at least portions of this book too dense. If it was simplified, it could serve as a self-help book, but Sinclair is emphatically not writing a self-help book, and is instead writing about the latest research (much of it his own lab’s) on the science of aging. The book was optimistic, indeed idealistic, at times, but I found Sinclair’s rosy view of the future contagious and also extremely motivating. I think probably some people will take issue with Sinclair’s steps (leaping bounds) into realms outside of his science. He writes extensively about how a healthier aged population living several decades longer than the current average lifespan will affect various aspects of society (jobs, health care, people’s mindsets, child bearing etc) and I think he does a really good job of anticipating and addressing key concerns. He kept bringing up things that were just on the tip of my tongue. As a public figure, he probably doesn’t have to anticipate the questions, he probably gets asked them every day by government officials, private industry, as well as concerned individuals. The book really motivated me to keep doing some of the lifestyle habits I currently do, as well as adopt new ones. I’ll plan to spend even more time in the sauna, try intermittent fasting, and perhaps look into NAD boosters in a decade or so once more long term studies have been conducted.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joyce Stahmann

    Wow! Don't miss this information that will totally change your ideas about aging!!! This book is full of groundbreaking information about why aging has always been synonymous with physical (and sometimes mental) deterioration. From this genetics researcher, we discover that aging is a disease of DNA deterioration, and that deterioration can be stopped and reversed with the new discoveries in cell science. He gives a few basic lifestyle changes that can help, such as a plant- based diet with Wow! Don't miss this information that will totally change your ideas about aging!!! This book is full of groundbreaking information about why aging has always been synonymous with physical (and sometimes mental) deterioration. From this genetics researcher, we discover that aging is a disease of DNA deterioration, and that deterioration can be stopped and reversed with the new discoveries in cell science. He gives a few basic lifestyle changes that can help, such as a plant- based diet with little animal protein, vigorous exercise ( or at least interval- type training, with short bursts of vigorous exercise), some form of intermittent fasting, exposure to cold ( not to the point of hypothermia-- like the other suggestions, this type of stressor revs up DNA repair), and allowing yourself to get hungry before eating anything. There is also one supplement so promising that the author and his whole family take it. His father, in his 80s, was rejuvenated by this supplement several years ago and took up a new career and a very active life that includes lots of hiking and international travel. The above information is just the beginning of what will be coming down the research pipeline very soon, and part of the book is a fascinating look at the near future and the end of aging as we know it, along with so many of the diseases and disabi!ity that are currently associated with it. This is a realistic and scientific look at what is possible now and in the near future, and it has comp!early altered my depressing ideas of how aging unfolds. Read it ( the earlier in life the better) and start developing the cellular resilience that will allow you to be a much happier a d healthier elder.

  23. 5 out of 5

    daniel

    The Shape of Things to Come Great book, but the negative reviews complain about how he talks about lifespan, but not the subjects the readers specifically wanted? If you want more technical information about that, get the scientific papers and journals. Here David clearly divides the book in 3 parts: The relative history of discoveries relevant to aging; a brief explanation of the present and proven methods that work; finishing with balanced perspectives around the repercussions that prolonging The Shape of Things to Come Great book, but the negative reviews complain about how he talks about lifespan, but not the subjects the readers specifically wanted? If you want more technical information about that, get the scientific papers and journals. Here David clearly divides the book in 3 parts: The relative history of discoveries relevant to aging; a brief explanation of the present and proven methods that work; finishing with balanced perspectives around the repercussions that prolonging human life will have on our world. Again, the reviews here complain about the "lack" of depth on the methods for living longer. But its enough information, going deeper would've made the book way too technical. He clearly states that they're at the beginning of a substantial change so not much information is clear, but as of now stick to (view spoiler)[fasting, exercise, checking your food intake (aminos), avoid DNA damage (xrays, excessive sun exposure), do extreme weather (cold/hot) exposure and he names some pills that will help, but aren't fully optimal yet. (hide spoiler)]

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brad Roepke

    I have mixed feelings on this book. I have nothing but respect for Dr. Sinclair and the high impact research he's conducting, but I can't help but feel underwhelmed. The first hundred pages or so were great, with Dr. Sinclair providing an outline of a novel approach to aging and longevity known as the "Information Theory of Aging." He provides a very convincing argument for his model and does a phenomenal job of summarizing the current state of understanding regarding the ubiquitous disease I have mixed feelings on this book. I have nothing but respect for Dr. Sinclair and the high impact research he's conducting, but I can't help but feel underwhelmed. The first hundred pages or so were great, with Dr. Sinclair providing an outline of a novel approach to aging and longevity known as the "Information Theory of Aging." He provides a very convincing argument for his model and does a phenomenal job of summarizing the current state of understanding regarding the ubiquitous disease known as aging. Almost all of my complaints stem from the latter half of the book. In place of the novel ideas that made the first part of the book so enticing, the later chapters seemed to be overrun by anecdotes and personal reflections. Not to completely discount the book, as I found certain sections to be both informative and entertaining, but I found myself quite disappointed at the end and feel that the central tenets of this book could be summed up in less than 100 pages.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ginger Hudock

    The title and subtitle of this book would imply that this is a "how to" book about aging and steps that can be taken to slow down the process. Instead this book goes deeply into the biological and genetic processes of aging and the research that has been done on aging. I am a nutritionist and so am somewhat familiar with human physiology. This book was too complex for me and I think would be too complex for the average lay person interested in health. There are no "how to" steps in the book The title and subtitle of this book would imply that this is a "how to" book about aging and steps that can be taken to slow down the process. Instead this book goes deeply into the biological and genetic processes of aging and the research that has been done on aging. I am a nutritionist and so am somewhat familiar with human physiology. This book was too complex for me and I think would be too complex for the average lay person interested in health. There are no "how to" steps in the book other than a small paragraph at the end in which Sinclair shares some of his personal lifestyle and nutrition strategies. The last section in the book was somewhat rambling when talking about the future in terms of technologies, how to provide food for the population, how much the population would grow with a longer lifespan, social security, taxes, hurry, government investment, the right to die, over consumption, and many other topics that are not strictly related to the theme of the book. I received a complementary copy of this book from the publisher via Net Galley in exchange for my honest review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Francisco Gutierrez

    A great book, absolutely worth your time! Sinclair is at the forefront of research, and I am grateful that he took some time away from writing scientific papers to write a book for the general public. He distills the last 20 years or so of anti-aging research into an easy to read book. Sinclair's theory of aging is elegant. Simple enough to explain with an evolutionary argument going all the way back to the primordial soup, but powerful enough to explain all sorts of observations, for example, A great book, absolutely worth your time! Sinclair is at the forefront of research, and I am grateful that he took some time away from writing scientific papers to write a book for the general public. He distills the last 20 years or so of anti-aging research into an easy to read book. Sinclair's theory of aging is elegant. Simple enough to explain with an evolutionary argument going all the way back to the primordial soup, but powerful enough to explain all sorts of observations, for example, hormesis. Have you ever wondered why stresses to the body like exercise, fasting, sauna, and cold exposure all work to keep you young? His theory explains why, and this book explains his theory in an accessible form.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Sinclair is a well respected scientist who researches aging, aging as a disease that can be “cured” and not just delayed. The premise is fascinating and I learned a lot about the field. I will say finishing this book took determination. I have no background in science so staying focused and following his argument was a challenge. The sections of the book that dealt with the ethics of extending lifespans and the impact on the planet we’re much more interesting to me.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Zhuo Zhang

    It is a good read and very eye-opening. The structure of the book is really clear thus it is easy for the reader to digest the context from past to present and the future. Even though I feel the present and the future is a little bit overlapping. Take the supplement, exercises, no or very less sugar/carb intake, plant based diet, intermittent fasting and most important, having a belief that aging is not unavailable. The book instills a lot of hope to longevity.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Simon Hohenadl

    I've been looking for a book like this for some time: an understandable summary of the current state of ageing and longevity science and what you can do to benefit from it. I liked the style, the explanations and the accompanying illustrations a lot, although in several instances Sinclair trails off in accounts from his personal life, other researchers' lives or a bit of ranting.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    A bit technical at times, but an enjoyable recapitulation of the Harvard geneticist's research and other science in the field of how to slow aging, and how by activating our epigenetic profile -- and perhaps in the not to distant future even reverse aging it by rewriting it. Advancements that would not just extend human life but health into later years. Definitely worth a read!

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