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Judith Kerr

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This season’s second volume in The Illustrators series showcases the work of Judith Kerr, one of Britain’s most beloved authors and illustrators. She first started writing and illustrating stories for children when in her forties and some fifty years later she is still producing bestselling books. Her first book, The Tiger Who Came to Tea, is a well-established classic and the This season’s second volume in The Illustrators series showcases the work of Judith Kerr, one of Britain’s most beloved authors and illustrators. She first started writing and illustrating stories for children when in her forties and some fifty years later she is still producing bestselling books. Her first book, The Tiger Who Came to Tea, is a well-established classic and the series about Mog the cat now runs to seventeen books in numerous editions worldwide. Kerr’s semiautobiographical children’s novel When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit, about her family’s escape from Germany in 1933, is widely read and used in schools to teach what it is like to be a refugee. Joanna Carey, who has had unrestricted access to Judith Kerr and her archive, explores the backstory behind Kerr’s popular books and analyzes how she works. She draws on a range of never-before-seen visual materials to take readers behind the scenes of Kerr’s unforgettable creations. The result is not only a celebration of Kerr’s classic work, but also a thoughtful and intimate account of her long and remarkable career.


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This season’s second volume in The Illustrators series showcases the work of Judith Kerr, one of Britain’s most beloved authors and illustrators. She first started writing and illustrating stories for children when in her forties and some fifty years later she is still producing bestselling books. Her first book, The Tiger Who Came to Tea, is a well-established classic and the This season’s second volume in The Illustrators series showcases the work of Judith Kerr, one of Britain’s most beloved authors and illustrators. She first started writing and illustrating stories for children when in her forties and some fifty years later she is still producing bestselling books. Her first book, The Tiger Who Came to Tea, is a well-established classic and the series about Mog the cat now runs to seventeen books in numerous editions worldwide. Kerr’s semiautobiographical children’s novel When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit, about her family’s escape from Germany in 1933, is widely read and used in schools to teach what it is like to be a refugee. Joanna Carey, who has had unrestricted access to Judith Kerr and her archive, explores the backstory behind Kerr’s popular books and analyzes how she works. She draws on a range of never-before-seen visual materials to take readers behind the scenes of Kerr’s unforgettable creations. The result is not only a celebration of Kerr’s classic work, but also a thoughtful and intimate account of her long and remarkable career.

29 review for Judith Kerr

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    I’m kind of Judith Kerr’d out re reading about her. I’ve read so much this year. But this book was excellent and now I’m curious about what other illustrators are in this book series. I’d still like to read even more of her children’s books. I’ve read relatively few so far. There were some photos and illustrations included that I hadn’t seen in the other books I’ve read but much of the time it felt as though I had already read this book because there were so many photos/art that I’d already seen I’m kind of Judith Kerr’d out re reading about her. I’ve read so much this year. But this book was excellent and now I’m curious about what other illustrators are in this book series. I’d still like to read even more of her children’s books. I’ve read relatively few so far. There were some photos and illustrations included that I hadn’t seen in the other books I’ve read but much of the time it felt as though I had already read this book because there were so many photos/art that I’d already seen in other books and so much information/account that I’d already read. When I shelved this book and reserved it at the library I’d been under the impression that it was a book written for young people but it’s a book geared toward the adult reader. The materials at the end are not impressive. The bibliography at the end simply lists Kerr’s books, not other books about her. I’m wondering who the other illustrators in this series are. I’m tempted to downgrade it because I’ve read/seen so much of its contents already. But that’s not the book’s fault so I’m rating it as it stands on it’s own. It’s a fine introduction not if it’s someone’s first books about this woman I suspect they’ll want to read more. I kept wanting to read more. And I did. And now I think I’m done. 3-1/2 stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

  3. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

  4. 5 out of 5

    Archie

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hilary

  6. 4 out of 5

    HP Saucerer

  7. 5 out of 5

    4eyedreader

  8. 4 out of 5

    Emily S.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bex

  10. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hilary Glenn

  12. 4 out of 5

    Frimple

  13. 4 out of 5

    Luna

  14. 4 out of 5

    Taif Ahmed

  15. 5 out of 5

    elisha

  16. 4 out of 5

    º❀•Curiosity•✿º

  17. 4 out of 5

    Paula

  18. 4 out of 5

    Maria

  19. 5 out of 5

    Agnes

  20. 4 out of 5

    Aaroosh Anand

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joanna Turner

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ann

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kr Kafei

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jose

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cierra

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sam Cate

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alexis Steele

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