Hot Best Seller

Wildhood: The Epic Journey from Adolescence to Adulthood in Humans and Other Animals

Availability: Ready to download

Publishers Weekly Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2019 A New York Times Editor’s Pick People Best Books Fall 2019 Chicago Tribune 28 Books You Need to Read Now “It blew my mind to discover that teenage animals and teenage humans are so similar. Both are naive risk-takers. I loved this book!” —Temple Grandin, author of Animals Make Us Human and Animals in Translation A revelatory invA Publishers Weekly Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2019 A New York Times Editor’s Pick People Best Books Fall 2019 Chicago Tribune 28 Books You Need to Read Now “It blew my mind to discover that teenage animals and teenage humans are so similar. Both are naive risk-takers. I loved this book!” —Temple Grandin, author of Animals Make Us Human and Animals in Translation A revelatory investigation of human and animal adolescence and young adulthood from the New York Times bestselling authors of Zoobiquity. With Wildhood, Harvard evolutionary biologist Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and award-winning science writer Kathryn Bowers have created an entirely new way of thinking about the crucial, vulnerable, and exhilarating phase of life between childhood and adulthood across the animal kingdom. In their critically acclaimed bestseller, Zoobiquity, the authors revealed the essential connection between human and animal health. In Wildhood, they turn the same eye-opening, species-spanning lens to adolescent young adult life. Traveling around the world and drawing from their latest research, they find that the same four universal challenges are faced by every adolescent human and animal on earth: how to be safe, how to navigate hierarchy; how to court potential mates; and how to feed oneself. Safety. Status. Sex. Self-reliance. How human and animal adolescents and young adults confront the challenges of wildhood shapes their adult destinies. Natterson-Horowitz and Bowers illuminate these core challenges through the lives of four animals in the wild: Ursula, a young king penguin; Shrink, a charismatic hyena; Salt, a matriarchal humpback whale; and Slavc, a roaming European wolf. Through their riveting stories—and those of countless others, from adventurous eagles and rambunctious high schooler to inexperienced orcas and naive young soldiers—readers get a vivid and game-changing portrait of adolescent young adults as a horizontal tribe, sharing behaviors and challenges, setbacks and triumphs. Upending our understanding of everything from risk-taking and anxiety to the origins of privilege and the nature of sexual coercion and consent, Wildhood is a profound and necessary guide to the perilous, thrilling, and universal journey to adulthood on planet earth.


Compare

Publishers Weekly Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2019 A New York Times Editor’s Pick People Best Books Fall 2019 Chicago Tribune 28 Books You Need to Read Now “It blew my mind to discover that teenage animals and teenage humans are so similar. Both are naive risk-takers. I loved this book!” —Temple Grandin, author of Animals Make Us Human and Animals in Translation A revelatory invA Publishers Weekly Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2019 A New York Times Editor’s Pick People Best Books Fall 2019 Chicago Tribune 28 Books You Need to Read Now “It blew my mind to discover that teenage animals and teenage humans are so similar. Both are naive risk-takers. I loved this book!” —Temple Grandin, author of Animals Make Us Human and Animals in Translation A revelatory investigation of human and animal adolescence and young adulthood from the New York Times bestselling authors of Zoobiquity. With Wildhood, Harvard evolutionary biologist Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and award-winning science writer Kathryn Bowers have created an entirely new way of thinking about the crucial, vulnerable, and exhilarating phase of life between childhood and adulthood across the animal kingdom. In their critically acclaimed bestseller, Zoobiquity, the authors revealed the essential connection between human and animal health. In Wildhood, they turn the same eye-opening, species-spanning lens to adolescent young adult life. Traveling around the world and drawing from their latest research, they find that the same four universal challenges are faced by every adolescent human and animal on earth: how to be safe, how to navigate hierarchy; how to court potential mates; and how to feed oneself. Safety. Status. Sex. Self-reliance. How human and animal adolescents and young adults confront the challenges of wildhood shapes their adult destinies. Natterson-Horowitz and Bowers illuminate these core challenges through the lives of four animals in the wild: Ursula, a young king penguin; Shrink, a charismatic hyena; Salt, a matriarchal humpback whale; and Slavc, a roaming European wolf. Through their riveting stories—and those of countless others, from adventurous eagles and rambunctious high schooler to inexperienced orcas and naive young soldiers—readers get a vivid and game-changing portrait of adolescent young adults as a horizontal tribe, sharing behaviors and challenges, setbacks and triumphs. Upending our understanding of everything from risk-taking and anxiety to the origins of privilege and the nature of sexual coercion and consent, Wildhood is a profound and necessary guide to the perilous, thrilling, and universal journey to adulthood on planet earth.

30 review for Wildhood: The Epic Journey from Adolescence to Adulthood in Humans and Other Animals

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    I received a copy of this book from the goodreads giveaways. Wildhood: The Epic Journey from Adolescence to Adulthood in Humans and Other Animals" Is rather unique. The authors study the Adolescence years in Animals and humans. They write of all kinds of species, like Penquins, hyena's, humpback Whales, and human teenagers. They study things that this age group go through, like status,{ pecking order} sex, self reliance, leaving the nest etc to name a few. I found this book fun and interesting t I received a copy of this book from the goodreads giveaways. Wildhood: The Epic Journey from Adolescence to Adulthood in Humans and Other Animals" Is rather unique. The authors study the Adolescence years in Animals and humans. They write of all kinds of species, like Penquins, hyena's, humpback Whales, and human teenagers. They study things that this age group go through, like status,{ pecking order} sex, self reliance, leaving the nest etc to name a few. I found this book fun and interesting to read. I liked getting to see what other species go through at this age. Not so different from us humans in ways.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kelly K

    A super interesting comparison on the awkward stages of growing up across the animal world and how human behavior isn't so unique after all. I also love that this was written by two women who blatantly point out multiple times that research is often done on the male of the species instead of the female because male scientists are obsessed with other dicks. The end of that statement may vaguely be a matter of personal opinion but seriously, where's the lie?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Judith

    This book is multi-disciplinary. It looks at the period in which 4 different animals pass from babyhood to learning to be on their own. The 4 animals are a king penguins a hyena, humpback whale, and wolf. All have been tagged by radio though the radios are no longer working. The presumptions are two: that various (all birds and mammals?) have an adolescent period in which they learn how to be adults on their own; and that their experiences offer insight and parallels to our own children's adoles This book is multi-disciplinary. It looks at the period in which 4 different animals pass from babyhood to learning to be on their own. The 4 animals are a king penguins a hyena, humpback whale, and wolf. All have been tagged by radio though the radios are no longer working. The presumptions are two: that various (all birds and mammals?) have an adolescent period in which they learn how to be adults on their own; and that their experiences offer insight and parallels to our own children's adolescence. Underlying but not specifically expressed presumptions I thinker that "our own" is "First World" nations/cultures and that adolescence can run from 16 or so through the late 20s (as seen in a number of households with adult-by-age offspring that are still living with their parents). Each animal is looked at gaining ability to live on their own in different respects (though of course all must learn this for each respect). The female king penguin learns how to identify predators and escape them; the male hyena learns how to negotiate his status in his natal group; the female humpback whale learns how to negotiate sexual encounters and coercion; the male wolf learns how to become self-reliant while seeking a new living area many hundreds of miles away from his natal area. Because data were gathered on each animal by radio and/or observation, these vignettes of each animal are not (entirely) imagined composites but actual happenings. It is good to look at the challenges adolescents face in each of these species and then consider how these challenges play out amongst our own adolescents--and importantly all challenges are going on at the same time. I am not so sure that these studies produce sensible hypotheses "for raising, educating, counseling and treating" adolescent humans as one of the review blurbs states on the back cover. But as I say it is good to look at the problems as a construct set (and there surely are more problems adolescents must learn to deal with than just these four). What I don't see is how to transfer a roaming wolf's experiences to an adolescent's going away to college or entering the armed forces or the Peace Corps. Each milieu is more or less strictly ordered, the groups the adolescent enters more or less changing in number, purpose, inter alia. There is much musing in each story about how to apply the animal's situation to ours that I found a little strained.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Scribe Publications

    The authors steer clear of excesses of ethology or anthropomorphism, and they emphasise that maturity is not a goal but a process. A lucid, entertaining account of how creatures of many kinds learn to navigate the complex world that adulthood opens. Kirkus A life-changing perspective on adolescents. A treasure trove of scientific exploration and practical implications for how we understand and support youth. Daniel J. Siegel, MD, author of Brainstorm: the power and purpose of the teenage brain Human teens have much in com/>Human/>Daniel/> The authors steer clear of excesses of ethology or anthropomorphism, and they emphasise that maturity is not a goal but a process. A lucid, entertaining account of how creatures of many kinds learn to navigate the complex world that adulthood opens. Kirkus A life-changing perspective on adolescents. A treasure trove of scientific exploration and practical implications for how we understand and support youth. Daniel J. Siegel, MD, author of Brainstorm: the power and purpose of the teenage brain Human teens have much in common with their counterparts throughout the animal kingdom — and those commonalities are eye-opening as described in the latest from biologist Natterson-Horowitz and science journalist Bowers. Reassuring ... should appeal to anyone who’s ever raised an adolescent, human or otherwise. STARRED REVIEW Publishers Weekly Paradigm-shattering. This illuminating new book generates dozens of hypotheses for raising, educating, counselling and treating, and living life as an adolescent human. Gene Beresin, MD, Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School It blew my mind to discover that teenage animals and teenage humans are so similar. Both are naïve risk-takers. I love this book! Temple Grandin, PHD, author of Animals Make Us Human and ANimals in Translation This fascinating book tells the compelling story of adolescence across species, framed in the convincing context of evolutionary and adaptive explanations. Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, author of Inventing Ourselves: the secret life of the teenage brain Unfailingly fascinating — and sometimes downright mind-blowing — this is a remarkably original account of the nature, meaning, and purpose of adolescence in today’s world … Wildhood is one of the most insightful books ever written about this critically important stage of life. Laurence Steinberg, University Professor of Psychology, Temple University, and author fo Age of Opportunity Deeply researched and beautifully written, this account of the trials faced by teenagers across the animal kingdom inspires compassion for young people and appreciation for what they must accomplish on the journey into adulthood. Lida Damour, PHD, author of Under Pressure and Untangled A masterpiece. This is a spellbinding lens on the ways creatures with big bodies yet little life experience figure out how to survive and thrive. Read Wildhood. Wendy Mogel, PHD, author of Voice Lessons for Parents and The Blessing of a Skinned Knee Our teenage years can be many things, from fraught to exhilarating. Natterson-Horowitz and Bowers show them to be something else altogether — essential for humans and animals. Read their enlightening journey and you will never see the transition to adulthood the same way again. Neil Shubin, PHD, author of Your Inner Fish and The Universe Within Wildhood’s tour of the natural history of adolescence is original, entertaining and constructive, full of ideas for understanding it better. Richard Wrangham, PHD, author of The Goodness Paradox and Catching Fire Wise, entrancing and astounding. Daniel E. Lieberman, PHD, author of The Story of the Human Body: evolution, health and disease An incredibly fascinating read, Wildhood illuminates what humans can learn from the animal world and how all species are more connected to one another than they may appear. STARRED REVIEW Booklist This compelling account of how strongly human adolescent behaviours are rooted in our wild animal past should intrigue general science readers and fans of Zoobiquity. Library Journal The wild adventure of adolescence has never been analysed in such depth. In lively personalised accounts that keep our attention, the authors explain how the transition to independence works in each species, and why it looks so similar across the board. Frans de Wall, PHD, author of Mama’s Last Hug and Our Inner Ape Those travails of adolescence? It isn’t just you. Or your culture. Or even your species. Wildhood uses riveting stories about the challenges overcome by specific whales, wolves, and more to put the challenges of adolescence in a universal evolutionary context for the first time. Groundbreaking and fascinating. Randolph M. Nesse, MD, author of Good Reasons for Bad Feelings Adolescence isn't just for humans. Here an evolutionary biologist offers up rollicking tales of young animals navigating risk, social hierarchy, and sex with all the bravura (and dopiness) of our own teenage beasts. People All this time spent reading books on adulting can be harrowing for a worried parent who isn’t entirely sold on the survival skills of her teenage son. I needed some reassurance … Luckily, I found it with a king penguin, a hyena, a humpback whale and a wolf … Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and Kathryn Bowers … follow this cast of characters as they face the trials of making it into adulthood in their savage and competitive worlds. You don’t even need to anthropomorphise to find some of the similarities between animal and human teenagers uncanny, and the lessons they have to learn remarkably similar. Judith Newman, New York Times Book Review Harvard evolutionary biologist Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and science journalist Kathryn Bowers draw fascinating connections between human and animal young adulthood. Laura Pearson, The Chicago Tribune, ‘28 New Books Your Need to Read Now’ The vivid storytelling and fascinating scientific digressions in Wildhood make it a pleasurable read. Patrick J. Kiger, Los Angeles Times There is much here for the nature lover, the parent seeking advice, and the college freshman tackling ‘adulting.’ By laying out the adolescent experience of so many species in rich detail, the authors normalise and celebrate the beauty and complexity of our own species’ journey into the big wide world. Linda Welbrecht, Science Magazine Take the authors up on their invitation to observe animals in the wild and in your own household, and you’ll never look at other beings the same again. Wildhood is for parents, nature lovers, and the curious alike. You’ll be wild for it. Terri Schlichenmeyer, Times Record Reading [Wildhood], I was surprised to see that many of the adolescent behaviours humans exhibit are wired in for adolescents of most species. This may not provide much consolation for you as you try to guide your teen through the dangers of risk-taking, but it provides insights into how much your teen is exhibiting normal adolescent behaviour shared with birds and monkeys. Most importantly, it’s a reminder that this is usually not about you. Mark Phillips, Marin Independent Journal

  5. 5 out of 5

    Paul Pessolano

    “Wildhood” by Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and Kathryn Bowers, published by Scribner. Category – Animal/Human Studies Publication Date – September 17, 2019. Before jumping into this book the reader must understand that this book was written by two scholarly women who used the book as a teaching tool in their college classes. However, saying that, I must admit that there are some fantastic things brought out in this book that could be very helpful for those bringing up teenage “Wildhood” by Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and Kathryn Bowers, published by Scribner. Category – Animal/Human Studies Publication Date – September 17, 2019. Before jumping into this book the reader must understand that this book was written by two scholarly women who used the book as a teaching tool in their college classes. However, saying that, I must admit that there are some fantastic things brought out in this book that could be very helpful for those bringing up teenagers. This book all started with the two young ladies learning about the “Triangle of Death” in the Pacific Ocean. This is an area that is inhabited by sharks and few, if any other, animals inhabit this space, that is except for the California Sea Otter. This does not include all of them just the adolescent or teenage sea otters. They discovered that these teenagers took risk and invited danger as a way of growing up. They then likened this to the human teenager who went out a night, drank, and again invited danger. This is only a small assumption that they made from this one occurrence. They explored and found numerous situations in nature that ran parallel to the sea otter. They found that fear become a factor in their lives as well as romance, living alone, and social status. Again, this is an erudite book but could present some insights into our human behavior. It is definitely worth the time and effort to look into.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lael Walters

    The authors compare the turbulent teenage and young adult years of various animal species, including human. They call this age "wildhood" (although I must admit I did not click with this created word at all throughout the book -- it does make a great title). The sections of the book are based on what they consider the core competencies learned during these years: staying safe, living with others, sexual communications and taking care of oneself. The first two sections were excellent -- the compa The authors compare the turbulent teenage and young adult years of various animal species, including human. They call this age "wildhood" (although I must admit I did not click with this created word at all throughout the book -- it does make a great title). The sections of the book are based on what they consider the core competencies learned during these years: staying safe, living with others, sexual communications and taking care of oneself. The first two sections were excellent -- the comparison to the lives of various animals give insight into how normal some parts of the teenage/young adult experience actually are across species and gave me a lot of food for thought on how I could parent my own kids as well.. The second two sections were not as impressive even while still enjoyable, overshadowed by how good the first two sections were I suppose-- overall the book was a worthwhile read and I expect I'll be reading it again in the future.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Candice

    Wildhood: The Epic Journey from Adolescence to Adulthood in Humans and Other Animals describes the period of time between childhood and adulthood. We commonly refer to this time as adolescence. I never considered whether other species pass through this awkward time until I saw this book. The authors thoroughly researched the topic and broke it down into four stages: safety, status, sex and self-reliance. Each of the four sections blends human and animal observations, and they seem surprisingly similar. Wildhood: The Epic Journey from Adolescence to Adulthood in Humans and Other Animals describes the period of time between childhood and adulthood. We commonly refer to this time as adolescence. I never considered whether other species pass through this awkward time until I saw this book. The authors thoroughly researched the topic and broke it down into four stages: safety, status, sex and self-reliance. Each of the four sections blends human and animal observations, and they seem surprisingly similar. During the status chapters, I saw many parallels with the social challenges we are currently facing across the globe. If you are a parent, educator or someone who is fascinated by biology, I highly recommend this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    EXCELLENT book. I found myself highlighting and tabbing multiple pages, and sending texts to teacher friends with the cover and telling them THEY MUST READ. Any adult who has kids or works with kids should read this book, as it makes very good points about issues that kids deal with during adolescence, many of them things that drive the adults around them to distraction - why they do what they do, and how it's essential to them learning to be successful adults. I would never have thought about t EXCELLENT book. I found myself highlighting and tabbing multiple pages, and sending texts to teacher friends with the cover and telling them THEY MUST READ. Any adult who has kids or works with kids should read this book, as it makes very good points about issues that kids deal with during adolescence, many of them things that drive the adults around them to distraction - why they do what they do, and how it's essential to them learning to be successful adults. I would never have thought about the premise of nature copying humans and vice versa in their adolescence, but...it makes so much sense when finally presented with the loads of information. BUT - this book is not a dry, factual treatise. It is *extremely* readable, and really quite fascinating. A future Staff Pick at the Powell's PDX store.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Pat

    I just loved this from both biological standpoint and cultural standpoints. Honestly, it's a wonder any adolescent of any species survives to adulthood. Many of the tales are quite sad as teens starve, are killed or simply die, often sacrificed by the adults. But, hey, that's the way the cookie crumbles in nature! I loved it that the authors examine such diverse species as penguin, humpback whales, penguins--and humans. This is really an indictment of "helicopter parenting," as failure to e I just loved this from both biological standpoint and cultural standpoints. Honestly, it's a wonder any adolescent of any species survives to adulthood. Many of the tales are quite sad as teens starve, are killed or simply die, often sacrificed by the adults. But, hey, that's the way the cookie crumbles in nature! I loved it that the authors examine such diverse species as penguin, humpback whales, penguins--and humans. This is really an indictment of "helicopter parenting," as failure to expose teens to risk usually results in unsuccessful maturity, as the many examples from the nonhuman species attests.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amanda K

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the e-arc! Interesting largely jargon-free overview of the process of maturation and gaining independence across species which the authors term 'wildhood'. The plethora of multi-taxa examples makes for interesting reading as does the interweaving of human anecdotes to illustrate the four challenges facing youngsters growing up. These are; securing safety, gaining status, navigating sex and sexual interaction and finally self-reliance. Overall a fun introduction Thanks to Edelweiss for the e-arc! Interesting largely jargon-free overview of the process of maturation and gaining independence across species which the authors term 'wildhood'. The plethora of multi-taxa examples makes for interesting reading as does the interweaving of human anecdotes to illustrate the four challenges facing youngsters growing up. These are; securing safety, gaining status, navigating sex and sexual interaction and finally self-reliance. Overall a fun introduction to a fascinating subject.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dalton

    An enjoyable and quick read, Wildhood offers plenty of insight into the adolescence and maturing of a myriad of creatures across the globe. A number of fields are fascinating and richly explored however some could have been more thoroughly detailed and could have been done so with the cutting of some of the fluffier elements. This includes tracking abilities of the humans with animals focused on and the animal backstory which is mostly there to create a narrative for the animals and not for the An enjoyable and quick read, Wildhood offers plenty of insight into the adolescence and maturing of a myriad of creatures across the globe. A number of fields are fascinating and richly explored however some could have been more thoroughly detailed and could have been done so with the cutting of some of the fluffier elements. This includes tracking abilities of the humans with animals focused on and the animal backstory which is mostly there to create a narrative for the animals and not for the benefit of scientific exploration. Other than that, a still fun and overall insightful read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susan Strayer

    Safety, Status Sex, Self-Sufficiency. Wildhood is an academic read, fascinating and full of narrative tales of juvenile penguins, humpback whales, wolves and hyenas, but what I most enjoyed was how the nature tales always came back on what we as humans could learn to help our adolescents through this awkward phase and toward adulthood. PS - The publishers sent me a copy of wildhood to review because of my blog MountainMomandTots.com but my opinions are my own.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Zhuo Zhang

    Bioinspiration: Turning to nature to find solutions to the challenges of human life. This is a brand new area and it is really interesting and thought-provoking. "Staying safe, navigating hierarchies, communicating respectfully about sex, and learning the satisfaction of self-reliance are the true markers of adulthood. The book has a clear structure and a lot of vivid examples to make the arguments more memorable. A great read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I really enjoyed this book. Then again, I’m a psychologist trained in a developmental perspective with a significant interest in non-human animal behavior, so it really couldn’t possibly have been more directly targeted at me. Any comparative discussion of behavior involves telling some just-so stories, and these authors don’t escape that, but they make good arguments and share intriguing insights. I learned some things, and I liked it. :)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Susan Reed

    This follow up book is equally fascinating and well written. A lot more commercial and popularized than Zoobiquity. Saw the author as AVMA Keynote speaker 2 months ago, and she has a great road show and stage presence.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Doris Raines

    AHHHH WHAT PRECIOUS. ANIMALS. 🦁 CUTE

  17. 5 out of 5

    PWRL

    SM

  18. 5 out of 5

    Isabelle

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kt

  21. 5 out of 5

    Fox

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mariam Johnson

  23. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Finn

  24. 4 out of 5

    Fred Fletcher

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alberto Corona

  26. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Urban

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jill

  28. 5 out of 5

    Aduvivier

  29. 5 out of 5

    TaAnna

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.