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Dreamland: An Autobiography

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Bob Lazar is the reason Area 51 became infamous in the 1980s and his recent appearance on Joe Rogan's podcast with 7 million listeners is credited with inspiring the Storm Area 51 phenomenon. In his DREAMLAND autobiography, Lazar reveals every detail of his highly controversial story about being an insider within the world's most legendary military research base. Bob Lazar Bob Lazar is the reason Area 51 became infamous in the 1980s and his recent appearance on Joe Rogan's podcast with 7 million listeners is credited with inspiring the Storm Area 51 phenomenon. In his DREAMLAND autobiography, Lazar reveals every detail of his highly controversial story about being an insider within the world's most legendary military research base. Bob Lazar was a brilliant young physicist that found himself employed at a top secret facility in the middle of the desert outside Las Vegas. Under the watchful eye of the government elite, he is tasked with understanding an exotic propulsion system being used by an advanced aerospace vehicle he is told came from outer space. The stressful work and long, odd hours start to wear on Bob and he becomes concerned for his safety. He tells his wife and a couple close friends about what he's doing in the desert, and his employers find out and are furious. When they station goons outside his house, Bob seeks help from wealthy UFOlogist, John Lear, who encourages Bob to take his story to award-winning investigative journalist George Knapp at KLAS-TV, a CBS affiliate. To prove he's telling the truth, Bob takes a group of people out into the desert to watch a test flight of the "flying saucer." On the way home, they are stopped by the police, who notify the base, and Bob loses his job. In a series of interviews with CBS TV, Bob Lazar then blows the lid off "Area 51," blows the whistle on the effort to conceal this craft from the American people, and blows up his career as a top physicist. Bob Lazar's reports have been the subject of intense controversy for decades. He has been interviewed numerous times and his story has been corroborated by other individuals he worked with and who were present when these events happened. But until now, Bob Lazar has never told his own story, in every detail in his own words, about those exciting days in the desert outside of Las Vegas and how the world came to learn about the experiments being conducted at Area 51.


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Bob Lazar is the reason Area 51 became infamous in the 1980s and his recent appearance on Joe Rogan's podcast with 7 million listeners is credited with inspiring the Storm Area 51 phenomenon. In his DREAMLAND autobiography, Lazar reveals every detail of his highly controversial story about being an insider within the world's most legendary military research base. Bob Lazar Bob Lazar is the reason Area 51 became infamous in the 1980s and his recent appearance on Joe Rogan's podcast with 7 million listeners is credited with inspiring the Storm Area 51 phenomenon. In his DREAMLAND autobiography, Lazar reveals every detail of his highly controversial story about being an insider within the world's most legendary military research base. Bob Lazar was a brilliant young physicist that found himself employed at a top secret facility in the middle of the desert outside Las Vegas. Under the watchful eye of the government elite, he is tasked with understanding an exotic propulsion system being used by an advanced aerospace vehicle he is told came from outer space. The stressful work and long, odd hours start to wear on Bob and he becomes concerned for his safety. He tells his wife and a couple close friends about what he's doing in the desert, and his employers find out and are furious. When they station goons outside his house, Bob seeks help from wealthy UFOlogist, John Lear, who encourages Bob to take his story to award-winning investigative journalist George Knapp at KLAS-TV, a CBS affiliate. To prove he's telling the truth, Bob takes a group of people out into the desert to watch a test flight of the "flying saucer." On the way home, they are stopped by the police, who notify the base, and Bob loses his job. In a series of interviews with CBS TV, Bob Lazar then blows the lid off "Area 51," blows the whistle on the effort to conceal this craft from the American people, and blows up his career as a top physicist. Bob Lazar's reports have been the subject of intense controversy for decades. He has been interviewed numerous times and his story has been corroborated by other individuals he worked with and who were present when these events happened. But until now, Bob Lazar has never told his own story, in every detail in his own words, about those exciting days in the desert outside of Las Vegas and how the world came to learn about the experiments being conducted at Area 51.

30 review for Dreamland: An Autobiography

  1. 4 out of 5

    Owlseyes

    He's a physicist who worked in Los Alamos, but also in a site (near Area 51) called S-4. In that site he had the chance of "working" (making experiments) with an alien spacecraft, whose composition he still doesn't know if of metal or ceramics. Inside the ship there was space for little creatures (but not quite for humans), and hardly any instrumentation of earth-like nature. On the outside you could not really touch the craft as there was a field (anti-gravity?) surrounding it. But he saw a He's a physicist who worked in Los Alamos, but also in a site (near Area 51) called S-4. In that site he had the chance of "working" (making experiments) with an alien spacecraft, whose composition he still doesn't know if of metal or ceramics. Inside the ship there was space for little creatures (but not quite for humans), and hardly any instrumentation of earth-like nature. On the outside you could not really touch the craft as there was a field (anti-gravity?) surrounding it. But he saw a total of 9 ships. As he broke the accord of telling none about the nature of his work he was expelled from the site. And those above him took care of damaging Bob Lazar's life in several ways. Amazing story.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Brisbane

    I haven't read but surely will read this, upon stumbling a documentary, what Bob says can be true and he understands how the technology works if I had to guess, I'm no scholar but I understand the idea of physics mixed with mechanical and electrical engineering. With that being said, I believe the technology from Star Wars could be accomplished, just my opinion. I'm not even a Star Wars fan. It's been a weird Monday....

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Warren

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I was 4 in 1989, so I was not tracking this story. The forward seems almost as long as the story itself, it was an interesting read for sure. I don't normally post reviews, but this book is new this month and figured some ratings would help others check it out. Slight spoilers ahead. (It isn't a murder mystery) A scientist claims he works at Area 51 and he worked on a propulsion system from an alien spaceship. The information he presents seems logical and he clearly believes what he says. The fact I was 4 in 1989, so I was not tracking this story. The forward seems almost as long as the story itself, it was an interesting read for sure. I don't normally post reviews, but this book is new this month and figured some ratings would help others check it out. Slight spoilers ahead. (It isn't a murder mystery) A scientist claims he works at Area 51 and he worked on a propulsion system from an alien spaceship. The information he presents seems logical and he clearly believes what he says. The fact he so quickly moved from don't tell anyone to tell everyone is very strange to me. It is a great stepping off point I think if you want to believe (think X-files). The story is interesting and not crazy long give it a read. Bonus fun fact, he drove a Datsun 280z, those are awesome cars.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joe Sabet

    If you’re into ufology, it’s well-worth reading. Gives more details than the recent documentary about him. I found it hard to put down, and his story is quite interesting considering the subject matter and its implications. I also appreciated his genuine delivery and his explanation of scientific principles; he would be a great physics teacher. The only problem was beyond his intellect, knowledge, and short-lived experience at S4, there’s not much depth to his character in my opinion. He’s If you’re into ufology, it’s well-worth reading. Gives more details than the recent documentary about him. I found it hard to put down, and his story is quite interesting considering the subject matter and its implications. I also appreciated his genuine delivery and his explanation of scientific principles; he would be a great physics teacher. The only problem was beyond his intellect, knowledge, and short-lived experience at S4, there’s not much depth to his character in my opinion. He’s honest about why he primarily came forward, but I don’t understand how he could be so indifferent to gov’t secrecy about such an important discovery for humankind. Or what were his thoughts about the existence of life elsewhere in the universe in childhood, college, nowadays? What does he think about religion or God? I was interested to learn more about him in an autobiography, but it mainly circled around a small point in his life, albeit an otherworldly one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Hammer

    Never have I ever wanted a story to be true as strongly as I do with this one. Bob Lazar is the reason area-51 made it into popular culture, and recently reached mainstream news through a Facebook post with users planning to raid the location. Lazar also guested the Joe Rogan podcast and told his story there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEWz4... The document above shows he was stationed at the United States Department of Naval Intelligence in Nevada. Lazar tells us he walked at a location Never have I ever wanted a story to be true as strongly as I do with this one. Bob Lazar is the reason area-51 made it into popular culture, and recently reached mainstream news through a Facebook post with users planning to raid the location. Lazar also guested the Joe Rogan podcast and told his story there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEWz4... The document above shows he was stationed at the United States Department of Naval Intelligence in Nevada. Lazar tells us he walked at a location called S-4, where he claims to have worked on extraterrestrial technology, apparently being hidden away in the desert by the US military. He claims to have worked on a generator of sorts, that had anti-gravity technology, something no nation on earth knows how to make. Furthermore he claims to have been shown the actual spacecraft in one of the hangars, which according to Lazar was unlike anything he imagined he would see in his life. Being shown this solidified his belief that was actually working on non-human technology. He describes the object as being uniform in its construction, without visible seams or of discrete parts, as being wholly one, as integrated and needing no fueld to power itself. Ordinarily one would dismiss such extraordinary claims rather quickly. However, Lazar told us about a sort of hand-scanner that he used while working there, which could see individual differences in the bone structure of hands. This apparatus has later been confirmed and shown to the public, partly confirming some of Lazar's story. Due to personal issues having to do with his wife, Lazar did not get the clearance he needed to keep working on the project. He further tells us that he got followed by agents in the weeks after being dismissed from the project, waiting in cars outside his house and searching his car without him being there. In need of telling somebody of what he'd seen, Lazar decided to bring some friends into the dessert to watch the tesing of one of the flying objects in 1989. Apparantly shown here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufPIH... While the actuality of there being UFO's in the video remains unclear, it at least confirms that Lazar knew something about the place and time in wich the Navy would be having test flights. After the recent confirmation from US navy that they did indeed discover unidentified flying objects during military training in 2004, and furthermore that the nature and behaviour of said objects align with the describtion og Lazar, makes the story very juicy. Speculating into how this could possibly be so is also a stimulating exercise. Imagine if humanity actually are in possession of alien technology. How could this possibly be hidden for so long? After all, Lazar came out in the 80s, and the project was according to him, not new at that point. As Lazar says himself, the reality of the technolog he saw would constitue an enourmous paradigm shift in the way we think of ourselves. Furthermore, having control over technology like anti-gravity would make you very powerful. The implications for society can hardly be imagined.. Maybe deciding to not disclose it to the public is indeed wise. Simultaneously, maybe this is all a very well done smokescreen? Maybe Lazar is a lying psychopath? (in which case I would be very impressed nonetheless) It remains to be seen, at least it is a very intriguing read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tony Cook

    If you've heard of Bob Lazar prior to seeing this book, then you will have heard the basic story of how he claimed to work on flying saucers in Area 51, S-4, Dreamland. Where I found this book interesting was the insight into Bobs thinking during the short time he worked there; the frustrations at not being able to properly practice the scientific method within the stifling security compartmentalization; of not having a complete picture; of being called in intermittently and the paranoia that If you've heard of Bob Lazar prior to seeing this book, then you will have heard the basic story of how he claimed to work on flying saucers in Area 51, S-4, Dreamland. Where I found this book interesting was the insight into Bobs thinking during the short time he worked there; the frustrations at not being able to properly practice the scientific method within the stifling security compartmentalization; of not having a complete picture; of being called in intermittently and the paranoia that this creates and Bob balances with his desire to continue researching the incredible technology he is exposed to. Seeing these things from Bob's point of view was the best aspect of this book and shows you how things turned out like they did. There were parts of the book where the interactions were very simplistic and made me feel that these would never have happened like that in "real life". Either that, or Bob has withheld details to keep the story clear (or for some other reason) I would like all the gory details.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rob Kristoffersen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Actual rating of the book is 3.5 stars Bob Lazar is one of ufology's most polarizing figures. Less a UFO witness, and more akin to a "whistleblower," Lazar came forward in 1989 with information that he had worked on an alien craft at site called S-4 near the infamous Area 51. For the first few years following his interviews on KLAS-TV conducted by George Knapp, he became a hotly debates figure. His most infamous detractor was Nuclear Physicist Stanton Friedman who attacked Bob's credentials. And Actual rating of the book is 3.5 stars Bob Lazar is one of ufology's most polarizing figures. Less a UFO witness, and more akin to a "whistleblower," Lazar came forward in 1989 with information that he had worked on an alien craft at site called S-4 near the infamous Area 51. For the first few years following his interviews on KLAS-TV conducted by George Knapp, he became a hotly debates figure. His most infamous detractor was Nuclear Physicist Stanton Friedman who attacked Bob's credentials. And beyond the 90s he had faded, maybe not in total obscurity, but kept a low profile. In 2018, Lazar emerged from hybernation and was the subject of a documentary by Jeremy Corbell. Bob Lazar: Area 51 & Flying Saucers exposed a whole new generation to Bob’s story, and did so completely with the tectonic voice of Mickey Rourke. Flash forward one year later and in October of 2019 a new book appeared on shelves, published by an imprint of To The Stars Academy, Tom DeLonge's fledgling Science and Entertainment venture. In Dreamland: An Autobiography readers are exposed to a snapshot of Bob's life in the mid-to-late 80s during a time when he worked at Los Alamos National Labratory, and gained noteriety for constructing a jet engine for his car. This allegedly caught the eye of the government who recruited him to work on recovered alien technology out at a location known as S-4, a number of miles from the infamous, and for a long time "non-existent" Area 51 installation, where Lockheed Martin engineered some of its greatest planes, including the U2 spy plane, the SR-71, and the F-117 stealth fighter. Just from Bob's voice in the book we can tell that he loves science. He claims to have degrees in electronics and physics, and certainly talks the part. He goes into detail about how the craft operated, and his struggles to unravel the mystery of how it flew with his partner Barry. Bob's story has been surprisingly consistent over the years and remains so in this book. Where the book shines is in reading, or in my case, hearing about Bob's motivations. He largely doesn't consider the larger world of UFO sightings and incidents to be credible, nor does he care for them. And yet, he believes that he worked on alien technology. The best comparison I can make to Bob is Cletus T. Judd's character in the music video for Alan Jackson's rendition of "Pop a Top," originally recorded and made famous by Jim Ed Brown. In the video, Cletus pops the top on a beer and is transported into this swanky world where he is transformed into a rich man. All throughout the video we see people as they truly are, through the beer swashing around in bottles transported by waiters. At the end, Cletus is transported back into the real world just as he's about to kiss a beautiful woman. Like a mad man he Continues to pop beers to try to return to that world, but alas, he is forces to accept his blue collar life once again. The sentiment Bob presents toward the end of the book is that of a man who is desperately trying to get back to that kind of world. A world in which alien technology was at his finger tips. His obsessive nature seemed to have real life consequences. It led to his wife having an affair, it led to his life being turned upside down by the government, and it put Bob on his current path. At the end of the day, Bob's story is still that, a story, with very little proof of its validity. His story returns to us, much like Halley's Comet every 76 years, in the cyclical trend of recent ufological study. If anything, the reader may fail to grasp Bob's place in the wider world of ufology. He's no UFO witness, and it's hard to call him a whistleblower without verifiable proof. It's as if Bob is an alien himself in the world of the human. P.S. It should be noted that a lot of the negative stuff in Bob's past is not talked about, including the Bordello, which is barely mentioned, his defrauding of Bob Bigelow, and various other shady things. Let those be what they will and use them as you will to shade his character. This review is of the book alone.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    **audio For fans of UFO stories this one is right off the pages of true life. Growing up in Las Vegas, Bob Lazar was a well known name in the space stories around town. George Knapp, who has supplied the forward on this story, is still a household name in the news and in big-story reveals. I remember when he had to go off the news and "go into hiding" for the threats on his life, but I digress. This story is about Bob, how he came to work in Las Vegas, how he was recruited to work on a super **audio For fans of UFO stories this one is right off the pages of true life. Growing up in Las Vegas, Bob Lazar was a well known name in the space stories around town. George Knapp, who has supplied the forward on this story, is still a household name in the news and in big-story reveals. I remember when he had to go off the news and "go into hiding" for the threats on his life, but I digress. This story is about Bob, how he came to work in Las Vegas, how he was recruited to work on a super secret project, what happened when he did dig too deep, and how he became THE name to watch for in the true stories of super secret things being worked on at super secret "don't exist" places in the deserts outside of Las Vegas. If you have any interest, or just find it interesting, this is a good story to start with, and I hear there are new videos and streaming services with even more stories.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Geoffrey

    I remember when Bob's amazing story first aired on the news with investigative journalist,George Knapp back in 1989. More anecdotal evidence and corroboration have come out over the past 30 years that seem to support the narrative and vindicate his unbelievable claims. The more I hear from TTSA, and the years of research I've made thru prominent UFO authors such as Richard Dolan, have definitely convinced me that something is going on that is so compartmentalized and of such high secrecy within I remember when Bob's amazing story first aired on the news with investigative journalist,George Knapp back in 1989. More anecdotal evidence and corroboration have come out over the past 30 years that seem to support the narrative and vindicate his unbelievable claims. The more I hear from TTSA, and the years of research I've made thru prominent UFO authors such as Richard Dolan, have definitely convinced me that something is going on that is so compartmentalized and of such high secrecy within black budget and special access programs, that we may never know the truth to this multifaceted subject. It seems Bob may have offered us a glimpse, just a tip of the iceberg, as to what's going on in the world of UFO's and the national security state.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    This book details the experiences Bob Lazar went through during his time working at S4 (Area 51). I watched the podcast before reading this so I already knew sort of what to expect, but the book gives you a better explanation of the science and technical side of the work he did and also goes through the personal issues and traumas that Bob went through due to the pressure and stress from his employers. Overall I really enjoyed reading this, I thought the story was easy to follow, not too long This book details the experiences Bob Lazar went through during his time working at S4 (Area 51). I watched the podcast before reading this so I already knew sort of what to expect, but the book gives you a better explanation of the science and technical side of the work he did and also goes through the personal issues and traumas that Bob went through due to the pressure and stress from his employers. Overall I really enjoyed reading this, I thought the story was easy to follow, not too long and stretched out and left me wanting to read more whenever I finished a chapter. This is a must read if you like science or have an interest in UFOs / Area 51.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    I remember when Bob’s story broke and both he and the things he said seemed unbelievable,especially at that time. Since then, parts of his background the government tried to erase have been shown to be true. Discoveries and technology he talked about have also been brought to the public. I wish the book was longer and had better editing.

  12. 4 out of 5

    David Way

    needs better editing. I love his story but really he should have focused on dates and what exactly happened rather than making up conversations that happened 30 years ago. I believe his story and really like reading about it but just wanted a bit more substance.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jim Miller

    There is no way that the government is going to allow an employee who doesn't yet have a completed security check work on possibly the most advanced technology known to man. So no I don't believe the "story" being told here. That being said it makes a fun novel-like read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Scott Meade

    Well if Lazar is lying, he's a wonderfully consistent liar with one heck of an active imagination. I don't know if everything he recounts here is 100% the whole truth, but I think he's stating what he saw as accurately as he can.

  15. 5 out of 5

    galacticctzn

    This is a must read for anyone remotely interested in this difficult subject, finally released.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Me

    Bob Lazar is a fraud. http://www.stantonfriedman.com/index....

  17. 5 out of 5

    Doris Raines

    GOOD BOOK.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mark elliott

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My gut tells me this is a true story. In coming out with this Lazar ruined his life. I find it hard to think he would have done this for any other reason but self preservation.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Callum Wells

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kookaracha

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dallas

  22. 4 out of 5

    Maia M

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael Manley

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tim Obzud

  27. 4 out of 5

    James F Rendek

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Miller

  29. 4 out of 5

    Randy

  30. 4 out of 5

    Siddhesh S

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