Hot Best Seller

Vicksburg: Grant's Campaign That Broke the Confederacy

Availability: Ready to download

The astonishing story of the longest and most decisive military campaign of the Civil War in Vicksburg, Mississippi, which opened the Mississippi River, split the Confederacy, freed tens of thousands of slaves, and made Ulysses S. Grant the most important general of the war. Vicksburg, Mississippi, was the last stronghold of the Confederacy on the Mississippi River. It The astonishing story of the longest and most decisive military campaign of the Civil War in Vicksburg, Mississippi, which opened the Mississippi River, split the Confederacy, freed tens of thousands of slaves, and made Ulysses S. Grant the most important general of the war. Vicksburg, Mississippi, was the last stronghold of the Confederacy on the Mississippi River. It prevented the Union from using the river for shipping between the Union-controlled Midwest and New Orleans and the Gulf of Mexico. The Union navy tried to take Vicksburg, which sat on a high bluff overlooking the river, but couldn’t do it. General Grant moved his army south and joined forces with Admiral Porter, but even together they could not come up with a successful plan. At one point Grant even tried to build a canal so that the river could be diverted away from Vicksburg. In Vicksburg, Donald L. Miller tells the full story of this year-long campaign to win the city. He brings to life all the drama, characters, and significance of Vicksburg, a historic moment that rivals any war story in history. Grant’s efforts repeatedly failed until he found a way to lay siege and force the city to capitulate. In the course of the campaign, tens of thousands of slaves fled to the Union lines, where more than twenty thousand became soldiers, while others seized the plantations they had been forced to work on, destroying the economy of a large part of Mississippi and creating a social revolution. Ultimately, Vicksburg was the battle that solidified Grant’s reputation as the Union’s most capable general. Today no general would ever be permitted to fail as often as Grant did, but in the end he succeeded in what he himself called the most important battle of the war, the one that all but sealed the fate of the Confederacy.


Compare

The astonishing story of the longest and most decisive military campaign of the Civil War in Vicksburg, Mississippi, which opened the Mississippi River, split the Confederacy, freed tens of thousands of slaves, and made Ulysses S. Grant the most important general of the war. Vicksburg, Mississippi, was the last stronghold of the Confederacy on the Mississippi River. It The astonishing story of the longest and most decisive military campaign of the Civil War in Vicksburg, Mississippi, which opened the Mississippi River, split the Confederacy, freed tens of thousands of slaves, and made Ulysses S. Grant the most important general of the war. Vicksburg, Mississippi, was the last stronghold of the Confederacy on the Mississippi River. It prevented the Union from using the river for shipping between the Union-controlled Midwest and New Orleans and the Gulf of Mexico. The Union navy tried to take Vicksburg, which sat on a high bluff overlooking the river, but couldn’t do it. General Grant moved his army south and joined forces with Admiral Porter, but even together they could not come up with a successful plan. At one point Grant even tried to build a canal so that the river could be diverted away from Vicksburg. In Vicksburg, Donald L. Miller tells the full story of this year-long campaign to win the city. He brings to life all the drama, characters, and significance of Vicksburg, a historic moment that rivals any war story in history. Grant’s efforts repeatedly failed until he found a way to lay siege and force the city to capitulate. In the course of the campaign, tens of thousands of slaves fled to the Union lines, where more than twenty thousand became soldiers, while others seized the plantations they had been forced to work on, destroying the economy of a large part of Mississippi and creating a social revolution. Ultimately, Vicksburg was the battle that solidified Grant’s reputation as the Union’s most capable general. Today no general would ever be permitted to fail as often as Grant did, but in the end he succeeded in what he himself called the most important battle of the war, the one that all but sealed the fate of the Confederacy.

30 review for Vicksburg: Grant's Campaign That Broke the Confederacy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nemo Nemo

    Synopsis This book written by Professor Emeritus Donald L. Miller is already heralded as a potential best seller. This does not surprise me because having read this rare gem I also hold that opinion. Miller guides us through the evolution of strategies used by Grant, Porter, and Sherman. Professor Miller’s review of the history of the Campaign at Vicksburg was the singular pivotal event leading to the final minutes of the South at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Vicksburg was thought completely Synopsis This book written by Professor Emeritus Donald L. Miller is already heralded as a potential best seller. This does not surprise me because having read this rare gem I also hold that opinion. Miller guides us through the evolution of strategies used by Grant, Porter, and Sherman. Professor Miller’s review of the history of the Campaign at Vicksburg was the singular pivotal event leading to the final minutes of the South at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Vicksburg was thought completely impregnable due in part to: environment, geographic, natural and geological factors. Grant together with both of his cohorts Porter and Sherman managed to solve a seemingly impossible puzzle in breaching the unreachable. It wasn’t without losses, however, and illness and disease took there toll. The retelling of the events leading to the conquest of Vicksburg is a compelling tale fixed in history, but now brought to life for a new audience. It is well paced, easy to understand and contains a plethora of facts. It is so well written that many people who usually don’t enjoy these subject may mind they do enjoy Miller’s style of writing. Conclusion I have no reluctance in highly recommending this book to you. It is likely to be an award winning book in my opinion. I received this as a reviewer for NeGalley but I will purchasing a copy because I like to support great writers. Don’t wait till it sells out, get your copy as soon as you can. Acknowledgment My sincere thanks go to: The Author, NetGalley, and the Publisher, Simon & Schuster for affording me the opportunity to review of Vicksburg.

  2. 4 out of 5

    P.e. lolo

    A book that takes you through the entire battle of Vicksburg. From first a naval siege almost a year prior. You get a look once again at Grant's life before the war and also the battles leading up to this one. This was a very important victory for the North and I always felt that most people did not think about the travel of the Mississippi River and once having control from North to New Orleans it changed everything. The author takes you through the politics between the generals and Washington, A book that takes you through the entire battle of Vicksburg. From first a naval siege almost a year prior. You get a look once again at Grant's life before the war and also the battles leading up to this one. This was a very important victory for the North and I always felt that most people did not think about the travel of the Mississippi River and once having control from North to New Orleans it changed everything. The author takes you through the politics between the generals and Washington, how others wanted to take Vicksburg but always stopped and wired back to Washington the need for more troops. What was accomplished by Grant and the Navy would not be done again until D-Day and that is really amazing? At times I could not get if the author cared for Grant or not? The author would talk about how he would get lucky in some battles and some other things. The problem I had was at least Grant and Sherman were willing to fight where other generals were not. The entire battle is described and the plans of taking an Army South of Vicksburg then marching at it from another direction. He also describes how Grant being a quartermaster in the Mexican War would always help him when marching his troops and having or thinking about supplies. Overall this was a good book and shows you just how important Vicksburg was to the victory of the North for it was truly a blow to the South. I received this book from Netgalley.com I gave it 5 stars. Follow us at www.1rad-readerreviews.com

  3. 5 out of 5

    Casey Wheeler

    This book covers the campaigns during the civil war that led to the seige of Vicksburg and its final defeat. The book focuses on the Ulysses Grant and William Tecumseh Sherman primarily, but also addreses a number of others who played key roles in the seige. It is the most comprehensive book on the battle that I have read and I learned a number of things that I did not know prior to this book. I recommend this book to anyone who is looking to gain a better understanding of Ulysses Grant and his This book covers the campaigns during the civil war that led to the seige of Vicksburg and its final defeat. The book focuses on the Ulysses Grant and William Tecumseh Sherman primarily, but also addreses a number of others who played key roles in the seige. It is the most comprehensive book on the battle that I have read and I learned a number of things that I did not know prior to this book. I recommend this book to anyone who is looking to gain a better understanding of Ulysses Grant and his thought process and leadership style. It will also resonate with those with a keen interest in the civil war. I received a free Kindle copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley and the publisher with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon and my nonfiction book review blog. I also posted it to my Facebook  page.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    An excellent and well researched book on the Battle of Vicksburg. Vicksburg was a strong Confederate port for its war supplies and armaments. Union general Ulysses S. Grant made a bold invasion of Vicksburg and used troops and artillery to besiege the port city as well as as ironclad gunboats of the Union navy, which was the largest amphibious assault during the Civil War. After forty seven days Vicksburg surrendered.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Donna Davis

    Review soon.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Craig Pearson

    Thank you to Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. This book is a very good compliment to Grant's 'Memoirs'. General histories of the Civil War do not give much detail to the problems Grant had in the Vicksburg campaign. One annoying aspect of this book is Miller's annoying use of casual refernces to the major players. Calling General Sherman 'Tecumseh' seems too familiar in this situation.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Peter Goodman

    “Vicksburg: Grant’s campaign that broke the Confederacy,” by Donald A. Miller (Simon and Schuster, 2019). The campaign down the Mississippi, which Miller argues was the most important and the capture of Vicksburg the decisive moment of the war. He begins at the beginning: the early, unpromising history of Hiram Ulysses Grant (never called Hiram), and his unerring strategic eye. From his arrival at the incipient Union base of Cairo, Ill., Grant saw that the US needed to conduct a campaign down “Vicksburg: Grant’s campaign that broke the Confederacy,” by Donald A. Miller (Simon and Schuster, 2019). The campaign down the Mississippi, which Miller argues was the most important and the capture of Vicksburg the decisive moment of the war. He begins at the beginning: the early, unpromising history of Hiram Ulysses Grant (never called Hiram), and his unerring strategic eye. From his arrival at the incipient Union base of Cairo, Ill., Grant saw that the US needed to conduct a campaign down the Mississippi and its tributaries. That was always his vision, whether supported by others, primarily Henry Halleck, the nominal western commander in chief. Halleck was thought to be the best military mind in the west, if not the nation. But he spent a lot of time at the beginning undermining Grant if not trying to get rid of him, and he never really got involved in the movement of armies. Miller gathers a myriad threads: the work of the salf-water and brown-water navies, Farragut with his sea-going sloops-of-war moving north, Foote and Porter and their slope-sided ironclads moving south; the personalities of the various commanders with all their strengths and weaknesses, such as John McLernan, a superb battlefield general but otherwise untrustworthy, insurbordinate, and unreliable; John Pemberton, the Confederate commander of Vicksburg: essentially incompetent and disorganized; the terrible effects of unsanitary conditions and ignorant medicine, so that thousands of soldiers died of disease or lack of proper care; the tremendous logistical difficulties of getting and supplying troops a long way from their bases (Grant made a serious error in his first move south by using a single railway line from the supply center at Holly Springs; when it was destroyed by Confederate raiders, he was forced to withdraw ignominiously; So many different elements were involved). One facet of the campaign Miller emphasizes: the effect of the Union invasion on the enslaved people of the South. They began to flee the plantations; they flocked to the Union troops, ragged, sickly, but so happy to be free; how could they be used? As laborers? As soldiers? In any case, the South’s economy was being destroyed; rich, fertile plantations and farms were going to waste as their labor disappeared; gradually the performance of black soldiers in combat began to overcome the Union troops’ habitual racism and contempt. Grant understood the importance of the land: his troops burned, razed, left desolate the countryside, often by plan, just as often by looting. Sherman’s march to the sea was presaged by what Grant’s forces did on the way down the Mississippi. Miller is unsparing in his analysis of the generalship: Grant made mistake after mistake: but he recovered immediately, was never shaken, was resilient, and saw the battlefield and campaign territory at least as well as anyone else. And he drank---no doubt about that. The question was, how drunk and how often. He drank when not under pressure; he was surrounded by officers, primarily John Rawlins and Charles Dana, who did their best to keep him away from liquor. There is so much that has been written about the Civil War that Miller uses a lot of previously published work, as well as obscure letters and documents. He quarrels with historians when he thinks their work is weak or incorrect. He makes a case for Vicksburg as the most important victory of the war, and suggests that the battle of Champions Hill, where Grant met Pemberton head on and beat him in open battle, was the decisive battle, more important strategically than either Antietam or Gettysburg His writing is lucid and easy to read and digest. The maps are excellent: they show the important geography, the rail lines, the locations just when they are needed in the text. He does a pretty good job describing the warships, though he gets hyperbolic about their size: Farragut’s vessels were not behemoths; only once does he call them ships of the line. I wonder if Miller is now going to look at the eastern campaign. https://www.simonandschuster.com/book...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Socraticgadfly

    Best Vicksburg book I've read. Miller covers not only the full scope on the land side, but on the naval side, starting with Farragut's attempt to force surrender by naval bombardment only in the summer of 1862, not too long after the fall of New Orleans, while noting Hallack's failure to release Grant from what was essentially "occupation and defense" duty in northern Mississippi. Miller then does good analysis of Grant as a military commander from Henry & Donelson up to this point. He doesn't Best Vicksburg book I've read. Miller covers not only the full scope on the land side, but on the naval side, starting with Farragut's attempt to force surrender by naval bombardment only in the summer of 1862, not too long after the fall of New Orleans, while noting Hallack's failure to release Grant from what was essentially "occupation and defense" duty in northern Mississippi. Miller then does good analysis of Grant as a military commander from Henry & Donelson up to this point. He doesn't throw Grant under the bus, but he does cast a fairly critical eye in the best sense. And then he tackles the history of his drinking during the war up to the end of the Vicksburg campaign. Stripping away some excesses of his writing, he accepts the core of Cadwallader's account about Grant going on a bender mid-siege and makes a good case for it. On the military side, he does a good layout of the entire Vicksburg campaign.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    I really only knew the broad basics of the Civil War until I met my husband. He is a Civil War buff so while I have learned a lot since we've been together, there is still much I don't know. I found this book to be so interesting. I knew absolutely nothing about Grant's youth or even his early years in the Army. I had no clue that he actually had to resign from the Army (before the Civil War) due to his drinking. I knew even less about Sherman so to find out he suffered bouts of severe I really only knew the broad basics of the Civil War until I met my husband. He is a Civil War buff so while I have learned a lot since we've been together, there is still much I don't know. I found this book to be so interesting. I knew absolutely nothing about Grant's youth or even his early years in the Army. I had no clue that he actually had to resign from the Army (before the Civil War) due to his drinking. I knew even less about Sherman so to find out he suffered bouts of severe depression was interesting. The author gives us a well sourced detailing of the Vicksburg campaign and made the case for why it was the most important. I didn't realize that the entire campaign lasted several months. I highly recommend for anyone interested in the Civil War. Thank you to Netgalley and Simon & Schuster for the ARC. All opinions expressed are my own.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    A good book about Vicksburg and Grant and his Western campaign. I love having been to Memphis, Shiloh, Corinth, Vicksburg, ect, it brings it all to life in my minds eye. Spoiler alert: Just as I thought the Secessionist surrendered on July 4th 1863 after Grant tried many different options to get them to capitulate and then ultimately resigned to siege warfare. Must have been a great day for Lincoln, a win at Gettysburg on the 3rd and Vicksburg the 4th opening up the Mississippi River. Did ya A good book about Vicksburg and Grant and his Western campaign. I love having been to Memphis, Shiloh, Corinth, Vicksburg, ect, it brings it all to life in my minds eye. Spoiler alert: Just as I thought the Secessionist surrendered on July 4th 1863 after Grant tried many different options to get them to capitulate and then ultimately resigned to siege warfare. Must have been a great day for Lincoln, a win at Gettysburg on the 3rd and Vicksburg the 4th opening up the Mississippi River. Did ya know that the residents of Vicksburg refused to celebrate the 4th of July until WWII, not covered in this book but an interesting anecdote. Hmm, I may have to go to Vicksburg again, the 5 days spent at that military park may not have been enough. :)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    A new, well written, extensively researched popular history which includes an excellent bibliography. That said, nothing particularly new for students of the Vicksburg campaign, no new revelations, no new analytic leaps. Good book for the general public; not so for the aficionado nor deep students of the war in Mississippi.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lloyd Berkey

    Very good and detailed review of the Vicksburg Campaign. The more Iread on Grant, the more fascinated I am with this complex, yet simple man. It is amazing to see his growth as a military leader and as a man.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Doris Raines

    GOOD BOOK.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shelby West

  16. 4 out of 5

    Doris Moore

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brian Penick

  18. 4 out of 5

    Scott Pomeroy

  19. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sharron

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  22. 4 out of 5

    Martin Spiegelman

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hill Krishnan

  24. 4 out of 5

    Adam Gilchrest

  25. 4 out of 5

    John Mulcahy

  26. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

  27. 4 out of 5

    James Hayes

  28. 5 out of 5

    YiYang

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Dow

  30. 5 out of 5

    Peter E.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.