30 review for You Are What You Read

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    When did you last see a good news story? We seem to have a diet of really bad news that never stops. Even when the presenter is talking about the latest disaster there is a ticker tape of sub-stories that expand to fill the vacuum of the entire day. It is just draining listening to or reading the stories that flood out of our media. I stopped watching a while ago now, and even though I buy the weekend papers, I tend to read the supplements rather than the main section. Thankfully though, there When did you last see a good news story? We seem to have a diet of really bad news that never stops. Even when the presenter is talking about the latest disaster there is a ticker tape of sub-stories that expand to fill the vacuum of the entire day. It is just draining listening to or reading the stories that flood out of our media. I stopped watching a while ago now, and even though I buy the weekend papers, I tend to read the supplements rather than the main section. Thankfully though, there could be another way and campaigner and researcher Jodie Jackson wants to show us it. First, though, you have to understand that psychology of why the media outlets produce the material that they do, Jackson goes into the details behind the headlines, why bad news rather than good news sells and the cumulative effect that this has on our mental well being. She addresses points on fake news, and churnalism, where journalists take a very liberal view of the truth in the speed to get the articles written for the ever hungry news machine. She says that we don’t need to stop seeing bad news, being informed about significant world events is necessary, however, we need to limit our intake of it. What Jackson is advocating though is looking for alternative sources for your news, places that have taken time to do the proper research about a topic, can write with a balanced view and are seeking to inform rather than just go for the sensational headline. Seeking solution focused news sources that concentrate on innovation, initiative peacebuilding and positive responses to social issues need to make up a significant proportion of our media diet. There are various methods and suggestions in the book that are very sensible. Stop reading the dirge from the media outlets that want sensational headlines and find those that have a more considered and balanced approach. Avoid the tabloids they are preaching to a base level of readers as well as trying to dictate the political agenda in a lot of cases. Read from different perspectives on the same story. Don’t forget though, we as the consumers of this actually hold the power, if we stop buying and watching the worst news channels then they will change as they will lose customers and then income. Jackson writes with a positive clarity about a subject that most people find unpalatable these days, but more than that there are things that you can do to change your media intake and make you a better-informed person.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Doug DesCombaz

    Fine points, lots of filler If you are reading this, you may already be in the choir. In that case, you can safely move to the resource list at the end. If you have time to kill, some core concepts wrapped around anecdotes, quotes, and tropes. But, yeah, as a recovering news junkie, I agree with the crux of the book,, and have been on a quest to be educated, engaged, and informed in a manner that is actionable (whatever that means).

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mathilde

    The fast pace and negative bias of the news leaves many - me included - feeling hopeless. For a while I shut down all news outlets from my life, but this felt wrong. There was surely another way to stay informed. Jodie Jackson makes a case for solution based news as a way to empower readers to take action. She does not suggests that it should replace investigative journalism, but rather complement it. She thinks that journalism can expose problems, and also highlight solutions. Together with The fast pace and negative bias of the news leaves many - me included - feeling hopeless. For a while I shut down all news outlets from my life, but this felt wrong. There was surely another way to stay informed. Jodie Jackson makes a case for solution based news as a way to empower readers to take action. She does not suggests that it should replace investigative journalism, but rather complement it. She thinks that journalism can expose problems, and also highlight solutions. Together with Hans Rosling book, Factfulness, Jackson’s book provides a much needed breath of fresh air and inspiration for my (seemingly eternal) pessimism.

  4. 5 out of 5

    A Reader

    It’s not a big revelation that the current media environment and poor-quality journalism has overtaken good-quality journalism. The 24/7 news and our constant exposure to the negative news can significantly change an individual’s mood and have long-lasting psychological effects. The rise of social media has drastically changed political discourse and public engagement. There is a lot of fake news and fake people on social media whose purpose is to manipulate us and to influence us. But the rise It’s not a big revelation that the current media environment and poor-quality journalism has overtaken good-quality journalism. The 24/7 news and our constant exposure to the negative news can significantly change an individual’s mood and have long-lasting psychological effects. The rise of social media has drastically changed political discourse and public engagement. There is a lot of fake news and fake people on social media whose purpose is to manipulate us and to influence us. But the rise of social media had an impact on mainstream journalism, too. Regularly lead television bulletins, breaking news that is not really breaking, the exaggerated front pages of newspapers and the opinionated blogging has redefined the frontiers of journalism itself. Considering that the information we consume through the news becomes our basis for understanding the world, this is deeply worrying. In this excellent book, Jodie Jackson will make you question your consumption of news and reflect on what news is for. She explains why we should be more critical of the way we consume the news and perhaps be more proactive in our use of it. She finally investigates what step can you take to help you navigate your way through the news to be able to take greater control of your mind, worldview and psychological well-being. And finally, she provides a convincing argument to include solutions-focused news in your media diet. I hope everyone takes the chance to read this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jason Hillenburg

    Jodie Jackson’s You Are What You Read will cause a stir. Jackson’s book takes an unusual but well-reasoned position. She earned a degree in Positive Psychology and has built a reputation for researching the psychological impact negative news coverage has on the viewing public. The central thrust of her argument is that the media lacks a balanced approach to news coverage all too often slanted towards the dark and dire rather than incorporating solutions and the forward march of human progress Jodie Jackson’s You Are What You Read will cause a stir. Jackson’s book takes an unusual but well-reasoned position. She earned a degree in Positive Psychology and has built a reputation for researching the psychological impact negative news coverage has on the viewing public. The central thrust of her argument is that the media lacks a balanced approach to news coverage all too often slanted towards the dark and dire rather than incorporating solutions and the forward march of human progress into our informational diet. Naysayers may claim no such prejudice exists; networks and other outlets are simply covering the reality of our age. You Are What You Read aims, in part, our errors in appraising the current situation. URL: https://www.jodiejackson.com/ She begins the book with a section laying out her motivation and purpose for writing the book, a sort of initial “argument” for everything that follows. It is a shrewd move charting her personal journey to writing this book as it brings added passion to the work rather than grounding it in dry research. Jackson does draw from the work of others to help make her point on a number of the book’s contentions, but You Are What You Read isn’t reliant on such references to state its case for readers. Jackson gains reams of credibility by never viewing this issue through conspiratorial lenses alone. . There’s no inclination in her point of view towards casting the bias she sees as part of a conscious plot aimed towards shaping our attitudes and opinions, though she doesn’t discredit such possibilities. Her tacit acknowledgment of personal and even unconscious bias reporters bring to their work is an inescapable recognition of our own human nature. The book opens with an exploration about how perception transforms our understanding about events and their effect on us and the world. AMAZON: https://www.amazon.com/You-Are-What-R... Her cool command of language continues sustaining reader interest through later sections “Misread or Misled” and “Bad News Sells” examining the accelerating slide media outlets have made in the direction of “informtainment” rather than disseminating hard and objective content. I do not think Jackson disagrees with anyone who comes into this discussion believing or finishes this book understanding how the commercial and profit driven model of mass media casts a long shadow over our understanding of the world and one another. Ever in pursuit of advertising dollars, networks like CNN and Fox News pander to our growing alarm, division, fascination with abomination, and even our thoughts of “better him/her/them than me”. “Too Much of a Good Thing” tackles how even the best-intentioned media outlets and individual reporters can cause more harm than good overexposing the public to negative news. She believes the often altruistic motivations driving people to pursue journalism run head long into the reality these attempts provoking empathy can produce fear, feelings of insignificance, paranoia, and depression. “The News Solution” puts forth her vision for how news organization and media hubs can better report the news in a responsible and conscientious manner. The remainder of the book goes into how our personal attitudes shape our connections and the need for a balance between news focused on solutions and problems. The skewing towards negativity is a central theme she revisits often in this book and leaves no angle of attack untaken. Jodie Jackson’s You Are What You Read provides readers with an alternate take on how they perceive and why. She makes her arguments from a position of strength and backs up her assertions with solid reasoning and a lucid roadmap for changing the media landscape. This will be a compelling read for anyone studying modern media and its impact on our world.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Darkgiggsxx

    While interesting and thought-provoking, I found the book lacked organization. At worst, there's a lot of padding. At best, it feels like each chapter was written as a stand-alone article, and then everything was stitched together as a book. There's a lot of repetition, to the point where I had to stop several times wondering whether I'd somehow already read what I was reading. It's a shame. The author did interesting research and has a lot to teach, I feel like the ideas presented here need to While interesting and thought-provoking, I found the book lacked organization. At worst, there's a lot of padding. At best, it feels like each chapter was written as a stand-alone article, and then everything was stitched together as a book. There's a lot of repetition, to the point where I had to stop several times wondering whether I'd somehow already read what I was reading. It's a shame. The author did interesting research and has a lot to teach, I feel like the ideas presented here need to spread. I just find that the book doesn't do a very good job at it. Maybe I was just not in the target audience.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    It talks about some basic principles for a reader. Good effort and genuine passion, but it can be easily done in an article not worth a book. As for the suggestion to the journalism, it's unrealistic and impractical.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    A short but extremely well written and well researched book on the benefits of solutions-focussed news. Makes its case well and, suitably, goes further than just telling us there’s a problem.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Siri Arntzen

    I warmly recommend this book. After feeling thoroughly down from the doom and gloom of the daily news picture, this book was a true saviour! Not only do I now have a plethora of sources on constructive journalism, I have a better understanding of how and why the news diet is the way it is, the psychological effects, and what can be done to change it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Batist

    As media organisations globally are starting to embrace constructive journalism, Jodie fulfills a crucial role by engaging and empowering not just those who make the news, but all of us. If ‘You Are What You Read’ is about consuming stories that are good for you, then this very book is a great place to start.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Gintare Balseviciute

    Well researched, eye-opening book. I really liked that it not only highlighted the benefits of solutions journalism, but also provided tips on how to improve your reading diet.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl M-M

    I absolutely understand why some people, including the author choose to step away from the negativity that drives the media. It has become almost like a shark feeding frenzy with the audience baying for blood. The more traumatic, brutal and soul-destroying the news is the better. The news of today isn't the news of yesterday. We used to have media outlets with journalists who strived to give the world, their audience, the facts and the truth, albeit as they perceived it through their frame of I absolutely understand why some people, including the author choose to step away from the negativity that drives the media. It has become almost like a shark feeding frenzy with the audience baying for blood. The more traumatic, brutal and soul-destroying the news is the better. The news of today isn't the news of yesterday. We used to have media outlets with journalists who strived to give the world, their audience, the facts and the truth, albeit as they perceived it through their frame of reference. Nowadays you get opinion based journalism, sensationalist tabloid pieces and a slowly declining number of outlets and individuals who report the facts. On top of that our media outlets are controlled by conglomerates and moguls who have bought up the majority of them, so it has become a kind of monopoly. There is a good reason the peasants rose up to demand Rupert Murdoch not be allowed to buy yet another media outlet that reaches millions of people. Monopolies change the way we receive information and more importantly they control the information we are being fed. They decide what to feed the masses, which means they can sway opinions and votes. Not exactly unimportant in our day and age when tempers are frayed and the extreme right is on the rise. I think the saddest aspect of all of the above, aside from journalists not being journalists anymore, is that the majority of people don't realise they are being manipulated to think, vote and perceive information a certain way. That's not the same as being ignorant or uninformed. If you have no clue that someone is trying to dictate or influence your opinions, then you will be none the wiser. It's a fact that the Russians have influenced political outcomes in multiple countries, and still are. They have buildings filled with people who plant false information and stories to influence the public - troll farms. Fact. It's also a fact that big media outlets no longer produce non-biased news. We live in a world where the public is hungry for every detail of someone's life. Reality shows and Z-celebrities make money the more extreme, aggressive and dramatic they are. The other side of that coin is the fact that the public wants it to be delivered to them. Jackson advocates for the audience to adapt a more balanced media diet. I concur with the general idea, however I do believe it is quite hard to do so. It's not easy for everyone to discern between fact and opinion, and whilst I agree that more positivity is needed to balance the negativity, I think it's becoming harder to find sources to deliver that. Although the theoretical idea is one I believe will allow many to have a more productive life and be less stressed, I also believe it's important not to retreat into a false bubble of hope. I do believe it's important to educate people and to fight this war of negativity head on. You can't change something if you don't know it's already swallowed you whole and influenced you, which means helping others to understand what is happening is even more important. This is an engaging and thought-provoking piece of non-fiction. In fact perhaps the world would be a better place if we had more voices like Jackson, who are trying to be heard through the cacophony of falsities. It is indeed a movement. *I received a courtesy copy*

  13. 4 out of 5

    The Literary Shed

    Jodie Jackson’s You Are What You Read: Why Changing Your Media Diet Can Change the World is what all good non-fiction should be – exciting, challenging and perceptive. That said, we are Jackson’s readership. The people who’ve stopped reading newspapers, watching the news, even watching terrestrial television because we’re irritated with the way in which information is handed to us, the way in which the press manipulates what we see, we read, we hear. We just get our news in a different way now. Jodie Jackson’s You Are What You Read: Why Changing Your Media Diet Can Change the World is what all good non-fiction should be – exciting, challenging and perceptive. That said, we are Jackson’s readership. The people who’ve stopped reading newspapers, watching the news, even watching terrestrial television because we’re irritated with the way in which information is handed to us, the way in which the press manipulates what we see, we read, we hear. We just get our news in a different way now. And we’re not the only ones. The premise of this book is that the news we consume is predominantly negative and it inevitably impacts on our lives, the way we think, the way we act, the way we treat others. ‘We are familiar with the saying “You are what you eat”; a simple but effective summary that has made us increasingly aware of the impact that food has on our physical health,’ the author comments early on in the book. ‘… Well food is to the body what news is to the mind. … [T]he news affects our mood, our beliefs, our understanding of the world, our relationship to other people and our politics, but its impact remains largely unquestioned by the consumers who are affected by its content.’ In You Are What You Read, Jackson hands us the tools with which to protect ourselves against this insidious news cycle and shows us how to rethink the way in which we consume our news, thereby challenging the predominantly doom and gloom information that is ‘fed’ to us. It’s not about ignoring the bad things that happen but rather about not ignoring the positives, about allowing ourselves balance and the choice to make informed decisions about what is happening in our world and what we choose to do about it. This is a thought-provoking read, the author providing us with enough intelligent prompts to look at how we interact with news without it appearing preachy or heavy handed. Certainly, we’ll be buying multiple copies of this book; we think it’s that important.... For full review: http://www.theliteraryshed.co.uk/read... Thanks to the publisher for sending a review copy. This review was published originally as part of a book tour. All opinions are our own. All rights reserved.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Wearsteel

    This book is a demonstration of the need to review how you interact with media. It provides the bolster for the idea that critical thinking is important not just it’s application but also n it’s benefits. How you both challenge and explore the media avalanche of news can both be of benefit to understanding and emotional wellbeing. I would recommend supporting the ideas and framework this book champions. If you feel the need to know more by accepting less then this should be a appropriate way This book is a demonstration of the need to review how you interact with media. It provides the bolster for the idea that critical thinking is important not just it’s application but also n it’s benefits. How you both challenge and explore the media avalanche of news can both be of benefit to understanding and emotional wellbeing. I would recommend supporting the ideas and framework this book champions. If you feel the need to know more by accepting less then this should be a appropriate way point towards a more fulfilling relationship with news output.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michael MacDonald

    Good overview of Solutions Focused Journalism This is a solid addition to any positive psychology enthusiast’s library. It’s a quick yet insightful introduction to how your reading diet can affect the way you think, feel, and act. Feed your brain well and boost your mood in positive tangible ways. Definitely worth checking out.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mark Bowsher

    Jodie Jackson’s book is more than just a dream - it’s a balanced, realistic love letter to constructive journalism. It addresses not just the industry of fast food style news journalism but how it effects our mental health. Optimistic and vital reading.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Claude

    Very interesting read on the toxic outcomes of the majority of today's media (fast paced, sensational, quantity over quality, the conglomerates annex ads, etc.)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bian Wenbo

    The news pursues excitement, so it presents too many negative events that are difficult to see on a daily basis; news organizations pursue interests and need more readers, so they are destined to be unable to dig deeper. In fact, this problem Neil Postman has long said in "Entertainment to Death", the solution is simple and rude, do not look at the news, to focus on the scope of their own capabilities. The author of this book is not so absolute, he gives solutions from two aspects. On the one hand, The news pursues excitement, so it presents too many negative events that are difficult to see on a daily basis; news organizations pursue interests and need more readers, so they are destined to be unable to dig deeper. In fact, this problem Neil Postman has long said in "Entertainment to Death", the solution is simple and rude, do not look at the news, to focus on the scope of their own capabilities. The author of this book is not so absolute, he gives solutions from two aspects. On the one hand, for news practitioners, use solutions-focused instead of problems-focused News, and carry out in-depth mining; on the other hand, to meet the reader's requirements to achieve six points, the original excerpt is as follows: 1. Become a conscious consumer 2. Read/watch good-quality journalism 3. Burst your filter bubble 4. Be prepared to pay for content 5. Read beyond the news 6. Read solutions-focused news -- Chapter: THE POWER TO CHANGE. Namely: 1. Become a tasteful reader; 2. Choose a high-quality information source; 3. Go beyond the prejudice to get out of the comfort zone; 4. Pay for the content; 5. Diversify the information source (don't read the news); 6. Be sure to If you read the news, you will see the type of news that focuses on the results. So what kind of information is high quality? A quality paper's popularity is not built on voyeurism, sensationalism or prurience. It offers its readers facts (in meaning context), ideas, interpretation; in short it presents a continuing education. It gives its reader the feeling that [s]he is getting a synthesised at at most most significant happenings and thinking of the day. -- The Elite Press: Great Newspapers of the World, John C. Merrill According to this standard, the author provides a list of resources: - Website: www.you-are-what-you-read.com This is the official website of this book; - News organisations: ‘BBC World Hacks’, BRIGHT Magazine, The Correspondent, Delayed Gratification, INKLINE, Monocle, News Deeply, The Optimist Daily, Positive News, Solutions Journalism Network, Sparknews, ‘The Upside’ (by the Guardian), The Week, ‘What’s Working’ (by the Huffington Post), YES! Media - Books: The Better Angels of Our Nature: A History of Violence and Humanity by Steven Pinker Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why It Matters Now by Alan Rusbridger Broadcasting Happiness: The Science of Igniting and Sustaining Positive Change by Michelle Gielan Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism and Progress by Steven Pinker Factfulness: Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World – And Why Things Are Better Than You Think by Hans Rosling, with Ola Rosling and Anna Rosling Rönnlund A Force for Good: How the American News Media Have Propelled Positive Change by Rodger Streitmatter The Information Diet: A Case for Conscious Consumption by Clay A. Johnson It’s Better Than It Looks: Reasons for Optimism in an Age of Fear by Gregg Easterbrook Journalism of Outrage: Investigative Reporting and Agenda Building in America by David L. Protess, Fay Lomax Cook, Jack C. Doppelt, James S. Ettema, Margaret T. Gordon, Donna R. Leff and Peter Miller The News: A User’s Manual by Alain de Botton The Perils of Perception: Why We’re Wrong About Nearly Everything by Bobby Duffy Progress: Ten Reasons to Look Forward to the Future by Johan Norberg The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves by Matt Ridley Utopia for Realists: And How We Can Get There by Rutger Bregman The Vanishing Voter: Public Involvement in an Age of Uncertainty by Thomas E. Patterson

  19. 4 out of 5

    Simon Howard

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is a very well-researched and well-referenced discussion of the psychological and social effects of news reporting that focuses excessively on negative stories, with little counterbalance from "solutions-focused" journalism. I enjoyed reading this, but didn't find myself completely persuaded by the arguments. It felt more like the beginning of a conversation. I wasn't convinced by the characterisation of journalism as almost exclusively negative. I think that is true of television news, which This is a very well-researched and well-referenced discussion of the psychological and social effects of news reporting that focuses excessively on negative stories, with little counterbalance from "solutions-focused" journalism. I enjoyed reading this, but didn't find myself completely persuaded by the arguments. It felt more like the beginning of a conversation. I wasn't convinced by the characterisation of journalism as almost exclusively negative. I think that is true of television news, which only ever reports on a handful of stories, and I also think it is true of news shared on social media, which is driven by unambiguously and simply expressed (and hence largely negative) emotions. I don't think it is true of other forms of journalism, including quality newspapers, which cover more stories and appear to me to be much more balanced between positive and negative - even if the front pages tend to be excessively negative. This is one reason I consciously choose to read newspapers. But perhaps I'm wrong - I'd be interested to see the evidence. I would have liked to have seen more discussion of the role of social media in driving journalism. Jackson talks interestingly about the business aspects of modern journalism, and argues that if consumers change what they read then the media will respond. But I think there is a missing link here: in the modern media landscape, news tends to have to filter through social media to reach consumers. Social media is typically driven by simple emotions that can be captured in a single 'emoji' - sadness and anger are easy. The emotions associated with solutions-focused journalism, which Jackson categories as celebration of progress coupled with recognition that we need to go further, are not easily expressed drivers of engagement. All of that said, I enjoyed this book, and think it is an important marker in the recognition of the psychological impact of a lot of news coverage. Much of the advice in this book is stuff I already do, so perhaps Jackson was preaching to the converted to some extent, but I often found myself agreeing with her perspective.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Venables

    This book is so interesting and I hope everyone takes the chance to read it. It was fascinating to think of media, as you would food. What news you take aboard informs your outlook and view of the world. The argument throughout the book is not that we should purely see/hear positive news but that there should be a more equal balance between the news we are fed now, brexit, brexit, wars, disasters and news that provides answers to problems. News that spreads hope and provides us with some notion This book is so interesting and I hope everyone takes the chance to read it. It was fascinating to think of media, as you would food. What news you take aboard informs your outlook and view of the world. The argument throughout the book is not that we should purely see/hear positive news but that there should be a more equal balance between the news we are fed now, brexit, brexit, wars, disasters and news that provides answers to problems. News that spreads hope and provides us with some notion that somebody, somewhere is working on making the world a better place. Just so that the news we consume whether it be on television or through the radio gives a more complete picture. What I really liked how well researched the book was, I am guilty of thinking the world is getting worse. This belief is covered in the book and in reality, it isn’t. This is the point the author is trying to prove, I personally hear nothing but doom and gloom stories pretty much concentrating on what I said earlier. An excellent book that everyone should read and schools should implement. Subjects like this should be raised in school so our children grow up learning about media bias, the inclusion of stories purely for revenue. So they can make more informed choices.

  21. 4 out of 5

    M R

    Like the idea of this book It is good to know that someone is trying to stand up against the rather broken model of modern journalism. Journalists are information leaders who drive the flow of information. If they keep driving us towards negative news, then we tend to overcompensate our feelings about the world around us. The idea of solution based news is a good ideal to lead us towards a mentality of trying to fix problems rather than feeling helpless. Modern psychology and management theories all Like the idea of this book It is good to know that someone is trying to stand up against the rather broken model of modern journalism. Journalists are information leaders who drive the flow of information. If they keep driving us towards negative news, then we tend to overcompensate our feelings about the world around us. The idea of solution based news is a good ideal to lead us towards a mentality of trying to fix problems rather than feeling helpless. Modern psychology and management theories all talk about positiveness. It is indeed strange to find that journalism is unable to find the right balance. My reason for a four star rating instead of five star is that the book feels repetitive in places.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Flaws

    Скучна и угоена книга с добра идея, за която всички трябва да знаят. Ако вече не сте, струва си да се запознаете с журналистиката с фокус към решения на проблеми. Има нужда от промяна в начина, по който ни се поднасят новините и тази промяна би била постижима само ако масовият потребител вземе мерки относно информацията, която консумира онлайн. Не си струва обаче да четете тези 181 страници. Спестете си няколко часа и вместо това почетете онлайн за какво става въпрос и разчистете новинарските Скучна и угоена книга с добра идея, за която всички трябва да знаят. Ако вече не сте, струва си да се запознаете с журналистиката с фокус към решения на проблеми. Има нужда от промяна в начина, по който ни се поднасят новините и тази промяна би била постижима само ако масовият потребител вземе мерки относно информацията, която консумира онлайн. Не си струва обаче да четете тези 181 страници. Спестете си няколко часа и вместо това почетете онлайн за какво става въпрос и разчистете новинарските източници, които следите. Има добри препоръки на сайта на книгата: https://you-are-what-you-read.com/sta...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Beckie

    3.5/5. If you're someone who is already aware of, or interested in this topic then it's likely that this book wont be groundbreaking for you. Nevertheless, it's an important (and short) read if you know very little about the impact or how to adjust your media diet.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Omar Alassil

    Good topic and much needed debate and I agree with the author but I felt the book could have been much shorter. Many pages have nothing to add to the topic apart from just re-iterating the same idea

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ian Pitchford

    Dull If you want a brief and superficial overview of pop psychology in a positive journalism context then this book could be for you.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Laura Murphy

    3 and a half stars really! Some useful thought provoking ideas, but at times a little repetitive and laboured.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

    A short book but could have been even shorter. Gist is that bad news news needs to be balanced with solutions news. Research based and thought provoking.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sandy Morley

    A short rallying cry to consume the news more consciously and make your head and the world a better place.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rosie

    Interesting message but it felt very repetitive for the second half

  30. 4 out of 5

    Doris Raines

    GREAT TITLE YOU ARE WHAT YOU READ——IT IS ALSO TRUE SOME WHERE I READ YOU ARE WHAT YOU —-E-A-T— BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU READ ——— BE VERY CAREFUL WHAT YOU PUT IN YOUR MOUTH...

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