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Mycroft and Sherlock: The Empty Birdcage

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The new novel by NBA All-Star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, starring brothers Mycroft and Sherlock Holmes. It is 1873, and as the economies of Europe threaten to crumble, Mycroft Holmes finds himself in service to the Crown once again. A distant relative of Queen Victoria has been slain by the Fire Four Eleven killer, a serial murderer who leaves no mark upon his victims, only a The new novel by NBA All-Star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, starring brothers Mycroft and Sherlock Holmes. It is 1873, and as the economies of Europe threaten to crumble, Mycroft Holmes finds himself in service to the Crown once again. A distant relative of Queen Victoria has been slain by the Fire Four Eleven killer, a serial murderer who leaves no mark upon his victims, only a mysterious calling card. Meanwhile, Sherlock has already taken it upon himself to solve the case, as his interest in the criminal mind grows into an obsession. Mycroft begrudgingly allows Sherlock to investigate, as Ai Lin—the woman he is still in love with—needs his aid. Her fiancé has been kidnapped, and the only man who might know his fate is a ruthless arms dealer with a reputation for killing those who cross him. Mycroft persuades his friend Cyrus Douglas to help find the young man, but Douglas himself is put in harm’s way. As Sherlock travels the country on the hunt for the Fire Four Eleven murderer, both he and Mycroft will discover that the greed of others is at the root of the evil they are trying to unearth…


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The new novel by NBA All-Star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, starring brothers Mycroft and Sherlock Holmes. It is 1873, and as the economies of Europe threaten to crumble, Mycroft Holmes finds himself in service to the Crown once again. A distant relative of Queen Victoria has been slain by the Fire Four Eleven killer, a serial murderer who leaves no mark upon his victims, only a The new novel by NBA All-Star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, starring brothers Mycroft and Sherlock Holmes. It is 1873, and as the economies of Europe threaten to crumble, Mycroft Holmes finds himself in service to the Crown once again. A distant relative of Queen Victoria has been slain by the Fire Four Eleven killer, a serial murderer who leaves no mark upon his victims, only a mysterious calling card. Meanwhile, Sherlock has already taken it upon himself to solve the case, as his interest in the criminal mind grows into an obsession. Mycroft begrudgingly allows Sherlock to investigate, as Ai Lin—the woman he is still in love with—needs his aid. Her fiancé has been kidnapped, and the only man who might know his fate is a ruthless arms dealer with a reputation for killing those who cross him. Mycroft persuades his friend Cyrus Douglas to help find the young man, but Douglas himself is put in harm’s way. As Sherlock travels the country on the hunt for the Fire Four Eleven murderer, both he and Mycroft will discover that the greed of others is at the root of the evil they are trying to unearth…

30 review for Mycroft and Sherlock: The Empty Birdcage

  1. 5 out of 5

    Deb Jones

    As a lifelong fan of the original Sherlock Holmes, I am picky about Holmesian tales written by anyone who isn't Conan Doyle. This series of Holmes stories, co-authored by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Anna Waterhouse fit neatly into the original cast of characters and their personalities. The prose is similar in style to the original stories and maintains the same feeling of time and place. The Empty Birdcage is the third in this ongoing series featuring Mycroft and Sherlock in their early years. I As a lifelong fan of the original Sherlock Holmes, I am picky about Holmesian tales written by anyone who isn't Conan Doyle. This series of Holmes stories, co-authored by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Anna Waterhouse fit neatly into the original cast of characters and their personalities. The prose is similar in style to the original stories and maintains the same feeling of time and place. The Empty Birdcage is the third in this ongoing series featuring Mycroft and Sherlock in their early years. I found the first two amazing and truly enjoyed this one, although by comparison with the first two, it was a bit less in-depth -- not enough to prevent enjoyment of the reading experience -- just a little bit less of a dash of spice found in the first two titles.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Doreen

    I really enjoyed about 80% of the book, but towards the end, I kept thinking, wait, that can't be all. Beyond the completely mystifying headstands in the garret (I get the point of them but could not for the life of me decipher what was actually going on while reading their depiction,) I was annoyed by what short shrift the apprehension of the serial killer earned. There was so much rich, exciting material in the lead up to the solution of this case that for the book to end as abruptly as it did I really enjoyed about 80% of the book, but towards the end, I kept thinking, wait, that can't be all. Beyond the completely mystifying headstands in the garret (I get the point of them but could not for the life of me decipher what was actually going on while reading their depiction,) I was annoyed by what short shrift the apprehension of the serial killer earned. There was so much rich, exciting material in the lead up to the solution of this case that for the book to end as abruptly as it did felt odd and unearned, never mind that completely unnecessary letter at the end. Of that rich, exciting material: Mycroft Holmes is hiding his health issues from his loved ones while also pursuing a personal vendetta against a hated nobleman. During the course of this latter, an acquaintance asks Mycroft for help in locating his abruptly vanished prospective son-in-law. Bingwen Shi is the scion of a noble Chinese family, who happened to be working with a known international arms dealer. Ordinarily, Mycroft would think nothing of assisting, but Bingwen Shi's intended is Ai Lin, the beautiful, spirited woman he secretly pines for himself. To further muddle his emotions is the return of his incorrigible younger brother from Cambridge. Sherlock has become obsessed with the so-called Fire Four Eleven serial killer, who seems to choose his victims at random and leave no trace besides a calling card with those three words on it. In fact, no one would even guess that the deaths were anything but natural and unrelated were it not for said calling cards. Mycroft tries to discourage his brother from putting himself in danger but when the next victim proves to be a relation to the queen, he must reluctantly allow them both to get involved. So this will be the kind of story that aficionados of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's more exotic solutions will enjoy. I'm mostly iffy on those, but think Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Anna Waterhouse did a decent job of grounding their plot devices in reality while still painting with Sir Conan Doyle's palette. I do think they could have done more with telling us the background of the killer instead of just scattering the various hints over the last few chapters. I don't think we ever actually find out his name, for example. Not that it matters, in the grand scheme of things, but it seems like an odd oversight. One thing I did very much enjoy and hope to read more of was the burgeoning friendship between Sherlock and Huan. Huan already feels like a much more useful sidekick than Watson, though the former's steadying influence is likely far more necessary on a young, rash Sherlock than the good doctor will have to exert some years in the future. It was also really nice to see the dynamic between Sherlock and Mycroft from the latter's perspective. Sherlock is insufferable, as always, and Mycroft's concern for him understandably verges into scolding, even as Mycroft's own personal proclivities begin to calcify. Our authors absolutely shine in the way they hint at the canon they're writing towards with this series. I didn't enjoy this installment quite as much as I did Book Two, but I am very much looking forward to reading more.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I've enjoyed all of Abdul-Jabbar's "Sherlock Holmes" novels, but this one not quite so much. Mycroft and his friend Cyrus Douglas are trying to find the Chinese fiancé of Ai Lin, a woman Mycroft loves but knows he can never win. The fiancé is mixed up with a sinister arms dealer who is sure he can outwit Mycroft. Meanwhile, the still young Sherlock comes down from his college determined to find the mysterious killer who seems to kill without weapons or motives. Both parties achieve their aims, I've enjoyed all of Abdul-Jabbar's "Sherlock Holmes" novels, but this one not quite so much. Mycroft and his friend Cyrus Douglas are trying to find the Chinese fiancé of Ai Lin, a woman Mycroft loves but knows he can never win. The fiancé is mixed up with a sinister arms dealer who is sure he can outwit Mycroft. Meanwhile, the still young Sherlock comes down from his college determined to find the mysterious killer who seems to kill without weapons or motives. Both parties achieve their aims, although in Mycroft's case there's an ironic twist. But while we're finally given the killer's motive and weapons, we never even learn his name. That type of ending leaves me ultimately unsatisfied, so the book loses a star.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Devann

    This just was not as good as the first two. For one thing I don't feel like we really learned anything new here or made any kind of character progress, or even introduced any new characters! For another thing, the mystery aspect was pretty subpar as well. The dual mysteries did not connect in any way at all, which you would really expect them to in a book like this. It was just Sherlock and Mycroft running around trying to solve two totally different mysteries and while Mycroft's had a mildly This just was not as good as the first two. For one thing I don't feel like we really learned anything new here or made any kind of character progress, or even introduced any new characters! For another thing, the mystery aspect was pretty subpar as well. The dual mysteries did not connect in any way at all, which you would really expect them to in a book like this. It was just Sherlock and Mycroft running around trying to solve two totally different mysteries and while Mycroft's had a mildly satisfactory resolution, Sherlock's was just shoved into the last chapter and I literally don't think we ever even learned the guy's name who did it. Also, while I appreciate that the series tackles issues of race during this time period I continue to be annoyed that any women present in the books for more than a single scene are generally either villains or Mycroft's love interests [or both]. It's just not a great look. Hopefully the next one will be better.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Mishap

    A lot tighter than the last offering, with parallel story lines lending suspense but not at the expense of momentum. You'll like this Sherlock, but it is Mycroft and Cyrus that are the more complicated, engaging characters.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Juli

    Love this series!!!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sam Prince

    A brilliant plot. Very entertaining. Thank you so very much Kareem Abdul Jabar for bringing The Holmes Brothers back to life.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Llyr Heller-Humphreys

    With that ending there just HAS to be another book in the series!!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Flow Chi Minh

    Ah man, this was a let down. I really dug the book preceding this (haven't read the first in the series yet), but Abdul-Jabbar and Waterhouse might have rushed this some. There are two mysteries in The Empty Birdcage, one for each Holmes. Mycroft is tasked with finding the missing fiance of his love interest Ai Lin (introduced in Mycroft and Sherlock) while Sherlock is running down a possible serial killer. This sounds great on paper, but the execution is really sloppy. Both cases suffer from a Ah man, this was a let down. I really dug the book preceding this (haven't read the first in the series yet), but Abdul-Jabbar and Waterhouse might have rushed this some. There are two mysteries in The Empty Birdcage, one for each Holmes. Mycroft is tasked with finding the missing fiance of his love interest Ai Lin (introduced in Mycroft and Sherlock) while Sherlock is running down a possible serial killer. This sounds great on paper, but the execution is really sloppy. Both cases suffer from a lack of enjoyable pacing but the serial killer mystery especially comes across as messy. It also ends with a feeling of everything being a little rushed. I hope Abdul-Jabbar and Waterhouse can rebound if the series continues.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lorraine

    An intelligently written book yet it fails to live up to the first two of the series. Alfred Hitchcock might have been pleased with the twist ending but it does not exactly satisfy here. This book is strictly 'whodunit'. In the last two books Abdul-Jabbar wrote deeply about the characters allowing the reader to care about them. He weaved interesting cultural and historical information in the story as well. Now that I am used to that brand I was disappointed in this one. Hopefully another book is An intelligently written book yet it fails to live up to the first two of the series. Alfred Hitchcock might have been pleased with the twist ending but it does not exactly satisfy here. This book is strictly 'whodunit'. In the last two books Abdul-Jabbar wrote deeply about the characters allowing the reader to care about them. He weaved interesting cultural and historical information in the story as well. Now that I am used to that brand I was disappointed in this one. Hopefully another book is planned to rescue the stranded reader. Of course, this could be the plan all along. Leave the reader in suspension about characters like Cyrus and Ai Lin, even young Sherlock. For sure there are creative paths for other stories as Mycroft now has old and new nemeses, and Sherlock seems to have a new friend-sleuthing partner (who by the way isn't Watson).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Marlene

    Originally published at Reading Reality In this third book in the Mycroft Holmes and Sherlock series – after the marvelous Mycroft Holmes and Mycroft and Sherlock – we have the portrait of the bureaucrat as a young and still surprisingly slender and exceedingly insufferable young man alongside the portrait of the detective as an even more insufferable young man. We also see their sibling rivalry at full flower – and it’s not a pretty sight. Absolutely fascinating, but not pretty at all. Mycroft is Originally published at Reading Reality In this third book in the Mycroft Holmes and Sherlock series – after the marvelous Mycroft Holmes and Mycroft and Sherlock – we have the portrait of the bureaucrat as a young and still surprisingly slender and exceedingly insufferable young man alongside the portrait of the detective as an even more insufferable young man. We also see their sibling rivalry at full flower – and it’s not a pretty sight. Absolutely fascinating, but not pretty at all. Mycroft is enough years older than Sherlock that he expects to be respected and obeyed by his younger brother while Sherlock is both intelligent enough to know his own mind and already detached enough from his own emotions and any thought of social consequences to respect little and obey no one unless it serves his still developing ends. And in their relationship in this story as well as the previous we see the seeds of what is known of that relationship in the canonical Holmes stories – two men, tied by blood but not affinity, of extreme intelligence but with few emotions, acknowledging their relationship and sometimes using it while having virtually no sympathy for each other. We’re not there yet, but we’re getting there. At the point in their lives when this story takes place, Mycroft is in his mid-20s and Sherlock in his nearing 20 – and attempting to escape the confines of academia at Oxford. As was true in Mycroft and Sherlock, there are two cases in this story. As it is Mycroft’s series rather than Sherlock’s, Mycroft’s case is both more important and takes up more of the story, while Sherlock’s, although important, doesn’t have quite the same consequences. As fits the lives they are growing into, Mycroft’s case has international ramifications, while Sherlock’s is entirely local to England and fits more into his canon of detective stories. Sherlock is after a diabolically clever serial killer, a case that it not out of his later line but is currently stretching both Mycroft’s patience and Sherlock’s growing abilities. Mycroft, on the other hand, is after an international arms dealer who is trying to start a war between China and Japan. The stakes are much higher for Mycroft, and not just because his beloved Britain will inevitably get dragged into any conflict on one side or the other if only to protect their power in India and the subcontinent. But the part of the plot that twists Mycroft into knots is the danger to the woman he loves but cannot have. Her fiance is either a catspaw or conspirator in the plot. Mycroft thinks he’s caught on the horns or a dilemma between love and duty – only to find that the place he’s truly caught is between conflicting hells. Escape Rating A-: Unlike the previous two books in the series, this is one that I listened to all the way through. I believe that the narrator, Damian Lynch, is intended to represent the older, calmer, and more dispassionate voice of Cyrus Douglas in his narration, and he does an excellent job representing Douglas as narrator and chronicler as well as voicing the considerably younger and more excitable Holmes’ Brothers. Not that Douglas doesn’t have his own important part to play in this case – among his other duties he acts as Mycroft’s conscience. A conscience that Mycroft definitely needs but listens to less and less. Which is part of him becoming the man we know from his first appearance in the canon, The Adventure of the Greek Interpreter – at least in personality if not in physical aspect. Sherlock’s case, while being as convoluted as any in the Conan Doyle stories, is a relatively straightforward case of investigation. The fascination in observing Sherlock in this story is in watching as he is in the process of developing the methods we are familiar with. He is young, he is still learning, and he is almost certainly making it up as he goes along. He’s already traveled a good way towards becoming the persona we’re familiar with, but he’s still in the process of creating the methodology that made him famous. He also still makes a lot more mistakes. But the heart of this story, in more ways than one, is the case that Mycroft is pursuing. We see him on his way to becoming the spider at the heart of Britain’s web of intelligence and operation. His entree into this case is through the young Chinese woman Ai Lin, a woman that he loves but knows that he cannot marry – and vice versa. They would be cast out of both of their cultures in ways that neither is willing to risk. So he is resolved to do his best for her, to find her fiance who has become embroiled in the arms trade and is being offered as a sacrifice so that his employer can continue to deal with both sides of the current Sino-Japanese conflict. Mycroft begins the case somewhat blinded by his affections, and gulled into believing in his own intellectual superiority – only to discover that he’s been mistaken about the later while deciding that he needs to ignore the former – if he can. His conclusions in the end put him squarely in the midst of this week’s theme, whether or not the ends justify the means, and who gets to decide the answer to that question. Mycroft makes a decision that is arguably the best for the country that he loves and serves, knowing that the cost of that decision will be borne by others who had no part in making it. He believes he is doing the right thing, but there is no one to whom he is accountable. And the cost is excruciatingly high, and will be paid in ways that Mycroft only becomes aware of as the story closes. Yet we know that he would not change his decisions. In the Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes series, this is the central core of Mary’s estrangement from Mycroft. That he believes he sees all, knows all, and makes the best decisions for all, but there are no checks and balances on his decisions and he never has to answer for his actions to anyone. Mycroft has maneuvered himself into a hidden position of absolute power, and everyone knows the saying about about absolute power and the inevitability of it corrupting absolutely. At the end of Mycroft and Sherlock: The Empty Birdcage, Mycroft is left to deal with the painful consequences of his actions – consequences that I expect to ripple through future books in this series. Books that I eagerly await.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Yaaresse

    4.5 rounding up. I'm enjoying this series so much. This third book is definitely not a stand-alone, not if one wants a full appreciation of the characters and their motivations. Third books seem to be awkward points in a series. If you've made it to the third book, it starts getting more exposure, but not all that exposure makes it clear that someone new to the ride that they are getting on the train mid-journey. There are really two mysteries within this book. Mycroft seeks to solve the 4.5 rounding up. I'm enjoying this series so much. This third book is definitely not a stand-alone, not if one wants a full appreciation of the characters and their motivations. Third books seem to be awkward points in a series. If you've made it to the third book, it starts getting more exposure, but not all that exposure makes it clear that someone new to the ride that they are getting on the train mid-journey. There are really two mysteries within this book. Mycroft seeks to solve the disappearance of his friend's (i.e. secret crush's) fiance, a man who is reportedly sentenced to death in his homeland for treason, and Sherlock has wheedled and connived his way into Mycroft setting him loose on his very first case to solve a string of what appears to be random murders. Well...sort of setting him loose. After all, Mycroft is a secret worrier and, let's face it, a control freak. So we have more Mycroft-Sherlock interaction than in the other two books, but the writers don't sacrifice the Mycroft-Cyrus friendship that made the first two books enjoyable. In truth, neither of the mysterious cases is all that mysterious. I figured out that how and why of the murders fairly early in the book and the who and why of the fiance's disappearance about 2/3 of the way in. It didn't detract from my enjoyment of the book. This series is more about the characters and their relationships than the cases.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dana Linde

    What a pleasant surprise. I was not expecting Holmesian mystery from an NBA legend, but as a lover of the genre, I couldn't resist. I found the focus on Mycroft to be a nice addition as he so often plays a supporting role in Holmes' mysteries. In this book, he seemed to take the main stage, and learning about him and the family indirectly, helps the reader better understand Sherlock. I felt the authors did a great job with historical features and dialog of the period as well as making the dialog What a pleasant surprise. I was not expecting Holmesian mystery from an NBA legend, but as a lover of the genre, I couldn't resist. I found the focus on Mycroft to be a nice addition as he so often plays a supporting role in Holmes' mysteries. In this book, he seemed to take the main stage, and learning about him and the family indirectly, helps the reader better understand Sherlock. I felt the authors did a great job with historical features and dialog of the period as well as making the dialog for both Mycroft and Sherlock appropriate to their characters. I was saddened to not see the expected "elementary" from Sherlock's lips, however. Perhaps that doesn't emerge until Sherlock becomes a full-fledged detective. The plot was engaging, but I felt Sherlock's story less so. Once he discovered the thorn, predictions were fairly easy to compose. Furthermore, I know exposition and rising action comprise the majority of a book, but I would have loved a bit more development of the climactic meeting with the killer. Still, it was a pleasant read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    The Holmes' brothers solve a couple of convoluted mysteries. This story involved both Mycroft and Sherlock Holmes and it was different because each brother was solving a different crime, but in the end their combined clues led to a marketer's death. Sherlock had help from Mycroft's Chinese valet and Mycroft had Dr. Douglas. There were 11 murder victims one of whom was related to Queen Victoria. The second mystery was about a kidnapped Chinese man who was engaged to girl who Mycroft had fallen in The Holmes' brothers solve a couple of convoluted mysteries. This story involved both Mycroft and Sherlock Holmes and it was different because each brother was solving a different crime, but in the end their combined clues led to a marketer's death. Sherlock had help from Mycroft's Chinese valet and Mycroft had Dr. Douglas. There were 11 murder victims one of whom was related to Queen Victoria. The second mystery was about a kidnapped Chinese man who was engaged to girl who Mycroft had fallen in love with. I was disappointed with the endings to both mysteries, since I don't think justice was done; but in real life it rarely is.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I was sort of disappointed in this book. I really expected a more cohesive story, more excitement, something. I felt totally distracted while reading it so maybe it’s partially my fault and I missed connecting details that would have made the story surrounding the mystery clearer. I preferred Sherlock’s narrative to Mycroft’s, and the epilogue was SUCH a bummer. That being said, it’s still just as well done as the others in the way that it feels and I still enjoyed the characters and I did like I was sort of disappointed in this book. I really expected a more cohesive story, more excitement, something. I felt totally distracted while reading it so maybe it’s partially my fault and I missed connecting details that would have made the story surrounding the mystery clearer. I preferred Sherlock’s narrative to Mycroft’s, and the epilogue was SUCH a bummer. That being said, it’s still just as well done as the others in the way that it feels and I still enjoyed the characters and I did like the book, I just didn’t love it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jean Doane

    A Fine Mystery Another enjoyable adventure with the Holmes brothers as young men, Sherlock as a gangly, impetuous teen and Mycroft as his ultra-responsible older brother, already a veteran of the war office and a guardian of the fortunes of Britain. The book is well-written, with two suitably convoluted plots that eventually twine together requiring the brothers to collaborate to find a solution. I look forward to more installments in this series.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Helene

    While I really like the very first book, and enjoyed reading the second well enough, I had a very hard time reading this one, and I was highly disappointed - though not surprised in the slightest - by the ending... Such a long and complicated storyline for that? I’m honestly only giving it 3 stars out of kindness for the style and the research in Victorian London, but as far as the story goes, it’s a hard pass from me.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

    If I could give this a 3.5, I would. I enjoyed the book, but I didn't REALLY enjoy the book. I had not heard of this series and definitely enjoyed the portrayal of Sherlock and Mycroft and their parallel adventures. I thought it was clever and entertaining. I'm glad to be introduced to the series. I also thought it was written in the style of the Holmes books. An enjoyable few hours on a rainy weekend.

  19. 5 out of 5

    H

    I lied. I didn't finish this book. I just wanted it not to be on the Want to Read or Currently Reading shelves. I pretty much figured out the weapon, motive, and almost whodun it by the time I reached page 30 (or so). I have not had so much apathy to finish a book in decades!!! I did not flip to the back to see if my guesses were correct; I couldn't even. I am going to go watch Sherlock now to wash the bleh from my brain.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Readerkuna1

    this was a pretty good Mystery. Mycroft is back working for the goverment and Sherilock left college to investigate mudrers. They come to an agreement. Myscroft and his friend Douglas work on finding someone. While Sherlock and he body guard look to find out why these people were murdered. Things happen and they work hard to find out what is going on. This is a pretty good read from a first time author who took a risk and found a good coauthor. Worth the read

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    This is the third in this series of stories, set in the period before the classic "Holmes and Watson" stories of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. As such, they're a treat, because a younger Mycroft Holmes is fascinating to read about, and the interactions with a younger Sherlock are great. In this one, the mystery is the really tricky bit, because there are clues that work, but require serious stretches of the imagination to make them fit together. As a whole, though, it is a quick and enjoyable read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gay

    A good effort to write a Sherlock Holmes-style novel. Not entirely successful. Serial killer on the loose. Relative of Her Majesty the Queen is killed. Convoluted story of intrique, Chinese lovers, kidnapped fiance, unexplained murder methods, crow at scene of the crimes, darts, etc. I did not relate to many of the characters. Keep writing and trying to write a good Sherlock mystery!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Susan Sarabasha

    So well written. Very interesting take on a very young Sherlock and Mycroft who is responsible for him. Both are extremely detail oriented. Also tells of POC in that time in London which most books ignore. AAMOF one of the lead characters is Black but must act as though he’s a secretary to an often ill guy instead of the boss. Looking forward to the sequel in Sept.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Charles Francis

    This was my first reading of a book by the great basketball player. I was pleasantly surprised. While I much prefer the old Sherlock and Dr. Watson stories, the author puts a nice touch on the young Sherlock and his older brother Mycroft, along with the charactes that are important to them both. I will have to pick up another in the series to get a full flavor.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    I was very pleasantly surprised by the top-notch quality of this book! I was skeptical at first because often "celebrity" authors are just so-so. But I found the plot, characters, pacing, and setting of this novel to be engaging and engrossing. I'm looking forward to picking up the earlier books from this series.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Erik Deckers

    I didn’t realize this was the third book before I started it, skipping the second book entirely. I loved the story and the glimpse into Mycroft’s beginnings as a man of influence. I hope Kareem and Anna continue this impressive partnership!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Roy M.

    A Worthy Successor to Conan-Doyle. Reading this and the other two books in this series has been as pleasurable for me as reading the original stories. I eagerly await another installment.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mary Sue

    The brothers Holmes are so alike and so different. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar writes well giving the reader a strong sense of the era and setting. A series of unusual murders have one common element , a note reading Fire 411.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Megret00

    Could not put it down, a brilliant look at not just A.C. Doyle's characters and the relationship between the brothers Holmes and the world they lived in. Plots are twistie and snarled, clues everywhere. A fun fast read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Froebe

    I grew so angry at the author at one point, for how a beloved character was being treated, I almost gave up on the book completely! I'm glad I didn't. I guess that's the sign of a great story, it brought out true emotions in me. Looking forward to the next adventure!

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