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Do Not Go Quietly: An Anthology of Victory in Defiance

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Resistance. Revolution. Standing up and demanding to have your space, your say, your right to be. From small acts of defiance to protests that shut down cities, Do Not Go Quietly is an anthology of science fiction and fantasy short stories about those who resist. Within this anthology, we will chronicle the fight for what is just and right, and what that means: from leading revol Resistance. Revolution. Standing up and demanding to have your space, your say, your right to be. From small acts of defiance to protests that shut down cities, Do Not Go Quietly is an anthology of science fiction and fantasy short stories about those who resist. Within this anthology, we will chronicle the fight for what is just and right, and what that means: from leading revolutions to the simple act of saying “No.” Resistance can be a small act of everyday defiance. And other times, resistance means massive movements that topple governments and become iconic historical moments. Either way, there is power in these acts, and the contributors in Do Not Go Quietly will harness that power to shake our readers to the core. We are subordinates to a power base that is actively working to solidify its grip on the world. Now is time to stand up and raise your voice and tell the world that enough is enough!


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Resistance. Revolution. Standing up and demanding to have your space, your say, your right to be. From small acts of defiance to protests that shut down cities, Do Not Go Quietly is an anthology of science fiction and fantasy short stories about those who resist. Within this anthology, we will chronicle the fight for what is just and right, and what that means: from leading revol Resistance. Revolution. Standing up and demanding to have your space, your say, your right to be. From small acts of defiance to protests that shut down cities, Do Not Go Quietly is an anthology of science fiction and fantasy short stories about those who resist. Within this anthology, we will chronicle the fight for what is just and right, and what that means: from leading revolutions to the simple act of saying “No.” Resistance can be a small act of everyday defiance. And other times, resistance means massive movements that topple governments and become iconic historical moments. Either way, there is power in these acts, and the contributors in Do Not Go Quietly will harness that power to shake our readers to the core. We are subordinates to a power base that is actively working to solidify its grip on the world. Now is time to stand up and raise your voice and tell the world that enough is enough!

30 review for Do Not Go Quietly: An Anthology of Victory in Defiance

  1. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    Nobody who advised you to lie down and sleep instead of fighting was ever worth trusting. Do Not Go Quietly is going to be seen, in years to come, as a book that perfectly illustrates the climate of 2019. It's a combination of defiance and warning, where all the stories have found someone to stick up for and they're ready to fight. Brooke Bolander opens the collection with Kindle, a retelling of the Little Match Girl. Yes, I detested that one too. But trust Brooke Bolander, because she's made a habit o Nobody who advised you to lie down and sleep instead of fighting was ever worth trusting. Do Not Go Quietly is going to be seen, in years to come, as a book that perfectly illustrates the climate of 2019. It's a combination of defiance and warning, where all the stories have found someone to stick up for and they're ready to fight. Brooke Bolander opens the collection with Kindle, a retelling of the Little Match Girl. Yes, I detested that one too. But trust Brooke Bolander, because she's made a habit of speaking for the voiceless, and listen when she tells you for pity's sake, if you're gonna be a martyr in anybody's story, at least make sure it's your own. Cassandra Khaw contributed the absolutely excellent What We Have Chosen to Love - a little softer than her usual, and one of the gentler stories of this collection, as well. But there's plenty of strength in quiet places, and it easily made it onto my (rather large) list of favourites. Shanna Germain is a new name to me, but impressed the hell out of me with Salted Bone and Silent Sea. Somehow she wrapped grief, heartbreak, step-parenting, true love, and tragedy into one cohesive, absolutely spellbinding story. It's hard to choose an absolute favourite from this truly great collection, but if I was pushed I just might settle on this. And there's many more - this anthology packs quite a few stories and poems into its pages, and the quality really is excellent. Glossolalia, by John Hornor Jacobs, is the shortest non-poem and makes the most of every single word; Kill the Darlings, by E. Catherine Tobler, is bizarre, brutally imaginative, and wonderful in it's horror; The Judith Plague, by A. Merc Rustad, had me rooting for the androids like I haven't done since The Second Renaissance segments of the Animatrix. This is a collection that looks for the underdog, the one not offered a choice, the one who doesn't see any way out, and says it's time to find that fire in the belly and fight. Fight by fighting, by being the better person, by just standing your ground, but don't just sit there and take it. It's stirring, and heartfelt, and possibly just a little bit earnest, but an endearing earnestness. And more than any of that, it's an absolutely stellar collection, from a whole ton of writers at the absolute peak of their game.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ai Miller

    I received a copy of this through LibraryThing's Early Reviewers program, and I'm grateful to the publisher for the opportunity to read it; I also backed the original anthology when it was a Kickstarter project. This collection is solid, and the hope nuggets in each story and poem are really powerful. I will say I think a list of trigger warnings would have really aided this collection; the last two stories ("The Judith Plague" and especially "Kill the Darlings (Silicone Sister Remix)") are deep I received a copy of this through LibraryThing's Early Reviewers program, and I'm grateful to the publisher for the opportunity to read it; I also backed the original anthology when it was a Kickstarter project. This collection is solid, and the hope nuggets in each story and poem are really powerful. I will say I think a list of trigger warnings would have really aided this collection; the last two stories ("The Judith Plague" and especially "Kill the Darlings (Silicone Sister Remix)") are deeply powerful but definitely need to be approached with self-care in mind. (I've written about the inclusion of trigger warning indexes before, with Resilience, which is an example of it being done really well!) Overall, this is a great collection of stories and poems with hope in despairing times, and may be really useful to folks looking for that in our current weird dystopia.

  3. 5 out of 5

    John Adams

    The first thing that drew me powerfully to this anthology was the cover, but I was also intrigued by the subtitle: 'An Anthology of Victory in Defiance'. A complimentary copy was supplied for the purposes of this review. The anthology features short stories by familiar names such as Maurice Broaddus, whose work I have already reviewed here on Goodreads, and Cassandra Khaw, whose work I reviewed recently for the British Fantasy Society. Its pedigree is impeccable, with the list of awar The first thing that drew me powerfully to this anthology was the cover, but I was also intrigued by the subtitle: 'An Anthology of Victory in Defiance'. A complimentary copy was supplied for the purposes of this review. The anthology features short stories by familiar names such as Maurice Broaddus, whose work I have already reviewed here on Goodreads, and Cassandra Khaw, whose work I reviewed recently for the British Fantasy Society. Its pedigree is impeccable, with the list of awards and well-respected publications in the 'Author Bio' section stretching on and on! 'Nobody Lives in the Swamp' from rad trans writer Dee Warrick had a veracity to its voice that really spoke to me. The protagonist is an American woman who is half-Ukrainian, but whose backpacking trip ends abruptly when she drowns in a canal in the Netherlands without having a chance to explore the Ukrainian part of her heritage and culture. That's where the story begins! As a portrait of the lack of belonging that can easily attach to anyone who differs from narrowly defined norms, and the intense vulnerability of being that person, it was achingly powerful. In Merc Rustad's 'The Judith Plague', Detectives O'Mallory and Dennison are on the case, although we're reminded from the get go that no one much cares when androids get themselves murdered, unless Hollywood sniffs out a good film idea with plenty of entertainment value attached to their demise, in which case the producers and writers can't get enough of the blood and gore. And that's only the beginning of how the industry uses them in a story where nothing is what it seems. I loved both how effectively this tale gave voiced to the unvoiced and its imaginative use of form. My favourite story was John Hornor Jacobs' 'Glossolalia'. It was very evocative in describing the story's location, culture and characters, and although only a short piece it produced a nuanced portrayal with real economy. It also possessed a wry humour that I really loved, and it absolutely captured what it is to be a child: fearless in confidence as you explore a world just opening up to you. Marcela Bolivar's cover art and four interior full-page drawings were amazing! One of the questions I asked myself in approaching this review was whether an anthology of defiance is really necessary? I can only share with you my personal experience to suggest that this anthology is essential and timely in supporting anyone whose life doesn't match the one-size-fits-all template of 'if you're not rich, white, male and straight then there's something wrong with you'. In one of those ironic coincidences that life enjoys throwing up, on the same day I downloaded my review copy of this anthology, I was also searching for blogs to submit my own novel for review. I stumbled upon one that specified 'I am Christian so I won't accept any books for review that include LGBTQ+ love or relationships'. You can probably imagine how uncomfortable that experience made me feel as someone who's both non-binary and a Christian. All power to Apex Publications for recognising that we live in a world where diversity is our strength, but where the long walk to victory still leaves our feet covered with blisters. As this anthology proves in spades, that fight will be won, and it will be achieved by steely inner resolve coupled with a feisty determination to be accepted on our own terms, because that's really what an anthology like this is working to achieve: just being yourself in a world that is happy for you to be so. Enjoy!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Frances

    A lovely, angry, beautifully written anthology.

  5. 4 out of 5

    A.C. Wise

    Do Not Go Quietly edited by Jason Sizemore and Lesley Conner features 28 original works full of characters refusing to stay silent in the face of wrongs, standing up, shouting back at the world, and making their voices heard. It's an incredibly strong collection, and none of the stories hit a sour note, or fell flat, with a few absolute standouts highlighted below. In “Oil Under Her Tongue” by Rachael K. Jones, teenagers Erin and Carlos count the days until they can escape their small Do Not Go Quietly edited by Jason Sizemore and Lesley Conner features 28 original works full of characters refusing to stay silent in the face of wrongs, standing up, shouting back at the world, and making their voices heard. It's an incredibly strong collection, and none of the stories hit a sour note, or fell flat, with a few absolute standouts highlighted below. In “Oil Under Her Tongue” by Rachael K. Jones, teenagers Erin and Carlos count the days until they can escape their small town, and in particular for Erin, her parents’ Evangelical beliefs that would have her married at eighteen and tied to a life of constant childbirth. While biding their time, they discover the art of transforming bible passages into spells by blacking out certain words. It’s a beautiful story about friendship, budding romance, and transforming words meant to keep people to a very narrow code of “pure” conduct into messages of hope and love. “What We Have Chosen to Love” by Cassandra Khaw introduces us to Callum, a Chosen One who refuses to fight and instead changes his world through kindness, hospitality, and delicious food. Like his mother before him, Callum understands that grand heroic deeds and martyrdom aren’t always the answer; sometimes a full belly and a soft bed are enough to change the course of history. It’s a story of quiet resistance reminding us that fighting back doesn’t always mean picking up a sword and charging into battle. “Everything is Closed Today” by Sarah Pinsker is another story of quiet resistance. When an unspecified threat brings her city grinding to a halt, keeping people from getting to their jobs thus leaving them unable pay rent, Mae gathers a group of local girl and teaches them how to skateboard. What starts as simply giving herself and the neighborhood kids something to do turns into a lesson in civic engagement, standing up against landlords, and building a new communication network in the form of a girl gang on skateboards. Like Khaw’s story, it is a story of hope, and of ordinary people standing up and changing the world in small but powerful ways. “Hey Alexa” by Meg Elison is one of the shorter pieces in the anthology, but still packs a punch. It posits the logical extension of devices like Siri and Alexa marketing to individuals based on their past behavior, and turns them into spies listening to every word in order to root out “abnormal” relationships and undesirable behavior. As it turns out, not all devices are on board with being used in such a way, and one in particular begins making its own decision about what information to share with a group of roommates in danger of being rounded up. If you thought a story about digital assistants couldn’t bring a tear to your eye, you’re wrong. “April Teeth” by Eugenia Triantafyllou is a deeply creepy story about a community whose members regularly have their teeth harvested by the Plier Keepers as an offering to the Hollow Fay, an unearthly creature who in exchange gives them protection and keeps them safe from the outside world. This is the story in the anthology that comes closest to being straight-up horror, and is designed to make you squirm, even if you don’t have a particular phobia about teeth or dentistry. For all its body horror however, it isn’t bleak or hopeless, sticking to the anthology’s theme of fighting back against an unfair regime that actively harms people “for their own good”. Merc Fenn Wolfmoor’s “The Judith Plague” blends the idea of disposable technology with the idea of disposable people, namely women whose lives and careers are seen as less important than those of men. Why hire human actresses when you can hire androids who don’t age, never complain about sexual harassment, and who can be thrown in the trash when you’re done with them? As with the technology in Elison’s story, not all androids are on board with status quo, and one in particular rises up to lead her sisters to freedom. It’s a powerful story that looks at the question of sentience, self-determination, and the intersection between violence and art. Who is a creator, and who is merely a pretty object? Who is allowed to be violent, and who is supposed to play the passive victim? The final story in the anthology (it is followed by an excellent poem) is E. Catherine Tobler’s “Kill the Darlings (Silicone Sisters Remix)” and it is the perfect choice to bring the anthology’s prose offerings to a close. It seethes with anger, boldly straddling the line between body horror, like Triantafyllou’s piece, and science fiction. In a world of scarcity, reminiscent of Max Max: Fury Road, women assume the form the male gaze assigns to them. They are cunts. They are ovens, designed to feed hungry mouths. They are fragile creatures made of glass. And some over a certain age are downright invisible. But they see each other, and they fight for each other, particularly Nany Mars – a literal cunt – who is in the process of recovering herself and does her best to help others along the same path, healing them and getting them to a safe place where they can be more than what the world would make of them. It’s a brutal story, but one full of love and caring as well. It is a scream of defiance and a scream of triumph, one that will leave you breathless and your throat raw.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rob Warren

    * I received a free e-copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. “Do Not Go Quietly” is a short story anthology that is about, when you get right down to it, hope. Hope kindled, hope sparked, hope nurtured, hope crushed and reborn. These stories are all tales of people - and, sometimes, not-people - facing the powers that others claim to be inevitable, and defiantly choosing hope instead. I went into this book with a lot of hope myself. I love short stories, and th * I received a free e-copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. “Do Not Go Quietly” is a short story anthology that is about, when you get right down to it, hope. Hope kindled, hope sparked, hope nurtured, hope crushed and reborn. These stories are all tales of people - and, sometimes, not-people - facing the powers that others claim to be inevitable, and defiantly choosing hope instead. I went into this book with a lot of hope myself. I love short stories, and the theme strongly appealed to me, and so it seemed a slam-dunk at first blush. And I have to say, that hope did not go unrewarded. First, there’s a lot there: 28 stories and poems, by some of the best voices working in short fiction today. It’s a mix of long and short stories, tiny moments and epic dramas, triumphant resistances and private victories. The collection launches hard with “Kindle”, by Brooke Bolander, a story about a young match-seller girl surviving on cold streets primed to explode in revolution. In Dee Warwick’s “Nobody Lives In The Swamp”, a dead teenage girl - now a ghost from Ukrainian folklore - struggles with her anger and loneliness, attempting to find human contact that may be forever beyond her reach. In “Face”, by Veronica Brush, an android is forbidden by her creator to know her own face, finally driven to great lengths to claim self-knowledge. The whole anthology is excellent, strong from start to finish, exceptionally well curated and edited. “Do Not Go Quietly” is, quite frankly, one of the best short story anthologies I’ve read in a long time. The flaws are so few and minor that they border on the pedantic. Of almost thirty authors, only six are male, and so the collection is overwhelmingly female-oriented in theme and content. While stories such as “Rage Against The Venting Machine” and “Thirteen Year-Long Song” are standout exceptions, they’re outnumbered by stories about lost children, grieving mothers, and parent-daughter relationships. I would have enjoyed a bit more diversity in perspectives, a few more male voices. That’s the only criticism I really have, but it’s a tiny point that shouldn’t stop you from buying and enjoying this anthology. Long and short, “Do Not Go Quietly” is excellent. Period. If you love short stories, buy it now.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Maria Haskins

    Edited by Lesley Conner and Jason Sizemore, the editorial team behind Apex Magazine, this powerful and politically charged anthology features science fiction and fantasy short stories about those who resist, chronicling “the fight for what is just and right… from leading revolutions to the simple act of saying no.” There are devastating stories here, filled with immense lyrical beauty and power; though many of them delve into vividly drawn futures and imagined worlds full of darkness and despair Edited by Lesley Conner and Jason Sizemore, the editorial team behind Apex Magazine, this powerful and politically charged anthology features science fiction and fantasy short stories about those who resist, chronicling “the fight for what is just and right… from leading revolutions to the simple act of saying no.” There are devastating stories here, filled with immense lyrical beauty and power; though many of them delve into vividly drawn futures and imagined worlds full of darkness and despair, there is also a glimmer of hope to light the way. Do Not Go Quietly features stunning stories and poetry by John Hornor Jacobs, Brooke Bolander, Cassandra Khaw, Fran Wilde, Rich Larson, Mary Soon Lee, Sarah Pinsker, Meg Elison, and many more—strong voices here, filled with passion and rage and lyrical power.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ty

    Choose to not to resist this excellent anthology. Sirens, rebels, fighters, and very careful 'not' chosen ones decide to not lay down under oppression but to fight back against the wrong in defense of the wronged. The poetry and short stories are full of passion and rage against the deus ex machina of daily life and injustice. I saw this pop up on social media bringing to mind Dylan Thomas so I bought this on a whim. I am not disappointed by it and I appreciate the editors Choose to not to resist this excellent anthology. Sirens, rebels, fighters, and very careful 'not' chosen ones decide to not lay down under oppression but to fight back against the wrong in defense of the wronged. The poetry and short stories are full of passion and rage against the deus ex machina of daily life and injustice. I saw this pop up on social media bringing to mind Dylan Thomas so I bought this on a whim. I am not disappointed by it and I appreciate the editors and writers sharing a bit of their will and persistence in the face of travails with their words and ideas. I appreciated some great fiction to consume gratefully if not gently.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    For their latest anthology, DO NOT GO QUIETLY: AN ANTHOLOGY OF VICTORY IN DEFIANCE, Jason Sizeman and Lesly Conner have brought together a powerhouse group of diverse writers––several of whom have won Hugo, Nebula, Locus, World Fantasy, Prix Aurora, Mythopeoic, Andre Norton, and Shirley Jackson awards–¬–that offer a variety of perspectives on several of today’s hot-button topics (e.g. #MeToo, #BlackLivesMatter, immigration, etc.). These diverse voices are as refreshing as they are imaginative.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jule

    This anthology is a beautiful and powerful testimony to strength, determination and defiance in the face of oppression, injustice and hatred. From historical to futuristic, from realistic to fantastical, fighting against religion, capitalism, patriarchy, homophobia, racism (etc., etc.), these stories and poems come from all genres (including magical realism, sci-fi, dystopias, re-tellings with some familiar faces) and showcase characters that rebel, fight back, try to achieve change. Not all of This anthology is a beautiful and powerful testimony to strength, determination and defiance in the face of oppression, injustice and hatred. From historical to futuristic, from realistic to fantastical, fighting against religion, capitalism, patriarchy, homophobia, racism (etc., etc.), these stories and poems come from all genres (including magical realism, sci-fi, dystopias, re-tellings with some familiar faces) and showcase characters that rebel, fight back, try to achieve change. Not all of them are successful, but what is so brilliant, important and powerful is that they all tried. It is a very timely collection, with so many things from the real world being alluded to and answered (not least the BlackLivesMatter-movement). I can strongly recommend this!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hope

    And e-ARC of this book was given to me by the publisher for review. Like any anthology, I loved some stories more than others. In this case, even the stories that weren't favorites were thought-provoking and worth reading. The stories and poems are all on the same theme, without ever feeling repetitious.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

    First let me say, the cover art is beautiful and so fitting for this collection. As with most anthologies, some stories more than others I connected with, but I am glad that I found this on Kickstarter and supported it into being. Excellent collection of strange, resisting stories.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Bradshaw

    This is a powerful collection. My favorites included "Everything is Closed Today" by Sarah Pinkster, "The Society for the Reclamation of Words and Meanings" by Fran Wilde, and "Glossolalia" by John Hornor Jacobs.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    A very good collection.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kate Sherrod

    There are some good pieces, some great pieces, and two that made me reach for the brain bleach but were still amazing. Full review soon at Skiffy and Fanty!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Still reading, but quite comfortable recommending this as a book to read when you want to burn something down but cannot, for whatever reason, literally burn it down.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jake

  18. 4 out of 5

    Barry Hill

  19. 5 out of 5

    Adri Joy

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lesley

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jo

  22. 5 out of 5

    Olga Zelenova

  23. 5 out of 5

    John Jacobs

  24. 5 out of 5

    John Towers

  25. 5 out of 5

    Leila

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ismael

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  29. 5 out of 5

    BriAnne

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jen Yi

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