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Ark

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On the eve of Earth’s destruction, a young scientist discovers something too precious to lose, in a story of cataclysm and hope by the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Divergent trilogy. It’s only two weeks before an asteroid turns home to dust. Though most of Earth has already been evacuated, it’s Samantha’s job to catalog plant samples for the survivors’ On the eve of Earth’s destruction, a young scientist discovers something too precious to lose, in a story of cataclysm and hope by the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Divergent trilogy. It’s only two weeks before an asteroid turns home to dust. Though most of Earth has already been evacuated, it’s Samantha’s job to catalog plant samples for the survivors’ unknowable journey beyond. Preparing to stay behind and watch the world end, she makes a final human connection. As certain doom hurtles nearer, the unexpected and beautiful potential for the future begins to flower. Veronica Roth’s Ark is part of Forward, a collection of six stories of the near and far future from out-of-this-world authors. Each piece can be read or listened to in a single thought-provoking sitting.


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On the eve of Earth’s destruction, a young scientist discovers something too precious to lose, in a story of cataclysm and hope by the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Divergent trilogy. It’s only two weeks before an asteroid turns home to dust. Though most of Earth has already been evacuated, it’s Samantha’s job to catalog plant samples for the survivors’ On the eve of Earth’s destruction, a young scientist discovers something too precious to lose, in a story of cataclysm and hope by the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Divergent trilogy. It’s only two weeks before an asteroid turns home to dust. Though most of Earth has already been evacuated, it’s Samantha’s job to catalog plant samples for the survivors’ unknowable journey beyond. Preparing to stay behind and watch the world end, she makes a final human connection. As certain doom hurtles nearer, the unexpected and beautiful potential for the future begins to flower. Veronica Roth’s Ark is part of Forward, a collection of six stories of the near and far future from out-of-this-world authors. Each piece can be read or listened to in a single thought-provoking sitting.

30 review for Ark

  1. 5 out of 5

    Emily May

    Ark was my second read from the Forward collection and my second least favourite. To be fair, I think I liked it more than a lot of other readers did, judging by the reviews, but it was very slow for such a short story. I like this story more when looking back over it than I did while I was reading. It's a very slow, quiet tale, exploring the beauty of Earth through horticulture. Samantha is a scientist, cataloging plant samples to take on the Ark when the final people leave Earth. Most have alrea Ark was my second read from the Forward collection and my second least favourite. To be fair, I think I liked it more than a lot of other readers did, judging by the reviews, but it was very slow for such a short story. I like this story more when looking back over it than I did while I was reading. It's a very slow, quiet tale, exploring the beauty of Earth through horticulture. Samantha is a scientist, cataloging plant samples to take on the Ark when the final people leave Earth. Most have already been evacuated and Earth's last days are rapidly approaching in the form of an asteroid. There's some understated beauty to it, but the lack of connection with the characters or any real emotional drive to the story kept me at a distance. The idea itself is very simple and it presents a sad nostalgia for Earth and all still left to discover about it. After I had read it and given it some thought, it struck me as a kind of love letter to our planet. It's just too bad that the story itself was not as compelling as the idea suggests. Randomize by Andy Weir - ⭑☆☆☆☆ Emergency Skin by N.K. Jemisin - ⭑⭑⭑⭑⭑ You Have Arrived at Your Destination by Amor Towles - ⭑⭑⭑⭑☆ The Last Conversation by Paul Tremblay - ⭑⭑⭑⭑☆ Summer Frost by Blake Crouch - ⭑⭑⭑⭑☆

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    Well, this read was actually a pleasant surprise for me. I thought Veronica Roth's DIVERGENT trilogy went off the rails in the second book, and I never even read the controversial third book. But this contemplative, melancholic novella was really well done. An asteroid is about to crash into the earth, and it's a worldwide extinction event - the asteroid has been appropriately named Finis. Humanity has known this was coming for over 20 years (the asteroid did a few flybys first) and s Well, this read was actually a pleasant surprise for me. I thought Veronica Roth's DIVERGENT trilogy went off the rails in the second book, and I never even read the controversial third book. But this contemplative, melancholic novella was really well done. An asteroid is about to crash into the earth, and it's a worldwide extinction event - the asteroid has been appropriately named Finis. Humanity has known this was coming for over 20 years (the asteroid did a few flybys first) and somehow everyone has managed to leave Earth for another planet (how exactly this was pulled off is never explained, which I thought was a big hole in the story). The only remaining people are a group of scientists who are finishing up the collection and cataloging of various plants and animals. They're planning to take off in their two spaceship "Arks" just a few days before Finis hits. But Sarah, a horticulturist, isn't planning to get on the Ark, because of complicated Reasons. Ark won't be to every reader's taste (the GR reviews are all over the map). There's a lot - maybe too much - talk about plants generally and orchids in particular. But if you're in the mood for a thoughtful, slower-paced SF novella, you might enjoy this one. Full review to come!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Constantine

    Rating: 3.5/5.0 Genre: Science Fiction + Dystopia This was a good short story about a scientist called Samantha. She has the responsibility of getting all the plant samples from earth planet to take them on the ship Ark before Finis asteroid hits the earth and ends all life on the planet. The story is slow but beautifully written. Its atmosphere somehow reminded me of an indie film that I love a lot called Another Earth. The ending was fitting for the story. There is no much character development because it is less than 40 pages Rating: 3.5/5.0 Genre: Science Fiction + Dystopia This was a good short story about a scientist called Samantha. She has the responsibility of getting all the plant samples from earth planet to take them on the ship Ark before Finis asteroid hits the earth and ends all life on the planet. The story is slow but beautifully written. Its atmosphere somehow reminded me of an indie film that I love a lot called Another Earth. The ending was fitting for the story. There is no much character development because it is less than 40 pages in total. Ark is the first book in the Forward series which is an Amazon Original Series. I give it strong 3.5 stars out of 5.0 Available on Kindle Unlimited

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hamad

    This Review ✍ Blog 📖 Twitter 🐦 Instagram 📷 ★ I am going to write short reviews for each of these novellas after finishing them immediately. ★ I have never read anything by Veronica before and I always had a gut feeling that I would not enjoy her book and it looks like I was right! ★ It was not like the worst book that I ever read and that's why it is not a 1 star. But I did not feel a single thing, I did not care about the characters and by next week, it would be deleted from my brain! ★ This Review ✍️ Blog 📖 Twitter 🐦 Instagram 📷 ★ I am going to write short reviews for each of these novellas after finishing them immediately. ★ I have never read anything by Veronica before and I always had a gut feeling that I would not enjoy her book and it looks like I was right! ★ It was not like the worst book that I ever read and that's why it is not a 1 star. But I did not feel a single thing, I did not care about the characters and by next week, it would be deleted from my brain! ★ I don't know what was the point of the story, it may sound appealing for someone who is a botanist and have an interest in horticulture but other than that, it was a disappointing read! I hope the rest of the collection is better! You can get more books from Book Depository

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carol (Bookaria)

    This is a reflective short-fiction novel that takes place in the future. An asteroid will soon crash with planet Earth and life as we know it is not expected to survive. For years now, humanity has been preparing to move to another planet before the collision occurs. The story revolves around Samantha, a young scientist whose job is to catalog plant samples that will be taken with the surviving humans to their new home. I enjoyed the story, the author is descriptive and imm This is a reflective short-fiction novel that takes place in the future. An asteroid will soon crash with planet Earth and life as we know it is not expected to survive. For years now, humanity has been preparing to move to another planet before the collision occurs. The story revolves around Samantha, a young scientist whose job is to catalog plant samples that will be taken with the surviving humans to their new home. I enjoyed the story, the author is descriptive and immerses the reader in the character’s tasks, there are detailed description of the flowers being studied, so it should be interesting for those with horticulture interests. Overall, I recommend it to readers of sci-fi and contemporary fiction.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Reading Tam Ishly

    So Veronica Roth clichè. The writing style is fine but the character development and the plot are so repetitive. Dystopian, controlled world. People are chosen/selected. The earth is going to get destroyed soon. Everything natural on earth is coming to an end. Sadly, it couldn't hold my interest. It becomes really monotonous after the first 5 pages and the characters are so so. The ending is really bad. Like a story was just starting and it ended out of nowhere.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    The audio did not work for me at all. I was bored from the beginning. It just rambled along, I looked in vain for a red thread or something to grab my interest. I listened to it a second time with half an ear this morning and then proceeded to skim the written word. I think that did the trick. I still don‘t love this story, but I think reading this brings out the subtleties of the story much better than listening to it. I only caught the final twist when I read the words, crazily enou The audio did not work for me at all. I was bored from the beginning. It just rambled along, I looked in vain for a red thread or something to grab my interest. I listened to it a second time with half an ear this morning and then proceeded to skim the written word. I think that did the trick. I still don‘t love this story, but I think reading this brings out the subtleties of the story much better than listening to it. I only caught the final twist when I read the words, crazily enough. I might have fallen asleep last night, listening to this. Audio narration by Evan Rachel Wood, who appeared on my radar in the role of Queen Sophie-Anne on True Blood. She did ok. Relatively bland. She made no attempt to bring any of the characters alive by giving them different voices. Random thoughts, whilst reading this: Svalbard makes me think of dark elves. Not sure, who is to blame. In case you are wondering: From spectacular orchids to towering trees – 2018's top new plant discoveries https://www.theguardian.com/environme... None of my orchids have soil. Most orchids grow on trees (epiphytic orchids), although some are terrestrial. Or do you call the substrate that is used for potted orchids soil as well in English? Look up a photo of a mirror orchid, it is so cool!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Veronique

    3.5* Melancholic short story. I liked how Roth juxtaposed the immense with the tiny, the cataclysmic end of Earth against a flower. And yet, it kind of makes sense. The small things often are the most important ones in the grand scheme of things. She also contrasted the vast emptiness of an arctic setting (any mention of Svalbard always makes me think of His Dark Materials) with the fecundity of plants in all their tiny and rich intricacies. This wasn’t an easy t 3.5* Melancholic short story. I liked how Roth juxtaposed the immense with the tiny, the cataclysmic end of Earth against a flower. And yet, it kind of makes sense. The small things often are the most important ones in the grand scheme of things. She also contrasted the vast emptiness of an arctic setting (any mention of Svalbard always makes me think of His Dark Materials) with the fecundity of plants in all their tiny and rich intricacies. This wasn’t an easy to connect with story. The voice of the narration from the main lead is disconnected from her life in light of the event that has shaded and shaped her existence, and this is reflected in the tone. However, the author gives us her awakening, full of hope.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    The Publisher Says: On the eve of Earth’s destruction, a young scientist discovers something too precious to lose, in a story of cataclysm and hope by the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Divergent trilogy. It’s only two weeks before an asteroid turns home to dust. Though most of Earth has already been evacuated, it’s Samantha’s job to catalog plant samples for the survivors’ unknowable journey beyond. Preparing to stay behind and watch the world end, she makes a final hum The Publisher Says: On the eve of Earth’s destruction, a young scientist discovers something too precious to lose, in a story of cataclysm and hope by the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Divergent trilogy. It’s only two weeks before an asteroid turns home to dust. Though most of Earth has already been evacuated, it’s Samantha’s job to catalog plant samples for the survivors’ unknowable journey beyond. Preparing to stay behind and watch the world end, she makes a final human connection. As certain doom hurtles nearer, the unexpected and beautiful potential for the future begins to flower. Veronica Roth’s Ark is part of Forward, a collection of six stories of the near and far future from out-of-this-world authors. Each piece can be read or listened to in a single thought-provoking sitting. THESE SIX STORIES ARE FREE TO READ FOR ALL PRIME MEMBERS. NO KINDLE UNLIMITED NEEDED. AS LONG AS YOUR MEMBERSHIP REMAINS IN GOOD STANDING THEY WILL REMAIN IN YOUR COLLECTION. My Review: The Svalbard Global Seed Vault is a very real thing, one that I am a bit surprised exists...it's so logical, so self-evidently necessary a thing that I'm amazed some religious nut or another hasn't blown it up...and has existed in differing forms since 1984. If there is to be any smallest hope of survival for humanity, this type of gene bank/seed collection/research project must exist and be replicated many, many times over. Blessedly, the Nordic countries and Kew Gardens in the UK are making this global movement happen. I personally thank them for this difficult, contentious, and urgent task being done to benefit all of humankind. Author Roth, whose Divergent series was not to my personal taste, is a skilled phrasemaker and a keen observer of Life. I was utterly transported to Svalbard, brought *right*there* by this stellar phrase: The land had glowed blue—beautiful in the way that a Rothko painting was beautiful, because it was empty enough to shrink a person and then swallow them. Two things I adore—Arctic landscapes and Rothko paintings—brought together in a way I'd never so much as dreamed was possible. I treasure moments of discovery like this, they make mental furniture fresh and interesting again by unexpected interrelationships. Samantha, whose world was always going to be destroyed in her lifetime by the irresistible force of a five-mile-wide asteroid Author Roth (or series creator Blake Crouch, I don't know for sure which) named "Finis" (Latin for "end" and the title of a much-anthologized story from a 1906 issue of The Argosy magazine) meeting the Earth's crust, is an ultimate orphan...her family all dead...as well as a detail-oriented and thorough person. Perfect type to have working on this program, like she was designed for it: So maybe {her father} had been apologizing for giving her life in the first place, when he knew it would be full of dread. She wished she could have told him that life was already full of dread, no matter who you were. That there was nothing you could have that you couldn’t one day lose. She volunteers to remain in Svalbard cataloging germ plasm samples for inclusion in the Ark Flora's hold. This is it, you see, these last few items from the seed bank represent the final species on Old Earth to make the deep-space voyage to Terra, our new home. Samantha, however, is holding a secret: She has decided she ain't a-goin' since, if she stays, she will have the one and only chance anyone will ever have to experience first-hand the end of the world. The *actual* end of the world. Someone without close ties can make that decision for themself, no one really can argue...and since she hasn't shared the plan, no one will. Snort. Doctor Nils Hagen, an eminent widowed scientist, is like Samantha. He's not interested in a space voyage he won't live to see the end of; he'll die here in his greenhouse full of the orchids he so passionately loves. In Svalbard. Not far from the North Pole. Privileged much, Nils? He's lost his will to live with his wife's death, and Samantha relates to his desire to see the end of something we all thought should be eternal: Home. After all, what use is a future without your love in it? His wife gone, his orchids dying in Svalbard as the sun goes out for a generation or two; nothing on an Ark for the likes of his old-man ass. Samantha isn't old enough to know that the question, "what's your favorite...", isn't one old people care to answer. How the hell can you, brash young pup, even begin to scrape the frost from the corner of the windowpane that we've allowed to frost over so long ago that glass was a novelty item? If we tell you something, anything at all, you still won't know what you're asking: "Look at everything you've ever done and thought and felt about this thing, sort through the Alp of memories, and spit some pat, facile phrase into the whippersnapper's ear. Maybe she'll quieten down then." Nils tries an old stand-by: "I don't have a favorite. I love them all equally." “You just can’t—and if you did, then it’s the same as loving nothing at all. So you have to hold just a few things dear, because that’s what love is. Particular. Specific.” Smart, this one. Saw through that "hush now, little one" response in a heartbeat! So a friendship begins. And so Nils, with so many ideas and so much information, begins to let Samantha see what truly happens when The End has a date on it, how life lived becomes A Life, how meaningless nothings are, in fact, everything as well, and how utterly impossible it is to see The End without also seeing In The Beginning clear as sunlight on water in, on, over, above, around it. When the student is ready, the teacher will come.

  10. 5 out of 5

    TS Chan

    Update: Finished all 6 stories in the Forward collection, and I've to say this one is my favourite as it resonated most with my love for nature, and the poignancy of fleeting moments of human connection. Not a story that would appeal to everyone, but its brand of melancholy was beautiful and struck me deeply. I was surprised by the emotions I felt from such a short story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Henry

    Enganging This is a terrific story in the Forward books curated by Blake Crouch. It is the first book I have read by Veronica Roth. It will not be the last!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mackey

    Ark is part of the Forward Collection featured on Amazon.com. Each of the short stories, including this one, explore the author's view of the earth's future. In Ark, Earth and its inhabitants will be destroyed by an asteroid that crashes into the planet. Knowing in advance this will happen, scientists have found an alternate world and most of Earth's inhabitants have been evacuated. The only ones left are the scientists who collecting specimens for the Arks that will travel to the new world. As Ark is part of the Forward Collection featured on Amazon.com. Each of the short stories, including this one, explore the author's view of the earth's future. In Ark, Earth and its inhabitants will be destroyed by an asteroid that crashes into the planet. Knowing in advance this will happen, scientists have found an alternate world and most of Earth's inhabitants have been evacuated. The only ones left are the scientists who collecting specimens for the Arks that will travel to the new world. As we count down the days to the end of time, we get a glimpse into the beauty, sadness and hope of what Earth was, what a new world could be. I love dystopian fiction and Roth, an accomplished author, created an intriguing look into that future world.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alec Lyons

    Simply put, one of the most beautiful pieces I've read in a long, long time. Quiet, earnest but a little melancholy but also deeply moving and completely utterly tender. It's hard to summarise, and impossible to capture the quiet, gentle beauty of the prose that tells us this moment in time. I think this will stay with me for a time.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Inkish Kingdoms

    Visit me at: Book Blog / Instagram This short story was a really nice read... mainly because of Veronica's writing style. I love the inconsequential feeling the author transmits through the main character. How this small story cover the hopelessness and inevitable events of the apocalypse while still holding tide to hope and life. As a weird new discovered plant makes the cut to survive, the main character undergoes a change so deep that saves her life and allows her to move on. Yes, life can become Visit me at: Book Blog / Instagram This short story was a really nice read... mainly because of Veronica's writing style. I love the inconsequential feeling the author transmits through the main character. How this small story cover the hopelessness and inevitable events of the apocalypse while still holding tide to hope and life. As a weird new discovered plant makes the cut to survive, the main character undergoes a change so deep that saves her life and allows her to move on. Yes, life can become inconsequential, but even the smallest beautiful things in life can make the difference. Everything is valuable depending on the meaning we give to them, and the nostalgia of losing this beautiful planet is clearly unbearable. I hope the rest of the stories are as pleasant as this one. I had forgotten who I enjoy Veronica's narrative. Updated: This is not a dystopian title. This is more fiction/sci-fi, and it is not YA either. When reading this title, you shouldn't expect a Divergent or Dystopian feeling as this is not what the author wrote. :)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gabi

    So beautiful and melancholic! A story more like a poem, a feeling. Very moving in a quiet voice. The audio narration by Evan Rachel Wood did the subdued atmosphere justice.

  16. 5 out of 5

    David

    With Ark, Veronica Roth has written a beautiful story that, like all good science fiction, uses a futuristic setting to highlight something true about ourselves. In this case, the truth Roth illuminates is the beauty of the earth and how much we have to lose. As such, I viewed it as a very subtle message of conservation / environmentalism. The mood is somber, which based on the reviews clearly turned off some readers, but it's hard to be too upbeat in a story about the world rapidly nearing destruct With Ark, Veronica Roth has written a beautiful story that, like all good science fiction, uses a futuristic setting to highlight something true about ourselves. In this case, the truth Roth illuminates is the beauty of the earth and how much we have to lose. As such, I viewed it as a very subtle message of conservation / environmentalism. The mood is somber, which based on the reviews clearly turned off some readers, but it's hard to be too upbeat in a story about the world rapidly nearing destruction via a collision with an asteroid (humanity has been aware of its fate for many years). Here's an example: Maybe he [the main character's father] had been apologizing for giving her life in the first place, when he knew it would be full of dread. She wished she could have told him that life was already full of dread, no matter who you were. That there was nothing you could have that you couldn’t one day lose. That autumn always gave way to winter, but it was her favorite time of year—those fleeting bursts of beauty before the branches went bare. I don't like giving 5 stars. Is Ark among the best 10% of fiction I've ever read? No, I don't think so, but on the other hand I couldn't have asked anything more from 39 pages. Thank you to Amazon for making this available free to Prime members.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Henk

    Rather slow, twee and overly sweet for my taste, certainly taking into account it’s a 38 page story about the end of the world We follow Samantha, a horticulturist on an evacuated earth. She researches plants in the Svalbard gene vault to include these on Ark Flora, preserving biodiversity while humanity moves to earth the sequel. An asteroid is coming to bring the planet back to a pristine state. You might imagine everyone is freaked out and racing to save as much as they can, but Samant Rather slow, twee and overly sweet for my taste, certainly taking into account it’s a 38 page story about the end of the world We follow Samantha, a horticulturist on an evacuated earth. She researches plants in the Svalbard gene vault to include these on Ark Flora, preserving biodiversity while humanity moves to earth the sequel. An asteroid is coming to bring the planet back to a pristine state. You might imagine everyone is freaked out and racing to save as much as they can, but Samantha and friends have time to stack a boat with supplies, bring lunch to people a hour away growing orchids in the midst of blizzards and even hit a blunt while categorizing plants. Despite the implausibilities I liked the atmosphere Roth portrayed: melancholic, tinged with love for a dissapearing planet and people lost. The writing is quite nice with some pretty, almost selfhelp like quotes included below. Why take a shower when you’re just going to get dirty? Why eat when you’re just going to get hungry? Every flower dies eventually, Sam. But not yet. She wished she could have told him that life was already full of dread, no matter who you were. That there was nothing you could have that you couldn’t one day lose. That autumn always gave way to winter, but it was her favorite time of year—those fleeting bursts of beauty before the branches went bare. “Well, you can’t love everything equally,” she said. “You just can’t—and if you did, then it’s the same as loving nothing at all. So you have to hold just a few things dear, because that’s what love is. Particular. Specific.” But the story felt implausible (like how would we evacuate 7,5 billion people into space?) and non-urgent, something I would have at least expected based on the basic premise of the story. 2,5 stars rounded down.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    A short story so interesting, I wish it continued. What would you do, with the end of Earth by natural causes approaching? Stay and perish or get aboard the last ship, living the rest of your natural life in space?

  19. 4 out of 5

    ✨Skye✨

    I quite liked this one, although I think it's telling that I had to read the blurb again and remind myself of what it was about! I did find it resonated quite deeply with me though about the value of our planet and what we stand to lose should humanity not change. There was some interesting discussion about what it means to be human and to live. The flower and plant saving was actually quite interesting too.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    Ark The earth's last day's so many stories have been written about the earth's destruction. This one is about an asteroid that will hit the earth and the group of people that are gathering together the wonders of the earth to take with them Samantha is determined not to go when the Ark finally leaves. She will sail her boat and face the end on Earth. She has been cataloging the plant species of the earth that will be taken into the Ark. She talks with Hagen another that has made Ark The earth's last day's so many stories have been written about the earth's destruction. This one is about an asteroid that will hit the earth and the group of people that are gathering together the wonders of the earth to take with them Samantha is determined not to go when the Ark finally leaves. She will sail her boat and face the end on Earth. She has been cataloging the plant species of the earth that will be taken into the Ark. She talks with Hagen another that has made the decision to stay on earth. It is a good story that is more about the decision to keep surviving than it is about the destruction of the earth. The ending is somewhat expected so I was unhappy about how the character inevitably makes her choice.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Roz

    I do love the cover.

  22. 4 out of 5

    ❀❀Chikiboom❀❀

    I'm so excited for this one.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Obsidian

    I was worried I wouldn't like this one since I hard disliked Roth's "Divergent." This book though hit me in a way I wasn't expecting. Roth talks about the last days on Earth before an asteroid hits and wipes out life on the planet as people know it. What I found interesting is that many people realized this was going to happen and that they still went on, had children, etc. That part of the book was interesting to me. I wish that Roth had focused more on the before part, which is the only reaso I was worried I wouldn't like this one since I hard disliked Roth's "Divergent." This book though hit me in a way I wasn't expecting. Roth talks about the last days on Earth before an asteroid hits and wipes out life on the planet as people know it. What I found interesting is that many people realized this was going to happen and that they still went on, had children, etc. That part of the book was interesting to me. I wish that Roth had focused more on the before part, which is the only reason why I gave this 4 stars. There was a lot that I wanted explained, that was not by the time I got to the end of this book. "Ark" follows a young horticulturalist, Samantha. Samantha and the last few scientists on Earth are classifying flora and fauna that will be put aboard an "ark" that will eventually travel to a new Earth called Terra. Samantha though has different plans for heself which eventually change after she starts taking with one of the scientist at the camp she is at named Hagen. So Samantha's history was a bit scattered I thought. We find out about her mother and father in parts, but then we hear about what happened towards them in the end. I was able to piece together that somehow when Samantha's father and mother were young (maybe) they were told about an asteroid that was going to be the so-called "planet killer." To live in a time where you are told that the world you know is one day going to be over was a bit chilling. I wanted more about that, but it's a short story, so you can't ask for everything. The character of Hagen was interesting and I loved the little bit of scenes that we get between him and Samantha. The writing I thought was good and the flow too. We start off with two weeks left before the final two arks leave Earth. So it's a slow count-off. We have Samantha remembering her parents, and things that happened to her (her first school dance, slow dance, going to Warren Field with her father). The setting of this book is unknown. It's a dystopia novel, so let's guess Earth's future plus or minus a thousand years or so. I was interested in how people found a new Earth, and how they got everyone off, etc. It seemed so interesting to me that this happened with barely any skirmishes. Based on watching disaster movies I thought it be an ugly lottery system and most of the planet destroyed or something. The ending was moving and loving. Life goes on, no matter what.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kayleigh

    3 stars. “A black shift that fell to the middle of her calves was the most promising option, though she had clutched her hands tight around the rise of fat around her middle when she first put it on, only for her mother to smack them away and tell her not to be silly—it was no crime to have a body.” Ark follows a young scientist named Samantha on the eve of Earth’s destruction. There’s only two weeks left before an asteroid turns the planet int/>“A 3 stars. “A black shift that fell to the middle of her calves was the most promising option, though she had clutched her hands tight around the rise of fat around her middle when she first put it on, only for her mother to smack them away and tell her not to be silly—it was no crime to have a body.” Ark follows a young scientist named Samantha on the eve of Earth’s destruction. There’s only two weeks left before an asteroid turns the planet into dust. Most people on Earth have already been evacuated, but it’s Samantha’s job to plant samples for the survivors’ journey away from Earth. Preparing to stay behind and watch the world end, she makes a final human connection and as certain doom hurtles nearer, the unexpected and beautiful potential for the future begins to flower. To be completely honest, I think I liked this as much as I did because it was written by Veronica Roth. She has a very easy and engaging writing style, one I have enjoyed for such a long time. However, the concept was much, much better than the execution, in my opinion. All of the Forward Collection is short, but I think this one would have done much better as a full length book. I did like the characters, but I don’t think I had nearly enough time to get to know them or connect with them for them to really mean anything to me. All of that being said, I still did like this one, and I’m excited to continue with this series.

  25. 5 out of 5

    The Behrg

    Nominal sci-fi tale that delivers what you might expect without adding anything extra.

  26. 4 out of 5

    mina reads™️

    This was admittedly a bit corny but for whatever reason I found that the story ached with tender longing for a dying earth and for me there was something really sad and beautiful about seeing the last group of humans say goodbye to their old home. So I enjoyed it despite my checkered past with Roth’s previous work

  27. 4 out of 5

    Neil (or bleed)

    I like it. Ark is a character-driven story that focuses to the main character's (Samantha's) disposition towards life and the future. How the people around her and her discoveries will affect her mindset about the end of the world and her role as a survivor. As a human being.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gerhard

    If this had been the first Forward story I had read, I would probably have given up on the series. I liked it even less than the Andy Weir, mainly due to its eye-rolling melodrama. There is a great delicate idea in there, an SF version of 'The Orchard Thief' by Susan Orlean, but spoilt by the heavy-handed intro of the planet-killer comet. Called Finis. Geddit?

  29. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    Interesting premise, but unfortunately fell short for me. Obviously it's hard to pack a big story into a small space, so I can't fault them there, just wish this was a full-fledged book as it could have been so much better.

  30. 4 out of 5

    B.A. Wilson

    The concept was really interesting. The content was heavy and definitely on the artsy morbid side of things. The character development was incredibly weak, overall, so I think this concept just didn’t fare well in a short story format. I was bored a lot, which probably isn’t good considering I listened on audio, on 3 speed, which means the whole story was only about 27 minutes long for me. Basically, this story struggled to hold my attention for half an hour. I guess, all this results in that I The concept was really interesting. The content was heavy and definitely on the artsy morbid side of things. The character development was incredibly weak, overall, so I think this concept just didn’t fare well in a short story format. I was bored a lot, which probably isn’t good considering I listened on audio, on 3 speed, which means the whole story was only about 27 minutes long for me. Basically, this story struggled to hold my attention for half an hour. I guess, all this results in that I don’t particularly like this story, and yet I also don’t hate it. I think the bones of something interesting were buried deep here, but not enough bone fragments rose to the surface to capture and hold my attention. It’s almost like it tried too hard to be insightful, and instead bordered on tedious and underdeveloped. Pages: 39

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