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The Science Fiction Hall of Fame: Volume II A

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Eleven Classic Novellas by the most honored authors of science fiction: This volume is the definitive collection of the best science fiction novellas between 1929 to 1964 and contains eleven great classics. There is no better anthology that captures the birth of science fiction as a literary field. Published in 1973 to honor stories that had come before the institution of Eleven Classic Novellas by the most honored authors of science fiction: This volume is the definitive collection of the best science fiction novellas between 1929 to 1964 and contains eleven great classics. There is no better anthology that captures the birth of science fiction as a literary field. Published in 1973 to honor stories that had come before the institution of the Nebula Awards, The Science Fiction Hall of Fame introduced tens of thousands of young readers to the wonders of science fiction and was a favorite of libraries across the country. This volume contains novellas by: Ray Bradbury, James Blish, Algis Budrys, Theodore Cogswell, E. M. Forster, Frederik Pohl, James H. Schmitz, T. L. Sherred, Wilmar H. Shiras, Clifford D. Simak, and Jack Vance. Contents: Introduction · Ben Bova · in · Call Me Joe · Poul Anderson · nv Astounding Apr ’57 · Who Goes There? [as by Don A. Stuart] · John W. Campbell, Jr. · na Astounding Aug ’38 · Nerves · Lester del Rey · na Astounding Sep ’42 · Universe [Hugh Hoyland] · Robert A. Heinlein · na Astounding May ’41 · The Marching Morons · C. M. Kornbluth · nv Galaxy Apr ’51 · Vintage Season [as by Lawrence O’Donnell] · Henry Kuttner & C. L. Moore · na Astounding Sep ’46 · ...And Then There Were None · Eric Frank Russell · na Astounding Jun ’51 · The Ballad of Lost C’Mell · Cordwainer Smith · nv Galaxy Oct ’62 · Baby Is Three · Theodore Sturgeon · na Galaxy Oct ’52 · The Time Machine [Time Machine] · H. G. Wells · na The New Review Jan, 1895 (+4) · With Folded Hands... [Humanoids] · Jack Williamson · nv Astounding Jul ’47


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Eleven Classic Novellas by the most honored authors of science fiction: This volume is the definitive collection of the best science fiction novellas between 1929 to 1964 and contains eleven great classics. There is no better anthology that captures the birth of science fiction as a literary field. Published in 1973 to honor stories that had come before the institution of Eleven Classic Novellas by the most honored authors of science fiction: This volume is the definitive collection of the best science fiction novellas between 1929 to 1964 and contains eleven great classics. There is no better anthology that captures the birth of science fiction as a literary field. Published in 1973 to honor stories that had come before the institution of the Nebula Awards, The Science Fiction Hall of Fame introduced tens of thousands of young readers to the wonders of science fiction and was a favorite of libraries across the country. This volume contains novellas by: Ray Bradbury, James Blish, Algis Budrys, Theodore Cogswell, E. M. Forster, Frederik Pohl, James H. Schmitz, T. L. Sherred, Wilmar H. Shiras, Clifford D. Simak, and Jack Vance. Contents: Introduction · Ben Bova · in · Call Me Joe · Poul Anderson · nv Astounding Apr ’57 · Who Goes There? [as by Don A. Stuart] · John W. Campbell, Jr. · na Astounding Aug ’38 · Nerves · Lester del Rey · na Astounding Sep ’42 · Universe [Hugh Hoyland] · Robert A. Heinlein · na Astounding May ’41 · The Marching Morons · C. M. Kornbluth · nv Galaxy Apr ’51 · Vintage Season [as by Lawrence O’Donnell] · Henry Kuttner & C. L. Moore · na Astounding Sep ’46 · ...And Then There Were None · Eric Frank Russell · na Astounding Jun ’51 · The Ballad of Lost C’Mell · Cordwainer Smith · nv Galaxy Oct ’62 · Baby Is Three · Theodore Sturgeon · na Galaxy Oct ’52 · The Time Machine [Time Machine] · H. G. Wells · na The New Review Jan, 1895 (+4) · With Folded Hands... [Humanoids] · Jack Williamson · nv Astounding Jul ’47

30 review for The Science Fiction Hall of Fame: Volume II A

  1. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    5.0 stars. I have not read all of the books in this collection but will comment on the ones I have: Call Me Joe (Poul Anderson)(1957): 6.0 Stars (One of my All Time Favorite Stories). Outstanding story about exploring and terraforming the surface of Jupiter through the use of bio-mechanical life forms whose consciousness is controlled via remote control with researchers above the planet. A story of identity and quality of life. The Marching Morons (C.M. Kornbluth)(1951): 5.0 to 5.5 Stars. 5.0 stars. I have not read all of the books in this collection but will comment on the ones I have: Call Me Joe (Poul Anderson)(1957): 6.0 Stars (One of my All Time Favorite Stories). Outstanding story about exploring and terraforming the surface of Jupiter through the use of bio-mechanical life forms whose consciousness is controlled via remote control with researchers above the planet. A story of identity and quality of life. The Marching Morons (C.M. Kornbluth)(1951): 5.0 to 5.5 Stars. Satirical look at a world in which the vast majority of the world's population are idiots who live carefree lives and the few "intelligent" people work endlessly to keep society going. Who Goes There? (John Campbell)(1938): 4.5 to 5.0 stars. Classic novella about a remote Antarctic research station dealing with a hostile alien that can assume the shape and memories of any living creature. With Folded Hands (Jack Williamson): 5.5 stars. A chilling look at the dangers of robots trying to keep mankind "safe" even from itself. A great ending (read February 28, 2010). The Ballad of Lost C'Mell (Cordwainer Smith): 4.5 stars. Short prequel Novella set a few years before Smith's classic novel Norstrilia in which Jestocost, a Lord of the Instrumentality, conspires with C'Mell, an underperson, to improve the lot of the underpeople. The best part of this story (as with many of Smith's stories) is the world he has created. (read June 6, 2010) Vintage season (Henry Kuttner & C.L. Moore): 4.0 stars. Classic novella about a landlord who receives some unusual house guests during a memorable month of May. (read June 6, 2010)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    I have to quibble: C'Mell is 20 pp, hardly a novella. This book didn't take long to read, as most stories were quite familiar to me from other anthologies. And some just don't hold up all that well. But as an introduction to some of the foundational & inspirational classics, it's quite good.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Williwaw

    Okay, so I cheated a bit. I did not re-read "The Time Machine," by H.G. Wells. I think I've probably read that story twice before and I've probably seen the excellent and faithful George Pal movie (1960)a couple times, as well. It is a good story and was worthy of inclusion in this book. My favorite selection here is " . . . And Then There Were None," by Eric Frank Russell. This has got to be one of the most hilarious works of fiction that I have ever read. (If you love Vonnegut, my guess is Okay, so I cheated a bit. I did not re-read "The Time Machine," by H.G. Wells. I think I've probably read that story twice before and I've probably seen the excellent and faithful George Pal movie (1960)a couple times, as well. It is a good story and was worthy of inclusion in this book. My favorite selection here is " . . . And Then There Were None," by Eric Frank Russell. This has got to be one of the most hilarious works of fiction that I have ever read. (If you love Vonnegut, my guess is that you will love this story.) It is about a diplomatic mission to check up on progress at various planets that were colonized by humans centuries before, and then left to their own devices. The story focuses on an exploratory mission to a planet inhabited by colonists who now call themselves "Ghandians." It turns out that they have developed a whole culture based on Ghandi's principles of civil disobedience. They are completely uninterested in the giant spaceship which has landed in their midst. Their most common response to any request is "I won't!" The whole culture is non-monetary, and is instead based upon a complicated barter structure of "obs" (obligations). Needless to say, this hyper-libertarian culture turns out to be very seductive to the diplomatic crew! I'm eager to read some more E.F. Russell now. Other stand-out stories include: "Who Goes There," by John W. Campbell; "Vintage Season," by C.L. Moore & Henry Kuttner; and "The Marching Morons," by C.M. Kornbluth. "Who Goes There" is about a deadly, shape-shifing alien who murders, and then assumes the identities of the members of a polar base. Campbell pulls it off beautifully for a very suspenseful read, as the scientists are picked off, one by one. "Vintage Season" is an ingenious story about time-traveling "tourists" from the future. The narrative assumes the perspective of a clueless couple, who rent a house to the tourists. The tourists have taken an oath of secrecy, but the male landlord gets romantically involved with one of the "tourists" and their secrets are inadvertently revealed to him, with tragic results. Moore & Kuttner were masters of characterization. Their stories are full of subtle touches and observations that make them memorable and vivid. I should mention that Moore & Kuttner (a married couple) were the dynamic duo of science fiction during the 1940's and '50's. Their story, "Mimsy Were the Borogoves," appeared in Volume I of this "Hall of Fame" series. It was also one of the best in that volume. Perhaps Moore and Kuttner are not so well remembered today because they focused their energies on short stories and novellas instead of novels. It's a shame, because they were truly brilliant and deserve a wider audience. "The Marching Morons" is, for all its merit, an odd story. I had to read it twice because I was not sure that I understood it the first time. It is essentially a story about overpopulation in the distant future, and the struggle of a secret intelligentsia to overcome it. The discovery of a solution hinges on something that I found preposterous: the revival of a cryogenically preserved swindler from the past, whose simple, but unscrupulous ideas are somehow beyond the ken of the intelligentsia of the future. But I don't think the story is meant to be taken seriously. Instead, this is dark humor at its best (as long as you aren't too troubled by some borrowing from Nazi Germany). The only stories that really let me down here were: "Nerves," by Lester del Rey (good on details, but too long and too slow); and "Call Me Joe," by Poul Anderson (too "far out" for my tastes). In closing, I should give honorable mention to "Baby is Three," by Theodore Sturgeon. It works reasonably well as a stand-alone story, but I felt that it worked to better effect as part of the novel, "More Than Human." I have written a separate review of the novel, so I won't repeat myself here.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    So far: "Call Me Joe" by Poul Anderson -- excellent "Who's Out There?" by John W. Campbell -- Good page turner, interesting premise of a chameleon-like alien (the alien in Howard Hawks' classic horror film based on this story, The Thing, did not have this power), but a little too rushed and slapdash to be wholly convincing. "Nerves" by Lester del Rey -- There's a good story here, but, as told, is rather a mess -- verbose, unorganized, with the technical aspects of the story (involving a So far: "Call Me Joe" by Poul Anderson -- excellent "Who's Out There?" by John W. Campbell -- Good page turner, interesting premise of a chameleon-like alien (the alien in Howard Hawks' classic horror film based on this story, The Thing, did not have this power), but a little too rushed and slapdash to be wholly convincing. "Nerves" by Lester del Rey -- There's a good story here, but, as told, is rather a mess -- verbose, unorganized, with the technical aspects of the story (involving a Chernobyl-like disaster) not very adroitly handled. The main characters are, however, well-developed, and I did want to know how it all came out. Del Rey edited it for book publication, so perhaps the later version is better. "Universe" by Robert A. Heinlein -- [spoiler alert] Intriguing story where the perceived good guys and bad guys are really the reverse. Heinlein's narrative voice is, as usual, very attractive, if somewhat too "pulpish" (i.e. redolent of pulp fiction). I notice that many science-fiction stories seem too tied to the trappings of the genre. Their value as literature would expand, I believe, if the authors wrote them as straight-forward literature, and took time to develop the serious themes often touched upon. An example of such a work is 1984. I recognize that 1) this was often probably not possible given that they were slated for science-fiction magazines, and 2) some elements of the genre that fans love would be lost. Heinlein's "Universe," for instance, has a very appealing off-the-cuff quality which does reflect the personalities of its characters. This quality might be stifled by ponderous reflections on the need for freedom and independence in a successful society. I would still hope, however, that such thematic concerns could be integrated into the fabric of the story without didacticism. "The Marching Morons" by C. M. Kornbluth -- Contains a good idea illustrated by a clever, but too far-fetched plot. Interestingly (apropos my comment above) Kornbluth makes sure the significance of his story hits home by stating the story's theme very succinctly and poetically at the end. It's the best thing in the story. "Vintage Season" by Lawrence O'Donnell -- [spoiler alert] Fascinating -- until it all tumbles into a welter of pessimistic determinism. I wish O'Donnell had seen the potential in his characters to jump off the track of their disastrous fate. "And Then There Were None . . ." by Eric Frank Russell -- My favorite in the collection so far, though a bit too leisurely and long-winded in the telling. Like Van Vogt's "The Weapons Shop," a paean to individualism and the natural benevolence of people. "The Time Machine" by H.G. Wells -- I read this in my huge tome of Wells' Seven Famous Novels, and am now determined to read the other six this year. Wells is a born story-teller, with the knack for a relaxed, smoothly flowing and utterly captivating narrative. I see his influence on C. S. Lewis. In his preface, Wells emphasizes the importance of the verisimilitude of small details for fantasy and science-fiction, and he is clearly a master at making the unbelievable believable. The fact that the story is unrelentingly pessimistic almost seems beside the point given the sheer virtuosity of the story.

  5. 4 out of 5

    R.a.

    4.0 stars Summary / Anthology Review: A much belated “Congratulations” to the Science Fiction Writers of America, (SFWA), and editor Ben Bova for presenting Volume II, (A), The Science Fiction Hall of Fame anthology—eleven of the “Greatest Science Fiction Novellas of All Time.” Every included work is enjoyable and affecting in its own way. Particularly laudable is the process with which the separate works were chosen as Bova explains in his introduction: the basic vote. Further discernment for 4.0 stars Summary / Anthology Review: A much belated “Congratulations” to the Science Fiction Writers of America, (SFWA), and editor Ben Bova for presenting Volume II, (A), The Science Fiction Hall of Fame anthology—eleven of the “Greatest Science Fiction Novellas of All Time.” Every included work is enjoyable and affecting in its own way. Particularly laudable is the process with which the separate works were chosen as Bova explains in his introduction: the basic vote. Further discernment for selection included a limit of one narrative per author and the unfortunate inability to secure works from copyright holders. This anthology, then, becomes “classic” in its own right. A great collection. Individual Narrative Review, (Long): (view spoiler)[ Note: Reviews are listed as read--in written / published order, (different from the anthology’s selected order): 1. The Time Machine by H.G. Wells, 4.8 stars. H.G. Wells’ magnificent creation, The Time Machine, awaits a third film adaptation—one that may succeed in accurately relaying the author’s original vision. The first film version, with Rod Taylor, despite its limited budget and special effect technology, seems closer to Wells’ original narrative—at least with regard to the Morlocks. Perhaps only now, with all the digital CGI technology, can Wells’ conception of both Eloi and Morlock be recognized. Despite its modest length, formal 19th century diction, and conventional “tell-the- tale” frame, Wells narrative still captivates--simply because Wells’ original vision still captivates. A truly terrifying vision. (view spoiler)[ The horror of the year 802,701 and beyond become terrifying to us simply because human beings, as human beings, cease to exist. Indeed, both the Eloi and the Morlocks represent an evolutionary progression, (or regression), as the Time Traveler speculates. Here lies the primary fault of the film adaptations: the artisans seem to want and need to make the Eloi human. Yet, Wells sets no such precedent. He lays out just the opposite, in fact. (hide spoiler)] Although the Time Traveler feels attracted and compelled to the company of the Eloi, he feels disgusted, too. He feels as such for the Morlocks, as well. Though here, the co-mingled feelings are reversed. Disgust dominates while sympathy and pity follow. Both the end of the Time Traveler’s first sojourn, (wherein he advances even further into the future), and the end of the novel(la) itself satisfies. After all, given all of his observations made about humankind, Wells provides the perfectly logical conclusion. 2. Who Goes There, by John W. Campbell, Jr., 4.6 stars. Barring myth, Ovid’s Metamorphosis, and Lovecraft’s other dimensional arthopodic creatures, Campbell’s novella Who Goes There appears to be the first in a line of narratives which employs a particular idea for a creature, ** (view spoiler)[ – i.e., the shape-shifter). This line includes Dean Koontz’ Phantoms and Stephen King’s It, among others. (hide spoiler)] ** The horror element surrounding the creature, save its “contorted face” of “hatred,” and its “hate filled,” "red, three eyes,” Campbell plays down. Campbell rather plays up the horror surrounding the paranoia and hysteria within the Antarctic Research team. Telepathic ability becomes one element that Campbell includes in the original story—an element which heightens the suspense and paranoia. The “fear factor” rises, indeed, when the reader realizes that the team has been manipulated throughout, and possibly, from the beginning. Although three films have been made from this story, John Carpenter’s The Thing, (1982), stands out as closest to Campbell’s original vision. Indeed, many lines in the film come directly from the Campbell text. And so, script writer Bill Lancaster and director Carpenter deserve much credit for both a faithful adaptation as well as the extension and streamlining of story and character. With this story, Campbell seemingly begins another tradition as well, (view spoiler)[ one influencing both the Koontz and King subsequent narratives (hide spoiler)] —that of infusing the antagonist with hatred and viciousness so that it becomes equated with Hell and its occupants. Campbell’s matter-of- fact writing style both adds and “takes away” from the story. It adds to the mystery and the guesswork of “infection” but, along with some 1930s diction, takes away from maximizing suspense, at times. Campbell seems more interested with the scientific possibilities than with the horror, terror, and suspense aspects that such a creature necessarily invites. Lastly, given Campbell’s famous or infamous “outlook,” a reader cannot help but wonder if a politically / historically topical parallel existed—i.e., “the Thing” as a metaphor for events at the time. Consequently, was Campbell’s entity a correlative to: -the rising Facism in Europe, -Nietzchean herd mentality “taking over” the “individual” elite, or -the “selfish,” (a word Campbell uses), elitist(s) who destroyed the economy in 1929 and then, after suicides, etc., “blended back in” to the greater society—a masked monster “hiding within the general population,”only biding time, waiting “to strike” again. Unfortunately, even a “close” reading seems only to bring speculation. But, the possibilities are there. Decades old, this story, however, still attracts, scares, and provokes. If only Campbell extended his narrative to novel length, Who Goes There definitely would have moved from a “great” novella to a “classic” in every sense. 3. Universe, by Robert Heinlein, 3.75 stars. “All right gang, let’s go.” The line. The diction. Both together seem the signature of science fiction writer Robert Heinlein. Hopeful. Adventurous. And, the novella Universe aligns with Heinlein’s almost corny yet hopeful view of the future. Universe begins in mystery—Heinlein holding back on details of a hapless ark moving through space toward some unknown destination—some "promised land" for the possibly last descendents of Earth. And here, Heinlein may very well have been first to have created the idea of a multi-generational voyage. Here too may be the first playing out of “mutants” or “muties” as an exiled caste. As usual with Heinlein, some of the scenes come off as “clunky,” the heroic plot-line predictable, and many of the characters as “stock.” The scenes, however, where Hugh comes “out of his ignorance” to see the universe for the first time are written very well—if only Heinlein suspended such moments and scenes just a little bit more. Ultimately, Universe becomes a story of a “lost,” ignorant human race struggling to learn of their purpose and their destination—a parallel to our “here and now,” (and indeed, our whole past as well)—whether living on a wayward spaceship or a wayward planet. 4. Nerves, by Lester del Rey, 2.75 stars. A short story protracted to novella length, this cautionary tale of nuclear accident anticipated the Chernobyl and Three Mile Island disasters by thirty years. Yet, the Heinlein-like dialogue and convenient reversal towards the end contribute to a melodramatic feel, as does the numerous exclamation points. Published three years before the first atomic bomb was detonated over Japan, the novella has a ticking nuclear accident at the center of the narrative which genuinely scares. The story frustrates in another way. The commercial company is “National Atomic, Inc.,” Yet, nowhere in 70 pages is it communicated exactly why atomic reactions are being made. Is this a power plant, a government research facility? What? The reader has confirmation on part of this as s/he learns that Dr. Kokusai “will [get] his bomb.” Given the character’s name, the gross irony becomes clear. Also, despite paragraph after paragraph of good descriptive writing, the geography of the plant still remains unclear. The various discussions of various isotopes, half-lives, and reactions all combine to create a verisimilitude to the work and indeed contribute to the suspense and terror. Finally, though Nerves has many likable characters, the panic and emergency made in almost every episode seem to prevent the reader from connecting more fully with any character beyond a shallow level—to include Dr. Farrel. Given the subject matter, Nerves will continue to attract readers. The “science” part remains anchored and strong. The “fiction” part, however, remains weak. 5. Vintage Season, by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore, 4.4 Vintage Season has all the “good tale” elements that Edgar Allen Poe suggested. Beginning in mystery, the story unfolds as Oliver Wilson becomes curious about his short-term tenants. Given the title and the inclusion in the “Sci-Fi Greatest” anthology, “guessing” at the “sci-fi” solution to the mystery becomes predictable. Yet, this is not the joy or surprise of the tale. Adroitly, the authors leave clues, (in plain sight), for the climax. Yet, it is the depth beyond the plot which allows the climax to be so affecting. Because this novella is so enjoyable, direct spoilers are withheld here. Suffice it to say that: one, those “scars” do indicate an important event; two, Kleph’s mantra, despite “the rules,” is telling; and three, a mirror sometimes can cast quite an ugly reflection. Vintage Season intrigues, entertains, and provokes reflection. Wonderful. 6. The Marching Morons, by C.M. Kornbluth, 4.0 Years after Heller’s Catch-22 and Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse 5, C.M. Kornbluth penned the horrifically absurd The March of the Morons with a laughably absurd future society that nevertheless has an Ayn Rand-esque horrific quality. “I’ll buy that for a dollar,” the repeated advertising mantra in Paul Verhoeven’s 1987 film, Robocop echoes back here to Kornbluth’s “I’ll buy that for a quarter.” Both serve to simultaneously connect the audience / reader to the futuristic culture while alienating them by withholding the social context with which the punchline works. And yet, the audience / reader still laughs—a laugh brought on, ultimately, by a grotesque. Kornbluth’s witty, scathing, and absurdly humorous satire follows “Honest John Barlow” as he returns from a grotesque suspended animation and extorts from the Morons, the underling elite class to the future society, ultimate power as dictator. Yes, he from the past knows the solution, (direct reference to the horrific “Final Solution”), to the population-of-herd problem: Extermination. Written in 1951, The Marching Morons begins with the character Efrem Hawkins, a potter, who obsesses with his clay, “black-glazed carafes and clay baking kilns,” and ends with whole populations “baking” in space. Needless to say, the atrocity of the Holocaust, of genocide, becomes central here—as does the manipulations of such dictators. Both plot and prose progress quickly. And, the plot “bubbles” and “yanks” the reader through various turns. And, on any one of those turns, the author cajoles, tickles, disorients, and horrifies. Consequently, The Marching Morons is a wonderful-horrible ride. “I’ll buy that for a quarter!” Unfortunately . . . many did. 7. And Then There Were None, by Eric Frank Russell, 3.8 Earth has become an Empire with many planets colonized under its control. So the reader learns as s/he progresses through Eric Frank Russell’s And Then There Were None. A delightful, (and hopeful), story that follows a battleship and its crew as it visits one of the colonial planets, Russell’s novella crackles with satiric wit. Human behavior, institutions, and happiness become the central exploration of this joyful narrative. Although some of the idiomatic expressions and diction date the story, (written in 1951), the story, its subject, its plot, and its satire still hold up. And, despite the Ambassador’s, the Colonel’s, and the Captain’s potential objections, the Gand colonists indeed might possess the “ultimate weapon.” That “F—I.W.” apparatus is quite powerful. Even though a reader can anticipate the ending, the story still entertains and delights because of the fundamental question the Gand colonists pose. Heinlein-esque with its central theme, And Then There Were None becomes a fun read. “Myob.” 8. Baby is Three, by Theodore Sturgeon, 4.0 Theodore Sturgeon’s Baby is Three begins innocently. And, after progressing through the first few sections, a reader may wonder where lies the “science fiction” in a seemingly straight-forward psychoanalytic session. But, quite a few science fiction elements do appear as the intentionally disorienting narrative progresses: telekinesis, teleportation, and telepathy. Gerry, in crisis, sees psychologist, Dr. Stern. From his session, the reader journeys back and forth through time, learning of his meeting with Lane, an elderly “simple” man and his adopted family. Gerry, himself, becomes a member of that family. The cause of Gerry’s “breakthrough” in therapy comes with Lone’s death and the opposition against Miss Kew—Lone’s designated successor. Oblique and direct scenarios of racial, sexual, and eugenic prejudice emerge. And, the "empathic" scene becomes quite affecting. Gerry’s realization, and the narrative’s climax, unite all the previous episodes and bring reasoning to the story’s disorienting quality. While Sturgeon suggests a happy and satisfying ending, he nevertheless leaves open the possibility for its opposite. Consequently, Baby is Three leaves the reader a bit unsettled—hence, a provocation and implication which grows after the reader has set the book down. Baby is Three then fits into that class of unassuming and modest stories that stay with you--Baby is Three then, becomes one of those “hidden gems.” 9. With Folded Hands, by Jack Williamson, 4.5 Hands folded over each other in front of the body can give an impression of praying. Hands folded otherwise can give a multitude of impressions and meanings. Jack Williamson’s With Folded Hands leaves the reader with a paradox, which, after reflection, melts away to a definite solution—one as horrific as Huxley’s Brave New World or Orwell’s 1984. Hapless Mr. Underhill, who sells androids for a living, learns of a new competitor and its new humanoid models which are flooding the market. Likewise, his wife “Eos,” his daughter, “Joy,” and his son, “Ernest,” also discover the new humanoids subsequently. And, upon this family and the human race everywhere, a “Dawn of Happy Truth” begins. Williamson’s humanoids, exceedingly horrifying in their kindness and logic, seem the genesis for those in the film I, Robot, though the film strays from Asimov’s anthology of the same name. The film’s humanoids seem to come directly from Williamson’s vision, here. And, Williamson brings such an eerily human quality to these “robots.” Additionally, Eando Binder’s earlier, Frankenstein-like story, “I, Robot,” seems in play as well since both present a motif of perfection. Through the protagonist, Mr. Underhill, and his new lodger, Mr. Sledge, the reader learns of the building of this “Brave New World.” And, with publication dates of 1947, then 1954, the idea of unrestrained progress in science becomes pervasive throughout. Mr. Sledge’s “tale within a tale” captivates and his plans to alter the coming inevitability provide the novella’s final suspense. And so, in concert with the humanoids’ “Prime Directive,” (there’s a familiar phrase), “how does utopia become dystopic?” And similarly, “how does a dystopia become utopic?” Both predecessors Huxley and Orwell suggest a very much embraced answer: “Why—with lies, of course.” “Let us pray.” 10. Call Me Joe, by Poul Anderson, 3.75 Poul Anderson brings his readers to Jupiter in his novella, Call Me Joe. And there, the reader experiences a mosaic of ideas from Ovid’s Metamorphosis, Shelley’s Frankenstein, and Hawthorne’s “Dr. Heidegger’s Experiment.” From Jupiter’s, (Zeus’, Gk), satellites, an earth team engages in research and experiment with “life” on the planet. Engaging yet frustrating, Call Me Joe has both blemishes and beauty in its story and telling. By far, the biggest blemish is the too general explanation of the team’s mission. Like the geography of the team’s station and orbit(s), short-hand interspersed exposition force the reader to re-read. Also, the carefully built suspense becomes thwarted as the reader can anticipate the denouement to the narrative’s climax—possible relationships between Edward and Joe are reduced to three--based on logic, in context of the story. Anderson’s technique and diction also detract from his narrative. The exclamation points throughout the last third as ascribed to three of the four characters bring confusion and, in some cases, foil the author’s intended effect. The jargon, too, distances as much as it explains. Yet, Anderson’s technique and diction support his narrative as well. The stream-of-consciousness sections and shuttling organization “hook” the reader easily and reflect well the action of the plot. Through character, the reader gains focus. After such disorientation, Anderson introduces Jan Cornelius, a newcomer, to the team. And, with him, the reader can organize previous plot points. Anderson’s descriptions of Jupiter’s surface and atmosphere, like his “hook,” are striking and provide vivid pictures. Finally, like With Folded Hands, the power of Call Me Joe comes from the implication(s) borne out by its conclusion. Wonderfully, a discovery is made. And, the reader, like the characters, initially understands the idea of one mission, one goal--and ends understanding another—a possibility—one that may attract . . . or repulse. Perhaps Saturn, (Cronus, Gk), was a more appropriate planet for a setting, after all. 11. The Ballad of Lost C’Mell, by Cordwainer Smith, 3.75 Quickly, author Cordwainer Smith entices with language play: rhyme, verse, witty humor, symbol, and allusion. The opening verse not only hooks the reader but acts as an essay to the story following. Unique as a science-fiction story, (it has the feel of a “tale”), The Ballad . . . maintains a focus on the relationship between its two main characters. Ultimately, Smith presents an allegory reflecting the social consciousness of a time: the Civil Rights Movement in the United States, with its attendant struggle against racism, (structural), prejudice, and bigotry. The “racism” in Smith’s far-distant future, however, is “morphism,” i.e., limits on freedom of the “sub-hominid” life forms, or “underpeople.” The “individual” and “eccentric” Jestocost, a privileged “Lord of the Instrumentality,” with his “thirst for justice,” becomes the fulcrum to a more positive future: “Justice mattered: the perpetual return of mankind to progress mattered.” And so, Jestocost aids C’Mell, a “cat-person” who works as a type of Geisha, a “girly-girl,” and revolutionary. Smith’s prose is tight and packed. The underground plot advances quickly and keeps the reader engaged. Yet, Smith’s “effect,” with regard to the love story and sacrifice, affects the reader less than perhaps intended. Simply, the brevity of the narrative limits the emotional connection of reader to character. Although Smith’s “effect” works, it catches the reader in the head more so than in the heart—the very place such a ballad affects us most. (hide spoiler)]

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    Comments/Reviews of the novellas in this anthology: "Call Me Joe" - Poul Anderson. An artificial creature on the surface of Jupiter is psychically linked to a cripple in an orbiting spacestation. But who is controlling whom? Quite an enjoyable read. "Who Goes There?" John W. Campbell Jr (as Don A. Stuart). A polar expedition discovers an alien - what happens when it is thawed? Meh - interesting concept, I guess - but the writing didn't really move me. "Nerves" - Lester del Rey - A crisis at a Comments/Reviews of the novellas in this anthology: "Call Me Joe" - Poul Anderson. An artificial creature on the surface of Jupiter is psychically linked to a cripple in an orbiting spacestation. But who is controlling whom? Quite an enjoyable read. "Who Goes There?" John W. Campbell Jr (as Don A. Stuart). A polar expedition discovers an alien - what happens when it is thawed? Meh - interesting concept, I guess - but the writing didn't really move me. "Nerves" - Lester del Rey - A crisis at a nuclear power plant as seen through the eyes of the on-site doctor. I may be struck down for this - but another stoy that didn't do a lot for me. Perfect example of hard SF where the characters are subordinate to the technology. "Universe" - Robert Heinlein. A multi-generational spaceship where the residents have "regressed" to primitive technology - the protagonist is captured by the Muties and learns (some of) the truth. I'm a Heinlein fan, and I think this is a good, representational sample of his work. "The Marching Morons" - C.M. Kornbluth -- a man from our time is awakens in the far future where the lowest common denominator of society has overwhelmed the MENSA minority. Can the time-traveller help? A frighteningly prescient story , perhaps ... "Vintage Season" - Henry Kuttner & C.L. Moore (as Lawrence O'Donnell) .... three strange travellers rent a San Francisco home for the month of May. The owner observes more than he should. Another enjoyable read - also a good sample of their work. ". . . And Then There Were None" - Eric Frank Russell. An ambassadorial/military ship from Terra visits an abandoned colony - to find the colonists are doing just fine without them. I remember reading this some years ago & would have SWORN it was Heinlein - the sentiment fits. "The Ballad of Lost C'Mell" - Cordwainer Smith. A judge teams up with a catgirl to grant the underpeople freedom. One of several stories set in the same universe and very descriptive. Baby is Three" - Theodore Sturgeon. An almost creepy story - how psi powers could be used to create a new type of human - told through the eyes of a young man at a psychiatrist's office. " The Time Machine" - H.G. Wells - if you saw the most recent movie incarnation of this story (as I must admit I have :rolleyes:) -- go back & read the book. It's a bit heavy-handed at times, but required reading for any SF fan. " With Folded Hands" - Jack Williamson. An inventor creates robots designed to take care of our every need... and realizes how terribly wrong he was to do so.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Steven Peterson

    This is a treasure trove of older science fiction classic novellas. Authors here include such worthies as Poul Anderson, John Campbell, Jr., Lester del Rey, Robert Heinlein, C. M. Kornbluth, Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore, Eric Frank Russell, Cordwainer Smith, Theodore Sturgeon (progenitor of Sturgeon's Law, "90% of everything is crud," if I recall accurately), H. G. Wells, and Jack Williamson. This volume was published originally in 1973 (the version, in fact, that I have). Let's look at a This is a treasure trove of older science fiction classic novellas. Authors here include such worthies as Poul Anderson, John Campbell, Jr., Lester del Rey, Robert Heinlein, C. M. Kornbluth, Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore, Eric Frank Russell, Cordwainer Smith, Theodore Sturgeon (progenitor of Sturgeon's Law, "90% of everything is crud," if I recall accurately), H. G. Wells, and Jack Williamson. This volume was published originally in 1973 (the version, in fact, that I have). Let's look at a couple examples. Kornbluth's work is a lugubrious application of eugenics to humans. With the reduction in accidents, war, illness, fewer ungifted people were "weeded out." The end result? As a character says, "The average IQ is now 45." Why not just let the ungifted die out through stupidity? One of the "gifted" who were around to keep the world going on mentioned that they had--but the "marching morons" were too dense to know that anything was wrong, as they began to die by large numbers. So, the gifted continue to keep the species alive. When I read this, I have mixed emotions indeed! I am not a fan of eugenics, but the novella lays out an interesting scenario. Another favorite is Russell's "And Then There Were None." A sort of libertarian work, in which residents of a planet had seen their society evolve in a very different path from a galactic state. The central government decided to reassert authority over "The Gands" (residents of the planet, followers of the ideas of Gandhi). The society of the Gands is libertarian, with people having no right to define the duties of another. The ship's crew, when interacting with the Gands, decide they like their way of life better. Many desertions follow, before the officers and some crewmen lift off, to escape the society. H. G. Wells' "The T8ime Machine" is here. So, too, Campbell's "Who Goes There?", the source for two different versions of a movie known to us as "The Thing." As other reviewers note, the novella is appropriately creepy. Anyhow, if you don't like the style of classic science fiction, this may be unsatisfying. But for those of us who grew up with these authors, the book is a glorious reminder of our experiencing sci-fi in our younger days!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rasheed

    Call Me Joe (1957) by Poul Anderson 5/5 Who Goes There? (1938) John W. Campbell 5/5 Nerves (1942) by Lester del Rey 5/5 Universe (1941) by Robert A. Heinlein 5/5 1st part of Orphans of the Sky - 2nd part equally enjoyable The Marching Morons (1951) by C. M. Kornbluth 3/5 Vintage Season (1946) by Henry Kuttner & C.L. Moore 3/5 ...And Then There Were None (1951) by Eric Frank Russell 4/5 The Ballad of Lost C'Mell (1962) by Cordwainer Smith 3/5 Baby Is Three (1952) by Theodore Sturgeon 5/5 The Time Call Me Joe (1957) by Poul Anderson 5/5 Who Goes There? (1938) John W. Campbell 5/5 Nerves (1942) by Lester del Rey 5/5 Universe (1941) by Robert A. Heinlein 5/5 1st part of Orphans of the Sky - 2nd part equally enjoyable The Marching Morons (1951) by C. M. Kornbluth 3/5 Vintage Season (1946) by Henry Kuttner & C.L. Moore 3/5 ...And Then There Were None (1951) by Eric Frank Russell 4/5 The Ballad of Lost C'Mell (1962) by Cordwainer Smith 3/5 Baby Is Three (1952) by Theodore Sturgeon 5/5 The Time Machine (1895) novel by H. G. Wells 5/5 With Folded Hands (1947) by Jack Williamson 5/5

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gavin Otteson

    An anthology of epic proportions in both concept and literary execution. Volumes IIA and IIB are comprised of novellas instead of short stories like Vol. I which is why it is split into two sub-volumes. However it packs a serious punch and sits near the top of my recommendation list for anyone interested in fiction.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

    Stories too long to be in Vol 1. This is for both 2a and 2b My favorites: 2A: Heinlein's "Universe" Eric Frank Russel "... And then there were none" Sturgeon "Baby is Three" 2B: Asimov "The martian way" Blish "Earthman Come Home" Vance "The Moon Moth"

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    ??? childhood: ‘vintage season’ by kuttner and moore... an original favourite... good others too...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susanna - Censored by GoodReads

    Some stories are better than others; but as a whole, a strong collection. My favorites include "The Ballad of Lost C'Mell," by Cordwainer Smith, and "Baby is Three," by Ted Sturgeon.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    These are mostly of novella length rather than short stories, including "Who Goes There," the story that was filmed as "The Thing." Great collection.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Debbi

    A nice collection of SF story. I only skipped one story. Most had a timeless message. I especially enjoyed "With Folded Hands" by Williamson and "Universe" by Heinlein.

  15. 5 out of 5

    K.A.

    An excellent collection of short stories and classic novelettes in Science Fiction. I liked almost all of them and was happy to finally get the chance to read The Time Machine.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nihal Vrana

    I have enjoyed the first volume more, but this was a treat too. Except 2-3 weak stories, it is masterpiece after masterpiece. Call Me Joe · Poul Anderson : A better version of Rogue Moon and an expansion of the "running video" in Strange Days. Who Goes There? [as by Don A. Stuart] · John W. Campbell, Jr.: the second most famous story in the collection after Time machine and the inspiration for the famous "The Thing" movie which I should watch sometime. It has some plotholes, but the atmosphere and I have enjoyed the first volume more, but this was a treat too. Except 2-3 weak stories, it is masterpiece after masterpiece. Call Me Joe · Poul Anderson : A better version of Rogue Moon and an expansion of the "running video" in Strange Days. Who Goes There? [as by Don A. Stuart] · John W. Campbell, Jr.: the second most famous story in the collection after Time machine and the inspiration for the famous "The Thing" movie which I should watch sometime. It has some plotholes, but the atmosphere and the writing makes up for that. Nerves · Lester del Rey: I don't like Del Rey's style, he gets lost in technical details so much. And the technology he imagined was rather unimaginative so his stories aged quite badly; the weakest story in the collection. Universe [Hugh Hoyland] · Robert A. Heinlein: this was my favourite story in the collection; it is a bit like diluted Nightfall but very enjoyable nevertheless. The Marching Morons · C. M. Kornbluth: another kinda weak story although the intelligent servants of a moronic society has a ring of truth to it now unfortunately. Vintage Season [as by Lawrence O’Donnell] · Henry Kuttner & C. L. Moore : Very stylish time travelling tale only suffers from holding onto its punch for too long. And Then There Were None · Eric Frank Russell: This has one of the best confrontational dialogues I have ever read; my second favourite in the collection. The Ballad of Lost C’Mell · Cordwainer Smith: Great idea, weak execution. Baby Is Three · Theodore Sturgeon: One of the original X-Men stories of Sturgeon; it only suffers from packing too many things (psychology, racism, free-flow narrative) into a short story. The Time Machine [Time Machine] · H. G. Wells : Timeless classic, it was a joy to read it again. With Folded Hands... [Humanoids] · Jack Williamson: Suffers from being the last story honestly, I rushed through it. But it is an okay tale.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michael Tildsley

    This is another mixed bag of sorts. There are some really wonderful novellas in this collection, but also a fair share of clinkers. Some were clinkers for me personally because I first experienced them in a more entertaining media, such as "Who Goes There?" (which John Carpenter handled very well in his remake of The Thing) and "The Time Machine" (which I personally feel was handled better in both movie adaptations, because the time-traveler has more to gain or lose in his travels). My favorites This is another mixed bag of sorts. There are some really wonderful novellas in this collection, but also a fair share of clinkers. Some were clinkers for me personally because I first experienced them in a more entertaining media, such as "Who Goes There?" (which John Carpenter handled very well in his remake of The Thing) and "The Time Machine" (which I personally feel was handled better in both movie adaptations, because the time-traveler has more to gain or lose in his travels). My favorites and the ones I consider "five-star" tales include: "Universe" "The Marching Morons" "Vintage Season" "...And Then There Were None" (favorite) "With Folded Hands"

  18. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    This is another collection of true classics. H.G. Wells, one of Heinlein's best, one of Eric Frank Russell's best, terrific stories from Cordwainer Smith and Poul Anderson, the Campbell story that became famous films, stories by Lester Del Rey and Jack Williamson that were better than their longer novel versions... Classic stuff!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Steven Peterson

    Another set of terrific works, this time novellas, in the Science Fiction Hall of Fame. Ben Bova edited this volume. Some of nthe classics that I have enjoyed immensely that are included: Isaac Asimov, "The Martian Way," Algis Budrys, "Rogue Moon," Frederik Pohl, "The Midas Plague," and Jack Vance's "The Moon Moth." A fine collection of novellas. . . .

  20. 5 out of 5

    James Hurley

    This is a nice collection of some of the early works of some of the great masters of Sci Fi. My former instructor and mentor Jack Williamson is in this one, and it was one of my first readings of his work. A fun look back.

  21. 4 out of 5

    David

    This is a great book of science fiction writing. All of the stories are very good.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie "Jedigal"

    Volume II (at least two parts, A and B) is "The Greatest Science Fiction Novellas of All Time".

  23. 4 out of 5

    DaughterDaDa

    Classic science fiction stories that defined the genre.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    My own favorite story is "Mimsy Were the Borogoves". "X-logic" helped me toward a greater understanding of algebra! Well for a while, at least. Also check out "Macroscopic God"...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Asha Hawkesworth

    The novellas in this book were chosen by SFWA, and I don't agree with all the picks. Some of the writers are mostly underappreciated these days, and there are some real classics here. So I'll address each story on its merits. Call Me Joe, by Poul Anderson -- James Cameron probably "borrowed" (stole) from this story while he cobbled together the film "Avatar" (for the record, he has done this before, most notably stealing from and getting sued by Harlan Ellison for "Terminator"). A mind/bio-link The novellas in this book were chosen by SFWA, and I don't agree with all the picks. Some of the writers are mostly underappreciated these days, and there are some real classics here. So I'll address each story on its merits. Call Me Joe, by Poul Anderson -- James Cameron probably "borrowed" (stole) from this story while he cobbled together the film "Avatar" (for the record, he has done this before, most notably stealing from and getting sued by Harlan Ellison for "Terminator"). A mind/bio-link between a human and a genetically modified being who can tolerate the Jovian atmosphere/planet, with the human becoming more like his counterpart each day. Who Goes There? by John Campbell Jr -- This story is the basis for the films "The Thing From Another World" and "The Thing" by John Carpenter. A classic. Nerves, by Lester Del Rey -- A failure at a nuclear reactor, thanks to--yep--a failed experiment puts the region and possibly the world in danger. Can the medical team rescue the one guy who can possibly stop it? Well written hard SF. Universe, by Robert Heinlein -- A "generation" ship, sailing toward a planet they are meant to settle, consists of inhabitants who have forgotten their original mission and have exchanged science for a religion in which they believe their ship is the entirety of the universe. The only members who believe otherwise are "rebels" who occupy other parts of the ship after a civil war. A classic. The Marching Morons, by C.M. Kornbluth -- I would give this one a miss, unless you like stories that imply that only "smart" people (by whose criteria?) should breed, lest the ignorant masses outbreed them and produce a humanity that gets dumber and more incompetent by the day. Could have been written by Ayn Rand for her preteen audience. Vintage Season, by Henry Kuttner/C.L. Moore -- A lovely story of a San Francisco landlord who finds himself with surprising short term rental tenants, who travel through time as epicures, enjoying "big events" in history. So, why are they in his house at that particular time...? ...And Then There Were None, by Eric Frank Russell -- An earth space ship arrives at a lonely settled planetary outpost, come to impose its command hierarchy on the citizens, who have created a libertarian utopia in which every one does as they please, and all payments are made with "obs" or obligations that they incur with their fellow citizens. Would that it were so easy. The Ballad of Lost C'Mell, by Cordwainer Smith -- One of the many great stories by one of my favorite writers ever, drop everything now and go procure The Rediscovery of Man and The Instrumentality of Mankind and read them until you are finished. Amazing. Baby is Three, by Theodore Sturgeon -- Also one of my favorite writers ever. Baby is Three is one of those "what happens next?" stories, and I can't really say anything without giving the whole thing away. The Time Machine, by H. G. Wells -- It's easy to forget how old this book is. The framing is very Victorian, with the main narrative provided by a friend of the time traveler, with the subnarrative being spoken by the traveler himself. There is one point in the story where I cringed -- a comment made about African peoples that was all too normal in those days. Aside from that, it's still a classic. With Folded Hands, by Jack Williamson -- A very well done visualization of what happens when a well-meaning human being attempts to liberate humans from some of the worst aspects of themselves and inadvertently brings about their enslavement. Sort of like what happened to Mickey Mouse in The Sorcerer's Apprentice. Ahnna said it was her favorite story in the book. Very well done.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ken Abel

    Great selection of stories. Only one I feel was a waste of time was Vintage Season. The standout was Baby is Three by Theodore Sturgeon and Universe by Robert Heinlein. Although none prominently feature women or minorities, quite a few touch on civil rights. Call Me Joe Poul Anderson Great story about an enfeebled geriatric finding a new home in a new savage colony on the surface of Jupiter. · Who Goes There? John W. Campbell, Jr. The story that became the move The Thing. I felt like its still Great selection of stories. Only one I feel was a waste of time was Vintage Season. The standout was Baby is Three by Theodore Sturgeon and Universe by Robert Heinlein. Although none prominently feature women or minorities, quite a few touch on civil rights. Call Me Joe Poul Anderson Great story about an enfeebled geriatric finding a new home in a new savage colony on the surface of Jupiter. · Who Goes There? John W. Campbell, Jr. The story that became the move The Thing. I felt like its still funny after all these years. · Nerves · Lester del Rey This story was pretty dated. Its about an accident at a nuclear power plant. But atomic energy isn't really a thing anymore, and its not as fantastical as say the centaurian beings living on Jupiter in the previous story to suspend disbelief. · Universe Robert A. Heinlein This one has a great hook. What if society lived in a derelict spaceship for centuries until it forgot there was anything outside their ship and the old hierarchy and sciences developed into a crude religious imitation. · The Marching Morons C. M. Kornbluth Although it may seem to be a warning about letting the dumb people breed, I feel its really an indictment of the 20th century white men who were racist, greedy, and short sighted and how we need a different kind of leadership. · Vintage Season Henry Kuttner & C. L. Moore Some time travelers come back and their eerily beautiful and have strange drugs. Not very interesting. · ...And Then There Were None Eric Frank Russell What happens if you come to colonize a planet and the inhabitants merely carry on about their business. A great lesson on the power of civil disobedience that must have also been inspired by the civil rights movement. Unfortunately the anarchist, moneyless society doesn't seem very realistic. · The Ballad of Lost C’Mell Cordwainer Smith A freaky story about a cat woman who helps a government reformer with the help of a telepathic eagle. · Baby Is Three Theodore Sturgeon This had a great pace. Very suspenseful. I think beyond the obvious science fiction, there's a strong allegory of a society united beyond the divisions of race and gender being frighteningly powerful. · The Time Machine H. G. Wells The classic story. Its a short read and a great example of an enveloped story. · With Folded Hands... Jack Williamson A little help is a good thing. Too much is smothering.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Through these Science Fiction Hall of Fame compilations, I am learning to love short stories. For some reason I had this ignorant mindset that short stories could not, would not give me the same satisfaction as a full novel. Oh how wrong I was. I admit I didn't love Volume 2A as much as Volume 1. Many of the stories in Volume 1 enraptured me from beginning to end and lingered in my thoughts afterwards. With Volume 2A, there were a few stories I had a difficult time staying interested in. I would Through these Science Fiction Hall of Fame compilations, I am learning to love short stories. For some reason I had this ignorant mindset that short stories could not, would not give me the same satisfaction as a full novel. Oh how wrong I was. I admit I didn't love Volume 2A as much as Volume 1. Many of the stories in Volume 1 enraptured me from beginning to end and lingered in my thoughts afterwards. With Volume 2A, there were a few stories I had a difficult time staying interested in. I would have also like a few more stories within the volume. It felt shorter to me than Volume 1 even though these were novellas and not short stories. Some of the highlights for me are "Universe" by Robert A. Heinlein, "Vintage Seasons" by Harry Kuttner and C. L. Moore, "...And Then There Were None" by Eric Frank Russell, and "Nerves" by Lester del Rey. The reader is especially phenomenal for "...And Then There Were None." I wish he had been the reader on more stories. His voice took an excellent story to the next level. The stories I didn't care for are "Call Me Joe" by Poul Anderson, "The Ballad of Lost C'Mell" by Cordwainer Smith, and "The Time Machine" by H. G. Wells. The idea presented by "Call Me Joe" is intriguing, but I don't really care about the main characters or the story. I know "The Time Machine" is a classic, but honestly the movie with Rod Sterling is so much better. It is one of the few films I think is better than the novel. Don't even get me started on "The Ballad of Lost C'Mell." I had to rewind it multiple times because I kept losing interest. I have already begun 2B, and I am looking forward to what stories may lie within it. I did purchase a collection of short American stories from the 19th century, so after I finish this trilogy I plan on continuing my foray into this medium.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Peter Tillman

    Story comments, all from memory. Links where I could find them. • Call Me Joe • (1957) • novelette by Poul Anderson. https://www.baen.com/Chapters/9781625.... Proxy settlers on Jupiter. Hard SF, it ain't. The one I prefer is "Desertion" (1944) by Simak: "They would turn me back into a dog." [note 1] • Who Goes There? • (1938) • novella by John W. Campbell, Jr. • Nerves • (1942) • novella by Lester del Rey • Universe • (1941) • novelette by Robert A. Heinlein • The Marching Morons • (1951) • novelette Story comments, all from memory. Links where I could find them. • Call Me Joe • (1957) • novelette by Poul Anderson. https://www.baen.com/Chapters/9781625.... Proxy settlers on Jupiter. Hard SF, it ain't. The one I prefer is "Desertion" (1944) by Simak: "They would turn me back into a dog." [note 1] • Who Goes There? • (1938) • novella by John W. Campbell, Jr. • Nerves • (1942) • novella by Lester del Rey • Universe • (1941) • novelette by Robert A. Heinlein • The Marching Morons • (1951) • novelette by C. M. Kornbluth. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/51233. This one is entertaining, but has disturbing eugenics "science". • Vintage Season • (1946) • novelette by Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore. Time tourists seek perfect weather. [note 1] • ... And Then There Were None • (1951) • novella by Eric Frank Russell. http://www.abelard.org/e-f-russell.php A very unusual invasion. Myob! 4-star. • The Ballad of Lost C'mell • [The Instrumentality of Mankind] • (1962) • novelette by Cordwainer Smith. 4 star, by memory • Baby Is Three • (1952) • novella by Theodore Sturgeon • The Time Machine • (1895) • novel by H. G. Wells. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/35 4 stars, still a classic • With Folded Hands • [Humanoids] • (1948) • novelette by Jack Williamson. Not to my taste, 2-stars. -------------- Note 1. These have somewhat dodgy-looking copies online, which you can easily find for yourself. Not linked as possible copyright violations.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Lackey

    One of the best collections of sci-fi I've ever read (focused on those selected by other writers). Novellas, which is a pretty good length for sci-fi (although I'm also very partial to short stories). I'd only read a few of these before (most notably H.G. Wells The Time Machine, which was written in 1895 and seems like something which could have started the genre any time in the 20th century; truly before his time). A few were ok to good, most were very good to excellent. Works particularly well One of the best collections of sci-fi I've ever read (focused on those selected by other writers). Novellas, which is a pretty good length for sci-fi (although I'm also very partial to short stories). I'd only read a few of these before (most notably H.G. Wells The Time Machine, which was written in 1895 and seems like something which could have started the genre any time in the 20th century; truly before his time). A few were ok to good, most were very good to excellent. Works particularly well as an audiobook. Looking forward to vol 2-B. The best: Call Me Joe (Poul Anderson)(1957) The Marching Morons (C.M. Kornbluth)(1951) Who Goes There? (John Campbell)(1938) With Folded Hands (Jack Williamson) " . . . And Then There Were None," by Eric Frank Russell.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Bobbitt

    Although the idea of this collection is a solid one, I don't particularly enjoy many of the stories. The real saving grace of the book is its inclusion of "The Time Machine", which is my favorite of the 11 novellas. Call Me Joe - Poul Anderson - 2 Who Goes There? - John W. Campbell, Jr. - 2 Nerves - Lester del Rey - 3 Universe - Robert A. Heinlein - 3 The Marching Morons - C. M. Kornbluth - 4 Vintage Season - Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore - 2 … And Then There Were None - Eric Frank Russell - 3 The Although the idea of this collection is a solid one, I don't particularly enjoy many of the stories. The real saving grace of the book is its inclusion of "The Time Machine", which is my favorite of the 11 novellas. Call Me Joe - Poul Anderson - 2 Who Goes There? - John W. Campbell, Jr. - 2 Nerves - Lester del Rey - 3 Universe - Robert A. Heinlein - 3 The Marching Morons - C. M. Kornbluth - 4 Vintage Season - Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore - 2 … And Then There Were None - Eric Frank Russell - 3 The Ballad of Lost C'Mell - Cordwainer Smith - 2 Baby is Three - Theodore Sturgeon - 4 The Time Machine - H. G. Wells - 5 With Folded Hands - Jack Williamson - 3

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